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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897560

ABSTRACT

Severe cerebral edema associated with exertional heat stroke is a major cause of death or disability. However, few studies on severe cerebral edema resulting from heat stroke have reported neuroradiological findings. Moreover, all the patients in these previous reports either died or remained severely disabled. Here, we report a case of exertional heat stroke with severe cerebral edema that probably developed or worsened due to delayed body temperature normalization. In contrast to previous reports, the patient showed complete clinical and neuroradiological recovery. This rare case suggests that severe cerebral edema could be reversed through meticulous supportive management. Moreover, it confirms the importance of rapid and effective cooling in heat stroke treatment.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-889856

ABSTRACT

Severe cerebral edema associated with exertional heat stroke is a major cause of death or disability. However, few studies on severe cerebral edema resulting from heat stroke have reported neuroradiological findings. Moreover, all the patients in these previous reports either died or remained severely disabled. Here, we report a case of exertional heat stroke with severe cerebral edema that probably developed or worsened due to delayed body temperature normalization. In contrast to previous reports, the patient showed complete clinical and neuroradiological recovery. This rare case suggests that severe cerebral edema could be reversed through meticulous supportive management. Moreover, it confirms the importance of rapid and effective cooling in heat stroke treatment.

3.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-811451

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate the effect of hospital-based intensive rehabilitation program after ankle ligament operation.METHODS: A total of 35 patients were included in this randomized controlled trial. Fifty-minute sessions of hospital-based rehabilitation were performed three times weekly for 12 weeks in the intervention group. Home-based exercise was conducted in the control group. Outcomes were evaluated at baseline, 12 weeks, and 16 weeks. The primary outcome was measured using the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS). Secondary outcomes included the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score, ankle strength measured using an isokinetic device, fall index measured using a Tetrax posturography device, and the Berg Balance Scale.RESULTS: Significant improvements in FAOS, AOFAS, ankle strength, and fall index were found in the intervention group after performing the hospital-based rehabilitation (all p<0.05) and these improvements were sustained at T2 (all p<0.05). Between-group comparisons demonstrated significantly greater improvements in FAOS, AOFAS, ankle strength, and fall index in the intervention group than those in the control group at both T1 (all p<0.05), and T2 (all p<0.05).CONCLUSION: The rehabilitation program in this study improved postoperative pain, sports function, quality of life, and strength and balance of the ankle significantly better than home-based self-care. Therefore, we recommend hospital-based systematic rehabilitation programs after surgical treatment for chronic ankle instability.


Subject(s)
Ankle , Foot , Humans , Ligaments , Orthopedics , Pain, Postoperative , Quality of Life , Recovery of Function , Rehabilitation , Self Care , Sports
4.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-835218

ABSTRACT

Background@#Neuropathic pain (NP) is considered a clinically incurable condition despite various treatment options due to its diverse causes and complicated disease mechanisms. Since the early 2000s, multipotent human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been used in the treatment of NP in animal models. However, the effects of hMSC injections have not been studied in chronic post-ischemia pain (CPIP) mice models. Here, we investigated whether intrathecal (IT) and intrapaw (IP) injections of hMSCs can reduce mechanical allodynia in CPIP model mice. @*Methods@#Seventeen CPIP C57/BL6 mice were selected and randomized into four groups: IT sham (n = 4), IT stem (n = 5), IP sham (n = 4), and IP stem (n = 4). Mice in the IT sham and IT stem groups received an injection of 5 μL saline and 2 × 104 hMSCs, respectively, while mice in the IP sham and IP stem groups received an injection of 5 μL saline and 2 × 10 5 hMSCs, respectively. Mechanical allodynia was assessed using von Frey filaments from pre-injection to 30 days post-injection. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia were also evaluated. @*Results@#IT and IP injections of hMSCs improved mechanical allodynia. GFAP expression was decreased on day 25 post-injection compared with the sham group. Injections of hMSCs improved allodynia and GFAP expression was decreased compared with the sham group. @*Conclusions@#These results suggested that hMSCs may be also another treatment modality in NP model by ischemia-reperfusion.

