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1.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-873564

ABSTRACT

Objective To study the effect of metabolic syndrome on the fertility and reproduction in model animals. Methods The model of"high fat diet for spontaneously hypertensive rats(SHR)"was adopted to construct the model of metabolic syndrome in rats. The metabolic syndrome model rats were used to mate with male and female 1 : 1 cage, and the mating cycle was 2 weeks. Results After the SHR rats were fed a high-fat diet for 10 weeks, 16 males and 15 females met the screening criteria for metabolic syndrome, with the modeling rates of 40% and 37.5%, respectively. In addition to the abnormal metabolism-related indicators(such as blood glucose, blood lipid and blood pressure), the male rats with metabolic syndrome mainly had decreased sperm motility(P < 0.05), increased sperm malformation rate(P < 0.01), and decreased mating rate(P < 0.05). In addition to abnormal metabolism-related indicators, the conception rate and the live fetal rate of the female rats with metabolic syndrome were slightly lower than that of the control group; however, there was no statistical difference. The mean birth weight of the litter was significantly lower than that of the control group(P < 0.05). Conclusion According to the whole process from mating to natural production, metabolic syndrome is determined to have a significant effect on the fertility and reproductive ability of rats.

2.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-882219

ABSTRACT

Objective:To establish a comet test method for detection of genotoxicity of three reference chemicals in rat liver cells. Methods:6-10 week old Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups, with normal saline (0.9% NaCl solution) as negative control group. Animals in three test groups were treated, respectively, with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) 200 mg/kg, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) 50 mg/kg, and D-mannitol 2 000 mg/kg. There were 10 animals in each group, 5 males and 5 females. The animals received two times (21 h interval) of test compounds through intragastric administration, and their clinical symptoms and body weight changes were recorded during the experiment. The rats were sacrificed 3 h after the last exposure. The liver was weighed, then used to prepare single-cell suspensions for the alkaline comet test which determines the average tail DNA content percentage (DNA%) of hepatocytes and other comet indicators. Results:(1) D-mannitol, EMS and MNU did not show significant toxicity in the whole animal. (2) The mean values of tail DNA content percentage (DNA%) of rat hepatocytes in EMS [(60.07±24.69)%] and MNU [(41.66±22.35)%] groups were higher than that in the negative control group [(2.32±1.39)%] and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The difference between D-mannitol group [(3.06±3.30)%] and the negative control group was not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion:This laboratory has established a comet test method using hepatocytes from treated rats. Among three testing chemicals, EMS and MNU have displayed genotoxicity by this assay, but no genotoxicity was observed in D-mannitol treated animals.

3.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 140-145, 2012.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-238973

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate the effects of purine nucleotide on the expressions of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteotrophic hormone (LH) and the ultrastructures of the distal somatotrophic and gonadotrophic cells in the pituitary gland of heroin-addicted and -withdrawal rats.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Ninety-two male Wistar rats were randomly divided into a control group (ip saline for 14 d), a nucleotide group (ip AMP and GMP for 10 d), a heroin group (ip heroin for 10 d), a heroin + nucleotide group (ip AMP and GMP + heroin for 10 d), a 3 d withdrawal group (ip heroin for 10 d and killed at 14 d), a 9 d withdrawal group (ip heroin for 10 d and killed at 20 d), a 3 d nucleotide group (ip nucleotide for 3 d after 10 d heroin administration and killed at 14 d), and a 9 d nucleotide group (ip nucleotide for 9 d after 10 d heroin administration and killed at 20 d). Changes in the mRNA expressions of FSH and LH in the pituitary gland of the rats were analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and alterations in the ultrastructures of the distal somatotrophic and gonadotrophic cells were observed under the microscope.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The expression of FSH mRNA was significantly increased in the nucleotide, heroin + nucleotide, 3 d nucleotide and 9 d nucleotide groups (0.099 +/- 0.018, 0.177 +/- 0.046, 0.151 +/- 0.030 and 0.184 +/- 0.028) as compared with the control group (0.045 +/- 0.009) (P < 0.01); and so was that of LH mRNA in the heroin + nucleotide, 3 d nucleotide and 9 d nucleotide groups (0.950 +/- 0.169, 0.990 +/- 0.171 and 0.960 +/- 0.147) in comparison with the control group (0.700 +/- 0.099) (P < 0.01). In the heroin group, the nuclei of the distal somatotrophic and gonadotrophic cells exhibited morphological abnormality, unclear membrane, slightly pyknotic matrix, marginal and agglutinated heterochromatin, dilated rough endoplasmic reticula, swollen mitochondria, broken and vacuolated cristae in the cytoplasm, obviously decreased number of secretory granules, and myelin bodies in some cells. However, the heroin + nucleotide group showed no significant changes in the ultrastructures of somatotrophic and gonadotrophic cells compared with the control group.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>Short-term use of heroin does not obviously affect the expressions of FSH and LH mRNA in the pituitary gland of rats, while heroin + nucleotide, or nucleotide following heroin withdrawal can enhance their expressions significantly. Heroin damages the ultrastructures of the distal somatotrophic and gonadotrophic cells in the pituitary gland of male rats, and purine nucleotide can diminish or inhibit this damage.</p>


Subject(s)
Animals , Follicle Stimulating Hormone , Genetics , Metabolism , Gene Expression , Heroin , Heroin Dependence , Genetics , Metabolism , Luteinizing Hormone , Genetics , Metabolism , Male , Pituitary Gland , Metabolism , Purine Nucleotides , Pharmacology , Rats , Rats, Wistar , Substance Withdrawal Syndrome , Genetics , Metabolism
4.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-291823

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVES</b>To investigate intensity of extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELFMF) emitted from cathode-ray tubes (CRT) of monitors in various directions and to find ways to avoid its influence.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Two hundred CRT monitors and 10 monitors with liquid-crystal display (LCD) were selected. Their ELFMF was detected for three times in front of the monitor at an interval of every 5 cm from 0 cm to 50 cm, as well as at various directions from the monitor.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Intensity of ELFMF significantly attenuated at regular operating position (30 - 40 cm) from 0 cm to 50 cm in front of both 38 cm and 43 cm CRT monitors (P < 0.05). Intensity exceeded 0.4 microT both within 15 cm and 10 cm in front of 38 cm and 43 cm monitors. The highest intensity was found at the upright top position of both kinds of monitors, 9.54 microT for 38 cm monitor and 6.38 microT for 43 cm one, respectively.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>It is suggested to keep away from monitor screen as possible when operating a computer, to reduce unnecessary operation in front of a monitor screen, and to shorten operating time. To avoid more hazards from interactive interference between computers, it is necessary to increase distance between monitors.</p>


Subject(s)
Computers , Electromagnetic Fields , Environmental Exposure , Equipment Safety , Humans , Occupational Exposure , Radiation Monitoring , Methods , Risk Assessment
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