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1.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : e379-2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1001171

ABSTRACT

Background@#There is a strong correlation between risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) and aortic aneurysm (AA). We aimed to investigate the prevalence and prognostic impact of CAD and AA in patients who underwent coronary aorta computed tomography (CACT) protocol, which allowed simultaneous evaluation of coronary artery and aorta. @*Methods@#Between 2010 and 2021, 1,553 patients who underwent CACT were enrolled from a tertiary center. The presence and location of AA and the presence of CAD were identified from CT. The primary outcome was a composite of cardiovascular death, acute coronary syndrome requiring urgent revascularization, and stroke at 3 years after the index CT scan. @*Results@#Out of 1,553 enrolled patients, 179 (11.5%) had AA. The prevalence of CAD was significantly higher in patients with AA than those without (47.5% vs. 18.3%, P < 0.001). Among patients with AA, the prevalence of comorbid CAD was higher in those with abdominal AA than thoracic AA (57.3% vs. 37.8%, P = 0.014), respectively. In multivariable analysis, the presence of CAD was an independent predictor of primary outcome at 3 years (hazard ratio [HR], 2.58; 95% CI, 1.47–4.51; P = 0.001), while AA was not (HR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.48–2.07; P = 0.993). @*Conclusion@#In this cohort of patients undergoing simultaneous evaluation of coronary artery and aorta using CACT protocol, patients with AA had an increased risk of comorbid CAD compared to those without AA. CAD was independently associated with adverse clinical outcomes at 3 years.

2.
Journal of the Korean Radiological Society ; : 444-449, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-926428

ABSTRACT

Most cardiac tumors are metastases, and primary cardiac tumors are rare; even among primary cardiac tumors, primary cardiac neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are extremely rare. Herein, we report a case of a patient presenting a left atrial mass without past medical history. Because of the location and movement of the mass, as well as the patient's cerebral infarction episode, the mass was initially suspected to be a thrombus. However, the mass was surgically diagnosed as NET.

3.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : e62-2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-925899

ABSTRACT

Background@#Reduced exercise capacity reflects symptom severity and clinical outcomes in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The present study aimed to identify factors that may affect exercise capacity in patients with HCM. @*Methods@#In 294 patients with HCM and preserved left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, we compared peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2 ) evaluated by cardiopulmonary exercise testing as a representative parameter of exercise tolerance with clinical and laboratory data, including N-terminal pro-hormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), diastolic parameters on echocardiography, and the grade of myocardial fibrosis on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). @*Results@#Median peak VO2 , was 29.0 mL/kg/min (interquartile range [IQR], 25.0–34.0). Age (estimated β = −0.140, P < 0.001), female sex (β = −5.362, P < 0.001), NT-proBNP (β = −1.256, P < 0.001), and E/e′ ratio on echocardiography (β = −0.209, P = 0.019) were significantly associated with exercise capacity. Peak VO2 was not associated with the amount of myocardial fibrosis on CMR (mean of late gadolinium enhancement 12.25 ± 9.67%LV). @*Conclusion@#Decreased exercise capacity was associated with age, female sex, increased NTproBNP level, and E/e′ ratio on echocardiography. Hemodynamic changes and increased filling pressure on echocardiography should be monitored in this population for improved outcomes.

4.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 1266-1278, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-902428