5.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-831574

ABSTRACT

Background@#Spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model is one of the representative models of the neuropathic pain model. Neuropathic pain in a chronic post-ischemic pain (CPIP) mimics the symptoms of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). The administration of polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN), which has regenerative and anti-inflammatory effects, has been studied and is used in clinical practice treating various diseases. However, the analgesic effect of PDRN in a neuropathic pain or CRPS model remains unknown. @*Methods@#PDRN (3.3, 10, and 20 mg/kg) was administered into the subcutaneous (SC) layer of the hind paws of SNL and CPIP models. Mechanical anti-allodynic effects were then investigated using the von Frey test. In the immunohistochemical examination, dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the spinal cord were harvested and examined for the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) after the 20 mg PDRN injection. @*Results@#Mechanical allodynia was significantly alleviated by administration of PDRN in SNL and CPIP mice at all of the time point. As the dose of PDRN increased, the effect was greater. The 20 mg PDRN injection was found to have the most effective anti-allodynic effect. The increased expression of GFAP in DRG and the spinal cord of SNL and CPIP model decreased following the administration of PDRN than vehicle. @*Conclusion@#SC administration of PDRN results in the attenuation of allodynia and activation of astrocytes in neuropathic pain or CRPS models. We propose that PDRN can have significant potential advantages in neuropathic pain treatment.

6.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-915383

ABSTRACT

Although many patients who undergo bunion repair do well and have satisfactory results, a critical evaluation of these results shows the potential for improvement. Metatarsal deformity of the hallux valgus is a 3-dimensional deformity, including rotation in the coronal plane. Theoretically, it is important to understand the 3-dimensional displacement of the first metatarsal for correcting the deformities of valgus rotation in the frontal plane. Yet the current methods of metatarsal osteotomy principally attempt to correct the deformity in the transverse plane. The modified technique for the Lapidus procedure can be used in a variety of hallux valgus conditions and severities, and the early results suggest that a powerful correction can be maintained. In addition, efforts have been made to correct the 3-dimensional deformity by performing metatarsal shaft osteotomy. In the case of degenerative arthritis, first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis is a good option to correct the 3-dimensional deformation. Correction of the 3-dimensional deformity, including a rotational deformity in the frontal plane of the metatarsals, should be considered when selecting surgical treatment and is essential for achieving a good prognosis for patients with hallux valgus. This article reviews the classification and treatment of hallux valgus for correction of the 3-dimensional deformity.

7.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-915371

ABSTRACT

In clinical practice, recurrent Achilles ruptures have been noted to occurr at the original ruptured site. However, reports of new developed fresh rupture of the Achilles tendon in other sites are is extremely rare. Our report is about one uncommon case of a traumatic calcaneal tuberosity avulsion fracture following augmented repair, which was performed using the Krackow locking loop technique. We performed open reduction and intra-osseous fixation using a suture anchor. This procedure was done through the primary longitudinal incision for the calcaneal avulsion fracture fragment. After 6 months of follow-up, our patient has achieved a complete functional recovery and he can normally perform daily and work-related tasks without pain.

8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-739740

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In elbow fracture-dislocation, partial excision of the comminuted radial head fracture that is not amenable to fixation remains controversial considering the accompanying symptoms. This study was undertaken to evaluate the results of radial head partial excision when the comminuted radial head fracture involved < 50% of the articular surface in all-arthroscopic repair of elbow fracture-dislocation. METHODS: Patients were divided into two groups based on the condition of the radial head fracture. In Group A, the patients had a radial head comminuted fracture involving < 50% of the articular surface, and underwent arthroscopic partial excision. Group B was the non-excision group comprising patients with stable and non-displacement fractures. Follow-up consultations were conducted at 6 weeks and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. RESULTS: In all, 19 patients (Group A: 11; Group B: 8) met the inclusion criteria and were enrolled in the study. At the final follow-up, all 19 patients showed complete resolution of elbow instability. No significant differences were observed in the range of motion, visual analogue scale score, and Mayo elbow performance score between groups. Radiological findings did not show any complications of the radiocapitellar joint. However, nonunion of the coracoid fracture was observed in 3 patients (Group A: 1; Group B: 2), without any accompanying instability and clinical symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Considering that the final outcome is coronoid fracture fixation and lateral collateral ligament complex repair for restoring elbow stability, arthroscopic partial excision for radial head comminuted fractures involving < 50% of articular surface is an effective and acceptable treatment for elbow fracture-dislocation.


