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1.
Journal of the Korean Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons ; : 63-67, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-926228

ABSTRACT

Controversies exist regarding the need for prophylactic extraction of mandibular third molars in patients who plan to undergo orthognathic surgery.An 18-year-old male patient was diagnosed with mandibular prognathism and maxillary retrognathism with mild facial asymmetry. He had a severely damaged mandibular first molar and a horizontally impacted third molar. After extraction of the first molar, the second molar was protracted into the first molar space, and the third molar erupted into the posterior line of occlusion. The orthognathic surgery involved clockwise rotation of the maxillomandibular complex as well as angle shaving and chin border trimming. Patients who are missing or have damaged mandibular molars should be monitored for eruption of third molars to replace the missing posterior tooth regardless of the timing of orthognathic surgery.

2.
Journal of the Korean Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons ; : 233-236, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-893054

ABSTRACT

A mandibular continuity defect can be repaired using either a prosthetic device or autogenous bone. A titanium reconstruction plate can be used with a localized or vascularized flap over the defect of the mandible. Unfortunately, the plate may fail due to plate exposure, screw loosening, fracture, or infection, and will need to be removed. Plate exposure though the skin or mucosa is one of the main reasons for failure. In the present work, the authors introduced a lingually positioned reconstruction plate fabricated via three-dimensional printed bending support. This custom reconstruction plate can avoid plate re-exposure as well as reduce surgical errors and operation time.

3.
Journal of the Korean Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons ; : 233-236, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-900758

ABSTRACT

A mandibular continuity defect can be repaired using either a prosthetic device or autogenous bone. A titanium reconstruction plate can be used with a localized or vascularized flap over the defect of the mandible. Unfortunately, the plate may fail due to plate exposure, screw loosening, fracture, or infection, and will need to be removed. Plate exposure though the skin or mucosa is one of the main reasons for failure. In the present work, the authors introduced a lingually positioned reconstruction plate fabricated via three-dimensional printed bending support. This custom reconstruction plate can avoid plate re-exposure as well as reduce surgical errors and operation time.

4.
Maxillofacial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery ; : 21-2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-918475

ABSTRACT

Objectives@#The purpose of this study was to investigate the condylar morphology and position of Koreans using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Analyzing the mean values of this study with reference to left and right sides, gender, and age will help to understand the size of the condyle and glenoid fossa, condylar morphology, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) symmetry for establishing the standard temporomandibular joint structures of Koreans and then design the standard temporomandibular joint prosthesis for Koreans. @*Results@#There was no significant result in the condyle size, condyle axis angle, joint space, fossa depth, and mandibular body size between the left and right sides (p > 0.05). On the other hand, the mediolateral width of the condyle and mandibular body size show significantly different with the gender (P < 0.05). Also, significant differences were found in condyle size, joint space, fossa depth, and mandibular body size according to age groups (P < 0.05). @*Conclusions@#Condylar position and morphology vary according to side, age, and gender. The results of this study are expected to help in customizing a treatment for the patients who need TMJ reconstruction by predicting the TMJ morphology according to age and gender and design the standard temporomandibular joint prosthesis for the Koreans.

5.
Maxillofacial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery ; : 6-2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-741574

ABSTRACT

The publication of this article unfortunately contained several mistakes.


Subject(s)
Humans , Orthognathic Surgery , Publications , Snoring
6.
Maxillofacial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery ; : 22-2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-44059

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Two-jaw surgery including mandibular and maxillary backward movement procedures are commonly performed to correct class III malocclusion. Bimaxillary surgery can reposition the maxillofacial bone together with soft tissue, such as the soft palate and the tongue base. We analyzed changes of pharyngeal airway narrowing to ascertain clinical correlations with the prevalence of snoring after two-jaw surgery. METHODS: A prospective clinical study was designed including a survey on snoring and three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) in class III malocclusion subjects before and after bimaxillary surgery. We conducted an analysis on changes of the posterior pharyngeal space find out clinical correlations with the prevalence of snoring. RESULTS: Among 67 subjects, 12 subjects complained about snoring 5 weeks after the surgical correction, and examining the 12 subjects after 6 months, 6 patients complained about the snoring. The current findings demonstrated the attenuation of the largest transverse width (LTW), anteroposterior length (APL), and cross-sectional area (CSA) following bimaxillary surgery given to class III malocclusion patients, particularly at the retropalatal level. The average distance of maxillary posterior movements were measured to be relatively higher (horizontal distance 3.9 mm, vertical distance 2.6 mm) in case of new snorers. CONCLUSIONS: This study found that bimaxillary surgery could lead to the narrowing of upper airway at the retropalatal or retroglossal level as well as triggering snoring in subjects with class III malocclusion. Based on the current clinical findings, we also found that upper airway narrowing at retropalatal level may contribute to increasing the probability of snoring and that polysonography may need to be performed before orthognathic surgery in subjects with class III malocclusion.


Subject(s)
Humans , Clinical Study , Malocclusion , Orthognathic Surgery , Palate, Soft , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive , Snoring , Tongue
7.
Journal of the Korean Association of Maxillofacial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons ; : 470-476, 2006.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-784706
8.
Journal of the Korean Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons ; : 189-199, 2006.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-46443

ABSTRACT

<0.05). 4. Histologic examination revealed that AM protected leukocyte infiltration and epithelial migration was nearly completed at 4 weeks. Terudermis(R) group showed mild neutrophil infiltration until 2 weeks and completion of epithelization at 4 weeks. Control group showed massive leukocyte infiltration until 4 weeks. 5. Microvessels were increased sharply at 1 week and control group at 1 and 4 week showed significant differences with Terudermis(R) group of same interval(p<0.05) but no differences were found with AM group(p<0.05). CONCLUSION: EGF and EGF-R were well preserved in freeze-dried AM. AM attached to collagen acted as excellent biologic dressing which had similar effect with Terudermis(R). AM showed anti-inflammatory action and healing was completed at 4 weeks after full-thickness skin defect.


Subject(s)
Animals , Rats , Amnion , Bandages , Biological Dressings , Collagen , Epidermal Growth Factor , Leukocytes , Microvessels , Neutrophil Infiltration , Skin , Wound Healing , Wounds and Injuries
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