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1.
Acta Physiologica Sinica ; (6): 433-445, 2021.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-887679

ABSTRACT

Migraine is a neurological disorder characterized by attacks of moderate or severe headache and various neurological symptoms. Acupuncture, as a commonly used non-pharmacological therapy, has the advantage of obvious therapeutic effect and few side effects in the prevention and treatment of migraine. But the underlying mechanism of acupuncture on migraine remains unclear. Recently, advances in neuroimaging technology have helped to objectively assess the effect of acupuncture on treating migraine and offered new opportunities to explore the central mechanism of acupuncture on treating migraine. In order to better understand the current status of neuroimaging studies on the therapeutic mechanism of acupuncture on migraine and shed light on future research, this review aims to overview the neuroimaging studies in recent 10 years from two aspects: (1) Central mechanism of acupuncture on treating acute migraine attack; (2) Central mechanism of acupuncture on preventing migraine attack.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy , Humans , Migraine Disorders/therapy , Neuroimaging
2.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-826674

ABSTRACT

Based on the internationally-recognized Consolidated Standards for Reporting of Trials (CONSORT) statement and Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA), the reported quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture for cancer pain during last 10 years were evaluated. The RCTs of acupuncture for cancer pain were searched by computer. The English databases included PubMed and EMbase while the Chinese databases included CNKI, Wanfang, VIP and SinoMed. The publication date of the literature was from March 2009 to March 2019. As a result, 22 Chinese RCTs and 13 English RCTs were included. According to the CONSORT statement, among the Chinese studies, 1 RCT reported primary and secondary outcomes, 8 RCTs reported randomization, none of RCTs reported allocation concealment and blind method, and 4 RCTs reported baseline data; among the English studies, 8 RCTs reported primary and secondary outcomes, 8 RCTs reported randomization, 6 RCTs reported described allocation concealment, 7 RCTs reported blind method, and 13 RCTs reported baseline data. According to the STRICTA statement, among the Chinese studies, 17 RCTs reported the name of acupoints, 6 RCTs reported depth of insertion, 17 RCTs reported acupuncture response sought, and none of RCTs reported the qualifications of acupuncturists; among the English studies, 12 RCTs reported the name of acupoints, 7 RCTs reported depth of insertion, 8 RCTs reported acupuncture response sought, and 7 RCTs reported the qualifications of acupuncturists. The Chinese RCTs have more detailed description of acupuncture intervention and theory, but not enough attention is paid to methodological description such as randomization, blindness, data analysis. On the other hand, the English RCTs have better description of methodology, but the description of theory and details of acupuncture is relatively weak. It is concluded that more efforts were needed to further improve the clinical trial design according to the CONSORT statement and STRICTA statement to improve the quality of clinical evidence.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy , Cancer Pain , Therapeutics , Humans , Neoplasms , Therapeutics , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Reference Standards
3.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-776246

ABSTRACT

The internationally-accepted Consolidated Standards for Reporting of Trials (CONSORT) and Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) were applied to evaluate the literature quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) regarding acupuncture for chronic neck pain in past 10 years. The literature of RCTs regarding acupuncture for chronic neck pain was searched by computer; the English literature was searched in PubMed and EMbase, while the Chinese literature was searched in CNKI, Wanfang database, VIP database and China Biomedical Literature Database. The literature published from January 2008 to January 2018 was searched. As a result, 29 Chinese articles and 10 English articles were included. According to CONSORT, among Chinese articles, 28 articles (96.6%) described baseline data, 23 articles (79.3%) described randomization, 0 articles (0.0%) described allocation concealment, 3 articles (10.3%) described blind method; among English articles, 6 articles (60.0%) described baseline data, 8 articles (80.0%) described randomization, 8 articles (80.0%) described allocation concealment, and 7 articles (70.0%) described blind method. According to STRICTA, among Chinese articles, 8 articles (27.6%) described needle instrument selection, 18 articles (62.1%) described needle depth, 24 articles (82.8%) described needling sensation, and 0 articles (0.0%) described acupuncturist' qualifications; among English articles, 5 articles (50.0%) described needle instrument selection, 8 articles (80.0%) described needle depth, 3 articles (30.0%) described needling sensation, and 4 articles (40.0%) described acupuncturist' qualifications. In conclusion, the reporting of acupuncture details in Chinese literature is superior to that in English literature, while the reporting of trial design in English literature is slightly superior to that in Chinese literature. Moreover, both Chinese and English literature need to further improve clinical trial design to improve the reporting quality of clinical evidence based on CONSORT and STRICTA.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy , China , Humans , Neck Pain , Therapeutics , PubMed , Publications , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
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