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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-938422

ABSTRACT

The recent novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to unprecedented changes in behavior. We evaluated the current status of precautionary behavior and physical activity in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A population of CKD patients (n = 306) registered in the Study on Kidney Disease and Environmental Chemicals (SKETCH, Clinical Trial No. NCT04679168) cohort recruited from June 2020 to October 2020 was included in the study. We conducted a questionnaire survey related to risk perception of COVID-19, precautionary behavior, and physical activity. Results: There were 187 patients (61.1%) with estimated glomerular filtration rate of <45 mL/min/1.73 m2 . This population showed a higher degree of risk perception for COVID-19 than the general population. Age was the most significant determinant of risk perception among CKD patients. During the pandemic, social distancing and hygiene-related behavior were significantly increased (p < 0.001). The frequency of exercise was decreased only in those who took regular exercise, without diabetes, or with a lower Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) (p < 0.001), with no change among the other groups. Socioeconomic status and comorbidities significantly affected behavioral characteristics regardless of the category. Education and income were significantly associated with precautionary behaviors such as staying at home and hand sanitizer use. Patients with higher CCI status significantly increased frequency of exercise (adjusted odds ratio, 2.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.01–4.38). Conclusion: CKD patients showed higher risk perception with active precautionary behavioral changes than the general population. Healthcare providers should be aware of the characteristics to comprise precautionary behavior without reducing physical activity.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-926503

ABSTRACT

Long-term outcomes of live kidney donors remain controversial, although this information is crucial for selecting potential donors. Thus, this study compared the long-term risk of all-cause mortality between live kidney donors and healthy control. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study including donors from seven tertiary hospitals in South Korea. Persons who underwent voluntary health screening were included as controls. We created a matched control group considering age, sex, era, body mass index, baseline hypertension, diabetes, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and dipstick albuminuria. The study outcome was progression to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), and all-cause mortality as identified in the linked claims database. Results: We screened 1,878 kidney donors and 78,115 health screening examinees from 2003 to 2016. After matching, 1,701 persons remained in each group. The median age of the matched study subjects was 44 years, and 46.6% were male. Among the study subjects, 2.7% and 16.6% had underlying diabetes and hypertension, respectively. There were no ESKD events in the matched donor and control groups. There were 24 (1.4%) and 12 mortality cases (0.7%) in the matched donor and control groups, respectively. In the age-sex adjusted model, the risk for all-cause mortality was significantly higher in the donor group than in the control group. However, the significance was not retained after socioeconomic status was included as a covariate (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.87–3.80). Conclusion: All-cause mortality was similar in live kidney donors and matched non-donor healthy controls with similar health status and socioeconomic status in the Korean population.

3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-901526

ABSTRACT

Background@#Recurrent glomerulonephritis (GN) is a common cause of allograft loss in kidney transplantation (KT), the most frequent of which is immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy (IgAN). Galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) plays a major role in the pathophysiology of IgAN, but the association between Gd-IgA1 and recurrent IgAN in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) is uncertain. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Gd-IgA1 for prediction of recurrent IgAN and graft and patient survival according to Gd-IgA1 level. @*Methods@#We enrolled 27 KTRs who underwent allograft biopsy between 2009 and 2016 and measured the serum Gd-IgA1 level of each KTR. We divided the patients into two groups: nonrecurrent IgAN (patients with IgAN prior to KT who were not diagnosed with recurrent IgAN) and recurrent IgAN (patients with IgAN prior to KT who were diagnosed with recurrent IgAN). @*Results@#The mean serum Gd-IgA1 level was significantly higher in the recurrent IgAN group than in the nonrecurrent IgAN group (6,419 ± 3,675 ng/mL vs. 3,381 ± 2,844 ng/mL, p = 0.02). The cutoff value of serum Gd-IgA1 in receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was 4,338 ng/mL (area under the curve, 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57–0.95, p = 0.02). Serum Gd-IgA1 level was an independent factor for recurrent IgAN (odds ratio, 17.60; 95% CI, 1.33–233.03, p = 0.03). There was no significant difference in graft or patient survival between the two groups. @*Conclusion@#Serum Gd-IgA1 can be used as a diagnostic biomarker for recurrent IgAN in KT.

4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-901525

ABSTRACT

Background@#An inverse observational association between alcohol use and the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) or end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) has been reported. The causal effect of alcohol use on the risk of ESKD warrants additional investigation. @*Methods@#The study was an observational cohort study investigating the UK Biobank and performed Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis. Amounts of alcohol use were collected using a touchscreen questionnaire. In the observational analysis, 212,133 participants without prevalent ESKD were studied, and the association between alcohol use and the risk of prevalent CKD or incident ESKD was investigated. The genetic analysis included 337,138 participants of white British ancestry. For one-sample MR, an analysis based on a polygenic risk score (PRS) was conducted with genetically predicted alcohol intake. The MR analysis investigated ESKD outcome and related comorbidities. @*Results@#Lower alcohol use was observationally associated with a higher risk of prevalent CKD or incident ESKD. However, the genetic risk of CKD was significantly associated with lower alcohol use, suggesting reverse causation. A higher PRS for alcohol use was significantly associated with a higher risk of ESKD (per units of one phenotypical alcohol drink; adjusted odds ratio of 1.16 [95% confidence interval, 1.02–1.31]) and related comorbidities, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, and central obesity. @*Conclusion@#The inverse observational association between alcohol use and the risk of CKD or ESKD may have been affected by reverse causation. Our study supports a causal effect of alcohol use on a higher risk of ESKD and related predisposing comorbidities.

5.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-900910

ABSTRACT

Background@#Altered level of consciousness (ALC) is a challenging condition in the emergency department (ED). We evaluated the clinical characteristics, causes, and prognosis of adult patients presenting with ALC at an ED of a university hospital. @*Methods@#The medical records of patients with ALC who visited the ED of a university hospital from February 2019 to November 2020 were reviewed to compare before and after the outbreak of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) in Daegu, South Korea. The cause of ALC, its classification, the patients’ destinations, and prognosis were carefully decided and compared. @*Results@#A total of 1,851 patients with ALC in ED consisted of 1,068 before COVID-19 (BC; to February 17th, 2020) and 783 after COVID-19 (AC; from February 18th, 2020) were investigated. The all-time leading cause of ALC in ED was systemic infection (29.2% in BC, 25.0% in AC), followed by metabolic cause (21.0%) in BC and stroke (18.4%) in AC. Extra-cerebral etiologies of ALC were 1,206 (65.1%). The overall mortality of ALC in ED was 12.3%, consisting of 11.0% in BC and 14.2% in AC. During the daytime (07:00 to 18:59), patients in overall 1,179 patients (63.7%) with ALC visited ED, consisted of 665 (62.3%) in BC and 514 (65.5%) in AC. @*Conclusions@#This study demonstrated the extra-cerebral etiologies as the major causes of ALC in the ED. And there have been shifts in the etiology of ALC in ED.

6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-893822

ABSTRACT

Background@#Recurrent glomerulonephritis (GN) is a common cause of allograft loss in kidney transplantation (KT), the most frequent of which is immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy (IgAN). Galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) plays a major role in the pathophysiology of IgAN, but the association between Gd-IgA1 and recurrent IgAN in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) is uncertain. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Gd-IgA1 for prediction of recurrent IgAN and graft and patient survival according to Gd-IgA1 level. @*Methods@#We enrolled 27 KTRs who underwent allograft biopsy between 2009 and 2016 and measured the serum Gd-IgA1 level of each KTR. We divided the patients into two groups: nonrecurrent IgAN (patients with IgAN prior to KT who were not diagnosed with recurrent IgAN) and recurrent IgAN (patients with IgAN prior to KT who were diagnosed with recurrent IgAN). @*Results@#The mean serum Gd-IgA1 level was significantly higher in the recurrent IgAN group than in the nonrecurrent IgAN group (6,419 ± 3,675 ng/mL vs. 3,381 ± 2,844 ng/mL, p = 0.02). The cutoff value of serum Gd-IgA1 in receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was 4,338 ng/mL (area under the curve, 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57–0.95, p = 0.02). Serum Gd-IgA1 level was an independent factor for recurrent IgAN (odds ratio, 17.60; 95% CI, 1.33–233.03, p = 0.03). There was no significant difference in graft or patient survival between the two groups. @*Conclusion@#Serum Gd-IgA1 can be used as a diagnostic biomarker for recurrent IgAN in KT.

7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-893821

ABSTRACT

Background@#An inverse observational association between alcohol use and the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) or end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) has been reported. The causal effect of alcohol use on the risk of ESKD warrants additional investigation. @*Methods@#The study was an observational cohort study investigating the UK Biobank and performed Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis. Amounts of alcohol use were collected using a touchscreen questionnaire. In the observational analysis, 212,133 participants without prevalent ESKD were studied, and the association between alcohol use and the risk of prevalent CKD or incident ESKD was investigated. The genetic analysis included 337,138 participants of white British ancestry. For one-sample MR, an analysis based on a polygenic risk score (PRS) was conducted with genetically predicted alcohol intake. The MR analysis investigated ESKD outcome and related comorbidities. @*Results@#Lower alcohol use was observationally associated with a higher risk of prevalent CKD or incident ESKD. However, the genetic risk of CKD was significantly associated with lower alcohol use, suggesting reverse causation. A higher PRS for alcohol use was significantly associated with a higher risk of ESKD (per units of one phenotypical alcohol drink; adjusted odds ratio of 1.16 [95% confidence interval, 1.02–1.31]) and related comorbidities, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, and central obesity. @*Conclusion@#The inverse observational association between alcohol use and the risk of CKD or ESKD may have been affected by reverse causation. Our study supports a causal effect of alcohol use on a higher risk of ESKD and related predisposing comorbidities.

8.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-893206

ABSTRACT

Background@#Altered level of consciousness (ALC) is a challenging condition in the emergency department (ED). We evaluated the clinical characteristics, causes, and prognosis of adult patients presenting with ALC at an ED of a university hospital. @*Methods@#The medical records of patients with ALC who visited the ED of a university hospital from February 2019 to November 2020 were reviewed to compare before and after the outbreak of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) in Daegu, South Korea. The cause of ALC, its classification, the patients’ destinations, and prognosis were carefully decided and compared. @*Results@#A total of 1,851 patients with ALC in ED consisted of 1,068 before COVID-19 (BC; to February 17th, 2020) and 783 after COVID-19 (AC; from February 18th, 2020) were investigated. The all-time leading cause of ALC in ED was systemic infection (29.2% in BC, 25.0% in AC), followed by metabolic cause (21.0%) in BC and stroke (18.4%) in AC. Extra-cerebral etiologies of ALC were 1,206 (65.1%). The overall mortality of ALC in ED was 12.3%, consisting of 11.0% in BC and 14.2% in AC. During the daytime (07:00 to 18:59), patients in overall 1,179 patients (63.7%) with ALC visited ED, consisted of 665 (62.3%) in BC and 514 (65.5%) in AC. @*Conclusions@#This study demonstrated the extra-cerebral etiologies as the major causes of ALC in the ED. And there have been shifts in the etiology of ALC in ED.

9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-917044

ABSTRACT

Background@#Considering the growing prevalence of Western lifestyles and related chronic diseases occurring in South Korea, this study aimed to explore the progression of metabolic risk factors in living kidney donors compared to a control group. @*Methods@#This study enrolled living kidney donors from seven hospitals from 1982 to 2016. The controls were individuals that voluntarily received health check-ups from 1995 to 2016 that were matched with donors according to age, sex, diabetes status, baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate, and date of the medical record. Data on hyperuricemia, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and overweight/obesity were collected to determine metabolic risks. The proportion of individuals with three or more metabolic risk factors was evaluated. Logistic regressions with interaction terms between the medical record date and donor status were used to compare the trends in metabolic risks over time in the two groups. @*Results@#A total of 2,018 living kidney donors and matched non-donors were included. The median age was 44.0 years (interquartile range, 34.0–51.0 years) and 54% were women. The living kidney donors showed a lower absolute prevalence for all metabolic risk factors, except for those that were overweight/obese, than the non-donors. The proportion of subjects that were overweight/obese was consistently higher over time in the donor group. The changes over time in the prevalence of each metabolic risk were not significantly different between groups, except for a lower prevalence of metabolic risk factors ≥ 3 in donors. @*Conclusion@#Over time, metabolic risks in living kidney donors are generally the same as in non-donors, except for a lower prevalence of metabolic risk factors ≥ 3 in donors.

10.
Keimyung Medical Journal ; : 108-113, 2021.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-917028

ABSTRACT

A high body temperature, i.e. fever, is a crucial vital sign, and suggests the patient’s infection or inflammation. COVID-19 has changed the lifestyle, and led to the changes in medical use behavior of febrile patients. We investigated the change in etiologies of fever in the emergency department (ED) before and after COVID-19. The medical records of patients with fever who visited the ED of a university hospital before and after the outbreak of COVID-19 in Daegu metropolitan city, South Korea. The cause of fever and its classification were carefully decided and established by agreement through a discussion among board-certified clinicians in emergency medicine, neurology, general surgery, and internal medicine. The etiology of fever and its prevalence in ED were compared between before and after COVID-19. A total of 3,041 patients with fever (> 37.7°C) in the ED were investigated, with 1,400 men (46.0%). Their mean age was 55.88 ± 20.59, and the average number of patients with fever in ED was 8.16 ± 3.94 per a day. The most common etiology before COVID-19 was respiratory system infection (n = 535, 30.5%), followed by gastrointestinal (n = 313, 17.8%) and urinary tract infection (n = 209, 11.9%). However, after COVID-19, gastrointestinal cause became the most common (n = 247, 27.3%), followed by respiratory system (n = 126, 13.9%) and urinary tract infection (n = 102, 11.3%). There has been paradigm-shifting in fever etiology in the emergency department. It is necessary to cope with the changed fever etiology in the COVID-19 era.

11.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-834951

ABSTRACT

Background@#Hypoalbuminemia reflects several pathological conditions, including nutritional deficiencies and chronic inflammation. However, its relationship with short-term and long-term mortality in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) remains unclear. The present study aimed to assess the effect of hypoalbuminemia on mortality in a large cohort of patients undergoing CRRT. @*Methods@#The study retrospectively reviewed 1,581 patients who underwent CRRT for the treatment of acute kidney injury from 2010 to 2016. The patients were categorized by tertiles of serum albumin levels at CRRT initiation. The odds ratios and hazard ratios for the risk of all-cause mortality were calculated before and after adjustment for multiple covariates. @*Results@#The mean albumin level was 2.7 ± 0.6 g/dL at CRRT initiation. During a median follow-up period of 14 days (maximum, 4 years), 1,040 patients (65.8%) died. The risk of overall mortality was higher in the first tertile group than in the third tertile group (hazard ratio, 1.9 [1.63-2.21]). When the mortality rate was stratified by timeframe, the risk was steadily higher in the first tertile group than in the third tertile group (odds ratios: 3.0 [2.34-3.87] for 2-week mortality, 2.7 [2.12-3.52] for 1-month mortality, 2.7 [2.08-3.53] for 6-month mortality, and 2.8 [2.11- 3.62] for 1-year mortality). Additionally, the rates of intensive care unit mortality and in-hospital mortality were higher in the first tertile group than in the third tertile group. @*Conclusion@#The initial hypoalbuminemia was independently associated with short-term and long-term mortality in patients undergoing CRRT. Thus, the serum albumin level should be monitored during CRRT.

12.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-834935

ABSTRACT

Background@#Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is linked to various chronic comorbidities, including chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, few large studies have addressed whether recovery from MetS is associated with reduction in the risks of such comorbidities. @*Methods@#This nationwide population-based study in Korea screened 10,664,268 people who received national health screening ≥ 3 times between 2012 and 2016. Those with a history of major cardiovascular events or preexisting CKD were excluded. We classified study groups into four, according to the course of MetS state, as defined by the harmonizing criteria. The main study outcome was incidental CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 which was persistent until the last health exams). The study outcomes were investigated using multivariable logistic regression analysis, which was adjusted for clinical variables and the previous severity of MetS. @*Results@#Four study groups included 6,315,301 subjects: 4,537,869 people without MetS, 1,034,605 with chronic MetS, 438,287 who developed MetS, and 304,540 who recovered from preexisting MetS. Those who developed MetS demonstrated higher risk of CKD (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.26 [1.23-1.29]) than did those who did not develop MetS. In contrast, MetSrecovery was associated with decreased risk of CKD (adjusted OR, 0.84 [0.82-0.86]) than that in people with chronic MetS. Among the MetS components, change in hypertension was associated with the largest difference in CKD risk. @*Conclusion@#Reducing or preventing MetS may reduce the burden of CKD on a population-scale. Clinicians should consider the clinical importance of altering MetS status for risk of CKD.

13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-758974

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cancer risk and epidemiology in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) warrant further investigation in a large-scale cohort. METHODS: We performed a nationwide population-based study using the national health insurance database of Korea. We screened records from 18,936,885 individuals who received a national health examination ≥ 2 times from 2009 to 2016. Pre-dialysis CKD was identified based on serum creatinine and dipstick albuminuria results. Individuals with preexisting cancer history, renal replacement therapy, or transient CKD were excluded. A control group without evidence of kidney function impairment and matched for age, sex, low-income status, and smoking history was included. Risk of cancers, as identified in the claims database, was investigated using a multivariable Cox regression model including matched variables and other unmatched clinical characteristics as covariates. RESULTS: A total of 471,758 people with pre-dialysis CKD and the same number of matched controls were included. Urinary (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.97; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.82–2.13) and hematopoietic (adjusted HR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.38–1.68) malignancy risk was increased in pre-dialysis CKD and all CKD stages. However, the risk of digestive cancer was lower in the pre-dialysis CKD group (adjusted HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.87–0.92). The risk of digestive, respiratory, thyroid, and prostate malignancy demonstrated a non-linear association with CKD stage, with stage 1 or stage 4/5 CKD without dialysis demonstrating relatively lower risk. CONCLUSION: Cancer risk varied in pre-dialysis CKD compared to controls, and the association between cancer risk and CKD stage varied depending on the cancer type.


Subject(s)
Albuminuria , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Creatinine , Dialysis , Epidemiology , Kidney , Korea , National Health Programs , Prostate , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Renal Replacement Therapy , Smoke , Smoking , Thyroid Gland
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-718618

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Woman kidney donors face obstetric complication risks after kidney donation, such as gestational hypertension and preeclampsia. Studies on childbirth-related complications among Asian women donors are scarce. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included woman donors aged 45 years or younger at the time of kidney donation in a single tertiary hospital between 1985 and 2014. Pregnancy associated complications were investigated using medical records and telephone questionnaires for 426 pregnancies among 225 donors. Matched non-donor controls were selected by propensity score and the maternal and fetal outcomes were compared with those of donors. Primary outcomes were differences in maternal complications, and secondary outcomes were fetal outcomes in pregnancies of the donor and control groups. RESULTS: A total of 56 cases had post-donation pregnancies. The post-donation pregnancies group was younger at the time of donation and older at the time of delivery than the pre-donation pregnancies group, and there were no differences in primary outcomes between the groups except the proportion receiving cesarean section. Comparison of the complication risk between post-donation pregnancies and non-donor matched controls showed no significant differences in gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, or composite outcomes after propensity score matching including age at delivery, era at pregnancy, systolic blood pressure, body weight, and estimated glomerular filtration ratio (odds ratio, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.19–2.14; P = 0.724). CONCLUSION: This study revealed that maternal and fetal outcomes between woman kidney donors and non-donor matched controls were comparable. Studies with general population pregnancy controls are warranted to compare pregnancy outcomes for donors.


Subject(s)
Asians , Blood Pressure , Body Weight , Cesarean Section , Cohort Studies , Female , Filtration , Humans , Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced , Kidney , Medical Records , Pre-Eclampsia , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnancy , Propensity Score , Retrospective Studies , Telephone , Tertiary Care Centers , Tissue Donors
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-715582

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to narrow the gap between global guidelines and local practices, we recently established domestic recommendations by adapting the international guidelines for management of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). This study was undertaken to determine whether application of this guideline adaptation was associated with improved serum mineral profiles in patients with CKD-MBD. METHODS: A total of 355 patients on MHD were enrolled from seven dialysis units. After adhering to our strategy for one year, serum phosphorus, calcium, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), and alkaline phosphatase (AP) levels were compared with the baseline. The endpoint was improvement in the proportion of patients with serum mineral levels at target recommendations. RESULTS: The median serum phosphorus level and proportion of patients with serum phosphorus within the target range were not changed. Although the median serum calcium level was significantly increased, the proportion of patients with serum calcium within the target range was not significantly affected. The proportion of patients with serum iPTH at the target level was not altered, although the median serum iPTH was significantly decreased. However, both median serum AP and the proportion of patients with serum AP at the target level (70.4% vs. 89.6%, P < 0.001) were improved. CONCLUSION: In our patients with MHD, serum mineral profiles were altered and the serum AP level stabilized after implementing our recommendations. Long-term follow-up evaluations are necessary to determine whether uremic bone disease and cardiovascular calcifications are affected by these recommendations.


Subject(s)
Alkaline Phosphatase , Bone Diseases , Calcium , Dialysis , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary , Kidney , Miners , Parathyroid Hormone , Phosphorus , Quality Improvement , Renal Dialysis
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-715296

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is an important treatment modality for severe acute kidney injury. As such, the epidemiology of CRRT in Korea needs further investigation. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide, population-based study analyzing the claims data from National Health Insurance Service of Korea. All index intensive care unit admission cases of CRRT in government-designated tertiary referral hospitals in Korea from 2005 to 2016 were included. Patients with a history of renal replacement therapy or who were under 20 years old were not considered. In addition to baseline and treatment characteristics, patient outcomes, including all-cause mortality and renal survival rates, were investigated. We stratified the study patients according to 3-year time periods and major regions of the nation. RESULTS: We included 37,337 patients who received CRRT in Korea. The overall use of CRRT increased over time, and more than 80% of cases of acute renal replacement therapy were CRRT after 2014. Seoul was the region in which the majority of CRRT (45.0%) was performed. The clinical characteristics of CRRT patients were significantly different among time-intervals and regions. Both all-cause mortality and renal survival rates after CRRT were prominently improved in the recent time periods (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: CRRT is a widely used treatment strategy for severe acute kidney injury in Korea. The prognosis of CRRT patients has improved compared to the past. This epidemiological study of CRRT in Korea revealed notable trends with regard to time period and geographic region.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , Critical Care , Dialysis , Epidemiologic Studies , Epidemiology , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Korea , Mortality , National Health Programs , Prognosis , Renal Replacement Therapy , Seoul , Survival Rate , Tertiary Care Centers
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-145684