Subject(s)
Arthroscopy , Elbow , Follow-Up Studies , Fracture Fixation , Fractures, Comminuted , Head , Humans , Joints , Lateral Ligament, Ankle , Range of Motion, Articular , Referral and Consultation
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-739712

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study is to evaluate results of superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) repairs and debridement of type II SLAP lesions combined with Bankart lesions. METHODS: Between 2010 and 2014, total 58 patients with anterior shoulder instability due to a Bankart lesion combined with a type II SLAP lesion were enrolled. Patients were divided into two groups: group C consisted of 30 patients, each with a communicated Bankart and type II SLAP lesion and group NC consisted of 28 patients, each with a non-communicated Bankart and type II SLAP lesion. Bankart repairs were performed for all patients. SLAP lesions were repaired in group C and debrided in group NC. Clinical results were analysed to compare groups C and NC by using the visual analogue scale pain score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Constant scores, Rowe score for instability and range of motion assessments. RESULTS: The clinical scores were improved in both groups at final follow-up. Also, there were no differences between two groups. No significant difference was found in terms of the range of motion measured at the last follow-up. The number of suture anchors used was significantly higher in group C than in group NC (5.6 vs. 3.8; p=0.021). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, it is considered that Bankart repair and SLAP debridement could be a treatment option in patients with a non-communicated type II SLAP lesion combined with a Bankart lesion (study design: IV, therapeutic study, case series).


Subject(s)
Debridement , Elbow , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Range of Motion, Articular , Shoulder , Surgeons , Suture Anchors
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-28080

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Clinical symptoms associated with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) can vary widely. Carrier state without apparent symptoms is relatively common during infancy. The objective of this study was to determine the association of C. difficile colonization with bowel habit change and the effect of C. difficile colonization treatment on restoration of normal bowel habit. METHODS: Between 2006 and 2014, infants at 1 to 12 months of age with diarrhea for more than 2 weeks who did not improve with conservative care were recruited from Gachon University Gil Medical Center. Infants who were followed up for at least 7 days were included. The presence or absence of C. difficile colonization, effect of metronidazole, and other medical records were reviewed. To determine the association between CDI and bowel habit change, logistic regression analysis was used. RESULTS: Of a total of 126 infants, 74 (58.7%) were male patients. Of the 126 patients, 27 (21.4%) had C. difficile colonization. Significant (p<0.05) risk factors for C. difficile colonization included artificial milk feeding (odds ratio [OR], 4.310; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.564-11.878), prior rotavirus vaccination (OR, 4.322; 95% CI, 1.018-18.349), and antibiotic use (OR, 4.798; 95% CI, 1.430-16.101). There was improvement in bowel habit after metronidazole therapy (OR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.15-0.79; p<0.05), regardless of the presence or absence of C. difficile colonization, CONCLUSION: There was no significant correlation between bowel habit change and C. difficile colonization during infancy. However, metronidazole can be used as an optional method to manage functional gastrointestinal disorders.


Subject(s)
Carrier State , Clostridioides difficile , Clostridium , Colon , Diarrhea , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Humans , Infant , Logistic Models , Male , Medical Records , Methods , Metronidazole , Milk , Risk Factors , Rotavirus , Vaccination
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-770809

