Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 42
Filter
1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-925679

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Analysis of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in blood could allow noninvasive genetic analysis of primary tumors. Although there have been unmet needs for noninvasive methods in patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), it is still not determined whether plasma ctDNA analysis could be useful for patients with PCNSL. @*Materials and Methods@#Targeted deep sequencing of 54 genes was performed in cell-free DNA isolated from plasma samples collected pretreatment, during treatment, and at the end of treatment in 42 consecutively diagnosed PCNSL patients between January 2017 and December 2018. @*Results@#Targeted sequencing of plasma cell-free DNA detected somatic mutations representing ctDNA in 11 cases (11/41, 27%). The detection of ctDNA was not related to the concentration of cell-free DNA or tumor volume. The mutation profiles of these 11 cases varied between patients. The most frequently mutated gene was PIM1 (4/11, 36.4%), whereas KMT2D, PIK3CA, and MYD88 were each observed in three patients (3/11, 27%). The mutations of 13 genes were concordantly found in primary tumor tissue and plasma ctDNA, giving a detection sensitivity of 45%. During the serial tracking of seven patients with complete response, the disappearance of ctDNA mutations was found in four patients, whereas three patients had detected ctDNA mutation at the end of treatment. @*Conclusion@#The plasma ctDNA mutation analysis still has limited value for surveillance and predicting treatment outcomes of PCNSL because the detection efficiency was lower than other systemic lymphomas. Thus, analytical platforms should be improved to overcome anatomical hurdles associated with PCNSL.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-913820

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#We investigated the feasibility of using an anatomically localized, target-enriched liquid biopsy (TLB) in mouse models of lung cancer. @*Materials and Methods@#After irradiating xenograft mouse with human lung cancer cell lines, H1299 (NRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase [NRAS] Q61K) and HCC827 (epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR] E746-750del), circulating (cell-free) tumor DNA (ctDNA) levels were monitored with quantitative polymerase chain reaction on human long interspersed nuclear element-1 and cell line-specific mutations. We checked dose-dependency at 6, 12, or 18 Gy to each tumor-bearing mouse leg using 6-MV photon beams. We also analyzed ctDNA of lung cancer patients by LiquidSCAN, a targeted deep sequencing to validated the clinical performances of TLB method. @*Results@#Irradiation could enhance the detection sensitivity of NRAS Q61K in the plasma sample of H1299-xenograft mouse to 4.5- fold. While cell-free DNA (cfDNA) level was not changed at 6 Gy, ctDNA level was increased upon irradiation. Using double-xenograft mouse with H1299 and HCC827, ctDNA polymerase chain reaction analysis with local irradiation in each region could specify mutation type matched to transplanted cell types, proposing an anatomically localized, TLB. Furthermore, when we performed targeted deep sequencing of cfDNA to monitor ctDNA level in 11 patients with lung cancer who underwent radiotherapy, the average ctDNA level was increased within a week after the start of radiotherapy. @*Conclusion@#TLB using irradiation could temporarily amplify ctDNA release in xenograft mouse and lung cancer patients, which enables us to develop theragnostic method for cancer patients with accurate ctDNA detection.

3.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-836219

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study was conducted to evaluate the validity of the Gene-Health application in terms of estimating energy and macronutrients. @*Methods@#The subjects were 98 health adults participating in a weight-control intervention study. They recorded their diets in the Gene-Health application, took photographs before and after every meal on the same day, and uploaded them to the Gene-Health application. The amounts of foods and drinks consumed were estimated based on the photographs by trained experts, and the nutrient intakes were calculated using the CAN-Pro 5.0 program, which was named ‘Photo Estimation’. The energy and macronutrients estimated from the Gene-Health application were compared with those from a Photo Estimation. The mean differences in energy and macronutrient intakes between the two methods were compared using paired t-test. @*Results@#The mean energy intakes of Gene-Health and Photo Estimation were 1,937.0 kcal and 1,928.3 kcal, respectively. There were no significant differences in intakes of energy, carbohydrate, fat, and energy from fat (%) between two methods. The protein intake and energy from protein (%) of the Gene-Health were higher than those from the Photo Estimation. The energy from carbohydrate (%) for the Photo Estimation was higher than that of the Gene-Health. The Pearson correlation coefficients, weighted Kappa coefficients, and adjacent agreements for energy and macronutrient intakes between the two methods ranged from 0.382 to 0.607, 0.588 to 0.649, and 79.6% to 86.7%, respectively. @*Conclusion@#The Gene-Health application shows acceptable validity as a dietary intake assessment tool for energy and macronutrients. Further studies with female subjects and various age groups will be needed.

4.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-831089

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) panels for solid tumors have been useful in clinical framework for accurate tumor diagnosis and identifying essential molecular aberrations. However, most cancer panels have been designed to address a wide spectrum of pan-cancer models, lacking integral prognostic markers that are highly specific to gliomas. @*Materials and Methods@#To address such challenges, we have developed a glioma-specific NGS panel, termed “GliomaSCAN,” that is capable of capturing single nucleotide variations and insertion/deletion, copy number variation, and selected promoter mutations and structural variations that cover a subset of intron regions in 232 essential glioma-associated genes. We confirmed clinical concordance rate using pairwise comparison of the identified variants from whole exome sequencing (WES), immunohistochemical analysis, and fluorescence in situ hybridization. @*Results@#Our panel demonstrated high sensitivity in detecting potential genomic variants that were present in the standard materials. To ensure the accuracy of our targeted sequencing panel, we compared our targeted panel to WES. The comparison results demonstrated a high correlation. Furthermore, we evaluated clinical utility of our panel in 46 glioma patients to assess the detection capacity of potential actionable mutations. Thirty-two patients harbored at least one recurrent somatic mutation in clinically actionable gene. @*Conclusion@#We have established a glioma-specific cancer panel. GliomaSCAN highly excelled in capturing somatic variations in terms of both sensitivity and specificity and provided potential clinical implication in facilitating genome-based clinical trials. Our results could provide conceptual advance towards improving the response of genomically guided molecularly targeted therapy in glioma patients.

5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765849

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of globus pallidus interna deep brain stimulation (GPi-DBS) for treating dystonia due to the GNAL mutation. METHODS: We provide the first report of a dystonia patient with a genetically confirmed GNAL mutation in the Korean population and reviewed the literature on patients with the GNAL mutation who underwent GPi-DBS. We compared the effectiveness of DBS in patients with the GNAL mutation compared to that in patients with DYT1 and DYT6 in a previous study. RESULTS: Patients with the GNAL mutation and those with DYT1 had higher early responder rates (GNAL, 5/5, 100%; DYT1, 7/7, 100%) than did patients with DYT6 (p = 0.047). The responder rates at late follow-up did not differ statistically among the three groups (p = 0.278). The decrease in the dystonia motor scale score in the GNAL group was 46.9% at early follow-up and 63.4% at late follow-up. CONCLUSION: GPi-DBS would be an effective treatment option for dystonia patients with the GNAL mutation who are resistant to medication or botulinum toxin treatment.


Subject(s)
Botulinum Toxins , Deep Brain Stimulation , Dystonia , Follow-Up Studies , Globus Pallidus , Humans
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-719428

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: With the emergence of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, profiling a wide range of genomic alterations has become a possibility resulting in improved implementation of targeted cancer therapy. In Asian populations, the prevalence and spectrum of clinically actionable genetic alterations has not yet been determined because of a lack of studies examining high-throughput cancer genomic data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To address this issue, 1,071 tumor samples were collected from five major cancer institutes in Korea and analyzed using targeted NGS at a centralized laboratory. Samples were either fresh frozen or formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) and the quality and yield of extracted genomic DNA was assessed. In order to estimate the effect of sample condition on the quality of sequencing results, tissue preparation method, specimen type (resected or biopsied) and tissue storage time were compared. RESULTS: We detected 7,360 non-synonymous point mutations, 1,164 small insertions and deletions, 3,173 copy number alterations, and 462 structural variants. Fifty-four percent of tumors had one or more clinically relevant genetic mutation. The distribution of actionable variants was variable among different genes. Fresh frozen tissues, surgically resected specimens, and recently obtained specimens generated superior sequencing results over FFPE tissues, biopsied specimens, and tissues with long storage duration. CONCLUSION: In order to overcome, challenges involved in bringing NGS testing into routine clinical use, a centralized laboratory model was designed that could improve the NGS workflows, provide appropriate turnaround times and control costs with goal of enabling precision medicine.


Subject(s)
Academies and Institutes , Asians , DNA , Humans , Korea , Methods , Paraffin , Point Mutation , Precision Medicine , Prevalence
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-719415

ABSTRACT

Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)‒tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are effective clinical therapeutics for EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Osimertinib, a thirdgeneration EGFR TKI, has proven effective against T790M mutations. However, the vast majority of patients acquire resistance following successful treatment. A 59-year-old female patient with metastatic NSCLC developed resistance after 43 weeks of osimertinib. CancerSCAN of the metastatic liver lesion revealed a EGFR C797G mutation at an allele frequency of 72%, a preexisting T790M mutation (73%) in cis and an exon 19 deletion (87%). Another 53-year-old female patient developed systemic progression after 10 months of osimertinib. CancerSCAN of the lung biopsy identified an EGFR L718Q mutation at an allele frequency of 7%, concomitant PIK3CA E545K (12.90%) and preexisting EGFR L858R (38%), but loss of the T790M mutation. The heterogeneity of osimertinib resistance mechanisms warrants further investigation into novel or combination agents to overcome the rare acquired resistances.


Subject(s)
Biopsy , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Exons , Female , Gene Frequency , Humans , Liver , Lung , Middle Aged , Phosphotransferases , Population Characteristics , ErbB Receptors
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-160280

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDXs) can provide more reliable information about tumor biology than cell line models. We developed PDXs for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) that have histopathologic and genetic similarities to the primary patient tissues and evaluated their potential for use as a platform for translational EOC research. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We successfully established PDXs by subrenal capsule implantation of primary EOC tissues into female BALB/C-nude mice. The rate of successful PDX engraftment was 48.8% (22/45 cases). Hematoxylin and eosin staining and short tandem repeat analysis showed histopathological and genetic similarity between the PDX and primary patient tissues. RESULTS: Patients whose tumors were successfully engrafted in mice had significantly inferior overall survival when compared with those whose tumors failed to engraft (p=0.040). In preclinical tests of this model, we found that paclitaxel-carboplatin combination chemotherapy significantly deceased tumor weight in PDXs compared with the control treatment (p=0.013). Moreover, erlotinib treatment significantly decreased tumor weight in epidermal growth factor receptor–overexpressing PDX with clear cell histology (p=0.023). CONCLUSION: PDXs for EOC with histopathological and genetic stability can be efficiently developed by subrenal capsule implantation and have the potential to provide a promising platform for future translational research and precision medicine for EOC.


Subject(s)
Animals , Biology , Cell Line , Drug Therapy, Combination , Eosine Yellowish-(YS) , Epidermal Growth Factor , Erlotinib Hydrochloride , Female , Hematoxylin , Heterografts , Humans , Mice , Microsatellite Repeats , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Ovarian Neoplasms , Precision Medicine , Translational Research, Biomedical , Tumor Burden
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-38104

ABSTRACT

Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has recently emerged as an essential component of personalized cancer medicine due to its high throughput and low per-base cost. However, no sufficient guidelines for implementing NGS as a clinical molecular pathology test are established in Korea. To ensure clinical grade quality without inhibiting adoption of NGS, a taskforce team assembled by the Korean Society of Pathologists developed laboratory guidelines for NGS cancer panel testing procedures and requirements for clinical implementation of NGS. This consensus standard proposal consists of two parts: laboratory guidelines and requirements for clinical NGS laboratories. The laboratory guidelines part addressed several important issues across multistep NGS cancer panel tests including choice of gene panel and platform, sample handling, nucleic acid management, sample identity tracking, library preparation, sequencing, analysis and reporting. Requirements for clinical NGS tests were summarized in terms of documentation, validation, quality management, and other required written policies. Together with appropriate pathologist training and international laboratory standards, these laboratory standards would help molecular pathology laboratories to successfully implement NGS cancer panel tests in clinic. In this way, the oncology community would be able to help patients to benefit more from personalized cancer medicine.


Subject(s)
Consensus , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Korea , Pathology, Molecular , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Quality Control
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-168471

ABSTRACT

Choroideremia is a rare X-linked disorder causing progressive chorioretinal atrophy. Affected patients develop night blindness with progressive peripheral vision loss and eventual blindness. Herein, we report two Korean families with choroideremia. Multimodal imaging studies showed that the probands had progressive loss of visual field with characteristic chorioretinal atrophy, while electroretinography demonstrated nearly extinguished cone and rod responses compatible with choroideremia. Sanger sequencing of all coding exons and flanking intronic regions of the CHM gene revealed a novel small deletion at a splice site (c.184_189+3delTACCAGGTA) in one patient and a deletion of the entire exon 9 in the other. This is the first report on a molecular genetic diagnosis of choroideremia in Korean individuals. Molecular diagnosis of choroideremia should be widely adopted for proper diagnosis and the development of new treatment modalities including gene therapy.


Subject(s)
Atrophy , Blindness , Choroideremia , Clinical Coding , Diagnosis , Electroretinography , Exons , Genetic Therapy , Humans , Introns , Molecular Biology , Multimodal Imaging , Night Blindness , Visual Fields
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-224339

ABSTRACT

Stargardt-like macular dystrophy 4 (STGD4) is a rare macular dystrophy characterized by bull's eye atrophy of the macula and the underlying retinal pigment epithelium. Patients with STGD4 show decreased central vision, which often progresses to severe vision loss. The PROM1 gene encodes prominin-1, which is a 5-transmembrane glycoprotein also known as CD133 and is involved in photoreceptor disk morphogenesis. PROM1 mutations have been identified as genetic causes for STGD4 and other retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa. We report a case of STGD4 with a PROM1 p.R373C mutation in a Korean patient. Ophthalmic examinations of a 38-yr old man complaining of decreased visual acuity revealed bilateral atrophic macular lesions consistent with STGD4. Targeted exome sequencing of known inherited retinal degeneration genes revealed a heterozygous missense mutation c.1117C>T (p.R373C) of PROM1, which was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a PROM1 mutation causing STGD4 in Koreans.


Subject(s)
Atrophy , Exome , Glycoproteins , Humans , Macular Degeneration , Morphogenesis , Mutation, Missense , Retinal Degeneration , Retinal Pigment Epithelium , Retinitis Pigmentosa , Visual Acuity
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-78631

ABSTRACT

Nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy (NPHP-RC) is a common genetic cause of end-stage renal failure during childhood and adolescence and exhibits an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. Genetic diagnosis is quite limited owing to genetic heterogeneity in NPHP-RC. We designed a novel approach involving the step-wise screening of Sanger sequencing and targeted exome sequencing for the genetic diagnosis of 55 patients with NPHP-RC. First, five NPHP-RC genes were analyzed by Sanger sequencing in phenotypically classified patients. Known pathogenic mutations were identified in 12 patients (21.8%); homozygous deletions of NPHP1 in 4 juvenile nephronophthisis patients, IQCB1/NPHP5 mutations in 3 Senior–Løken syndrome patients, a CEP290/NPHP6 mutation in 1 Joubert syndrome patient, and TMEM67/MKS3 mutations in 4 Joubert syndrome patients with liver involvement. In the remaining undiagnosed patients, we applied targeted exome sequencing of 34 ciliopathy-related genes to detect known pathogenic mutations in 7 (16.3%) of 43 patients. Another 18 likely damaging heterozygous variants were identified in 13 NPHP-RC genes in 18 patients. In this study, we report a variety of pathogenic and candidate mutations identified in 55 patients with NPHP-RC in Korea using a step-wise application of two genetic tests. These results support the clinical utility of targeted exome sequencing to resolve the issue of allelic and genetic heterogeneity in NPHP-RC.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Diagnosis , Exome , Genetic Heterogeneity , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic , Korea , Liver , Mass Screening , Wills
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-32749

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are considered the first line treatment for a subset of EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Although transformation to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is one of the known mechanisms of resistance to EGFR TKIs, it is not certain whether transformation to SCLC is exclusively found as a mechanism of TKI resistance in EGFR-mutant tumors. METHODS: We identified six patients with primary lung adenocarcinoma that showed transformation to SCLC on second biopsy (n = 401) during a 6-year period. Clinicopathologic information was analyzed and EGFR mutation results were compared between initial and second biopsy samples. RESULTS: Six patients showed transformation from adenocarcinoma to SCLC, of which four were pure SCLCs and two were combined adenocarcinoma and SCLCs. Clinically, four cases were EGFR-mutant tumors from non-smoking females who underwent TKI treatment, and the EGFR mutation was retained in the transformed SCLC tumors. The remaining two adenocarcinomas were EGFR wild-type, and one of these patients received EGFR TKI treatment. CONCLUSIONS: NSCLC can acquire a neuroendocrine phenotype with or without EGFR TKI treatment.


Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma , Biopsy , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Female , Humans , Lung , Lung Neoplasms , Phenotype , Protein-Tyrosine Kinases , ErbB Receptors , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-161072

ABSTRACT

Infection by microorganisms may cause fatally erroneous interpretations in the biologic researches based on cell culture. The contamination by microorganism in the cell culture is quite frequent (5% to 35%). However, current approaches to identify the presence of contamination have many limitations such as high cost of time and labor, and difficulty in interpreting the result. In this paper, we propose a model to predict cell infection, using a microarray technique which gives an overview of the whole genome profile. By analysis of 62 microarray expression profiles under various experimental conditions altering cell type, source of infection and collection time, we discovered 5 marker genes, NM_005298, NM_016408, NM_014588, S76389, and NM_001853. In addition, we discovered two of these genes, S76389, and NM_001853, are involved in a Mycolplasma-specific infection process. We also suggest models to predict the source of infection, cell type or time after infection. We implemented a web based prediction tool in microarray data, named Prediction of Microbial Infection (http://www.snubi.org/software/PMI).


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Cell Line , Chondrocytes/cytology , Databases, Genetic , Gene Expression Profiling , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Keratinocytes/cytology , Models, Genetic , Mycoplasma/genetics , Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-102681

ABSTRACT

Radiation is the most useful treatment modality for cancer patients. It initiates a series of signal cascades such as DNA damage response (DDR) signaling for repairing damaged DNA, arresting the cell cycle, and inducing cell death. Until now, few genes have been found to be regulated by radiation, which explains the molecular mechanisms of cellular responses to radiation. Although the transcriptional changes caused by radiation have been widely investigated, little is known about the direct evidence for the transcriptional control of DDR-related genes. Here, we examined the radiosensitivity of two non-small cell lung cancer cell lines (H460 and H1299), which have different p53 status. We monitored the time-dependent changes of 24 DDR-related gene expressions via microarray analysis. Based on the basal expression levels and temporal patterns, we further classified 24 DDR-related genes into four subgroups. Then, we also addressed the protein levels of several DDR-related genes such as TopBP1, Chk1 and Chk2, confirming the results of microarray analysis. Together, these results indicate that the expression patterns of DDR-related genes are associated with radiosensitivity and with the p53 statuses of H460 and H1299, which adds to the understanding of the complex biological responses to radiation.


Subject(s)
Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Survival/radiation effects , DNA Damage/radiation effects , DNA Repair Enzymes/genetics , DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/radiation effects , Humans , Lung Neoplasms , Radiation Tolerance/genetics , Signal Transduction
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-153766

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Cancer-associated retinopathy is a paraneoplastic retinal degeneration which may primarily result from auto-immune mediated apoptosis. It has been hypothesized that high titer of auto-antibodies are able to cross the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) and to enter retinal cells to activate apoptotic pathway which has been already well-established. However, it still remains to be elucidated whether auto-antibodies could cross BRB in the retina. Herein, we demonstrated that intravenously administrated anti-recoverin antibodies could not pass through BRB and not lead to retinal cell death. METHODS: Anti-recoverin antibody was intravenously injected to C57BL/6 mice, which were sacrificed 1 and 7 days to obtain eye. Vascular endothelial growth factor was intravitreally injected to induce BRB breakdown, which was confirmed by fluorescein angiography and western blotting for zonula occludens (ZO)-1, ZO-2 and occludin. To investigate the location of anti-recoverin antibody in the retina, immunofluorescein was performed. The retinal toxicity of intravenous anti-recoverin antibody was evaluated by histological examination and transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling. Immunofluorescein staining for glial fibrillary acidic protein was done to address glial activation as well. RESULTS: Intravenously administrated anti-recoverin antibodies were exclusively distributed on retinal vessels which were co-localized with CD31, and led to neither increase of glial fibrillary acidic protein expression, as an indicator of retinal stress, nor apoptotic retinal cell death. Moreover, even in the condition of vascular endothelial growth factor-induced BRB breakdown, anti-recoverin antibodies could not migrate across BRB and still remained on retinal vessels without retinal cytotoxicity. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that high titer of intravascular anti-recoverin antibodies could not penetrate into the retina by themselves, and BRB breakdown mediated by dysregulation of tight junction might not be sufficient to allow anti-recoverin antibodies to pass through BRB.


Subject(s)
Animals , Antibodies/administration & dosage , Blood-Retinal Barrier/metabolism , Cell Death/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Female , Injections, Intravenous , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Recoverin/immunology , Retina/cytology , Retinal Vessels/metabolism
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-168747

ABSTRACT

The activation of nuclear factor-kappa B1 (NFkappaB1) in cancer cells may confer resistance to ionizing radiation (IR). To enhance the therapeutic efficiency of IR in lung cancer, we screened for microRNAs (miRNAs) that suppress NFkappaB1 and observed their effects on radiosensitivity in a human lung cancer cell line. From time series data of miRNA expression in gamma-irradiated H1299 human lung cancer cells, we found that the expression of miR-9 was inversely correlated with that of NFkappaB1. Overexpression of miR-9 down-regulated the level of NFkappaB1 in H1299 cells, and the surviving fraction of gamma-irradiated cells was decreased. Interestingly, let-7g also suppressed the expression of NFkappaB1, although there was no canonical target site for let-7g in the NFkappaB1 3' untranslated region. From these results, we conclude that the expression of miR-9 and let-7g could enhance the efficiency of radiotherapy for lung cancer treatment through the inhibition of NFkappaB1.


Subject(s)
Base Sequence , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Survival/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/radiation effects , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/genetics , MicroRNAs/genetics , NF-kappa B p50 Subunit/genetics , Radiation Tolerance/genetics , Radiation, Ionizing , Sequence Alignment
19.
Genomics & Informatics ; : 28-33, 2010.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-190602

ABSTRACT

Increased exposure of human to RF fields has raised concerns for its potential adverse effects on our health. To address the biological effects of RF radiation, we used genome wide gene expression as the indicator. We exposed normal WI-38 human fibroblast cells to 1763 MHz mobile phone RF radiation at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 60 W/kg with an operating cooling system for 24 h. There were no alterations in cell numbers or morphology after RF exposure. Through microarray analysis, we identified no differentially expressed genes (DEGs) at the 0.05 significance level after controlling for multiple testing errors with the Benjaminiochberg false discovery rate (BH FDR) method. Meanwhile, 82 genes were differentially expressed between RF-exposed cells and controls when the significance level was set at 0.01 without correction for multiple comparisons. We found that 24 genes (0.08% of the total genes examined) were changed by more than 1.5-fold on RF exposure. However, significant enrichment of any gene set or pathway was not observed from the functional annotation analysis. From these results, we did not find any evidence that non-thermal RF radiation at a 60-W/kg SAR significantly affects cell proliferation or gene expression in WI-38 cells.


Subject(s)
Absorption , Cell Count , Cell Proliferation , Cell Phone , Fibroblasts , Gene Expression , Genome , Humans , Microarray Analysis
20.
Genomics & Informatics ; : 34-40, 2010.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-190601

ABSTRACT

Radiofrequency (RF) radiation might induce the transcription of a certain set of genes as other physical stresses like ionizing radiation and UV. To observe transcriptional changes upon RF radiation, we exposed WI-38, human lung fibroblast cell to 1763 MHz of mobile phone RF radiation at 60 W/kg of specific absorption rate (SAR) for 24h with or without heat control. There were no significant changes in cell numbers and morphology after exposure to RF radiation. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we checked the expression of three heat shock protein (HSP) (HSPA1A, HSPA6 and HSP105) and seven stress-related genes (TNFRSF11B, FGF2, TGFB2, ITGA2, BRIP1, EXO1, and MCM10) in RF only and RF/HS groups of RF-exposed cells. The expressions of three heat shock proteins and seven stress-related genes were selectively changed only in RF/HS groups. Based on the expression of ten genes, we could classify thermal and non-thermal effect of RF-exposure, which genes can be used as biomarkers for RF radiation exposure.


Subject(s)
Absorption , Cell Count , Cell Phone , Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 , Fibroblasts , Gene Expression , Heat-Shock Proteins , Hot Temperature , Humans , Lung , Radiation, Ionizing , Transcriptome , Biomarkers
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL