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1.
Archives of Plastic Surgery ; : 133-143, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-874248

ABSTRACT

Background@#Extensive research has been conducted on islet transplantation as a possible cure for diabetes. Islet transplantation in the liver via the portal vein has shown remarkable results, but numerous other recipient sites are currently being investigated. We aimed to show the effectiveness of using a muscle flap as a recipient site for islet transplantation. @*Methods@#Islet cells were harvested from 12 isogenic Lewis rats, and then diabetes was induced in another 12 isogenic Lewis rats by streptozotocin injection. In six rats, 3,000 islets were transplanted into gastrocnemius muscle flaps, and in the other six rats, the same number of islets were transplanted into the gastrocnemius muscle. The transplanted islet cell function between the two groups was compared by means of blood glucose tests, glucose tolerance tests, immunohistochemistry, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. @*Results@#In the muscle flap group, blood glucose levels significantly decreased after islet transplantation. Blood glucose levels were significantly different between the two groups at 3 weeks after transplantation. The muscle flap group showed nearly normoglycemic results upon the glucose tolerance test, whereas the muscle group was hyperglycemic. Immunohistochemical evaluation showed positive results against insulin and glucagon in biopsies of both groups, and the islet cell density was higher in the muscle flap group. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction results. @*Conclusions@#Our results suggest that muscle flaps are promising candidates for islet cell transplantation.

2.
Korean Journal of Head and Neck Oncology ; (2): 69-72, 2020.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-902106

ABSTRACT

We report a surgically challenging case of a large lipoma located from the temple, across the zygomatic region to the buccal area, resembling two different masses.An 82-year-old man presented with two persistently growing soft masses at his left temple and cheek. A computed tomographic scan revealed a single large radiolucent mass extending from the submuscular layer of the left temple crossing beneath the zygomatic arch to the buccal region, rather than two individual masses. Excision was performed through upper gingivobuccal and temporal incisions. The mass was dissected through both incisions, cut in half, and extracted from both sides.No complications were observed. The biopsy result was consistent with a lipoma. Four months later, the scars were inconspicuous, and the patient was satisfied.Considering the size, shape, and location, this is a rare and intriguing case. The bi-directional approach allowed for successful total excision without any complications, leaving inconspicuous scars.

3.
Archives of Craniofacial Surgery ; : 345-350, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897045

ABSTRACT

Background@#This study evaluated the efficacy of the endoscopic medial orbital wall repair by comparing it with the conventional transcaruncular method. This surgical approach differs from the established endoscopic technique in that we push the mesh inside the orbit rather than placing it over the defect. @*Methods@#We retrospectively reviewed 40 patients with isolated medial orbital blowout fractures who underwent medial orbital wall reconstruction. Twenty-six patients underwent endoscopic repair, and 14 patients underwent external repair. All patients had preoperative computed tomography scans taken to determine the defect size. Pre- and postoperative exophthalmometry, operation time, the existence of diplopia, and pain were evaluated and compared between the two methods. We present a case showing our procedure. @*Results@#The operation time was significantly shorter in the endoscopic group (44.7 minutes vs. 73.9 minutes, p= 0.035). The preoperative defect size, enophthalmos correction rate, and pain did not significantly differ between the two groups. All patients with preoperative diplopia, eyeball movement limitation, or enophthalmos had their symptoms resolved, except for one patient who had preexisting strabismus. @*Conclusion@#This study demonstrates that endoscopic medial orbital wall repair is not inferior to the transcaruncular method. The endoscopic approach seems to reduce the operation time, probably because the dissection process is shorter, and no wound repair is needed. Compared to the previous endoscopic method, our method is not complicated, and is more physiological. Larger scale studies should be performed for validation.

4.
Korean Journal of Head and Neck Oncology ; (2): 69-72, 2020.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-894402

ABSTRACT

We report a surgically challenging case of a large lipoma located from the temple, across the zygomatic region to the buccal area, resembling two different masses.An 82-year-old man presented with two persistently growing soft masses at his left temple and cheek. A computed tomographic scan revealed a single large radiolucent mass extending from the submuscular layer of the left temple crossing beneath the zygomatic arch to the buccal region, rather than two individual masses. Excision was performed through upper gingivobuccal and temporal incisions. The mass was dissected through both incisions, cut in half, and extracted from both sides.No complications were observed. The biopsy result was consistent with a lipoma. Four months later, the scars were inconspicuous, and the patient was satisfied.Considering the size, shape, and location, this is a rare and intriguing case. The bi-directional approach allowed for successful total excision without any complications, leaving inconspicuous scars.

5.
Archives of Craniofacial Surgery ; : 345-350, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-889341

ABSTRACT

Background@#This study evaluated the efficacy of the endoscopic medial orbital wall repair by comparing it with the conventional transcaruncular method. This surgical approach differs from the established endoscopic technique in that we push the mesh inside the orbit rather than placing it over the defect. @*Methods@#We retrospectively reviewed 40 patients with isolated medial orbital blowout fractures who underwent medial orbital wall reconstruction. Twenty-six patients underwent endoscopic repair, and 14 patients underwent external repair. All patients had preoperative computed tomography scans taken to determine the defect size. Pre- and postoperative exophthalmometry, operation time, the existence of diplopia, and pain were evaluated and compared between the two methods. We present a case showing our procedure. @*Results@#The operation time was significantly shorter in the endoscopic group (44.7 minutes vs. 73.9 minutes, p= 0.035). The preoperative defect size, enophthalmos correction rate, and pain did not significantly differ between the two groups. All patients with preoperative diplopia, eyeball movement limitation, or enophthalmos had their symptoms resolved, except for one patient who had preexisting strabismus. @*Conclusion@#This study demonstrates that endoscopic medial orbital wall repair is not inferior to the transcaruncular method. The endoscopic approach seems to reduce the operation time, probably because the dissection process is shorter, and no wound repair is needed. Compared to the previous endoscopic method, our method is not complicated, and is more physiological. Larger scale studies should be performed for validation.

6.
Annals of Coloproctology ; : 155-162, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-830395

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Choosing the appropriate antibiotic is important for treatment of complicated appendicitis. However, increasing multidrug resistant bacteria have been a serious problem for successful treatment. This study was designed to identify bacteria isolated from patients with complicated appendicitis and reveal their susceptibilities for antibiotics and their relationship with patient clinical course. @*Methods@#This study included patients diagnosed with complicated appendicitis and examined the bacterial cultures and antimicrobial susceptibilities of the isolates. Data were retrospectively collected from medical records of Kangbuk Samsung Hospital from January 2008 to February 2018. @*Results@#The common bacterial species cultured in complicated appendicitis were as follows: Escherichia coli (n=113, 48.9%), Streptococcus spp. (n=29, 12.6%), Pseudomonas spp. (n=23, 10.0%), Bacteriodes spp. (n=22, 9.5%), Klebsiella (n=11, 4.8%), and Enterococcus spp. (n=8, 3.5%). In antibiotics susceptibility testing, the positive rate of extended-spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) was 9.1% (21 of 231). The resistance rate to carbapenem was 1.7% (4 of 231), while that to vancomycin was 0.4% (1 of 231). E. coli was 16.8% ESBL positive (19 of 113) and had 22.1% and 19.5% resistance rates to cefotaxime and ceftazidime, respectively. Inappropriate empirical antibiotic treatment (IEAT) occurred in 55 cases (31.8%) and was significantly related with organ/space surgical site infection (SSI) (7 of 55, P=0.005). @*Conclusion@#The rate of antibiotic resistance organisms was high in community-acquired complicated appendicitis in Koreans. Additionally, IEAT in complicated appendicitis may lead to increased rates of SSI. Routine intraoperative culture in patients with complicated appendicitis may be an effective strategy for appropriate antibiotic regimen.

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