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1.
Palliative Care Research ; : 231-239, 2021.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-887231

ABSTRACT

Methadone is a difficult medicine to assess the efficacy at an initial stage because the blood concentration of it varies greatly among individuals and it takes days to reach a steady state and cannot be increased for 7 days. Nevertheless, there are few reports of blood concentration together with effects after administration of methadone about Japanese cancer patients. In this study, we investigated changes in blood concentration and pain score (NRS), and factors that affect blood concentration. Dose per body weight was only correlated with blood concentration of methadone. In the effective cases, NRS decreased chronologically until the 7th day after treatment initiation, and significantly decreased from the 1st day compared to before treatment initiation, but in the ineffective cases, it tended to decrease until the 3rd day, but there was no change thereafter. The blood concentration increased to 110 ng/ml on the 7th day in the effective cases, and in the ineffective cases, it reached the concentration on the 3rd day. Thus there was no correlation between the blood concentration and the drug efficacy. The individual blood concentrations tended to increase slightly or decrease after the 3rd day, but in only one case, it continued to increase. From the above-mentioned, it was shown that the effect could be judged at an early stage, however, since there was a case in which the blood concentration continued to rise until the 7th day, it was considered that the early dose increase within 7 days after initiation should be performed carefully.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-913221

ABSTRACT

  Background: This study aimed to clarify the effects of bathing on cardiovascular and psychological responses during winter and summer, focusing on three different time points (immediately after entering the bathtub, during bathing, and immediately after leaving the bathtub).   Methods: Ten young (29.6 ± 1.5 years) individuals were asked to bathe for 20 min with 40℃ hot water in summer and with 42℃ hot water in winter. The room temperature and humidity in winter were 20.1℃ and 56.7%, while those in summer were 27.0℃ and 58.3%, respectively. Tympanic temperature (Tty) was measured using a thermistor thermometer; systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP) and heart rate (HR) were measured using an auto-sphygmomanometer, and double product (DP) was calculated using the value of HR multiplied by SBP value. Subjective thermal and comfortable sensations were evaluated using a seven-point rating scale.   Results: Results showed a significant increases in SBP values in both seasons immediately after bathing. In winter, DP increased significantly after bathing. Meanwhile, no significant differences were observed in all parameters immediately after bathing between winter and summer. On the contraly, significant differences were observed in Tty, HR, and DP value between winter and summer during bathing. HR and DP values in winter were significantly lower than those in summer immediately after leaving the bathtub. A relationship between thermal sensation and comfortable sensation was observed in both seasons, but the strength of the relationship was more relevant in summer than in winter.   Conclusion: The effects of bathing in 42℃ hot water on the cardiovascular system in winter are greater than those in 40℃ hot water in summer. The high temperature of the bath water may not produce as much discomfort during winter than that during summer, therefore bathing time may be longer.

3.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-826197

ABSTRACT

  In the health resorts of Germany, the empirical effects of the unique natural capital and environment on humans are verified by scientific methods such as medicine, meteorology, and chemistry, and then approved as therapeutic drugs. Natural capital is provided in various forms for the maintenance of health, treatment of diseases, and recovery from fatigue and stress. Natural capital include hot springs, natural gases, and peloid (from the soil), as well as climate and oceans. The categorization of health resorts is defined by the type and quality of natural capital available. Due to their unique characteristics, a system that allows users to select the health resorts that suit their specific needs has been established, enabling them to utilize natural capital effectively for health promotion.  Considering the current state of Japan, country with an abundance of natural capital that is considered underutilized, we visited Bad Homburg and six health resorts located in Germany’s Black Forest located in the southwestern part of the country to learn about the current state of their health resorts.  All the health resorts we visited were excellent centers certified by the German Spas Association and German Tourism Association. Bad Wildbad and Keidel Mineral-Thermalbad, both thermal health resorts, maintain the provision structure for medical treatment and tourism. Against a background of growing interest in the environment, they utilize the land and natural capital to their advantage by incorporating the elements of trendiness, fun, and excitement to revitalize the local and the health resorts’ communities.  Due to the differences in the structure, environment, and systems between the hot springs in Japan and those in Germany, it would not be easy to apply the current state of the German health resorts to similar resorts in Japan. However, Japan is rich in natural environments such as forests and hot springs and is blessed with a quantity and diversity comparable to that of Germany’s Black Forest. Therefore, we believe that there is potential for further utilization of Japan’s natural capital for health promotion. The efforts of the German health resorts could direct and inspire us.

