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1.
Journal of the Korean Society of Emergency Medicine ; : 462-466, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1001873

ABSTRACT

Objective@#This case report was intended to report on a rare cause of spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM). @*Methods@#When a patient with Crohn's disease (CD) visited our hospital for pneumomediastinum, a disease activity evaluation was performed, and specific questions were asked to identify possible causes of SPM. @*Results@#The disease status of CD was confirmed as in active by evaluation. Specific questions about situations requiring the Valsalva maneuver, including vigorous exercise, lifting heavy objects, and difficult stool passage, were asked, but none were applicable. When asked an open question regarding incidents related to deep breathing, the patient answered that he had recently started smoking an electronic cigarette which required taking deep breaths. @*Conclusion@#Even when there is an underlying disease, specific history-taking is important if the possibility of complications related to the underlying disease is low. A new wave of previously unseen complications has emerged in parallel with increased electronic cigarette use.

2.
Annals of Dermatology ; : S107-S111, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-976673

ABSTRACT

Pyoderma gangrenosum is one of the dermatological extra-intestinal manifestations of ulcerative colitis (UC). We report a case of a 26-year-old male patient suffering from relapsed UC with a newly developed pyoderma gangrenosum. His skin and intestinal symptoms were intractable to treatment with steroids, immunosuppressants, or a single biological agent such as infliximab, golimumab, or vedolizumab. For the first time in Korea, we report a successful treatment experience of pyoderma gangrenosum in UC using dual biological agents, vedolizumab and infliximab. We strategically targeted each of the intestinal and skin symptoms, with a specific biological agent based on the drug’s mechanism of action.

3.
Gut and Liver ; : 71-80, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-914384

ABSTRACT

Background/aims@#The efficacy of biologics for the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD) is affected by the drug concentrations. We aimed to evaluate the importance of albumin and globulin which are known to be associated with drug concentrations as prognostic biomarkers in CD. @*Methods@#In total, 121 pediatric patients with CD who had received anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α therapy were retrospectively examined between January 2010 and February 2019. @*Results@#Relapse was observed in 48.8% of patients (59/121). The level of calprotectin (odds ratio, 2.13; p=0.03) and the albumin-to-globulin ratio (AGR) at 1 year after anti-TNF-α therapy (odds ratio, 0.0002; p=0.003) were associated with relapse. The AGR at 1 year after anti-TNF-α therapy was the only factor associated with the time-to-relapse (hazard ratio, 0.02; p<0.001). The optimal AGR cutoff value for the prediction of relapse was 1.47 (area under the curve, 0.916; p<0.001). The median infliximab trough level (TL) was lower in patients with AGRs <1.47 than in those with AGRs ≥1.47. Anti-drug antibody (ADA) concentrations were negatively correlated with the AGR at 1 year of anti-TNF-α therapy (r=-0.413, p=0.032). @*Conclusions@#AGR can be used to predict relapse. Patients with AGRs <1.47 at 1 year after anti-TNF-α therapy are more likely to have low drug TLs and develop ADAs, which increase the possibility of relapse than those with AGRs ≥1.47. Therefore, if the AGR at 1 year after anti-TNF-α therapy is less than 1.47, clinicians should monitor disease activity, assess the TLs of the anti-TNF-α agents, test for ADAs and determine the appropriate therapeutic strategies.

4.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 470-473, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-904258

ABSTRACT

Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL) can cause leakage of lymphatic fluids into the gastrointestinal tract, eventually leading to protein-losing enteropathy. A 15-year-old male patient, whose disease began at the age of 8 years, recently felt worsening general weakness. After diagnosing abnormal lymphatic lesions in the duodenum through endoscopy with biopsy and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance lymphangiography, glue embolization of the leaking duodenal lymphatic channel was successfully performed. This procedure is typically reserved for adult patients, although as shown in this case, it can be properly performed in children. His serum albumin level was initially 1.5 g/dL, but elevated to 5.0 g/dL after two sessions of lymphatic embolization. Accordingly, we suggest that embolization could potentially be considered a first-line treatment for focal lesions of primary intestinal IL.

5.
Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition ; : 413-422, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-903126

ABSTRACT

Intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease which is causing protein-losing enteropathy.Treatment of intestinal lymphangiectasia can be a challenge for clinicians because of the lack of specific guidelines regarding pharmacological indications. We sought to introduce a diagnostic approach and suggest guidelines for treatment. After exclusion of secondary intestinal lymphangiectasia, magnetic resonance lymphangiography is a promising tool for the assessment of abnormal lymphatic lesions in primary intestinal lymphangiectasia.Determining the extent of the lesion provides direction for treatment options. Focal shortsegment intestinal lymphangiectasia can be treated via intestinal resection or radiologic embolization after dietary therapy failure. Diffuse intestinal lymphangiectasia and extensive lymphangiectasia should be treated with several drugs with a full understanding of their mechanisms.

6.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 470-473, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-896554

ABSTRACT

Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL) can cause leakage of lymphatic fluids into the gastrointestinal tract, eventually leading to protein-losing enteropathy. A 15-year-old male patient, whose disease began at the age of 8 years, recently felt worsening general weakness. After diagnosing abnormal lymphatic lesions in the duodenum through endoscopy with biopsy and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance lymphangiography, glue embolization of the leaking duodenal lymphatic channel was successfully performed. This procedure is typically reserved for adult patients, although as shown in this case, it can be properly performed in children. His serum albumin level was initially 1.5 g/dL, but elevated to 5.0 g/dL after two sessions of lymphatic embolization. Accordingly, we suggest that embolization could potentially be considered a first-line treatment for focal lesions of primary intestinal IL.

7.
Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition ; : 413-422, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-895422

ABSTRACT

Intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease which is causing protein-losing enteropathy.Treatment of intestinal lymphangiectasia can be a challenge for clinicians because of the lack of specific guidelines regarding pharmacological indications. We sought to introduce a diagnostic approach and suggest guidelines for treatment. After exclusion of secondary intestinal lymphangiectasia, magnetic resonance lymphangiography is a promising tool for the assessment of abnormal lymphatic lesions in primary intestinal lymphangiectasia.Determining the extent of the lesion provides direction for treatment options. Focal shortsegment intestinal lymphangiectasia can be treated via intestinal resection or radiologic embolization after dietary therapy failure. Diffuse intestinal lymphangiectasia and extensive lymphangiectasia should be treated with several drugs with a full understanding of their mechanisms.

8.
Clinical Pediatric Hematology-Oncology ; : 124-128, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-832103

ABSTRACT

In children and adolescents, acute pancreatitis is a rare cause of abdominal pain.The causes of pancreatitis in children are various including infection and drugs, but the overall cause of this condition in a pediatric patient is sometimes unknown. We describe a case of Burkitt lymphoma which showed acute pancreatitis findings as an initial presentation. In this case, a 16-year-old boy presented with abdominal pain in the left upper quadrant that had been present for one month. Pancreatitis was suspected due to high amylase and lipase and the computed tomography findings in the patient, which showed swelling and adjacent infiltration of the pancreas. However, initial treatments did not improve the patient’s symptoms. The following imaging studies showed mass-like lesions involving the pancreas, distal duodenum and jejunum associated with mesenteric lymphadenopathy that suggested a lymphoma in this case. In the final analysis, the patient was diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma which was seen on bone marrow biopsies and also found on the small bowel tissue biopsies.

9.
Korean Journal of Pediatrics ; : 422-427, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-786353

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Polyomavirus BK (BKV) infection is an important cause of graft loss in kidney transplant patients.PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical findings and risk factors for BKV in pediatric patients after kidney transplantation.METHODS: This retrospective single-center study included 31 pediatric kidney transplant recipients from January 2002 to December 2017. Two patients received 2 transplantations during the study period, and each transplant was analyzed independently. Total number of cases is 33 cases with 31 patients. BKV infection was confirmed from blood samples via periodic quantitative polymerase chain reaction.RESULTS: The mean age at kidney transplantation was 11.0±4.7 years, and the male-to-female ratio was 2.7:1. Three patients had a past medical history of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem-cell transplantation for solid tumors. Nine patients (27.3%) developed BKV infection. The median period from kidney transplantation to BKV detection in blood was 5.6 months. There was no statistically significant difference in estimated glomerular filtration rate between patients with and those without BKV infection. Among 9 patients with BKV viremia, 7 were treated by reducing their immunosuppressant dose, and BKV was cleared in 6 of these 7 patients. In the other 2 BKV-positive patients, viremia improved without immunosuppressant reduction.CONCLUSION: BKV infection is common in children with kidney transplantation and might not have affected short-term renal function in our patient sample due to early immunosuppressant reduction at the time of BKV detection.


Subject(s)
Child , Humans , BK Virus , Drug Therapy , Glomerular Filtration Rate , Kidney Transplantation , Kidney , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Polyomavirus , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Transplant Recipients , Transplants , Viremia
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