ABSTRACT

A 42-year-old man came to the hospital presenting chest discomfort and general weakness. He had come to the hospital with the same symptoms 3 months ago and 12 years prior. His laboratory test showed hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. The arterial blood gas analysis showed hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis. He had an ultrasonography guided renal biopsy, the result was normal at light microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy. However, a special stain for Na-Cl cotransporter was weakly expressed compared with the control. The patient and his family underwent genetic sequencing about the SLC12A3 gene. He had a homozygous mutation in the 179th nucleotide of Exon 1 on the SLC12A3 gene (p.Thr60Met) and his parents and sisters were diagnosed as carrier state of Gitelman's syndrome (GS). GS is an inherited tubular disorder which presents mild hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. Since the symptoms and laboratory results are not severe, it can go unnoticed by physicians. Herein we present a family with GS, diagnosed by genetic sequencing.


Subject(s)
Adult , Alkalosis , Biopsy , Blood Gas Analysis , Carrier State , Cytosine , Exons , Gitelman Syndrome , Humans , Hypokalemia , Microscopy , Microscopy, Fluorescence , Mutation, Missense , Parents , Pedigree , Siblings , Solute Carrier Family 12, Member 3 , Thorax , Threonine , Ultrasonography
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-67988

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.


Subject(s)
Enteritis , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-45801

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Thymoglobulin has been used for induction therapy to prevent acute rejection and delayed graft function (DGF) in kidney transplant patients. However, the usual dose of thymoglobulin is considered to be related with frequent infection. We compared the efficacy and safety of low-dose thymoglobulin to high-dose treatment in high risk recipients with kidney transplantation. METHODS: Twenty-one kidney transplant recipients underwent induction treatment with thymoglobulin and were divided into two groups: patients treated with low-dose (<6.0 mg/kg) and high-dose thymoglobulin (≥6.0 mg/kg). All patients showed one or more risk factors for acute rejection or DGF. The risk factors were re-transplantation, recipient or donor age over 60 years, human leukocyte antigen full mismatch, and panel-reactive antibody more than 50%. We compared incidence of acute rejection, infection, hematologic complications, and graft survival between two groups. RESULTS: The demographic characteristics of the two groups were comparable. Mean follow-up duration was 11.9±4.3 months, and cumulative thymoglobulin dosage was 6.3±1.6 mg/kg. The incidence rates of acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), DGF and infectious events as cytomegalovirus disease, or urinary tract infection were not significantly different between the two groups. Neutropenia occurred more frequently in the high-dose thymoglobulin group, but there was no statistically significant difference. The rate of graft loss were similar between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: There were no differences in graft survival, infectious disease, and hematologic problems between the two groups. We suggest to lower the dose of thymoglobulin to less than 6 mg/kg for prevent acute AMR and DGF in high risk patients.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases , Cytomegalovirus , Delayed Graft Function , Follow-Up Studies , Graft Survival , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents , Incidence , Kidney Transplantation , Kidney , Leukocytes , Neutropenia , Risk Factors , Tissue Donors , Transplant Recipients , Transplants , Urinary Tract Infections
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-86000

ABSTRACT

Tumoral calcinosis is a rare complication in uremic patients. An in-depth review of published literature suggests that most patients with uremic tumoral calcinosis do not respond to medical treatment. Here, we report the case of a patient on peritoneal dialysis who presented with infected multifocal masses on both hip joints and was successfully treated by medical intervention. The patient was diagnosed with uremic tumoral calcinosis by physical examination and radiologic imaging, and treated with low-calcium dialysis and a non-calcium phosphate binder, sevelamer, without increasing the dose of dialysis. At the 36-month follow-up, the majority of masses had disappeared and the patient was asymptomatic.


Subject(s)
Calcinosis , Dialysis , Follow-Up Studies , Hip Joint , Humans , Peritoneal Dialysis , Physical Examination , Sevelamer
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