4.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-873958

ABSTRACT

  In the health resorts of Germany, the empirical effects of the unique natural capital and environment on humans are verified by scientific methods such as medicine, meteorology, and chemistry, and then approved as therapeutic drugs. Natural capital is provided in various forms for the maintenance of health, treatment of diseases, and recovery from fatigue and stress. Natural capital include hot springs, natural gases, and peloid (from the soil), as well as climate and oceans. The categorization of health resorts is defined by the type and quality of natural capital available. Due to their unique characteristics, a system that allows users to select the health resorts that suit their specific needs has been established, enabling them to utilize natural capital effectively for health promotion.  Considering the current state of Japan, country with an abundance of natural capital that is considered underutilized, we visited Bad Homburg and six health resorts located in Germany’s Black Forest located in the southwestern part of the country to learn about the current state of their health resorts.  All the health resorts we visited were excellent centers certified by the German Spas Association and German Tourism Association. Bad Wildbad and Keidel Mineral-Thermalbad, both thermal health resorts, maintain the provision structure for medical treatment and tourism. Against a background of growing interest in the environment, they utilize the land and natural capital to their advantage by incorporating the elements of trendiness, fun, and excitement to revitalize the local and the health resorts’ communities.  Due to the differences in the structure, environment, and systems between the hot springs in Japan and those in Germany, it would not be easy to apply the current state of the German health resorts to similar resorts in Japan. However, Japan is rich in natural environments such as forests and hot springs and is blessed with a quantity and diversity comparable to that of Germany’s Black Forest. Therefore, we believe that there is potential for further utilization of Japan’s natural capital for health promotion. The efforts of the German health resorts could direct and inspire us.

5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-837446

ABSTRACT

  Background: This study aimed to clarify the effects of bathing on cardiovascular and psychological responses during winter and summer, focusing on three different time points (immediately after entering the bathtub, during bathing, and immediately after leaving the bathtub).   Methods: Ten young (29.6±1.5 years) individuals were asked to bathe for 20 min with 40°C hot water in summer and with 42°C hot water in winter. The room temperature and humidity in winter were 20.1°C and 56.7%, while those in summer were 27.0°C and 58.3%, respectively. Tympanic temperature (Tty) was measured using a thermistor thermometer; systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP) and heart rate (HR) were measured using an auto-sphygmomanometer, and double product (DP) was calculated using the value of HR multiplied by SBP value. Subjective thermal and comfortable sensations were evaluated using a seven-point rating scale.   Results: Results showed a significant increases in SBP values in both seasons immediately after bathing. In winter, DP increased significantly after bathing. Meanwhile, no significant differences were observed in all parameters immediately after bathing between winter and summer. On the contraly, significant differences were observed in Tty, HR, and DP value between winter and summer during bathing. HR and DP values in winter were significantly lower than those in summer immediately after leaving the bathtub. A relationship between thermal sensation and comfortable sensation was observed in both seasons, but the strength of the relationship was more relevant in summer than in winter.   Conclusion: The effects of bathing in 42°C hot water on the cardiovascular system in winter are greater than those in 40°C hot water in summer. The high temperature of the bath water may not produce as much discomfort during winter than that during summer, therefore bathing time may be longer.

6.
Asia Pacific Allergy ; (4): e5-2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-750169

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have reported that exposure to paraben (Pb) and triclosan (TCS) is associated with allergies. However, Pb and TCS exposure in the Japanese population is not fully understood. OBJECTIVES: The present study was aimed to examine such exposure among Japanese individuals with allergic diseases. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire survey to evaluate allergic outcomes and the collection of urine samples to examine Pb and TCS exposure. RESULTS: Pb containing daily commodities was used in 84.8% children. Pb use was positively associated with current atopic dermatitis (adjusted odds ratio, 4.61; 95% confidence interval, 1.23–17.3). Urinary Pb concentrations were increased significantly in those with current atopic dermatitis (AD) (median, 4.58 vs. 0; p < 0.0001), and showed an increased tendency in those with current wheeze (median, 3.45 vs. 1.81; p = 0.0535) in participants ≤15 years old. Urinary TCS concentration was under the limit of detection in all children. CONCLUSION: Urinary levels of Pb were associated with current AD in children. We should pay more attention about Pb and TCS.


Subject(s)
Asian Continental Ancestry Group , Asthma , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dermatitis, Atopic , Humans , Hypersensitivity , Limit of Detection , Odds Ratio , Respiratory Sounds , Triclosan
7.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-688371

ABSTRACT

  【Introduction】One of the effects of the hot spring provides worm temperature. This effect raises temperature, and temperature control function operates and causes increase of the bloodstream. This time, these changes examined the thing by the size of the bathtub and the spring quality of the hot spring.   【Subjects and Methods】The subjects were 10 healthy adult men (mean age: 25.2 years). They bathed for 10 min in bathtubs at 42°C. The enforcement used plunge bath (approximately 1,700 L: simple alkaline hot spring) and home bathtub (approximately 300 L: hot water, 0.1% artificially chlorinated spring). Measurement item of the maximum arterial blood flow rate using the Ultrasonic Rheometer Smart Doppler 45, deep body temperature using the deep body temperature monitor core temperature CM-210, I compared each value 10 min during the bathing, and during a 10-min, 20-min, 30-min resting period after bathing, furthermore, I found the conjugation on each condition resting period after bathing.   【Result】The rise in deep body temperature and maximum arterial blood flow rate showed the result that a hot spring of the plunge bath was more meaningful than the value of the home bathtub after 10 min of bathing. The deep body temperature of the hot spring of the plunge bath significantly rose from bathing 3 min after. In deep body temperature with the resting period after bathing, in the hot spring of the plunge bath, a meaningful rise was maintained in hot water 13 min for population chloride spring 16 min of the home bathtub for 15 min.  【Discussion】In thinks that a population spring let you maintain a temperature rise that it disturbs a drop of the water temperature by abundant quantity of water in the plunge bath that hot spring plunge bath had a bigger deep body temperature rise, maximum arterial blood flow rate than home bathtub, and the deep body temperature rise in the home bathtub was continued.

8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-379269

ABSTRACT

<p><b>Objectives</b>: Radon is a major feature of radioactive springs. According to an official notification article in Japan, bathing in radioactive springs may alleviate the effects of hyperuricemia (gout), rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. This study focuses on changes in the body during the use of a low-temperature sauna at a radioactive hot spring.</p><p><b>Methods</b>: In this study, we measured the core temperature, skin temperature, and skin blood flow, and performed an emotional assessment (Mood Check List-Short form.2 (MCL-S.2), Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and Numerical Rating Scale (NRS)) in individuals using a sauna at a radioactive spring. Eight healthy adults participated in this study. All participants partook in two sauna interventions, including one sauna with a high radon concentration (approximately 710 Bq/m<sup>3</sup>) and one with a low radon concentration (approximately 140 Bq/m<sup>3</sup>). The indoor temperature and relative humidity of the sauna room were approximately 38°C and 78%, respectively. All participants remained in the sauna room for 40 min, and then rested in an antechamber for 40 min.</p><p><b>Results and Discussion</b>: Comparing the MCL-S.2 scores, a significant increase was observed in the pleasantness score in the radon intervention. In addition, after comparing the VAS scores, significant improvements in the feelings of coldness and stress were observed only in the radon intervention. Moreover, skin blood flow increased for a longer duration in the radon sauna intervention than the control intervention. The results suggest that using radon saunas gives rise to positive effects, including reducing coldness, feelings of stress, and promoting blood circulation.</p>

9.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-379268

ABSTRACT

<p>  Komono Town is a well-known spa and health resort in Mie Prefecture. Komono Town has been seeking ways to promote the activities of hot spring area and health resources in surrounding areas. As part of these efforts, Komono Town has developed town-walk programs to promote the health of local residents. In this study, focusing on effect of walking on relaxation, we compared levels of stress hormones and emotional scores obtained before and after walking.</p><p>  After giving their informed consent, adult participated in two walking programs, each for a distance of approximately 7 km. Salivary cortisol levels were measured before and after intervention. In addition, the Mood Check List-Short form. 2 (MCL-S.2) and a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) were used to rate emotions before and after intervention.</p><p>  In both programs, walking tended to lower levels of salivary cortisol than resting. Low levels of cortisol, an adrenocortical hormone released during a state of predominantly sympathetic nervous activity, are thought to reflect mental relaxation; our result implies that the walking program enhanced relaxation in subjects. In addition, both MCL-S.2 and VAS rating showed that the subjects tended to feel better, more relaxed and less anxious after intervention. </p><p>  These findings suggest that the walking programs are beneficial human body thorough, for example, enhanced relaxation.</p>

10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-689415

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Radon is a major feature of radioactive springs. According to an official notification article in Japan, bathing in radioactive springs may alleviate the effects of hyperuricemia (gout), rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. This study focuses on changes in the body during the use of a low-temperature sauna at a radioactive hot spring.Methods: In this study, we measured the core temperature, skin temperature, and skin blood flow, and performed an emotional assessment (Mood Check List-Short form.2 (MCL-S.2), Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and Numerical Rating Scale (NRS)) in individuals using a sauna at a radioactive spring. Eight healthy adults participated in this study. All participants partook in two sauna interventions, including one sauna with a high radon concentration (approximately 710 Bq/m3) and one with a low radon concentration (approximately 140 Bq/m3). The indoor temperature and relative humidity of the sauna room were approximately 38°C and 78%, respectively. All participants remained in the sauna room for 40 min, and then rested in an antechamber for 40 min.Results and Discussion: Comparing the MCL-S.2 scores, a significant increase was observed in the pleasantness score in the radon intervention. In addition, after comparing the VAS scores, significant improvements in the feelings of coldness and stress were observed only in the radon intervention. Moreover, skin blood flow increased for a longer duration in the radon sauna intervention than the control intervention. The results suggest that using radon saunas gives rise to positive effects, including reducing coldness, feelings of stress, and promoting blood circulation.

11.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-689414

ABSTRACT

  Komono Town is a well-known spa and health resort in Mie Prefecture. Komono Town has been seeking ways to promote the activities of hot spring area and health resources in surrounding areas. As part of these efforts, Komono Town has developed town-walk programs to promote the health of local residents. In this study, focusing on effect of walking on relaxation, we compared levels of stress hormones and emotional scores obtained before and after walking.  After giving their informed consent, adult participated in two walking programs, each for a distance of approximately 7 km. Salivary cortisol levels were measured before and after intervention. In addition, the Mood Check List-Short form. 2 (MCL-S.2) and a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) were used to rate emotions before and after intervention.  In both programs, walking tended to lower levels of salivary cortisol than resting. Low levels of cortisol, an adrenocortical hormone released during a state of predominantly sympathetic nervous activity, are thought to reflect mental relaxation; our result implies that the walking program enhanced relaxation in subjects. In addition, both MCL-S.2 and VAS rating showed that the subjects tended to feel better, more relaxed and less anxious after intervention.   These findings suggest that the walking programs are beneficial human body thorough, for example, enhanced relaxation.

12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-379271

ABSTRACT

<p><b>Obj</b><b>ectives:</b> Radon is a major feature of radioactive springs. According to an official notification article in Japan, bathing in radioactive springs may alleviate the effects of hyperuricemia (gout), rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. This study focuses on changes in the body during the use of a low-temperature sauna at a radioactive hot spring.</p><p><b>Methods:</b> In this study, we measured the core temperature, skin temperature, and skin blood flow, and performed an emotional assessment (Mood Check List-Short form.2 (MCL-S.2), Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and Numerical Rating Scale (NRS)) in individuals using a sauna at a radioactive spring. Eight healthy adults participated in this study. All participants partook in two sauna interventions, including one sauna with a high radon concentration (approximately 710Bq/m<sup>3</sup>) and one with a low radon concentration (approximately 140Bq/m<sup>3</sup>). The indoor temperature and relative humidity of the sauna room were approximately 38°C and 78%, respectively. All participants remained in the sauna room for 40 min, and then rested in an antechamber for 40 min.</p><p><b>Results and Discussion:</b> Comparing the MCL-S.2 scores, a significant increase was observed in the pleasantness score in the radon intervention. In addition, after comparing the VAS scores, significant improvements in the feelings of coldness and stress were observed only in the radon intervention. Moreover, skin blood flow increased for a longer duration in the radon sauna intervention than the control intervention. The results suggest that using radon saunas gives rise to positive effects, including reducing coldness, feelings of stress, and promoting blood circulation.</p>

13.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-379265

ABSTRACT

<p>  Komono Town is a well-known spa and health resort in Mie Prefecture. Komono Town has been seeking ways to promote the activities of hot spring area and health resources in surrounding areas. As part of these efforts, Komono Town has developed town-walk programs to promote the health of local residents. In this study, focusing on effect of walking on relaxation, we compared levels of stress hormones and emotional scores obtained before and after walking.</p><p>  After giving their informed consent, adult participated in two walking programs, each for a distance of approximately 7 km. Salivary cortisol levels were measured before and after intervention. In addition, the Mood Check List-Short form. 2 (MCL-S.2) and a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) were used to rate emotions before and after intervention.</p><p>  In both programs, walking tended to lower levels of salivary cortisol than resting. Low levels of cortisol, an adrenocortical hormone released during a state of predominantly sympathetic nervous activity, are thought to reflect mental relaxation; our result implies that the walking program enhanced relaxation in subjects. In addition, both MCL-S.2 and VAS rating showed that the subjects tended to feel better, more relaxed and less anxious after intervention. </p><p>  These findings suggest that the walking programs are beneficial human body thorough, for example, enhanced relaxation.</p>

14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-375266

ABSTRACT

<b>Objective: </b>Oral mucositis is one of the serious and frequent acute side effects due to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for head and neck cancer.  In this study, we prepared an oral rinse as a hospital preparation for the treatment of oral mucositis, which was a suspension of polaprezinc (PZ), a zinc-containing therapeutic agent for gastric ulcer, in carboxyvinyl polymer (CP), a water-soluble large molecule.<br><b>Methods: </b>We carried out stability tests of the PZ-CP oral rinse, and investigated its effects on the radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients who received CRT for head and neck cancer.<br><b>Results: </b>In the stability test, the pH, viscosity, adhesion and PZ content in the preparations did not change throughout 28 days after preparation.  In the clinical evaluation on the basis of the distribution of the Grade of oral mucositis, the Grade of oral mucositis in the PZ group was significantly lower than in the control group at 6 and 7 weeks (<i>p</i>=0.016, <i>p</i>=0.018).  The incidence of severe oral mucositis of Grade 3 was 15.0% (3 cases) in the PZ group and 41.7% (10 cases) in the control group at 6 weeks, and was 15.0% (3 cases) in the PZ group and 33.3% (8 cases) in the control group at 7 weeks.<br><b>Conclusion: </b>These results suggest that PZ-CP oral rinse inhibits the aggravation of oral mucositis induced by CRT or promotes its healing.

15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-374947

ABSTRACT

<b>Objective: </b>In The Hospital of Hyogo College of Medicine, a oral rinse containing polaprezinc (PZ), a zinc-containing drug for gastric ulcers, was used as a hospital preparation to treat radiotherapy-related oral mucositis, and its efficacy was reported.  However, the dispersibility of PZ for carboxymethylcellulose sodium (CMC), which was used as the base of the oral rinse, was unfavorable, raising an issue.  In this study, we newly prepared a PZ oral rinse containing carboxyvinyl polymer (CP) as a base, and examined its usefulness.<br><b>Methods: </b>A questionnaire survey regarding the usefulness involving 10 healthy volunteers and a pharmaceutical test were conducted.<br><b>Results: </b>The results of the questionnaire survey showed that the optimal concentration of CP was 0.5%.  There were no serial changes in the pH, adhesiveness, or PZ content for 7 days after preparation.  Furthermore, there were no differences between CMC and CP.  The dispersibility of PZ in the oral rinse containing CP as a base was more favorable than that in the oral rinse containing CMC.<br><b>Conclusion: </b>The results of this study suggest that the PZ oral rinse containing 0.5% CP as a base is useful, and that its stability is similar to that of the oral rinse containing CMC as a base.

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