Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
Add filters








Language
Year range
1.
Journal of Stroke ; : 213-222, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-892943

ABSTRACT

Background@#and Purpose Previous studies have assessed the relationship between cerebral vessel tortuosity and intracranial aneurysm (IA) based on two-dimensional brain image analysis. We evaluated the relationship between cerebral vessel tortuosity and IA according to the hemodynamic location using three-dimensional (3D) analysis and studied the effect of tortuosity on the recurrence of treated IA. @*Methods@#We collected clinical and imaging data from patients with IA and disease-free controls. IAs were categorized into outer curvature and bifurcation types. Computerized analysis of the images provided information on the length of the arterial segment and tortuosity of the cerebral arteries in 3D space. @*Results@#Data from 95 patients with IA and 95 controls were analyzed. Regarding parent vessel tortuosity index (TI; P<0.01), average TI (P<0.01), basilar artery (BA; P=0.02), left posterior cerebral artery (P=0.03), both vertebral arteries (VAs; P<0.01), and right internal carotid artery (P<0.01), there was a significant difference only in the outer curvature type compared with the control group. The outer curvature type was analyzed, and the occurrence of an IA was associated with increased TI of the parent vessel, average, BA, right middle cerebral artery, and both VAs in the logistic regression analysis. However, in all aneurysm cases, recanalization of the treated aneurysm was inversely associated with increased TI of the parent vessels. @*Conclusions@#TIs of intracranial arteries are associated with the occurrence of IA, especially in the outer curvature type. IAs with a high TI in the parent vessel showed good outcomes with endovascular treatment.

2.
Journal of Stroke ; : 213-222, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-900647

ABSTRACT

Background@#and Purpose Previous studies have assessed the relationship between cerebral vessel tortuosity and intracranial aneurysm (IA) based on two-dimensional brain image analysis. We evaluated the relationship between cerebral vessel tortuosity and IA according to the hemodynamic location using three-dimensional (3D) analysis and studied the effect of tortuosity on the recurrence of treated IA. @*Methods@#We collected clinical and imaging data from patients with IA and disease-free controls. IAs were categorized into outer curvature and bifurcation types. Computerized analysis of the images provided information on the length of the arterial segment and tortuosity of the cerebral arteries in 3D space. @*Results@#Data from 95 patients with IA and 95 controls were analyzed. Regarding parent vessel tortuosity index (TI; P<0.01), average TI (P<0.01), basilar artery (BA; P=0.02), left posterior cerebral artery (P=0.03), both vertebral arteries (VAs; P<0.01), and right internal carotid artery (P<0.01), there was a significant difference only in the outer curvature type compared with the control group. The outer curvature type was analyzed, and the occurrence of an IA was associated with increased TI of the parent vessel, average, BA, right middle cerebral artery, and both VAs in the logistic regression analysis. However, in all aneurysm cases, recanalization of the treated aneurysm was inversely associated with increased TI of the parent vessels. @*Conclusions@#TIs of intracranial arteries are associated with the occurrence of IA, especially in the outer curvature type. IAs with a high TI in the parent vessel showed good outcomes with endovascular treatment.

3.
Korean Journal of Spine ; : 157-161, 2014.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-148283

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDS: Thymic carcinomas are very rare tumors that are often associated with extrathoracic metastasis to other organs. However, it is well known that thymic carcinomas rarely metastasize to the spine, and the prognosis, treatment, and natural course of this disease are not yet standardized. METHODS: We describe seven thymic carcinoma patients with spinal metastasis who were diagnosed and treated in our institute from January 2006 to December 2011. We performed surgical treatment and adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, in consideration of each individual disease's course, and we regularly followed up the patients. RESULTS: Of the seven patients, five were male and two were female. Six had metastases in the thoracic spine, and one had metastases in the lumbar spine. An extradural lesion was found in five patients, and two patients had both extradural and intradural lesions. The period from the primary diagnosis to spinal metastases varied widely (range, 1.23-14 years). After surgery, all patients showed an improvement of back pain and radicular pain. Two patients were lost to follow-up, but the other five maintained ambulatory function until their final follow-up. Four patients died because of pulmonary complications accompanied with the disease's progression. One patient died from uncontrolled brain metastases. After surgery, the median survival was 204+/-111.43 days. CONCLUSION: Because metastasis to the spine from thymic carcinoma is very rare, there are no treatment guidelines. Nevertheless, we suggest that appropriate surgical management of the metastatic lesion is necessary for the preservation of the patient's quality of life during survival.


