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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-892685

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Prokinetics can be used for treating patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), who exhibit suboptimal response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. We conducted a systematic review to assess the potential benefits of combination treatment with PPI plus prokinetics in GERD. @*Methods@#We searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and EMBASE for publications regarding randomized controlled trials comparing combination treatment of PPI plus prokinetics to PPI monotherapy with respect to global symptom improvement in GERD (until February 2020). The primary outcome was an absence or global symptom improvement in GERD. Adverse events and quality of life (QoL) scores were evaluated as secondary outcomes using a random effects model. Quality of evidence was rated using Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE). @*Results@#This meta-analysis included 16 studies involving 1446 participants (719 in the PPI plus prokinetics group and 727 in the PPI monotherapy group). The PPI plus prokinetics treatment resulted in a significant reduction in global symptoms of GERD regardless of the prokinetic type, refractoriness, and ethnicity. Additionally, treatment with PPI plus prokinetics for at least 4 weeks was found to be more beneficial than PPI monotherapy with respect to global symptom improvement. However, the QoL scores were not improved with PPI plus prokinetics treatment. Adverse events observed in response to PPI plus prokinetics treatment did not differ from those observed with PPI monotherapy. @*Conclusions@#Combination of prokinetics with PPI treatment is more effective than PPI alone in GERD patients. Further high-quality trials with large sample sizes are needed to verify the effects based on prokinetic type.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-900389

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Prokinetics can be used for treating patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), who exhibit suboptimal response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. We conducted a systematic review to assess the potential benefits of combination treatment with PPI plus prokinetics in GERD. @*Methods@#We searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and EMBASE for publications regarding randomized controlled trials comparing combination treatment of PPI plus prokinetics to PPI monotherapy with respect to global symptom improvement in GERD (until February 2020). The primary outcome was an absence or global symptom improvement in GERD. Adverse events and quality of life (QoL) scores were evaluated as secondary outcomes using a random effects model. Quality of evidence was rated using Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE). @*Results@#This meta-analysis included 16 studies involving 1446 participants (719 in the PPI plus prokinetics group and 727 in the PPI monotherapy group). The PPI plus prokinetics treatment resulted in a significant reduction in global symptoms of GERD regardless of the prokinetic type, refractoriness, and ethnicity. Additionally, treatment with PPI plus prokinetics for at least 4 weeks was found to be more beneficial than PPI monotherapy with respect to global symptom improvement. However, the QoL scores were not improved with PPI plus prokinetics treatment. Adverse events observed in response to PPI plus prokinetics treatment did not differ from those observed with PPI monotherapy. @*Conclusions@#Combination of prokinetics with PPI treatment is more effective than PPI alone in GERD patients. Further high-quality trials with large sample sizes are needed to verify the effects based on prokinetic type.

3.
Gut and Liver ; : 746-754, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-833164

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure (EVAC) has been attempted as new nonsurgical treatment for anastomotic leakage. We aimed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of EVAC and compare its efficacy with the self-ex-pandable metallic stent (SEMS) for postgastrectomy leakage. @*Methods@#Between January 2007 and February 2018, 39 patients underwent endoscopic treatment for anastomotic leakage after gastric cancer surgery. Of them, 28 patients were treated with SEMS, seven with EVAC after SEMS fail-ure, and four with EVAC. We retrospectively compared the clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcomes between EVAC (n=11) and SEMS (n=28). @*Results@#The median followup duration was 17 months (interquartile range, 9 to 26 months) in both groups. In comparison of clinical character-istics between two groups, only the median size of the leak was larger in the EVAC group than in the SEMS group (2.1 cm vs 1.0 cm; p<0.001). All EVAC cases healed successfully;however, two cases (7.1%) failed to heal in the SEMS group.Anastomotic stricture occurred one case (9.1%) in EVAC and four cases (14.3%) in SEMS within 1 year after endoscopic treatment. The median treatment duration of EVAC was shorter than that of SEMS (15 days vs 36 days; p<0.001).Median weight loss after therapy was similar in both groups (8.0 kg in EVAC vs 9.0 kg in SEMS; p=0.356). @*Conclusions@#EVAC can be effective endoscopic treatment for postgas-trectomy anastomotic leakage. Substantial leakage could be an important clinical factor for considering EVAC as a treatment option. Large randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the efficacy of EVAC.

4.
Gut and Liver ; : 642-648, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-763886

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Bicarbonate-containing alginate formulations are reported to be effective for controlling reflux symptoms. However, the efficacy of Lamina G alginate without gas production has not been reported. The aim is to evaluate the efficacy of a non-bicarbonate alginate in individuals with reflux symptoms without reflux esophagitis. METHODS: Participants who had experienced heartburn or regurgitation for 7 consecutive days were randomized to one of the following treatment groups: proton pump inhibitors (PPI) plus alginate (combination) or PPI plus placebo (PPI only). In addition, as a reference group, patients received placebo plus alginate (alginate only). The primary endpoint compared the percentage of patients with complete resolution of symptoms for the final 7 days of the treatment. Secondary endpoints compared changes in symptom score, symptom-free days during the treatment period, the Reflux Disease Questionnaire, Patient Assessment of Upper Gastrointestinal Disorders (PAGI)-Quality of Life and PAGI-Symptoms Severity Index scores, the investigator's assessment of symptoms, and incidence of adverse events. RESULTS: Complete resolution of heartburn or regurgitation was not significantly different between the combination and PPI only groups (58.7% vs 57.5%, p=0.903). The secondary endpoints were not significantly different between the two groups. Complete resolution of heartburn or regurgitation, did not differ between the alginate only reference group and the PPI only group (75.0% vs 57.5%, p=0.146). CONCLUSIONS: The addition of non-bicarbonate alginate to PPI was no more effective than PPI alone in controlling reflux symptoms.


Subject(s)
Alginates , Clinical Study , Esophagitis, Peptic , Gastroesophageal Reflux , Heartburn , Humans , Incidence , Proton Pump Inhibitors , Treatment Outcome
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-167301

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The correlation between radiation dose and loco-regional control (LRC) was evaluated in patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical records of 236 stage II-III esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive CRT at Yonsei Cancer Center between 1994 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Among these, 120 received a radiation dose of 60 Gy) is associated with increased LRC, PFS, and OS in patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with definitive CRT.


Subject(s)
Chemoradiotherapy , Disease-Free Survival , Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation , Drug Therapy , Esophageal Neoplasms , Humans , Karnofsky Performance Status , Medical Records , Retrospective Studies
6.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 293-296, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-165381

ABSTRACT

Gastrointestinal (GI) leakage, fistulae, and perforations can be serious and life threatening. There has been a paradigm shift in the management approach of these conditions, from surgical to conservative, including endoscopic management. Here, we report two cases of endoscopic closure of a GI fistula and perforation using polyglycolic acid (PGA) sheets with fibrin glue. The first case is of an anastomotic leak detected after subtotal gastrectomy with gastroduodenostomy. After failed application of endoclips, a PGA sheet was applied, and the fistula was successfully closed. The second case was of a 15-mm large perforated gastric ulcer, which was also successfully closed with a PGA sheet. This is the first case report that PGA sheet was used for the treatment of overt perforation. The outcome of these cases suggest that endoscopic closure using PGA sheets can be considered as a useful alternative for the management of GI leakage, fistulae, and perforations.


Subject(s)
Anastomotic Leak , Fibrin Tissue Adhesive , Fistula , Gastrectomy , Polyglycolic Acid , Stomach Ulcer
7.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 345-356, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-184058

ABSTRACT

The Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (KSGE) developed a gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy board in 1995 and related regulations. Although the KSGE has acquired many specialists since then, the education and training aims and guidelines were insufficient. During GI fellowship training, obtaining sufficient exposure to some types of endoscopic procedures is difficult. Fellows should acquire endoscopic skills through supervised endoscopic procedures during GI fellowship training. Thus, the KSGE requires training guidelines for fellowships that allow fellows to perform independent endoscopic procedures without supervision. This document is intended to provide principles that the Committee of Education and Training of the KSGE can use to develop practical guidelines for granting privileges to perform accurate GI endoscopy safely. The KSGE will improve the quality of GI endoscopy by providing guidelines for fellowships and supervisors.


