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1.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-828725

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To compare intranasal midazolam and intramuscular phenobarbital sodium for their sedative effect in neonates undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).@*METHODS@#A total of 70 neonates who underwent cranial MRI from September 2017 to March 2019 were randomized into an observation group and a control group, with 35 cases in each group. The observation group received intranasal drops of midazolam (0.3 mg/kg), and the control group received intramuscular injection of phenobarbital sodium (10 mg/kg). The sedation status of the neonates was evaluated using the Ramsay Sedation Scale. Meanwhile, the two groups were compared for the success rate of MRI procedure and incidence of adverse reactions.@*RESULTS@#In the observation group, the sedation score was the highest at 20 minutes post administration, then was gradually decreasing, and decreased to the lowest level at 70 minutes post administration. In the control group, the sedation score was the lowest at 10 minutes post administration, then was gradually increasing, and increased to the highest level at 40 minutes and 50 minutes post administration, followed by a gradual decrease. Comparison of the sedation score at each time period suggested that the sedation score was significantly higher in the observation group than in the control group within 40 minutes post administration (P0.05). The success rate of MRI procedure was significantly higher in the observation group than in the control group (89% vs 69%, P0.05).@*CONCLUSIONS@#Intranasal midazolam is superior to intramuscular phenobarbital sodium in the sedative effect in neonates undergoing MRI, with the benefits of being fast, convenient, safe, and effective.


Subject(s)
Humans , Hypnotics and Sedatives , Pharmacology , Infant, Newborn , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Midazolam , Prospective Studies , Single-Blind Method
2.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-689642

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To study the influence of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy (APIP) on pregnancy outcomes and neonates.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>A retrospective analysis was performed for 33 APIP patients and 31 neonates born alive.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Of the 33 APIP patients, 26 (79%) developed APIP in the late pregnancy. Fourteen (45%) patients had hyperlipidemic APIP, 13 (42%) had biliary APIP, and 4 (13%) had other types of APIP. According to the severity, 22 (67%) were mild APIP, 5 (15%) were moderate APIP, and 6 were severe APIP. None of the 33 APIP patients died. Among the 20 patients with term delivery, 11 underwent termination of pregnancy; among the 10 patients with preterm delivery, 9 underwent termination of pregnancy; two patients experienced intrauterine fetal death, and one experienced abortion during the second trimester. Among the 31 neonates born alive (two of them were twins), 1 (3%) died, 12 (39%) experienced neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, 8 (26%) had neonatal hypoglycemia, 6 (19%) had neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, 5 (16%) experienced infectious diseases, and 2 (6%) experienced intracranial hemorrhage. The hyperlipidemic APIP group had a higher percentage of patients undergoing termination of pregnancy than the biliary APIP and other types of APIP groups (P<0.05). The incidence rate of preterm infants in the moderate APIP was higher than in the mild and severe APIP groups (P<0.05). The mean birth weights of neonates were the lowest in the moderate APIP group. The incidence rates of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, intracranial hemorrhage, and infectious disease were the lowest in the mild APIP group (P<0.05).</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>APIP can lead to adverse pregnancy outcomes and neonatal diseases, which are associated with the severity of pancreatitis.</p>


Subject(s)
Acute Disease , Birth Weight , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Premature , Male , Pancreatitis , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications , Retrospective Studies
3.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 574-580, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-357955

ABSTRACT

<p><b>BACKGROUND</b>Mild hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) injury is becoming the major type in neonatal brain diseases. The aim of this study was to assess brain maturation in mild HIE neonatal brains using total maturation score (TMS) based on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Totally, 45 neonates with clinically mild HIE and 45 matched control neonates were enrolled. Gestated age, birth weight, age after birth and postmenstrual age at magnetic resonance (MR) scan were homogenous in the two groups. According to MR findings, mild HIE neonates were divided into three subgroups: Pattern I, neonates with normal MR appearance; Pattern II, preterm neonates with abnormal MR appearance; Pattern III, full-term neonates with abnormal MR appearance. TMS and its parameters, progressive myelination (M), cortical infolding (C), involution of germinal matrix tissue (G), and glial cell migration bands (B), were employed to assess brain maturation and compare difference between HIE and control groups.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The mean of TMS was significantly lower in mild HIE group than it in the control group (mean ± standard deviation [SD] 11.62 ± 1.53 vs. 12.36 ± 1.26, P < 0.001). In four parameters of TMS scores, the M and C scores were significantly lower in mild HIE group. Of the three patterns of mild HIE, Pattern I (10 cases) showed no significant difference of TMS compared with control neonates, while Pattern II (22 cases), III (13 cases) all had significantly decreased TMS than control neonates (mean ± SD 10.56 ± 0.93 vs. 11.48 ± 0.55, P < 0.05; 12.59 ± 1.28 vs. 13.25 ± 1.29, P < 0.05). It was M, C, and GM scores that significantly decreased in Pattern II, while for Pattern III, only C score significantly decreased.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>The TMS system, based on conventional MRI, is an effective method to detect delayed brain maturation in clinically mild HIE. The conventional MRI can reveal the different retardations in subtle structures and development processes among the different patterns of mild HIE.</p>


Subject(s)
Brain , Pathology , Female , Humans , Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain , Diagnosis , Infant, Newborn , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Methods , Male
4.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-346140

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To study the protocol of construction of the mutation E292V and M723I of hABCA3 gene associated with neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, as well as their eukaryotic green fluorescent protein expression rectors, and to examine the expression of mutation proteins in human lung carcinoma epithelial cells (A549).</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Site-directed mutagenesis method based on overlap extension PCR was used to introduce mutations in the two sites which were E292V and M723I in the ABCA3. The PCR fragments were subcloned to PEGFP-C2 vectors to construct the eukaryotic green fluorescent protein expression rectors. A549 cells were transiently transfected with the recombinants using Lipofectamine 2000 and the transfection efficiency was confirmed through GFP signal. The expression and location of recombinants were detected by FV1000 laser scanning microscope.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Direct sequence analysis confirmed an A to T transition at position 875 in E292V and a G to A transition at position 2169 in M723I. Recombinants were transfected to A549 cells and both wild type and mutant ABCA3 proteins were expressed in the cytoplasm.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>The eukaryotic green fluorescent protein expression rectors of wild type and mutant ABCA3 gene were constructed and they were successfully expressed in A549 cells. This experiment provides a basis for subsequent research.</p>


Subject(s)
ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters , Genetics , Cell Line, Tumor , Green Fluorescent Proteins , Genetics , Humans , Mutagenesis, Site-Directed , Transfection
5.
Chinese Journal of Pediatrics ; (12): 111-116, 2012.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-356327

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To detect possible relationship between genetic defect within the gene encoding member A3 of the ATP Binding Cassette family (ABCA3) and neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS), thus to understand the genetic mechanisms of NRDS in Han ethnic group.</p><p><b>METHOD</b>The clinical data of 11 cases with NRDS hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit was investigated. Blood samples were collected from 11 cases with NRDS and 97 unassociated normal individuals. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA direct sequencing were performed to screen all exons and their flanking introns of ABCA3 gene for mutation analysis in 11 cases with NRDS. If a new missense variation was identified, single strand conformation polymorphism analysis was performed in 97 healthy controls. Lung tissue sample from a case who died 12 hours after birth was examined with light microscopy and electron microscopy.</p><p><b>RESULT</b>Three missense genetic variants in exons, which include c. 2169 G > A (p.M723I), c. 1010 T > G (p.V337G), c. 4972 A > G (p.S1658G), one splice junction site variation (Exon 30 + 2 T/G), several unreported polymorphism sites [213 C > T(p.F71F), exon 21 + 34C/T] and reported polymorphism site (p.F353F) were identified on ABCA3 gene coding region in 11 case. The homozygous variation (c.2169G > A), which was in exon 17 and causes an M723I amino acid change, was found in the case who died 13 hours after birth, but not detected in 97 controls, indicating that this variation is indeed a mutation and not a polymorphism. In the case carrying c.2169G > A, ultrastructural examination of the alveolar type II cells with electron microscopy demonstrated abnormally small and dense lamellar body with eccentrically distributed electron dense substance.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>Genetic variants within ABCA3 may be the genetic cause of or a contributor to some unexplained refractory NRDS. Identification of ABCA3 genetic variant in NRDS infants is important to establish appropriate management and evaluation of treatment options, as well as to offer genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis.</p>