ABSTRACT

Objective@#We aimed to compare the aortic valve area (AVA) calculated using fast high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) image acquisition with that of the conventional two-dimensional (2D) cine MR technique. @*Materials and Methods@#We included 139 consecutive patients (mean age ± standard deviation [SD], 68.5 ± 9.4 years) with aortic valvular stenosis (AS) and 21 asymptomatic controls (52.3 ± 14.2 years). High-resolution T2-prepared 3D steady-state free precession (SSFP) images (2.0 mm slice thickness, 10 contiguous slices) for 3D planimetry (3DP) were acquired with a single breath hold during mid-systole. 2D SSFP cine MR images (6.0 mm slice thickness) for 2D planimetry (2DP) were also obtained at three aortic valve levels. The calculations for the effective AVA based on the MR images were compared with the transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE) measurements using the continuity equation. @*Results@#The mean AVA ± SD derived by 3DP, 2DP, and TTE in the AS group were 0.81 ± 0.26 cm2 , 0.82 ± 0.34 cm2 , and 0.80 ± 0.26 cm2 , respectively (p = 0.366). The intra-observer agreement was higher for 3DP than 2DP in one observer: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94–0.97) and 0.87 (95% CI, 0.82–0.91), respectively, for observer 1 and 0.97 (95% CI, 0.96–0.98) and 0.98 (95% CI, 0.97–0.99), respectively, for observer 2. Inter-observer agreement was similar between 3DP and 2DP, with the ICC of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.89–0.94) and 0.91 (95% CI, 0.88–0.93), respectively. 3DP-derived AVA showed a slightly higher agreement with AVA measured by TTE than the 2DP-derived AVA, with the ICC of 0.87 (95% CI, 0.82–0.91) vs. 0.85 (95% CI, 0.79–0.89). @*Conclusion@#High-resolution 3D MR image acquisition, with single-breath-hold SSFP sequences, gave AVA measurement with low observer variability that correlated highly with those obtained by TTE.

5.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 324-333, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-875297

ABSTRACT

Objective@#The clinical course of an individual patient with heart failure is unpredictable with left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) only. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived myocardial fibrosis extent and to determine the cutoff value for event-free survival in patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM) who had severely reduced LVEF. @*Materials and Methods@#Our prospective cohort study included 78 NICM patients with significantly reduced LV systolic function (LVEF < 35%). CMR images were analyzed for the presence and extent of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). The primary outcome was major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), defined as a composite of cardiac death, heart transplantation, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator discharge for major arrhythmia, and hospitalization for congestive heart failure within 5 years after enrollment. @*Results@#A total of 80.8% (n = 63) of enrolled patients had LGE, with the median LVEF of 25.4% (19.8–32.4%). The extent of myocardial scarring was significantly higher in patients who experienced MACE than in those without any cardiac events (22.0 [5.5–46.1] %LV vs. 6.7 [0–17.1] %LV, respectively, p = 0.008). During follow-up, 51.4% of patients with LGE ≥ 12.0 %LV experienced MACE, along with 20.9% of those with LGE ≤ 12.0 %LV (log-rank p = 0.001). According to multivariate analysis, LGE extent more than 12.0 %LV was independently associated with MACE (adjusted hazard ratio, 6.71; 95% confidence interval, 2.54–17.74; p < 0.001). @*Conclusion@#In NICM patients with significantly reduced LV systolic function, the extent of LGE is a strong predictor for longterm adverse cardiac outcomes. Event-free survival was well discriminated with an LGE cutoff value of 12.0 %LV in these patients.

6.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 1266-1278, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-894724

ABSTRACT

Objective@#We aimed to compare the aortic valve area (AVA) calculated using fast high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) image acquisition with that of the conventional two-dimensional (2D) cine MR technique. @*Materials and Methods@#We included 139 consecutive patients (mean age ± standard deviation [SD], 68.5 ± 9.4 years) with aortic valvular stenosis (AS) and 21 asymptomatic controls (52.3 ± 14.2 years). High-resolution T2-prepared 3D steady-state free precession (SSFP) images (2.0 mm slice thickness, 10 contiguous slices) for 3D planimetry (3DP) were acquired with a single breath hold during mid-systole. 2D SSFP cine MR images (6.0 mm slice thickness) for 2D planimetry (2DP) were also obtained at three aortic valve levels. The calculations for the effective AVA based on the MR images were compared with the transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE) measurements using the continuity equation. @*Results@#The mean AVA ± SD derived by 3DP, 2DP, and TTE in the AS group were 0.81 ± 0.26 cm2 , 0.82 ± 0.34 cm2 , and 0.80 ± 0.26 cm2 , respectively (p = 0.366). The intra-observer agreement was higher for 3DP than 2DP in one observer: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94–0.97) and 0.87 (95% CI, 0.82–0.91), respectively, for observer 1 and 0.97 (95% CI, 0.96–0.98) and 0.98 (95% CI, 0.97–0.99), respectively, for observer 2. Inter-observer agreement was similar between 3DP and 2DP, with the ICC of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.89–0.94) and 0.91 (95% CI, 0.88–0.93), respectively. 3DP-derived AVA showed a slightly higher agreement with AVA measured by TTE than the 2DP-derived AVA, with the ICC of 0.87 (95% CI, 0.82–0.91) vs. 0.85 (95% CI, 0.79–0.89). @*Conclusion@#High-resolution 3D MR image acquisition, with single-breath-hold SSFP sequences, gave AVA measurement with low observer variability that correlated highly with those obtained by TTE.