Subject(s)
Education , Endoscopy , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Fellowships and Scholarships , Financing, Organized , Organization and Administration , Social Control, Formal , Specialization
8.
Gut and Liver ; : 635-641, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-175167

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Few studies have evaluated the effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on the prognosis of patients diagnosed with gastric cancer (GC) after curative surgery. We investigated the association between the H. pylori infection status and clinical outcome after surgery. METHODS: We assessed the H. pylori status of 314 patients who underwent curative resection for GC. The H. pylori status was examined using a rapid urease test 2 months after resection. Patients were followed for 10 years after surgery. RESULTS: An H. pylori infection was observed in 128 of 314 patients. The median follow-up period was 93.5 months. A Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that patients with H. pylori had a higher cumulative survival rate than those who were negative for H. pylori. Patients with stage II cancer who tested negative for H. pylori were associated with a poor outcome. In a multivariate analysis, H. pylori-negative status was a significant independent prognostic factor for poor overall survival. CONCLUSIONS: Having a negative H. pylori infection status seems to indicate poor prognosis for patients with GC who have undergone curative resection. Further prospective controlled studies are needed to evaluate the mechanism by which H. pylori affects GC patients after curative surgery in Korea.


Subject(s)
Follow-Up Studies , Helicobacter pylori , Helicobacter , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Korea , Multivariate Analysis , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Stomach Neoplasms , Survival Rate , Urease
9.
Journal of Gastric Cancer ; : 374-383, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-179805

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Bleeding is one of the most serious complications of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) and is associated with a poor prognosis. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of endoscopic hemostasis for bleeding in patients with unresectable AGC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study included 106 patients with bleeding associated with gastric cancer who had undergone endoscopic hemostasis between January 2010 and December 2013. Clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes, including rates of successful endoscopic hemostasis and rebleeding, risk factors for rebleeding, and overall survival (OS) were investigated. RESULTS: Successful initial hemostasis was achieved in 83% of patients. Rebleeding occurred in 28.3% of patients within 30 days. The median OS after initial hemostasis was lower in patients with rebleeding than in those without rebleeding (2.7 and 3.9 months, respectively, P=0.02). There were no significant differences in disease status and rebleeding rates among patients with partial response or stable disease (n=4), progressive disease (n=64), and first diagnosis of disease (n=38). Univariate and multivariate analyses (P=0.038 and 0.034, respectively) revealed that transfusion of ≥5 units of RBCs was a significant risk factor for rebleeding. CONCLUSIONS: Despite favorable success rates of endoscopic hemostasis for bleeding associated with gastric cancer, the 30-day rebleeding rate was 28.3% and the median OS was significantly lower in patients with rebleeding than in those without rebleeding. Massive transfusion (≥5 units of RBCs) was the only significant risk factor for rebleeding. Patients with bleeding associated with AGC who have undergone massive transfusion should be observed closely following endoscopic hemostasis. Further research on approaches to reduce rebleeding rate and prevent death is needed.


Subject(s)
Diagnosis , Hemorrhage , Hemostasis , Hemostasis, Endoscopic , Humans , Multivariate Analysis , Prognosis , Risk Factors , Stomach Neoplasms
10.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-66968

ABSTRACT

Oxyntic gland polyp/adenoma is a recently reported rare neoplasm previously called gastric adenocarcinoma of fundic gland type (chief cell predominant type). We report a case of oxyntic gland adenoma curatively treated with endoscopic mucosal resection. On endoscopy, a small, round polypoid lesion was observed in the fundus of the stomach of a 33-year-old man. He underwent endoscopic mucosal resection with a cap for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, and was diagnosed as having oxyntic gland adenoma with high-grade dysplasia. On immunohistochemical analysis, the tumor was positive for MUC6 and negative for MUC5AC and MUC2. Our case suggests that endoscopic mucosal resection with immunohistochemical analysis might be useful for correctly diagnosing an uncertain lesion suspected as an oxyntic gland adenoma.


Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma , Adenoma , Adult , Endoscopy , Humans , Stomach
11.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 179-184, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-97897

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Long-term use of aspirin can be a risk factor of peptic ulcer diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Albis (Daewoong Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.) for the prevention of gastric mucosal injury caused by aspirin. METHODS: Aspirin users were enrolled and randomized into the Albis or placebo group. Screening and follow-up endoscopy were performed for modified Lanza scores (MLSs). Primary outcome was measured by the incidence rate of peptic ulcer, and secondary outcomes were measured by the incidence rate of gastritis, improvement in MLS and subjective symptoms. RESULTS: In total, 81 aspirin users were randomized, 43 in the Albis group and 38 in the placebo group. There was no incidence of peptic ulcer in both groups. The incidence of gastritis was significantly higher in the placebo group (44.4% vs. 10.0%, p=0.003); however, the scores of mucosal edema, hyperemia and hemorrhage were not statistically different between the two groups (p>0.05). The frequency of subjective symptoms were more improved in the Albis group than in the placebo group (p=0.023). CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of gastritis was lower in the group that received low-dose aspirin and Albis. The development of peptic ulcer due to long-term use of aspirin might be prevented with concomitant use of Albis.


Subject(s)
Aspirin , Edema , Endoscopy , Follow-Up Studies , Gastritis , Hemorrhage , Hyperemia , Incidence , Mass Screening , Peptic Ulcer , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-6980

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Gastric cancer is the third-leading cause of cancer-related death in Korea. As the Korean population is ageing, the number of extremely old patients with this disease is increasing. This study examined the clinicopathological characteristics of gastric cancer in extremely old (over 85 years) patients who received treatment or conservative observations and compared the treatment outcomes according to the treatment modality. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 170 patients over 85 years of age were diagnosed with gastric cancer. Of these, 81 underwent treatment for gastric cancer and 89 received conservative observations. The clinicopathological characteristics of the treatment and conservative groupswere compared. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 86.5 years. The conservative group included significantly more patients with older ages, macroscopically advanced cancer and upper-middle located cancer. The overall survival rate of the treatment group was significantly higher than that of the conservative group. The disease-specific mortality rate was significantly lower in the treatment group than in the conservative group. Multivariate analysis revealed the clinical course, alarm sign, and macroscopic classification to be independent prognosis factors. CONCLUSION: By itself, the chronological age should not be used as a strategy to determine whether treatmentwill be administered for gastric cancer. Patients who have early gastric cancer or lower-risk preexisting comorbidities should not be discouraged from treatment, even if they are older than 85 years.


Subject(s)
Aged, 80 and over , Classification , Comorbidity , Humans , Korea , Mortality , Multivariate Analysis , Prognosis , Stomach Neoplasms , Survival Rate
13.
Gut and Liver ; : 757-763, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-179852

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Surgeons must be aware of risk factors for strictures before performing endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), to enable early interventions to prevent severe strictures. METHODS: This study was a single-center retrospective study. We reviewed the clinical data of patients who has undergone gastric ESD from January 2007 to December 2012. RESULTS: Among the 3,819 patients who had undergone gastric ESD, 11 patients (7.2%) developed pyloric strictures and received successful endoscopic balloon dilation. Significant differences were noted between the patients without and with post-ESD strictures for pretreatment of antral or pyloric deformities (46.4% vs 81.8%), the proportion of extension to the lumen circumference (>3/4, 9.4% vs 54.5%), the longitudinal extent of mucosal defects (27.9±10.1 mm vs 51.5±10.8 mm), and post-ESD bleeding (2.9% vs 27.3%). Multivariate analysis revealed that pretreatment antral or pyloric deformities (odds ratio [OR], 30.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.476 to 631.565; p=0.027), larger longitudinal extent of mucosal defects (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.074 to 1.340; p=0.001), and circumferential extension of 3/4 (OR, 13.69; 95% CI, 1.583 to 118.387; p=0.017) were independent risk factors for post-ESD stricture. CONCLUSIONS: Antral or pyloric deformities, sub-circumferential resection over more than 75% of the circumference and greater longitudinal extent of mucosal defects are independent risk factors for post-ESD stricture.