Subject(s)
ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters , Genetics , DNA Mutational Analysis , Exons , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Polymorphism, Genetic , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn , Genetics
6.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-339579

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To study the protocol of construction of a KCNQ2-c.812G>T mutant and it's eukaryotic expression vector, the c.812G>T (p.G271V) mutation which was detected in a Chinese pedigree of benign familial infantile convulsions, and to examine the expression of mutant protein in human embyonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>A KCNQ2 mutation c.812G>T was engineered on KCNQ2 cDNAs cloned into pcDNA3.0 by sequence overlap extension PCR and restriction enzymes. HEK293 cells were co-transfected with pRK5-GFP and KCNQ2 plasmid (the wild type or mutant) using lipofectamine and then subjected to confocal microscopy. The transfected cells were immunostained to visualize the intracellular expression of the mutant molecules.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Direct sequence analysis revealed a G to T transition at position 812. The c.812G>T mutation was correctly combined to eukaryotic expressive vector pcDNA3.0 and expressed in HEK293 cells. Immunostaining of transfected cells showed the expression of both the wild type and mutant molecules on the plasma membrane, which suggested that the c.812G>T mutation at the pore forming region of KCNQ2 channel did not impair normal protein expression in HEK293 cells.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>Successful construction of mutant KCNQ2 eukaryotic expression vector and expression of KCNQ2 protein in HEK293 cells provide a basis for further study on the functional effects of convulsion-causing KCNQ2 mutations and for understanding the molecular pathogenesis of epilepsy.</p>


Subject(s)
Epilepsy, Benign Neonatal , Genetics , Fluorescent Antibody Technique , Genetic Vectors , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Infant, Newborn , KCNQ2 Potassium Channel , Genetics , Physiology , Mutagenesis, Site-Directed , Polymerase Chain Reaction
7.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-270423

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>The present study performed linkage analysis and gene mapping to find the possible chromosome locus harboring in one family with benign familial infantile convulsions (BFIC) and investigate the possible molecular pathogenesis of BFIC.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>A four-generation family with BFIC was investigated. The family was genotyped using eight hypervariable microsatellite markers covering four loci: D19S245 and D19S250 for the 19q12-13.1 region, D16S3131 and D16S3133 for the 16p12-q12 region, D2S156 and D2S286 for the 2q24 region, and D20S480 and D20S481 for the 20q13.3 region. Polymorphism fragments were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. PCR products for the markers were subjected to electrophoresis on 8% denatured polyacrylamide gel and silver staining for length judgment of amplification fragment. Linkage analysis was performed by use of MLINK in the LINKAGE computer package. Two-point LOD scores were calculated to estimate the linkage relationship.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The two-point LOD scores were less than -2.0 for the genetic markers at chromosomes 19q12-13.1, 16p12-q12 and 2q24 at the recombination rate between 0.000 and 0.01. The two-point LOD scores for D20S481 at the 20q13.3 region were 0.3 and 0.25 at the recombination rate of 0.000 and 0.01, respectively.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>There is no evidence that this family with BFIC is linked to one of the following loci: 19q12-13.1, 16p12-q12 and 2q24, but a possible linkage with 20q13.3 region cannot be excluded.</p>


Subject(s)
Chromosome Mapping , Epilepsy, Benign Neonatal , Genetics , Female , Genetic Linkage , Humans , Lod Score , Male , Microsatellite Repeats
8.
Chinese Journal of Pediatrics ; (12): 926-930, 2009.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-358467