7.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 1283-1283, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-902383

ABSTRACT

We are pleased to announce that Seong Ho Park, MD, PhD has been appointed as the new editor-in-chief for the Korean Journal of Radiology (KJR) by professor Joo Hyeong Oh, President of the Korean Society of Radiology (KSR), on behalf of KSR. His term begins in January 2021, replacing Yeon Hyeon Choe, MD, PhD, who is the current editor-in-chief.Seong Ho Park, MD, PhD is a professor in the Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology at Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Korea. Dr. Park graduated from Seoul National University, College of Medicine in 1996. He received radiology residency training at Seoul National University Hospital and abdominal radiology fellowship training at Asan Medical Center.Dr. Park is an experienced clinical practitioner and a world-renowned scholar in the field of gastrointestinal radiology. He has published numerous research papers in the academic area, particularly regarding the imaging-based diagnosis of colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel diseases. Dr. Park also has extensive expertise in clinical research methodology and biostatistics. Most importantly, Dr. Park has vast experience as an editor or a peer reviewer for academic journals, which distinguishes him as an excellent candidate for the editor-in-chief for KJR among prolific scholars in the field of radiology. Dr. Park has served or has been serving as a deputy editor for KJR (2008–present), an associate editor for Radiology (2012–2017; Gastrointestinal Imaging section: 2019–present; Artificial Intelligence and Radiomics section), an assistant editor for the American Journal of Roentgenology (2014–2020), and a consultant to the editor for Radiology (2018). I believe that Dr. Park will be an excellent asset for KJR who will facilitate further improvements in the quality and influence of the journal.

8.
Journal of the Korean Radiological Society ; : 1523-1528, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-901285

ABSTRACT

Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR) is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly that can be difficult to detect and often remains undiagnosed. PAPVR is diagnosed using non-invasive imaging techniques such as echocardiography, CT, and MRI. Image data are reviewed on a 2-dimensional (D) monitor, which may not facilitate a good understanding of the complex 3D heart structure. In recent years, 3D printing technology, which allows the creation of physical cardiac models using source image datasets obtained from cardiac CT or MRI, has been increasingly used in the medical field. We report a case involving a 3D-printed model of PAPVR with a biatrial connection. This model demonstrated separate drainages of the right upper and middle pulmonary veins into the lower superior vena cava (SVC) and the junction between the SVC and the right atrium, respectively, with biatrial communication through the right middle pulmonary vein.

9.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 1283-1283, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-894679

ABSTRACT

We are pleased to announce that Seong Ho Park, MD, PhD has been appointed as the new editor-in-chief for the Korean Journal of Radiology (KJR) by professor Joo Hyeong Oh, President of the Korean Society of Radiology (KSR), on behalf of KSR. His term begins in January 2021, replacing Yeon Hyeon Choe, MD, PhD, who is the current editor-in-chief.Seong Ho Park, MD, PhD is a professor in the Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology at Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Korea. Dr. Park graduated from Seoul National University, College of Medicine in 1996. He received radiology residency training at Seoul National University Hospital and abdominal radiology fellowship training at Asan Medical Center.Dr. Park is an experienced clinical practitioner and a world-renowned scholar in the field of gastrointestinal radiology. He has published numerous research papers in the academic area, particularly regarding the imaging-based diagnosis of colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel diseases. Dr. Park also has extensive expertise in clinical research methodology and biostatistics. Most importantly, Dr. Park has vast experience as an editor or a peer reviewer for academic journals, which distinguishes him as an excellent candidate for the editor-in-chief for KJR among prolific scholars in the field of radiology. Dr. Park has served or has been serving as a deputy editor for KJR (2008–present), an associate editor for Radiology (2012–2017; Gastrointestinal Imaging section: 2019–present; Artificial Intelligence and Radiomics section), an assistant editor for the American Journal of Roentgenology (2014–2020), and a consultant to the editor for Radiology (2018). I believe that Dr. Park will be an excellent asset for KJR who will facilitate further improvements in the quality and influence of the journal.

10.
Journal of the Korean Radiological Society ; : 1523-1528, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-893581

ABSTRACT

Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR) is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly that can be difficult to detect and often remains undiagnosed. PAPVR is diagnosed using non-invasive imaging techniques such as echocardiography, CT, and MRI. Image data are reviewed on a 2-dimensional (D) monitor, which may not facilitate a good understanding of the complex 3D heart structure. In recent years, 3D printing technology, which allows the creation of physical cardiac models using source image datasets obtained from cardiac CT or MRI, has been increasingly used in the medical field. We report a case involving a 3D-printed model of PAPVR with a biatrial connection. This model demonstrated separate drainages of the right upper and middle pulmonary veins into the lower superior vena cava (SVC) and the junction between the SVC and the right atrium, respectively, with biatrial communication through the right middle pulmonary vein.

11.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 1-3, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-782176

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.

12.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 4-4, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-782175

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.


Subject(s)
Breast
13.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 1491-1497, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-760260

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the natural course of coronary-to-pulmonary artery fistula (CPAF) detected on coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and to propose potential treatment strategies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this retrospective multicenter study, we assessed the CCTA reports of 188 CPAF patients evaluated between March 2009 and June 2016. Fifty-seven patients were excluded because their follow-up (FU) periods were less than 2 years. Information regarding demographic characteristics, past history, treatment method, and the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) during the FU period was collected. We analyzed the morphologic features of CPAF and the various factors associated with surgical treatment. Patients who had undergone FU CCTA after being diagnosed with CPAF were assessed for the presence of morphological changes on FU imaging. RESULTS: The median age of the study population was 63.0 years (range, 57.0–72.0 years), and the median FU period was 5.72 years (range, 4.08–6.96 years). The most common origin of the CPAF was both coronary arteries in 76 (58.0%) cases. An aneurysm or aneurysms was/were present in 41 (31.3%) cases. Fifty-four (41.2%) fistulas were less than 2 mm in size. Eight patients underwent surgery, and 123 (93.9%) patients received optimal medical treatment (OMT). The fistula size was significantly different between the two treatment groups (p = 0.013) and was the only factor associated with surgical treatment (odds ratio = 1.14, p = 0.021). Only one patient in the OMT group reported MACE during the FU period due to preexisting coronary artery disease. Twenty-nine patients (22.1%) underwent FU CCTA after CPAF diagnosis, with a median FU period of 3.81 years. None of the patients in the OMT group demonstrated morphological changes in the CPAF on FU imaging. CONCLUSION: Most CPAFs identified on CCTA have a favorable prognosis. Observation with OMT is usually an appropriate strategy. Fistula size is a possible determinant for surgical treatment.


Subject(s)
Adult , Humans , Aneurysm , Angiography , Arteries , Coronary Artery Disease , Coronary Vessels , Diagnosis , Fistula , Follow-Up Studies , Methods , Natural History , Prognosis , Pulmonary Artery , Retrospective Studies , Vascular Fistula
14.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 181-181, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-741409

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.

15.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 1555-1561, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-786374

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.

16.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 1-3, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-719603

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.

17.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 4-4, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-719602

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.

18.
The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine ; : 233-234, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-719446

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.


Subject(s)
Humans , Aortic Valve Insufficiency , Aortic Valve
19.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 1-3, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-741393

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , Radiography , Radiology , Peer Review, Research , Periodicals as Topic
20.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 4-4, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-741392
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