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To evaluate the clinical and functional outcomes of arthroscopic-assisted reduction and percutaneous screw fixation for glenoid fractures with scapular extension, and investigate the radiologic and clinical benefits from the results. METHODS: We evaluated patients treated with arthroscopic-assisted reduction and percutaneous screw fixation for glenoid fractures with scapular extension from November 2008 to September 2015. Fractures with displacement exceeding one-fourth of the anterior-articular surface or more than one-third of the posterior-articular surface in radiographic images were treated by surgery. Clinical assessment was conducted based on range of motion, Rowe score, and Constant score of injured arm and uninjured arm at last follow-up. RESULTS: Fifteen patients with Ideberg classification grade III, IV, and V glenoid fracture who underwent arthroscopic-assisted reduction using percutaneous screw fixation were retrospectively enrolled. There were no differences in clinical outcomes at final follow-up compared to uninjured arm. Bone union was seen in all cases within five months, and the average time to bone union was 15.2 weeks. Ankylosis in one case was observed as a postoperative complication, but the symptoms improved in response to physical therapy for six months. There was no failure of fixation and neurovascular complication. CONCLUSIONS: We identified acceptable results upon radiological and clinical assessment for the arthroscopic-assisted reduction and percutaneous fixation. For this reason, we believe the method is favorable for the treatment of Ideberg type III, IV, and V glenoid fractures. Restoration of the articular surface is considered to be more important than reduction of fractures reduction of the scapula body.


Subject(s)
Ankylosis , Arm , Arthroscopy , Classification , Follow-Up Studies , Fracture Fixation , Glenoid Cavity , Humans , Methods , Postoperative Complications , Range of Motion, Articular , Retrospective Studies , Scapula
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-770808

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study was conducted to compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of the locking hook plate fixation (HP) technique and the single tight rope (TR) technique applied for acute high-grade acromioclavicular (AC) joint separations. METHODS: Between 2009 and 2014, 135 consecutive patients with acute AC joint separation Rockwood types III, IV, and V were subjected to surgical reconstruction. One hundred fourteen patients (84.4%) were available for retrospective evaluation. Of them, 62 and 52 were treated using the single TR group and clavicular HP group techniques, respectively. The visual analogue scale, Constant, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and Taft scores were used for clinical assessment. Postoperative shoulder range of motion was also assessed. An anteroposterior radiograph of the coracoclavicular distance (CCD) was obtained to evaluate the radiographic signs of recurrence. RESULTS: The TR group patients had better Constant, ASES, and Taft scores than the HP group patients. The loss of reduction in terms of the CCD did not differ between groups. Subacromial osteolysis was observed in 34.6% of the cases in the HP group. However, there were no significant differences in the clinical outcomes between the patients with and without osteolysis in the HP group. Subcoracoid osteolysis, drill tunnel widening, and metal displacement were observed in 3.2%, 22.6%, and 4.8% of the cases in the TR group, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The single TR technique was relatively more effective at treating acute high-grade AC joint injuries than the HP fixation technique (level of evidence: therapeutic; retrospective comparative study, Level III).


Subject(s)
Acromioclavicular Joint , Joint Dislocations , Elbow , Humans , Joints , Osteolysis , Range of Motion, Articular , Recurrence , Retrospective Studies , Shoulder , Surgeons
15.
Hip & Pelvis ; : 270-276, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-192026

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: A basicervical femoral fracture is defined as a fracture of base of neck of femur that occurs medially from intertrochanteric line above lesser trochanter. In this study, we intended to evaluate radiological and clinical results of basicervical femoral fractures treated by intramedullary nailing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifteen patients, who underwent intramedullary nailing among 50 patients, out of 50 who were diagnosed with basicervical femoral fractures from July 2012 to May 2015 were studied. All of 15 patients' fracture were two-part basicervical fractures. Using radiography, we characterized the: i) state of reduction, ii) location of the lag screw, iii) tip apex distance (TAD), and iv) sliding distance of lag screw and bone union. Additionally, we performed clinical assessment before injury and at final follow-up. RESULTS: In radiological assessment, we achieved acceptable reduction state in all patients. All lag screws were fixated on appropriate locations. Mean TAD was 17.3 mm (11.0–21.1 mm), which showed insertion point of < 25 mm in all cases. The mean sliding distance of the lag screw was 5.1 mm (0.1–16.0 mm) at the final follow-up. The mean bone union period was 4.8 months (3–10 months) with achieving in all cases. In clinical assessment, Harris hip score, visual analogue scale score and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index score, all of them significantly improved postoperatively compared with preoperative scores (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: In elderly patients with basicervical femoral fractures, treatment with intramedullary nailing showed satisfactory results, considered to be a useful method if performed with skilled technique.


Subject(s)
Aged , Arthritis , Femoral Fractures , Femur , Follow-Up Studies , Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary , Hip , Humans , Methods , Neck , Ontario , Radiography
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-96470

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To evaluate the clinical and functional outcomes of arthroscopic-assisted reduction and percutaneous screw fixation for glenoid fractures with scapular extension, and investigate the radiologic and clinical benefits from the results. METHODS: We evaluated patients treated with arthroscopic-assisted reduction and percutaneous screw fixation for glenoid fractures with scapular extension from November 2008 to September 2015. Fractures with displacement exceeding one-fourth of the anterior-articular surface or more than one-third of the posterior-articular surface in radiographic images were treated by surgery. Clinical assessment was conducted based on range of motion, Rowe score, and Constant score of injured arm and uninjured arm at last follow-up. RESULTS: Fifteen patients with Ideberg classification grade III, IV, and V glenoid fracture who underwent arthroscopic-assisted reduction using percutaneous screw fixation were retrospectively enrolled. There were no differences in clinical outcomes at final follow-up compared to uninjured arm. Bone union was seen in all cases within five months, and the average time to bone union was 15.2 weeks. Ankylosis in one case was observed as a postoperative complication, but the symptoms improved in response to physical therapy for six months. There was no failure of fixation and neurovascular complication. CONCLUSIONS: We identified acceptable results upon radiological and clinical assessment for the arthroscopic-assisted reduction and percutaneous fixation. For this reason, we believe the method is favorable for the treatment of Ideberg type III, IV, and V glenoid fractures. Restoration of the articular surface is considered to be more important than reduction of fractures reduction of the scapula body.


Subject(s)
Ankylosis , Arm , Arthroscopy , Classification , Follow-Up Studies , Fracture Fixation , Glenoid Cavity , Humans , Methods , Postoperative Complications , Range of Motion, Articular , Retrospective Studies , Scapula
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-96469

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study was conducted to compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of the locking hook plate fixation (HP) technique and the single tight rope (TR) technique applied for acute high-grade acromioclavicular (AC) joint separations. METHODS: Between 2009 and 2014, 135 consecutive patients with acute AC joint separation Rockwood types III, IV, and V were subjected to surgical reconstruction. One hundred fourteen patients (84.4%) were available for retrospective evaluation. Of them, 62 and 52 were treated using the single TR group and clavicular HP group techniques, respectively. The visual analogue scale, Constant, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and Taft scores were used for clinical assessment. Postoperative shoulder range of motion was also assessed. An anteroposterior radiograph of the coracoclavicular distance (CCD) was obtained to evaluate the radiographic signs of recurrence. RESULTS: The TR group patients had better Constant, ASES, and Taft scores than the HP group patients. The loss of reduction in terms of the CCD did not differ between groups. Subacromial osteolysis was observed in 34.6% of the cases in the HP group. However, there were no significant differences in the clinical outcomes between the patients with and without osteolysis in the HP group. Subcoracoid osteolysis, drill tunnel widening, and metal displacement were observed in 3.2%, 22.6%, and 4.8% of the cases in the TR group, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The single TR technique was relatively more effective at treating acute high-grade AC joint injuries than the HP fixation technique (level of evidence: therapeutic; retrospective comparative study, Level III).


Subject(s)
Acromioclavicular Joint , Joint Dislocations , Elbow , Humans , Joints , Osteolysis , Range of Motion, Articular , Recurrence , Retrospective Studies , Shoulder , Surgeons
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-158491

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to investigate the association between elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and urosepsis in children with acute pyelonephritis (APN). METHODS: We retrospectively identified all children who were managed in our hospital with APN during a decade period. In our study a diagnosis of APN was defined as having a positive urine culture and a positive (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid scintigraphy. We compared those with elevated ALT and those with normal ALT according to the following variables: age, gender, duration of fever prior to admission, presence of hypotension, C-reactive protein (CRP), creatinine, presence of anemia, white blood cells count, platelet count, blood culture result, and grades of vesicoureteral reflux. In addition, the correlation between elevated ALT and positive blood culture was analyzed in detail. RESULTS: A total of 996 children were diagnosed with APN, of which 883 were included in the study. ALT was elevated in 81 children (9.2%). In the analysis of demographic characteristics, the number of children with elevated ALT was higher in children between 0 to 3 months, boys, and in those with positive blood culture (p=0.002, 0.036, and 0.010, respectively). In multivariate analysis of variables associated with positive blood culture, age younger than 3 months, elevated ALT, elevated CRP, and elevated creatinine showed statistical significance (p=0.004, 0.030, 0.043, and 0.044, respectively). CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates the association between elevated ALT and increased prevalence of urosepsis in addition to elevated CRP, elevated creatinine, and age younger than 3 months in children with APN.


Subject(s)
Alanine Transaminase , Alanine , Anemia , C-Reactive Protein , Child , Creatinine , Diagnosis , Fever , Humans , Hypotension , Infant , Leukocytes , Multivariate Analysis , Platelet Count , Prevalence , Pyelonephritis , Radionuclide Imaging , Retrospective Studies , Vesico-Ureteral Reflux
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-101615

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Degenerative osteoarthritis of the knee usually shows arthritic change in the medial tibiofemoral joint with severe varus deformity. In total knee arthroplasty (TKA), the medial release technique is often used for achieving mediolateral balancing. But, in a more severe varus knee, there are more difficult technical problems. Bony resection of the medial proximal tibia (MPT) as an alternative technique for achieving soft tissue balancing was assessed in terms of its effectiveness and possibility of quantification. METHODS: TKAs were performed in 78 knees (60 patients) with vertical bone resection of the MPT for soft tissue balancing from September 2011 to March 2013. During operation, the medial and lateral gaps were measured before and after the bony resection technique. First, the correlation between the measured thickness of the resected bone and the change in medial and lateral gaps was analyzed. Second, the possibility of quantification of each parameter was evaluated by linear regression and the coefficient ratio was obtained. RESULTS: A significant correlation was identified between alteration in the medial gap change in extension and the measured thickness of the vertically resected MPT (r = 0.695, p = 0.000). In the medial gap change in flexion, there was no statistical significance (r = 0.214, p = 0.059). When the MPT was resected at an average thickness of 8.25 +/- 1.92 mm, the medial gap in extension was increased by 2.94 +/- 0.87 mm. In simple linear regression, it was predictable that MPT resection at a thickness of 2.80 mm was required to increase the medial gap by 1.00 mm in knee extension. CONCLUSIONS: The method of bone resection of the MPT can be considered effective with a predictable result for achieving soft tissue balancing in terms of quantification during TKA.


Subject(s)
Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/methods , Female , Humans , Knee/physiology , Male , Middle Aged , Osteoarthritis, Knee/surgery , Tibia/physiology
20.
Radiation Oncology Journal ; : 233-241, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-73633

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy of RapidArc with robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of CyberKnife in the planning and delivery of SBRT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment by analyzing dosimetric parameters. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two radiation treatment plans were generated for 29 HCC patients, one using Eclipse for the RapidArc plan and the other using Multiplan for the CyberKnife plan. The prescription dose was 60 Gy in 3 fractions. The dosimetric parameters of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and normal tissue sparing in the RapidArc and the CyberKnife plans were analyzed. RESULTS: The conformity index was 1.05 +/- 0.02 for the CyberKnife plan, and 1.13 +/- 0.10 for the RapidArc plan. The homogeneity index was 1.23 +/- 0.01 for the CyberKnife plan, and 1.10 +/- 0.03 for the RapidArc plan. For the normal liver, there were significant differences between the two plans in the low-dose regions of V1 and V3. The normalized volumes of V60 for the normal liver in the RapidArc plan were drastically increased when the mean dose of the PTVs in RapidArc plan is equivalent to the mean dose of the PTVs in the CyberKnife plan. CONCLUSION: CyberKnife plans show greater dose conformity, especially in small-sized tumors, while RapidArc plans show good dosimetric distribution of low dose sparing in the normal liver and body.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Humans , Liver , Prescriptions , Radiosurgery , Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated
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