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>The congenital long QT syndrome (LQTs) is a hereditary disorder in which most affected family members have delayed ventricular repolarization manifested on the electrocardiogram (ECG) as QT interval prolongation. The disorder is associated with an increased propensity to arrhythmogenic syncope, polymorphous ventricular tachycardia (torsade de pointes), and sudden arrhythmic death. LQTs is due to mutations involving principally the myocyte ion-channels, and this monogenetic disorder has an autosomal inheritance pattern. This study investigated the gene mutation of a Chinese family of LQTs with multiple phenotypes including dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and cardiac conduction defects, thus to understand the molecular pathogenesis of the diseases.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>A three-generation Chinese LQTs family with multiple phenotypes was investigated. Blood sample was collected from the 8 family members and 100 unassociated normal individuals. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-DNA direct sequencing was performed to screen all exons and their flanking introns of SCN5A gene for mutation analysis. Polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) was used to exclude polymorphism.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>PCR amplification and subsequent direct sequencing of SCN5A from proband revealed a heterozygous deletion of nine base pairs (CAGAAGCCC) in exon 26, corresponding to the three amino acid residues Gln1507-Lys1508-Pro1509 (QKP). This mutation is localized in the linker region between DIII-DIV of SCN5A. The same mutation was found in another patient (her grandmother) and excluded in the remaining living subjects in this family. This mutation was confirmed using SSCP in 100 unassociated healthy individuals. Similar analysis excluded possible mutations that would lead to amino acid changes in KCNQ1, KCNH2 and LAMIN A/C commonly associated with LQTs and DCM with conduction disorders, no new mutations that would lead to amino acid changes was found.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>The result of the present study suggests that SCN5A mutation delQKP1507-1509 exists in patients with LQTs. The delQKP1507-1509 of SCN5A is a novel mutation in Chinese people. The same mutation was previously reported in a French family with only a single LQTs phenotype. Further studies on functional expression of SCN5A mutation delQKP1507-1509 will be helpful to understand the mechanism of the multiple phenotypes.</p>


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Asian Continental Ancestry Group , Genetics , DNA Mutational Analysis , ERG1 Potassium Channel , Ether-A-Go-Go Potassium Channels , Genetics , Female , Humans , KCNQ1 Potassium Channel , Genetics , Long QT Syndrome , Classification , Genetics , Male , Middle Aged , Mutation , Pedigree , Phenotype , Sodium Channels , Genetics
9.
Chinese Journal of Pediatrics ; (12): 177-181, 2006.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-309251

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>Hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) is an attractive procedure that has been used in treatment of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). However, depending on the HBO protocol, especially the time point of starting treatment of HBO, different and conflicting results were obtained. This study was undertaken to search for the optimal therapeutic window of ABO in neonatal rat with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD).</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Eighty-four healthy seven-day-old SD rats were used as research subjects and were randomly divided into seven groups with 12 in each: sham group, HI group, HI (1 h) + HBO group (HBO starting 1 h after HI), HI (3 h) + HBO group (HBO starting 3 h after HI), HI (6 h) + HBO group (HBO starting 6 h after HI), HI (12 h) + HBO group (HBO starting 12 h after HI), HI (24 h) + HBO group (HBO starting 24 h after HI). Single HBO treatment (2.5 atmospheres absolute, ATA for 1.5 h) was used in this study. Two indexes were used to assess the effect of HBO that included short-term (48 h after HI) histology change (the cell density in CA1 of hippocampus and cortex) and long-term (5 w and 6 w after HI) neurobehavioral testing (grip test and treadmill test for evaluating the deficits of sensor motor; step-down avoidance test for assessing the deficits of memory).</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>In HI (1 h) + HBO, HI (3 h) + HBO and HI (6 h) + HBO groups, neuron density of cortex and CA1 of hippocampus were 1981.76 +/- 299.55, 1841.53 +/- 241.21, 1525.78 +/- 189.00 and 4430.56 +/- 1180.31, 4507.54 +/- 1374.32, 3883.48 +/- 821.87, respectively, which were significantly higher than HIBD group (987.86 +/- 285.39 and 1813.59 +/- 295.33, P < 0.05, ANOVA). But in HI (12 h) + HBO and HI (24 h) + HBO, the neuron density of cortex and CA1 of hippocampus compared with those in HIBD group had no statistical significance (P > 0.05, ANOVA). In the sensor motor testing performed at 5 w after HI of rat, the grip time in grip test and the stay time in treadmill test of HI (1 h) + HBO, HI (3 h) + HBO and HI (6 h) + HBO groups were 193.39 +/- 51.19, 168.39 +/- 34.02, 168.95 +/- 34.93 and 130.34 +/- 42.56, 128.20 +/- 27.69, 125.74 +/- 36.99, respectively, which, compared with HIBD group, were significantly prolonged (P < 0.05, ANOVA). But in HI (12 h) + HBO and HI (24 h) + HBO groups, the time was not significantly longer compared with HI (P > 0.05, ANOVA). In the step-down avoidance test which was performed at 6 w after HI, the step-down latencies of HI (1 h) + HBO, HI (3 h) + HBO and HI (6 h) + HBO were 96.91 +/- 29.91, 90.35 +/- 28.44 and 76.46 +/- 38.70, respectively, which were significantly prolonged (P < 0.05, ANOVA), but in HI (12 h) + HBO and HI (24 h) + HBO, the latencies did not significantly increase compared with HIBD, P > 0.05, ANOVA.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>The optimal therapeutic window of HBO in neonatal rat with HIBD was within the first 6 hours after HI. In this therapeutic window, HBO was highly effective in reducing the cell loss in CA1 of hippocampus and cortex.</p>


