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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-875262

ABSTRACT

Objective@#To determine whether changes in the transiting nerve rootlet or its surroundings, as seen on MRI performed after lumbar hemilaminectomy, are associated with persistent postoperative pain (PPP), commonly known as the failed back surgery syndrome. @*Materials and Methods@#Seventy-three patients (mean age, 61 years; 43 males and 30 females) who underwent single-level partial hemilaminectomy of the lumbar spine without postoperative complications or other level spinal abnormalities between January 2010 and December 2018 were enrolled. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated transiting nerve rootlet abnormalities (thickening, signal alteration, distinction, and displacement), epidural fibrosis, and intrathecal arachnoiditis on MRI obtained one year after the operations. A spine surgeon blinded to the radiologic findings evaluated each patient for PPP. Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to evaluate the association between the MRI findings and PPP. @*Results@#The presence of transiting nerve rootlet thickening, signal alteration, and ill-distinction was significantly different between the patients with PPP and those without, for both readers (p ≤ 0.020). Conversely, the presence of transiting nerve rootlet displacement, epidural fibrosis, and intrathecal arachnoiditis was not significantly different between the two groups (p ≥ 0.128). Among the above radiologic findings, transiting nerve rootlet thickening and signal alteration were the most significant findings in the multivariable analyses (p ≤ 0.009). @*Conclusion@#On MRI, PPP was associated with transiting nerve rootlet abnormalities, including thickening, signal alterations, and ill-distinction, but was not associated with epidural fibrosis or intrathecal arachnoiditis. The most relevant findings were the nerve rootlet thickening and signal alteration.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-785928

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Endovascular coiling of ruptured tiny aneurysms (RTAs) in the brain has been known to be technically challenging owing to the higher rate of adverse events, such as thromboembolism and intraoperative rupture. The aim of this study was to report our ex-periences of endovascular treatment of RTAs (size, ≤3 mm).METHODS: From January 2006 to December 2017, 35 RTAs in 35 patients were treated at our institution with an endosaccular coiling. Procedural data and clinical and angiographic results were retrospectively reviewed.RESULTS: The mean size of the RTAs was 2.53 mm (SD: 0.38). The neck remodeling technique was applied to 14 aneurysms, including stent-assisted coiling (n=7) and balloon-assisted coiling (n=7). Procedure-related complications included intraprocedural rupture (n=2), thromboembolic event (n=1), and early rebleeding (n=2), which needed recoiling. Regarding immediate angiographic control, complete occlusion was achieved in 25 aneurysms (71.4%), small neck remnant in 5 (14.3%), and definite remnant in 5 (14.3%). At the end of follow-up, 31 of the 35 patients (88.6%) were able to function independently. Twenty-two of the 35 patients underwent follow-up conventional angiography (mean, 468 days). Stable occlusion was achieved in 20 of the 22 patients (90.9%), minor recanalization in 1 (4.5%), and major recanalization, which required recoiling, in 1 (4.5%).CONCLUSION: Our experiences demonstrate that endovascular treatment for RTAs is both feasible and effective. However, periprocedural rebleedings were found to occur more often (11.4%) than what is generally suspected.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Angiography , Brain , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Neck , Retrospective Studies , Rupture , Thromboembolism
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-785329

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The anatomy of middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms has been noted to be unfavorable for endovascular treatment. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of coiling for MCA aneurysms.METHODS: From January 2004 to December 2015, 72 MCA aneurysms (38 unruptured and 34 ruptured) in 67 patients were treated with coils. Treatment-related complications, clinical outcomes, and immediate and follow-up angiographic outcomes were retrospectively analyzed.RESULTS: Aneurysms were located at the MCA bifurcation (n=60), 1st segment (M1, n=8), and 2nd segment (M2, n=4). Sixty-nine aneurysms (95.8%) were treated by neck remodeling techniques using multi-catheter (n=44), balloon (n=14), stent (n=8), or combination of these (n=3). Only 3 aneurysms were treated by single-catheter technique. Angiographic results were 66 (91.7%) complete, 5 (6.9%) remnant neck, and 1 (1.4%) incomplete occlusion. Procedural complications included aneurysm rupture (n=1), asymptomatic coil migration to the distal vessel (n=1), and acute thromboembolism (n=10) consisting of 8 asymptomatic and 2 symptomatic events. Treatment-related permanent morbidity and mortality rates were 4.5% and 3.0%, respectively. There was no bleeding on clinical follow-up (mean, 29 months; range, 6-108 months). Follow-up angiographic results (mean, 26 months; range, 6-96 months) in patients included 1 major and 3 minor recanalizations.CONCLUSION: Coiling of MCA aneurysms could be a technically feasible and clinically effective treatment strategy with acceptable angiographic and clinical outcomes. However, the safety and efficacy of this technique as compared to surgical clipping remains to be ascertained.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Embolization, Therapeutic , Follow-Up Studies , Hemorrhage , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Middle Cerebral Artery , Mortality , Neck , Retrospective Studies , Rupture , Stents , Surgical Instruments , Thromboembolism
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-788706

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Very large (20–25 mm) and giant (≥25 mm) intracranial aneurysms have an extremely poor natural course, and treatment of these aneurysms remains a challenge for endovascular and surgical strategies. This study was undertaken to describe our experiences of endosaccular treatment of very large and giant intracranial aneurysms with parent artery preservation.METHODS: From January 2005 to October 2016, twenty-four very large or giant aneurysms in 24 patients were treated by endosaccular coil embolization with parent artery preservation. Nine (37.5%) aneurysms were ruptured and 15 were unruptured, and of these 15, 11 were symptomatic cases and 4 were incidentally discovered. The cohort comprised 17 women and 7 men of mean age 58.5 years (range, 26–82). Mean aneurysm size was 26.0 mm (range, 20–39) and 13 of the 24 aneurysms were giant.RESULTS: Immediate angiographic results were complete occlusion in nine (37.5%) cases, remnant neck in six (25.0%), and remnant sac in nine (37.5%). Overall procedural related morbidity and mortality rates were 12.5% and 4.2%, respectively. Angiographic follow-up was available in 16 patients (66.7%). Mean and median follow-up periods were 27.2 (range, 2–77) and 10.5 months, respectively. In 12 cases (12/16, 75%) stable occlusion was achieved, four cases (4/16, 25%) had recanalized, and two of these were retreated with additional coiling. At clinical follow-up of the nine ruptured cases, three patients (33.3%) achieved a good clinical outcome (Glasgow outcome scale [GOS] score of 4 or 5), two (22.2%) a poor outcome (GOS score of 2 or 3), and four patients (44.4%) expired (GOS 1). On the other hand, of the 15 unruptured cases, 13 patients (86.7%) achieved a good clinical outcome (GOS 4 or 5), one patient a poor outcome (GOS score of 2 or 3), and one patient expired (GOS 1).CONCLUSION: The present study shows endosaccular treatment of very large or giant intracranial aneurysms with parent artery preservation is both feasible and effective with acceptable morbidity and mortality.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Arteries , Cohort Studies , Embolization, Therapeutic , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hand , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Male , Mortality , Neck , Parents
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765276

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Very large (20–25 mm) and giant (≥25 mm) intracranial aneurysms have an extremely poor natural course, and treatment of these aneurysms remains a challenge for endovascular and surgical strategies. This study was undertaken to describe our experiences of endosaccular treatment of very large and giant intracranial aneurysms with parent artery preservation. METHODS: From January 2005 to October 2016, twenty-four very large or giant aneurysms in 24 patients were treated by endosaccular coil embolization with parent artery preservation. Nine (37.5%) aneurysms were ruptured and 15 were unruptured, and of these 15, 11 were symptomatic cases and 4 were incidentally discovered. The cohort comprised 17 women and 7 men of mean age 58.5 years (range, 26–82). Mean aneurysm size was 26.0 mm (range, 20–39) and 13 of the 24 aneurysms were giant. RESULTS: Immediate angiographic results were complete occlusion in nine (37.5%) cases, remnant neck in six (25.0%), and remnant sac in nine (37.5%). Overall procedural related morbidity and mortality rates were 12.5% and 4.2%, respectively. Angiographic follow-up was available in 16 patients (66.7%). Mean and median follow-up periods were 27.2 (range, 2–77) and 10.5 months, respectively. In 12 cases (12/16, 75%) stable occlusion was achieved, four cases (4/16, 25%) had recanalized, and two of these were retreated with additional coiling. At clinical follow-up of the nine ruptured cases, three patients (33.3%) achieved a good clinical outcome (Glasgow outcome scale [GOS] score of 4 or 5), two (22.2%) a poor outcome (GOS score of 2 or 3), and four patients (44.4%) expired (GOS 1). On the other hand, of the 15 unruptured cases, 13 patients (86.7%) achieved a good clinical outcome (GOS 4 or 5), one patient a poor outcome (GOS score of 2 or 3), and one patient expired (GOS 1). CONCLUSION: The present study shows endosaccular treatment of very large or giant intracranial aneurysms with parent artery preservation is both feasible and effective with acceptable morbidity and mortality.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Arteries , Cohort Studies , Embolization, Therapeutic , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hand , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Male , Mortality , Neck , Parents
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-152708

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The semi-jailing technique (SJT) provides stent-assisted remodeling of the aneurysm neck during coil embolization without grasping the coil delivery microcatheter. We retrospectively evaluated the efficacy and safety of SJT using a Neuroform3 stent for coiling of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. METHODS: We collected the clinical and radiological data between January 2009 and June 2015 of the wide-necked aneurysms treated with SJT using a Neuroform3 stent. RESULTS: SJT using a Neuroform3 stent was attempted in 70 wide-necked aneurysms (68 patients). There were 56 unruptured and 14 ruptured aneurysms. The size of aneurysm ranged from 1.7 to 28.1 mm (mean 6.1 mm). The immediate angiographic results were complete occlusion in 55 aneurysms (78.6%), neck remnant in 7 (10.0%), and aneurysm remnant in 8 (11.4%). Overall, periprocedural complications occurred in 13 patients (19.1%), including asymptomatic thromboembolism in 7 (10.3%), symptomatic thromboembolism in 4 (5.9%), and symptomatic hemorrhagic complications in 2 (2.9%). Conventional angiography follow-up was obtained in 55 (78.6%) of 70 aneurysms (mean, 10.9 months). The result showed progressive occlusion in 7 aneurysms (12.7%) and recanalization in 1 aneurysm (1.8%). At the end of the observation period (mean, 17.5 months), all 54 patients without subarachnoid hemorrhage showed excellent clinical outcomes (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] 0), except two (mRS 1 or 2) and seven of 14 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage remained symptom-free (mRS 0). CONCLUSION: In this report of 70 aneurysms, SJT using a Neuroform3 stent for coiling of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms showed good technical safety, as well as favorable clinical and angiographic outcomes.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Aneurysm, Ruptured , Angiography , Embolization, Therapeutic , Follow-Up Studies , Hand Strength , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Neck , Retrospective Studies , Stents , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Thromboembolism
7.
Neurointervention ; : 10-17, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-730293

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and early outcomes of the Pipeline device for large/giant or fusiform aneurysms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Pipeline was implanted in a total of 45 patients (mean age, 58 years; M:F=10:35) with 47 large/giant or fusiform aneurysms. We retrospectively evaluated the characteristics of the treated aneurysms, the periprocedural events, morbidity and mortality, and the early outcomes after Pipeline implantation. RESULTS: The aneurysms were located in the internal carotid artery (ICA) cavernous segment (n=25), ICA intradural segment (n=11), vertebrobasilar trunk (n=8), and middle cerebral artery (n=3). Procedure-related events occurred in 18 cases, consisting of incomplete expansion (n=8), shortening-migration (n=5), transient occlusion of a jailed branch (n=3), and in-stent thrombosis (n=2). Treatment-related morbidity occurred in two patients, but without mortality. Both patients had modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores of 2, but had an improved mRS score of 0 at 1-month follow-up. Of the 19 patients presenting with mass effect, 16 improved but three showed no changes in their presenting symptoms. All patients had excellent outcomes (mRS, 0 or 1) during the follow-up period (median, 6 months; range, 2-30 months). Vascular imaging follow-up (n=31, 65.9%; median, 3 months, range, 1-25 months) showed complete or near occlusion of the aneurysm in 24 patients (77.4%) and decreased sac size in seven patients (22.6%). CONCLUSION: In this initial multicenter study in Korea, the Pipeline seemed to be safe and effective for large/giant or fusiform aneurysms. However, a learning period may be required to alleviate device-related events.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Carotid Artery, Internal , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Korea , Learning , Middle Cerebral Artery , Mortality , Retrospective Studies , Thrombosis
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-190400

ABSTRACT

A 59-year-old female presented with progressive right proptosis, chemosis and ocular pain. An imaging work-up including conventional catheter angiography showed a right-sided dural arteriovenous fistula of the cavernous sinus, which drained into the right superior petrosal sinus, right superior ophthalmic vein, and right inferior ophthalmic vein, and cortical venous reflux was seen via the right petrosal vein in the right posterior fossa. After failure of transvenous embolization, the patient underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS). At one month after GKRS, she developed increasing ocular pain and occipital headache. Repeat angiography showed partial obliteration of the fistula and loss of drainage via the superior and inferior ophthalmic veins with severe congestion, resulting in slow flow around the right cerebellar hemisphere. Prompt transarterial embolization relieved the patient's ocular symptoms and headache. We report on a case of paradoxical exacerbation of symptoms resulting from obstruction of the venous outflow after GKRS for treatment of a dural arteriovenous fistula of the cavernous sinus.


Subject(s)
Angiography , Catheters , Cavernous Sinus , Central Nervous System Vascular Malformations , Drainage , Estrogens, Conjugated (USP) , Exophthalmos , Female , Fistula , Headache , Humans , Middle Aged , Radiosurgery , Veins
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-58505

ABSTRACT

We describe a case of a huge intramural hematoma in a thrombosed middle cerebral artery aneurysm. A 47-year-old female patient with liver cirrhosis and thrombocytopenia presented to the neurosurgical unit with a 5-day history of headache and cognitive dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of the brain showed a thrombosed aneurysm located in the right middle cerebral artery with a posteriorly located huge intramural hematoma mimicking an intracerebral hematoma. Imaging studies and cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed no evidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Angiography showed a partially thrombosed aneurysm at the origin of the right anterior temporal artery and an incidental aneurysm at the bifurcation of the right middle cerebral artery. Both aneurysms were embolized by coiling. After embolization, the thrombosed aneurysmal sac and intramural hematoma had decreased in size 4 days later and almost completely disappeared 8 months later. This is the first reported case of a nondissecting, nonfusiform aneurysm with a huge intramural hematoma, unlike that of a dissecting aneurysm.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Aneurysm, Dissecting , Angiography , Brain , Cerebrospinal Fluid , Embolization, Therapeutic , Female , Headache , Hematoma , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Liver Cirrhosis , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Middle Aged , Middle Cerebral Artery , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Temporal Arteries , Thrombocytopenia
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-19661

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Anterior communicating artery (AcomA) aneurysms represent the most common intracranial aneurysms and challenging to treat due to complex vascularity. The purpose of this study was to report our experience of endovascular treatment of AcomA aneurysms. METHODS: Between January 2003 and December 2013, we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 134 AcomA aneurysm patients available more than 6 months conventional angiographic and clinical follow-up results. We focused on aneurismal or AcomA vascular characters, angiographic and clinical follow-up results, and retreatment. RESULTS: The rate of ruptured cases was 75.4%, and the small ( or =6 months was performed in all patients (mean 16.3 months) and major recanalization was noted in 6.7% and regrowth in one case. The aneurysm size (p=0.016), and initial treatment results (p=0.00) were statistically significant risk factors related to aneurysm recurrence. An overall improvement in mRS was observed during the clinical follow-up period and no rebleeding episode occurred. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that endovascular treatment is an effective treatment modality for AcomA aneurysms with low morbidity. Patients should take long term clinical and angiographic follow-up in order to assess the recurrence and warrant retreatment, especially ruptured, large, and initially incomplete occluded aneurysms.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Angiography , Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Arteries , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Medical Records , Recurrence , Retreatment , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-19659

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Aneurysms arising from the pericallosal artery (PA) are uncommon and challenging to treat. The aim of this study was to report our experiences of the endovascular treatment of ruptured PA aneurysms. METHODS: From September 2003 to December 2013, 30 ruptured PA aneurysms in 30 patients were treated at our institution via an endovascular approach. Procedural data, clinical and angiographic results were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Regarding immediate angiographic control, complete occlusion was achieved in 21 (70.0%) patients and near-complete occlusion in 9 (30.0%). Eight procedure-related complications occurred, including intraprocedural rupture and early rebleeding in three each, and thromboembolic event in two. At last follow-up, 18 patients were independent with a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0-2, and the other 12 were either dependent or had expired (mRS score, 3-6). Adjacent hematoma was found to be associated with an increased risk of poor clinical outcome. Seventeen of 23 surviving patients underwent follow-up conventional angiography (mean, 16.5 months). Results showed stable occlusion in 14 (82.4%), minor recanalization in two (11.8%), and major recanalization, which required recoiling, in one (5.9%). CONCLUSION: Our experiences demonstrate that endovascular treatment for a ruptured PA aneurysms is both feasible and effective. However, periprocedural rebleedings were found to occur far more often (20.0%) than is generally suspected and to be associated with preoperative contrast retention. Analysis showed existing adjacent hematoma is predictive of a poor clinical outcome.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Angiography , Arteries , Follow-Up Studies , Hematoma , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Retrospective Studies , Rupture
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-104539

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of emergent carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) for acute stroke due to athero-thrombotic occlusion of the cervical internal carotid artery (ICA). METHODS: Review of medical records identified 17 patients who underwent emergent CAS for treatment of athero-thrombotic occlusion of the cervical ICA with acute stroke between 2009 and 2013. Eleven patients (64.7%) presented with concomitant intracranial artery occlusion, which was treated primarily by mechanical thrombectomy after CAS. RESULTS: Successful revascularization of the cervical ICA with emergent CAS was achieved in all patients. After CAS, intracranial recanalization with Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction > or =2b flow was achieved in four of the 11 patients (36.4%). The overall recanalization rate (cervical ICA and intracranial artery) was 10 of 17 patients (58.8%). Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in two patients (11.8%), resulting in death. Ten patients (58.8%) showed improvement (decrease in NIHSS score of > or =4 points) at seven days after recanalization. Nine patients (52.9%) showed a favorable outcome (mRS < or =2) at the last follow-up. A favorable outcome (mRS < or =2) was obtained in four of the six patients with isolated cervical ICA occlusion (4/6, 66.7%) and five of 11 patients with intracranial tandem occlusion (5/11, 45.5%). CONCLUSION: Emergent CAS for acute stroke due to athero-thrombotic occusion of the cervical ICA showed a good technical feasibility and favorable clinical outcome.


Subject(s)
Angioplasty , Arteries , Carotid Artery, Internal , Cerebral Infarction , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages , Medical Records , Stents , Stroke , Thrombectomy
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-197740

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Aneurysms arising from the proximal segment of the anterior cerebral artery (A1) are rare and challenging to treat. The aim of this study was to report our experience with endovascular treatment of A1 Aneurysms. METHODS: From August 2007 through May 2012, eleven A1 aneurysms in eleven patients were treated endovascularly. Six aneurysms were unruptured and 5 were ruptured. One patient with an unruptured A1 aneurysm presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Procedural data, clinical and angiographic results were reviewed retrospectively. RESULTS: All of the aneurysms were successfully treated with coil embolization. Six were treated with a simple technique while the remaining 5 required adjunctive technique : double catheters (n=2), balloon-assisted (n=2), and stent-assisted (n=1). The immediate angiographic control showed a complete occlusion in all cases. Procedure-related complication occurred in only one patient : parent artery occlusion, which was not clinically significant. All patients had excellent clinical outcomes but one patient was discharged with a slight disability. No neurologic deterioration or bleeding was seen during the follow-up period in this cohort of patients. Follow-up angiography (mean, 20 months) was available in ten patients and revealed stable occlusion in all cases. CONCLUSION: Endovascular treatment is a feasible and effective therapeutic modality for A1 aneurysms. Tailored microcatheter shaping and/or adjunctive techniques are necessary for successful aneurysm embolization because of the projection and location of A1 aneurysms.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Angiography , Anterior Cerebral Artery , Arteries , Catheters , Cohort Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Hemorrhage , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Parents , Rupture , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-202348

ABSTRACT

Endovascular embolization is being increasingly used to treat intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, we experienced two patients with retained microcatheters after AVM embolization using Onyx.


Subject(s)
Arteriovenous Malformations , Humans , Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations
16.
Neurointervention ; : 85-92, 2012.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-730232

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Axium(TM) coils were developed to improve the durability of coil-embolized cerebral aneurysms by increasing packing density. The purpose of this prospective multicenter registry was to evaluate the safety and durability of Axium(TM) coils. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred twenty-six patients with 135 aneurysms of < or = 15 mm in size underwent coil embolization using bare platinum coils, with Axium(TM) coils constituting over 50% of the total coil length. Immediate and short-term follow-up results were prospectively registered and retrospectively evaluated. RESULTS: Of the 135 aneurysms (83 unruptured and 52 ruptured), immediate post-embolization angiography revealed complete occlusion in 80 aneurysms (59.3%), neck remnants in 47 (34.8%), and incomplete occlusion in 8 (5.9%). The mean packing density was 42.8% (range, 9.5 - 90%) with Axium(TM) coil length constituting a mean of 87.9% of total coil length. The rate of procedure-related complications was 16.3%. Procedure-related permanent morbidity and mortality rates were 3.2% and 0.8%, respectively. Follow-up catheter or MR angiography, which was available in 101 aneurysms at 6 - 15 months (mean, 7.7 months), revealed stable or improved occlusion in 95 aneurysms and worsening in 6 aneurysms (5.9%). Lower packing density (< 30%) remained the only predictor for anatomical worsening on multivariable logistic regression analysis (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: In this registry, Axium(TM) coils showed a relatively low rate of anatomical worsening on short-term follow-up imaging with an acceptable periprocedural safety profile compared to reports of other platinum coils. These results may warrant further study of long-term durability with Axium(TM) coils in larger populations.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Angiography , Catheters , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Logistic Models , Neck , Platinum , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-199084

ABSTRACT

Thalamoperforating artery aneurysms are rarely reported in the literature. We report an extremely rare case of ruptured distal anterior thalamoperforating artery aneurysm which was treated by endovascular obliteration in a patient with occlusion of both the internal carotid arteries (ICAs) : A 72-year-old woman presented with severe headache and loss of consciousness. Initial level of consciousness at the time of admission was drowsy and the Glasgow Coma Scale score was 14. Brain computed tomography (CT) scan was performed which revealed intracerebral hemorrhage in right basal ganglia, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and intraventricular hemorrhage. The location of the aneurysm was identified as within the globus pallidus on CT angiogram. Conventional cerebral angiogram demonstrated occlusion of both the ICAs just distal to the fetal type of posterior communicating artery and the aneurysm was arising from right anterior thalamoperforating artery (ATPA). A microcatheter was navigated into ATPA and the ATPA proximal to aneurysm was embolized with 20% glue. Post-procedural ICA angiogram demonstrated no contrast filling of the aneurysm sac. The patient was discharged without any neurologic deficit. Endovascular treatment of ATPA aneurysm is probably a more feasible and safe treatment modality than surgical clipping because of the deep seated location of aneurysm and the possibility of brain retraction injury during surgical operation.


Subject(s)
Adhesives , Aged , Aneurysm , Arteries , Basal Ganglia , Brain , Carotid Artery, Internal , Cerebral Hemorrhage , Consciousness , Female , Glasgow Coma Scale , Globus Pallidus , Headache , Hemorrhage , Humans , Neurologic Manifestations , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Surgical Instruments , Unconsciousness
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-113499

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The endovascular treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms is challenging. The stent-assisted coil embolization has facilitated treatment of such complex aneurysms. However, the single stent-assisted technique has a limitation for the wide-necked intracranial aneurysm at the arterial bifurcation. The Y-stent-assisted technique could be an alternative solution for these aneurysms. We present a case series where stent-assisted coil embolization where the Y-configuration stent was used. METHODS: Between January 2007 to December 2010, 8 wide-necked bifurcation aneurysms in 8 patients were treated with the Y-stent technique. Among the eight patients, there were six unruptured aneurysms and the remaining two patients presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Three out of eight aneurysms were located at the anterior communicating artery (ACOM), three at the top of the basilar artery (BA), one at the middle cerebral artery (MCA) bifurcation and one at the pericallosal artery. The size of aneurysm ranged from 3.6 mm to 28.2 mm (mean 8.7 mm, neck size from 3 to 7 mm). Four patients were female and aged ranged from 52 to 73 years. RESULTS: The Y-stent-assisted coil embolization was successfully performed in all 8 cases. The immediate angiographic results were complete occlusion in 7 cases with a remnant neck the remaining case. Angiographic follow-up was done in six patients and stable occlusion was confirmed in all aneurysms. Acute thromboembolism (TE) during the procedure occurred in 4 patients. There were one acute cerebral infarction due to distal coil migration and one delayed cerebral infarction due to in-stent thrombosis after 2 months. CONCLUSION: Traditionally microsurgery has been the treatment of choice for wide-necked intracranial aneurysms at the arterial bifurcation. However, with the advancement of new techniques and instruments for endovascular treatment, the Y-stent-assisted coil embolization seems to be a feasible treatment option for reconstruction of these complex aneurysms.


Subject(s)
Aged , Aneurysm , Arteries , Basilar Artery , Cerebral Infarction , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Microsurgery , Middle Cerebral Artery , Neck , Stents , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Thromboembolism , Thrombosis
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-48914

ABSTRACT

A 57-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of left oculomotor palsy. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a pseudoaneurysm of the left cavernous internal carotid artery (ICA) measuring 37x32 mm. The pseudoaneurysm was treated with a balloon expandable graft-stent to occlude the aneurysmal neck and preserve the parent artery. A post-procedure angiogram confirmed normal patency of the ICA and complete sealing of the aneurysmal neck with no opacification of the sac. After the procedure, the oculomotor palsy improved gradually, and had completely resolved 3 months after the procedure. A graft-stent can be an effective treatment for a pseudoaneurysm of the cavernous ICA with preservation of the parent artery.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Aneurysm, False , Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Arteries , Carotid Artery, Internal , Caves , Humans , Middle Aged , Neck , Paralysis , Parents
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-38524

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Stenting of symptomatic intracranial stenosis has recently become an alternative treatment modality. However, urgent intracranial stenting in patients with intracranial stenosis following a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or minor stroke is open to dispute. We sought to assess the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of urgent intracranial stenting for severe stenosis (>70%) in TIA or minor stroke patients. METHODS: Between June 2009 and October 2010, stent-assisted angioplasty by using a balloon-expandable coronary stent for intracranial severe stenosis (>70%) was performed in 7 patients after TIA and 5 patients after minor stroke (14 stenotic lesions). Technical success rates, complications, angiographic findings, and clinical outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS: Stenting was successful in all 12 patients. The mean time from symptom onset to stenting was 2.1 days (1-8 days). Post-procedural angiography showed restoration to a normal luminal diameter in all patients. In-stent thrombosis occurred in one patient (n=1, 8.3%), and was lysed with abciximab. No device-related complications, such as perforations or dissections at the target arteries or intracranial hemorrhaging, occurred in any patient. The mortality rate was 0%. No patient had an ischemic event over the mean follow-up period of 12.5 months (range, 7-21 months), and follow-up angiography (n=7) revealed no significant in-stent restenosis (>50%). CONCLUSION: Urgent recanalization with stenting is feasible, safe, and effective in patients with TIA or acute minor stroke with intracranial stenosis of > or =70%.


Subject(s)
Angiography , Angioplasty , Antibodies, Monoclonal , Arteries , Constriction, Pathologic , Dissent and Disputes , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments , Intracranial Arteriosclerosis , Ischemic Attack, Transient , Phenobarbital , Retrospective Studies , Stents , Stroke , Thrombosis
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