Subject(s)
Congenital Abnormalities , Constriction, Pathologic , Early Intervention, Educational , Hemorrhage , Humans , Multivariate Analysis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Surgeons
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-222510

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: The clinicopathologic features of gastric cancer in young patients are different from those of older patients. However, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is performed regardless of age. The purpose of this study was to characterize younger patients (≤40 years) who underwent ESD for early gastric cancer (EGC) and analyze the results of ESD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From January 2006 to June 2014, 55 patients aged 40 years or younger with newly diagnosed EGC underwent ESD at two tertiary hospitals. The clinicopathologic features of EGC and clinical outcomes of ESD in these young patients were reviewed retrospectively. RESULTS: A total 55 patients with 57 EGC lesions underwent ESD. Female sex, superficial flat or depressed lesions, and undifferentiated histology were more common in younger patients than in older patients in our institutional ESD cohort. The en bloc resection rate was 92.7% and the complete resection rate was 94.5%. Although there was a high proportion of undifferentiated cancer in the younger patient group, the curative resection rate was 72.7%. Among 15 patients with non-curative resection, 4 patients underwent additional surgery and 1 patient underwent argon plasma coagulation at the ESD ulcer margin. Eight patients were placed under close surveillance without additional treatment, and no recurrent tumors developed, with a median follow-up period of 37.2±23.6 months. CONCLUSIONS: Younger EGC patients who underwent ESD showed the typical characteristics seen in younger patients with gastric cancer. ESD in younger EGC patients showed comparable outcomes to those in patients with undifferentiated EGC in general.


Subject(s)
Argon Plasma Coagulation , Cohort Studies , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Stomach Neoplasms , Tertiary Care Centers , Ulcer
15.
Journal of Gastric Cancer ; : 246-255, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-195756

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The importance of Helicobacter pylori eradication after endoscopic resection (ER) of gastric neoplasms remains controversial. In this study, we clarified the importance of H. pylori eradication for metachronous lesions after ER. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study included 3,882 patients with gastric neoplasms who underwent ER. We included patients infected with H. pylori who received eradication therapy. Among them, 34 patients with metachronous lesions after ER and 102 age- and sex-matched patients (nonmetachronous group) were enrolled. Background mucosal pathologies such as atrophy and intestinal metaplasia (IM) were evaluated endoscopically. The expression levels of CDX1, CDX2, Sonic hedgehog (SHH), and SOX2 were evaluated based on H. pylori eradication and the development of metachronous lesions. RESULTS: The eradication failure rate was higher in the metachronous group than in the nonmetachronous group (P=0.036). Open-type atrophy (P=0.003) and moderate-to-severe IM (P=0.001) occurred more frequently in the metachronous group. In patients with an initial diagnosis of dysplasia, the eradication failure rate was higher in the metachronous group than in the nonmetachronous group (P=0.002). In addition, open-type atrophy was more frequent in the metachronous group (P=0.047). In patients with an initial diagnosis of carcinoma, moderate-to-severe IM occurred more frequently in the metachronous group (P=0.003); however, the eradication failure rate was not significantly different between the two groups. SHH and SOX2 expression was increased, and CDX2 expression was decreased in the nonmetachronous group after eradication (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Open-type atrophy, moderate-to-severe IM, and H. pylori eradication failure were significantly associated with metachronous lesions. However, eradication failure was significantly associated with dysplasia, but not carcinoma, in the metachronous group. Thus, H. pylori eradication may play an important role in preventing metachronous lesions after ER for precancerous lesions before carcinomatous transformation.


Subject(s)
Atrophy , Diagnosis , Hedgehogs , Helicobacter pylori , Helicobacter , Humans , Metaplasia , Pathology , Recurrence , Stomach Neoplasms
16.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 1566-1571, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-177068

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During sedated esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), patients may not be able to perform inspiration, which is necessary to examine the esophagogastric junction. Therefore sedation may affect diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux-related findings. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of sedation on diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux-related findings during EGD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective study evaluated 28914 patients older than 20 years who underwent EGD at our institution between January 2011 and December 2011. Ultimately, 1546 patients indicated for EGD for health check-up and symptom evaluation were included. RESULTS: There were 18546 patients who had diagnostic EGD: 10471 patients (56%) by non-sedated EGD and 8075 patients (43%) by sedated EGD. After statistical adjustment for age, sex, and body mass index, minimal change esophagitis, and hiatal hernia were significantly less frequently observed in the sedated EGD group [odds ratio (OR), 0.651; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.586 to 0.722 and OR, 0.699; 95% CI, 0.564 to 0.866]. Nevertheless, there was no significant difference in other findings at the gastroesophageal junction, such as reflux esophagitis with Los Angeles classification A, B, C, and D or Barrett's esophagus, between the two groups. Similarly, there were no differences in early gastric cancer, advanced gastric cancer, and gastric ulcer occurrence. CONCLUSION: Sedation can impede the detection of minimal change esophagitis and hiatal hernia, but does not influence detection of reflux esophagitis of definite severity and Barrett's esophagus.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Barrett Esophagus , Body Mass Index , Endoscopy, Digestive System/instrumentation , Esophagitis, Peptic/diagnosis , Esophagogastric Junction/pathology , Female , Gastroesophageal Reflux/diagnosis , Hernia, Hiatal/diagnosis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
17.
Gut and Liver ; : 43-51, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-61576

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: This stuy evaluated the role of a second-look endoscopy after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection in patients without signs of bleeding. METHODS: Between March 2011 and March 2012, 407 patients with gastric neoplasms who underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection for 445 lesions were retrospectively reviewed. After the patients had undergone endoscopic submucosal dissection, they were allocated to two groups (with or without second-look endoscopy) according to the following endoscopy. The postoperative bleeding risk of the lesions was not considered when allocating the patients. RESULTS: The delayed postoperative bleeding rates did not differ between the two groups (with vs without second-look endoscopy, 3.0% vs 2.1%; p=0.546). However, a tumor in the upper-third of the stomach (odds ratio [OR], 5.353; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.075 to 26.650) and specimen size greater than 40 mm (OR, 4.794; 95% CI, 1.307 to 17.588) were both independent risk factors for delayed postoperative bleeding. Additionally, second-look endoscopy was not related to reduced delayed postoperative bleeding. However, delayed postoperative bleeding in the patients who did not undergo a second-look endoscopy occurred significantly earlier than that in patients who underwent a second-look endoscopy (4.5 and 14.0 days, respectively, p=0.022). CONCLUSIONS: A routine second-look endoscopy after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection is not necessary for all patients.


Subject(s)
Female , Gastrectomy/adverse effects , Gastric Mucosa/surgery , Gastroscopy , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Hemorrhage/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Second-Look Surgery , Stomach/pathology , Stomach Neoplasms/pathology , Time Factors
18.
Gut and Liver ; : 714-719, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-67335

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: The aim of this study was to analyze and propose a treatment strategy after endoscopic resection of superficial esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in a single institution. METHODS: This is a retrospective review of 37 patients who were treated by endoscopic resection during a 6-year period. RESULTS: The mean tumor size was 11.5+/-5.5 mm (range, 3 to 31 mm). Thirty-one lesions (83.8%) were treated by endoscopic submucosal dissection, and six lesions were treated by endoscopic mucosal resection (16.2%). The en bloc resection rate and complete resection rate were 91.9% and 81.8%, respectively. The tumor invasion depth was diagnosed as epithelial in five cases (13.5%), lamina propria mucosa in 12 cases (32.4%), muscularis mucosa in 10 cases (27.0%) and submucosa in 10 cases (27.0%). The complication rate was 13.5% and included three cases (8.1%) of perforation. Ten patients who had muscularis mucosa and submucosa lesions received additional treatments, including six patients who were treated with esophagectomy, three patients who were treated with radiotherapy and one patient who was treated with chemoradiotherapy. One patient with lamina propria lesions received radiotherapy due to a positive resection margin. The median follow-up duration was 22 months (range, 4 to 79 months), and no recurrence or metastasis was noted during follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Tailored management after endoscopic treatment of superficial esophageal squamous cell carcinoma can offer an acceptable oncologic outcome in early esophageal carcinoma.


Subject(s)
Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Protocols , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/pathology , Chemoradiotherapy , Combined Modality Therapy , Dissection , Esophageal Neoplasms/pathology , Esophagectomy , Esophagoscopy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mucous Membrane/pathology , Neoplasm Invasiveness , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Postoperative Care , Postoperative Period , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Tumor Burden
19.
Gut and Liver ; : 167-173, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-136395

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Interval gastric cancer (IGC) is defined as cancer that is diagnosed between the time of screening and postscreening esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). Unfortunately, little is known about the characteristics of IGC in Korea, a country with a high incidence of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinicopathologic characteristics of IGCs in Korea. METHODS: From January 2006 to July 2011, a total of 81,762 subjects underwent screening EGD at Yonsei University Health Promotion Center, Seoul, Korea. We defined missed cancer as cancer diagnosed within 1 year of screening EGD and latent cancer as cancer diagnosed more than 1 year after EGD. RESULTS: A total of 16 IGC patients (17 lesions; three missed cancers and 14 latent cancers) were identified, with a mean age of 60.68 years and a mean interval time of 19.64 months. IGCs tended to be undifferentiated (12/17, 70.6%), located in the lower body of the stomach (12/17, 70.6%) and exhibited flat/depressed endoscopic morphology (11/17, 64.7%). The patients with missed cancer were generally younger than the patients with latent cancer (51.3 years vs 62.8 years, p=0.037), and the patients with undifferentiated cancer were significantly younger than those with differentiated cancer (57.0 years vs 68.8 years, p=0.008). CONCLUSIONS: IGCs tended to be undifferentiated, located in the lower body of the stomach, and exhibited flat/depressed endoscopic morphology.


Subject(s)
Age Factors , Aged , Carcinoma/pathology , Delayed Diagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Diagnostic Errors/statistics & numerical data , Early Detection of Cancer , Endoscopy, Digestive System/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Seoul , Stomach/pathology , Stomach Neoplasms/pathology
20.
Gut and Liver ; : 167-173, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-136394

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Interval gastric cancer (IGC) is defined as cancer that is diagnosed between the time of screening and postscreening esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). Unfortunately, little is known about the characteristics of IGC in Korea, a country with a high incidence of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinicopathologic characteristics of IGCs in Korea. METHODS: From January 2006 to July 2011, a total of 81,762 subjects underwent screening EGD at Yonsei University Health Promotion Center, Seoul, Korea. We defined missed cancer as cancer diagnosed within 1 year of screening EGD and latent cancer as cancer diagnosed more than 1 year after EGD. RESULTS: A total of 16 IGC patients (17 lesions; three missed cancers and 14 latent cancers) were identified, with a mean age of 60.68 years and a mean interval time of 19.64 months. IGCs tended to be undifferentiated (12/17, 70.6%), located in the lower body of the stomach (12/17, 70.6%) and exhibited flat/depressed endoscopic morphology (11/17, 64.7%). The patients with missed cancer were generally younger than the patients with latent cancer (51.3 years vs 62.8 years, p=0.037), and the patients with undifferentiated cancer were significantly younger than those with differentiated cancer (57.0 years vs 68.8 years, p=0.008). CONCLUSIONS: IGCs tended to be undifferentiated, located in the lower body of the stomach, and exhibited flat/depressed endoscopic morphology.


Subject(s)
Age Factors , Aged , Carcinoma/pathology , Delayed Diagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Diagnostic Errors/statistics & numerical data , Early Detection of Cancer , Endoscopy, Digestive System/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Seoul , Stomach/pathology , Stomach Neoplasms/pathology
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