Subject(s)
Analysis of Variance , Animals , Animals, Newborn , Cell Count , Cerebral Cortex , Pathology , Disease Models, Animal , Hippocampus , Pathology , Hyperbaric Oxygenation , Methods , Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain , Pathology , Therapeutics , Random Allocation , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Time Factors
10.
Chinese Journal of Pediatrics ; (12): 487-491, 2006.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-278674

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>Benign familial infantile convulsions (BFIC) is a form of idiopathic epileptic syndrome characterized by onset of afebrile seizures between 3 and 12 months of life, Spontaneous remission after several weeks or months, and autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Previous linkage analysis in western countries defined three susceptible loci on chromosomes 19q12.0-13.1, 16p12-q12, and 2q23-31, but studies performed in several Chinese families with BFIC got negative results of these previously reported loci. The authors investigated the relation of voltage-gated potassium channel gene KCNQ2 to BFIC in a Chinese family and thus to understand the molecular pathogenesis of BFIC.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>A four-generation Chinese BFIC family was investigated. All the affected 17 members had similar pattern of seizures starting from 2 to 6 months of age. In 15 of them, the seizures disappeared spontaneously within the first year of life. The phenotype extended beyond infancy only in two patients. Blood sample was collected from the 41 family members and 75 unassociated normal individuals. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-DNA direct sequencing was performed to screen all exons and their flanking introns of KCNQ2 gene for mutation analysis. Polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) was used to ascertain the co-segregation of genotype and phenotype and to exclude polymorphism.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>PCR amplification and subsequent direct sequencing of KCNQ2 from the DNA of proband revealed a heterozygous guanine to thymine nucleotide exchange (G812T) in exon 5, leading to the substitution of glycine by valine at amino acid position 271 (G271V) of the predicted protein. The same mutation with a comparable localization has been previously described for KCNQ3 in benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC). The glycine at this position (G271) is located in pore region of KCNQ2 protein and is evolutionarily highly conserved. The same SSCP variant as that of the proband was shown in the rest of the affected members of this family but not in the unaffected members enrolled in the study of this family and all the 75 unrelated normal individuals.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>Previously reported mutations of KCNQ2 were mainly identified in BFNC family in which at least one individual had an onset of seizures during the first week of life, a hallmark of the BFNC disorder. The results of the present study suggest the possibility that KCNQ2 mutation exist in patients with BFIC diagnosis. G812T of KCNQ2 gene is a novel mutation found in BFIC and functional expression of KCNQ2 G812T is required for understanding the mechanism of BFIC and other idiopathic epilepsy.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Age of Onset , Asian Continental Ancestry Group , DNA Mutational Analysis , Epilepsy, Benign Neonatal , Genetics , Female , Genetic Linkage , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Infant , KCNQ2 Potassium Channel , Genetics , Male , Mutation , Pedigree , Phenotype , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Seizures , Genetics
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