Subject(s)
Back Pain , Brain , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Diagnosis , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Lost to Follow-Up , Male , Neoplasm Metastasis , Prognosis , Quality of Life , Spine , Thymoma
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-76402

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Meningioma is the second most common primary central nervous system neoplasm. In contrast, chordoid meningioma is rare; due to the paucity of cases, little is known about its clinical features or treatment outcomes. The objectives of this study were to describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes for patients with chordoid meningioma. METHODS: In total, 16 patients, with newly diagnosed chordoid meningioma who underwent surgical excision between 1999 and 2012 were included. We retrospectively evaluated the medical records, radiological findings, and pathological findings. The median follow-up period was 56.5 (range, 3-170) months. The MIB-1 labeling index ranged from 1 to 26.60% (median, 5.04). RESULTS: Simpson grade I, II, and III resections were performed in four, nine, and three patients, respectively. The overall recurrence rate was 37.5%. Overall progression-free survival (PFS) after resection was 94.7 months (95% CI=62.9-126.6). Of the 4 patients with Simpson grade I resection, recurrence occurred in one patient. Among the Simpson grade II and III resection groups, eight patients underwent adjuvant radiation therapy and they showed significantly longer PFS (121 months, 95% CI=82.1-159.9) than the patients who underwent surgery alone (40.5 months, 95% CI=9.6-71.3) by the log-rank test (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: Chordoid meningiomas are difficult to manage and have a high rate of recurrence. Complete resection of the tumor is a key determinant of better outcomes. Adjuvant radiation therapy is recommended, eparticulary when Simpson grade I resection was not achieved.


Subject(s)
Central Nervous System , Disease-Free Survival , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Medical Records , Meningioma , Recurrence , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-27593

ABSTRACT

Idiopathic hypertrophic spinal pachymeningitis (IHSP) is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disorder characterized by marked fibrosis of the spinal dura mater with unknown etiology. According to the location of the lesion, it might induce neurologic deficits by compression of spinal cord and nerve root. A 58-year old female with a 3-year history of progressive weakness in both lower extremities was referred to our institute. Spinal computed tomography (CT) scan showed an osteolytic lesion involving base of the C6 spinous process with adjacent epidural mass. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an epidural mass involving dorsal aspect of cervical spinal canal from C5 to C7 level, with low signal intensity on T1 and T2 weighted images and non-enhancement on T1 weighted-enhanced images. We decided to undertake surgical exploration. At the operation field, there was yellow colored, thickened fibrous tissue over the dura mater. The lesion was removed totally, and decompression of spinal cord was achieved. Symptoms improved partially after the operation. Histopathologically, fibrotic pachymeninges with scanty inflammatory cells was revealed, which was compatible with diagnosis of idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis. Six months after operation, motor power grade of both lower extremities was normal on physical examination. However, the patient still complained of mild weakness in the right lower extremity. Although the nature of IHSP is generally indolent, decompressive surgery should be considered for the patient with definite or progressive neurologic symptoms in order to prevent further deterioration. In addition, IHSP can present as an osteolytic lesion. Differential diagnosis with neoplastic disease, including giant cell tumor, is important.


Subject(s)
Decompression , Diagnosis , Diagnosis, Differential , Dura Mater , Female , Fibrosis , Giant Cell Tumors , Humans , Lower Extremity , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Meningitis , Neurologic Manifestations , Physical Examination , Spinal Canal , Spinal Cord
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-8769

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for perioptic lesions. METHODS: Thirty-eight patients with perioptic tumors were treated at our institute from May 2004 to December 2008. All patients had a lesion in close contact with the optic apparatus. Twenty-four of these patients had undergone surgical resection before fractionated GKRS. Radiation was delivered in four sessions with 12 hours intervals between sessions. The mean target volume was 3,851 mm3 and the median cumulative marginal dose was 20 Gy. The median follow-up was 38.2 months. Visual acuity and visual fields were analyzed according to visual impairment score using the German Ophthalmological Society guidelines. RESULTS: Tumor control was achieved in 35 (94.6%) of the 37 patients with available follow-up images. Progressive tumor growth was observed in two craniopharyngioma patients (5.4%). Favorable visual outcomes in the postoperative period were achieved in 94.7% of cases (36/38). Sixteen patients showed visual function after fractionated GKRS, twenty cases were stationary, and two patients showed visual function deterioration after GKRS. CONCLUSION: GKRS is a safe and effective alternative to either surgery or fractionated radiotherapy for selected benign lesions that are adjacent to the optic apparatus.


Subject(s)
Craniopharyngioma , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Postoperative Period , Radiosurgery , Radiotherapy , Vision Disorders , Visual Acuity , Visual Fields
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL