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1.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-835659

ABSTRACT

Objective@#Intracranial aneurysm most frequently occurs in old aged patients; however, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has been occasionally reported in young adults. This study aimed to compare patients with intracranial aneurysms younger than 40 years with those ≥40 years and investigates the characteristics of their ruptured aneurysm. @*Methods@#We retrospectively collected the data of 389 patients (103 patients aged 20 to 39 years; 286 patients aged above 40 years) who were treated for ruptured cerebral aneurysms between January 2008 and December 2018 at our institution. @*Results@#The young adult patients were more often men and were smokers as compared to controls (63.1% vs. 39.2%, 40.5% vs. 36.0%, respectively). The young adult patients showed a tendency for lower Hunt and Hess grade, modified Fisher grade, less postoperative morbidity, and better clinical outcome. Aneurysm ruptures occurred most frequently in the anterior cerebral artery in both groups, but aneurysms ruptures in the internal carotid artery and posterior circulation was infrequent among young adult patients. The aneurysms in young adult patients were more often elongated or irregularly shaped (82.5% vs. 64.0%, respectively) and were significantly smaller (5.9 mm) than that in controls (6.8 mm). @*Conclusions@#Ruptured aneurysms of young adult patients have unique characteristics with regard to its preponderance in male smoker, elongated or irregular shape and relatively smaller size.

2.
Neurointervention ; : 35-42, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-741675

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to report the authors’ experience with external ventricular drainage (EVD) before endovascular treatment (EVT) in patients with acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and to investigate its relation to hemorrhagic complications. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between March 2010 and December 2017, a total of 122 patients were recruited who had an aSAH, underwent EVT to secure the ruptured aneurysm, and had EVD performed within 72 hours of rupture. The pre-embo EVD group (n=67) comprised patients who underwent EVD before EVT, and the post-embo EVD group (n=55) comprised those who underwent EVD after EVT. RESULTS: Overall, EVD-related hemorrhage occurred in 18 patients (14.8%): six (8.9%) in the pre-embo EVD group and 12 (21.8%) in the post-embo EVD group (P=0.065). No rebleeding occurred between EVD and EVT in the pre-embo EVD group. Clinical outcomes at discharge did not differ significantly between groups (P=0.384). At discharge, the final modified Rankin Scale score in patients who experienced pre-embo rebleeding was better in the pre-embo EVD group than in the post-embo EVD group (P=0.041). Current use of an antiplatelet agent or anticoagulant on admission (odds ratio [OR], 2.928; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.234–7.439; P=0.042) and stent use (OR, 2.430; 95% CI, 1.524–7.613; P=0.047) remained independent risk factors for EVD-related hemorrhagic complications. CONCLUSION: EVD before EVT in patients with aSAH in acute period did not increase the rate of rebleeding as well as EVD-related hemorrhagic complications. Thus, performing EVD before EVT may be beneficial by normalizing increased intracranial pressure. Especially in patients with rebleeding before the ruptured aneurysm is secured, pre-embo EVD may improve clinical outcomes at discharge.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Aneurysm, Ruptured , Drainage , Hemorrhage , Humans , Hydrocephalus , Intracranial Aneurysm , Intracranial Pressure , Risk Factors , Rupture , Stents , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-717475

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to reinterpret the neurodevelopmental prognostic factors that are associated with birth head injury by performing a long-term follow-up. METHODS: Seventy-three neonates with head injuries were retrospectively analyzed after a duration of 10.0±7.3 years to determine the correlations between perinatal factors, including gender, head circumference, gestational age, body weight, and mode of delivery, and head injury factors from radiologic imaging with social, fine motor, language, and motor developmental quotients. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant difference between perinatal factors and head injury factors with respect to head circumference, body weight, gestational age, mode of delivery, Apgar scores at 1 min, cephalohematoma, subdural hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and hypoxic injury, but no direct correlation by regression analysis was observed between perinatal factors and developmental quotients. Of the head injury factors, falx hemorrhage showed a significant indirect relationship with the language and motor developmental quotients. Mode of delivery, subgaleal hematoma, cephalohematoma, greenstick skull fracture, epidural hemorrhage (EDH), tentorial hemorrhage, brain swelling, and hypoxic injury showed an indirect relationship with social development. CONCLUSION: In terms of perinatal factors and head injury factors, mode of delivery, subgaleal hematoma, cephalohematoma, greenstick skull fracture, EDH, tentorial hemorrhage, falx hemorrhage, brain swelling, and hypoxic injury displayed an indirect relationship with long-term development, and therefore these factors require particular attention for perinatal care.


Subject(s)
Birth Injuries , Body Weight , Craniocerebral Trauma , Follow-Up Studies , Gestational Age , Head , Hematoma , Hematoma, Subdural , Hemorrhage , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intracranial Hemorrhages , Parturition , Perinatal Care , Retrospective Studies , Skull Fractures , Social Change , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
4.
Journal of Neurocritical Care ; (2): 99-106, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765886

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to survey the anatomical angiographic finding of the aneurysm and identify parameters associated with visual recovery of the patients with Terson syndrome (TS). METHODS: This retrospective study was conducted on 494 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from 2008 to 2015. Radiologists independently reviewed findings on computed tomography scans and cerebral digital subtraction angiography. Ophthalmologists conducted ophthalmological examinations for patients who had no communication problem. The degree of visual acuity recovery (DVAR) was measured based on the visual acuity difference between the initial and sixth-month follow-up. Favorable visual recovery was defined as DVAR >0.4. RESULTS: A total of 494 patients diagnosed with aneurysmal SAH were given admission to a single institute, of whom 171 received ophthalmological examinations. Of the total, 40 patients were diagnosed with TS and 54 eyeballs were affected by vitreous or retinal hemorrhage. In the multivariable analysis, male sex (odds ratio [OR] 9.530; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.824–49.801), favorable Glasgow coma scale (GCS) (≥13 points) (OR 8.073; 95% CI 1.226–53.148), and anterior orientation of aneurysm (OR 5.006; 95% CI 1.842–29.751) were identified as independent factors predicting favorable visual recovery after adjusting covariables. CONCLUSION: TS was identified in 23.4% of patients with aneurysmal SAH. Male sex, favorable GCS at admission, and anterior orientation of the aneurysm were identified as prognostic factors for favorable visual recovery. It is proposed that positive ophthalmologic consultation and treatment can be helpful in improving vision and quality of life of TS patients.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Follow-Up Studies , Glasgow Coma Scale , Humans , Male , Prognosis , Quality of Life , Retinal Hemorrhage , Retrospective Studies , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Visual Acuity
5.
Journal of Neurocritical Care ; (2): 126-128, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765881

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT) is a rare disease with severe insufficiency of platelet function. There are no reports of GT associated with a cerebral hemorrhage. CASE REPORT: A 45-year-old woman had a stuporous mentality. Her computed tomographic (CT) angiography revealed a rupture of the posterior cerebral artery aneurysm. Hunt-Hess grade was 4 points and Fisher grade was 3 points. A clipping of the aneurysm was performed and proceeded to external ventricular drainage for hydrocephalus after 6 days. But, a new hemorrhage was detected several times via a follow-up brain CT. Various blood tests were conducted to evaluate the bleeding tendency, and the GT was diagnosed with PFA-200. The ventriculoperitoneal shunt was performed after the platelets transfusion, and she was discharged without other complications. CONCLUSION: With nonspecific and recurrent intracranial hemorrhage, a GT should be included in the differential diagnosis, which is important in controlling bleeding during the surgery.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Aneurysm, Ruptured , Angiography , Blood Platelets , Brain , Cerebral Hemorrhage , Diagnosis, Differential , Drainage , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hematologic Tests , Hemorrhage , Humans , Hydrocephalus , Intracranial Aneurysm , Intracranial Hemorrhages , Middle Aged , Postoperative Hemorrhage , Rare Diseases , Rupture , Stupor , Thrombasthenia , Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt
6.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 403-409, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-141641

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose was to evaluate the incidence and risk factors for rebleeding during cerebral angiography in ruptured intracranial aneurysms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Among 1896 patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms between September 2006 and December 2013, a total of 11 patients who experienced rebleeding of the ruptured aneurysms during digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were recruited in this study. RESULTS: There were 184 patients (9.7%) who had suffered rebleeding prior to the securing procedure. Among them, 11 patients experienced rebleeding during DSA and other 173 patients at a time other than DSA. Eight (72.7%) of the 11 patients experienced rebleeding during three-dimensional rotational angiography (3DRA). The incidence of rebleeding during DSA was 0.6% in patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that aneurysm location in anterior circulation [odds ratio=14.286; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.877 to 250.0; p=0.048] and higher aspect ratio (odds ratio=3.040; 95% CI, 1.896 to 10.309; p=0.041) remained independent risk factors for rebleeding during DSA. CONCLUSION: Ruptured aneurysms located in anterior circulation with a high aspect ratio might have the risk of rebleeding during DSA, especially during 3DRA.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Aneurysm, Ruptured , Angiography, Digital Subtraction/methods , Cerebral Angiography/methods , Female , Humans , Imaging, Three-Dimensional/methods , Incidence , Intracranial Aneurysm/epidemiology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Recurrence , Risk Factors , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
7.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 403-409, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-141640

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose was to evaluate the incidence and risk factors for rebleeding during cerebral angiography in ruptured intracranial aneurysms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Among 1896 patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms between September 2006 and December 2013, a total of 11 patients who experienced rebleeding of the ruptured aneurysms during digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were recruited in this study. RESULTS: There were 184 patients (9.7%) who had suffered rebleeding prior to the securing procedure. Among them, 11 patients experienced rebleeding during DSA and other 173 patients at a time other than DSA. Eight (72.7%) of the 11 patients experienced rebleeding during three-dimensional rotational angiography (3DRA). The incidence of rebleeding during DSA was 0.6% in patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that aneurysm location in anterior circulation [odds ratio=14.286; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.877 to 250.0; p=0.048] and higher aspect ratio (odds ratio=3.040; 95% CI, 1.896 to 10.309; p=0.041) remained independent risk factors for rebleeding during DSA. CONCLUSION: Ruptured aneurysms located in anterior circulation with a high aspect ratio might have the risk of rebleeding during DSA, especially during 3DRA.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Aneurysm, Ruptured , Angiography, Digital Subtraction/methods , Cerebral Angiography/methods , Female , Humans , Imaging, Three-Dimensional/methods , Incidence , Intracranial Aneurysm/epidemiology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Recurrence , Risk Factors , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-193380

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical course of intracranial aneurysm in patients aged 65 years and older and the immediate outcome after its aggressive management. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis using the medical records of 159 elderly patients managed at our institute from September 2008 to December 2013. Obtained clinical information included age, sex, Hunt and Hess grade (HHG), aneurysm location, Fisher grade (FG) and the treatment modality. Concomitant clinical data aside from cerebrovascular condition (hypertension, diabetes, previous medication) were evaluated to determine risk factors that might affect the functional outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 108 patients (67.9%) presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and 51 (32.1%) with unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs). Coiling was performed in 101 patients and 58 patients underwent clipping. In the SAH population, 62 patients (57.4%) showed favorable outcomes, with a mortality rate of 11.3% (n = 18). In the UIAs population, 50 (98%) patients achieved 'excellent' and one (2%) achieved 'good' outcome. Factors including high-grade HHG (p < 0.001), advanced age (p = 0.014), and the presence of intraventricular hematoma (IVH) (p = 0.017) were significant predictors of poor outcome. CONCLUSION: SAH patients with high grade HHG and IVH are associated with poor outcome with statistical significance, all the more prominent the older the patient is. Therefore, the indication for aggressive therapy should be considered more carefully in these patients. However, as the outcomes for elderly patients with UIAs were excellent regardless of the treatment modality, aggressive treatment could always be considered in UIAs cases.


Subject(s)
Aged , Aneurysm , Hematoma , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Medical Records , Mortality , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-32512

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The beneficial effect of decompressive craniectomy in the treatment of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is controversial, but there is no debate that decompression should be performed before irreversible neurological deficit occurs. The aim of our study was to assess the value of ultra-early decompressive craniectomy in patients with severe TBI. METHODS: Total of 127 patients who underwent decompressive craniectomy from January 2007 to December 2013 was included in this study. Among them, 60 patients had underwent ultra-early (within 4 hours from injury) emergent operation for relief of increased intracranial pressure. Initial Glasgow coma scale, brain computed tomography (CT) scan features by Marshall CT classification, and time interval between injury and craniectomy were evaluated retrospectively. Clinical outcome was evaluated, using the modified Rankin score. RESULTS: The outcomes of ultra-early decompressive craniectomy group were not better than those in the comparison group (p=0.809). The overall mortality rate was 68.5% (87 patients). Six of all patients (4.7%) showed good outcomes, and 34 patients (26.8%) remained in a severely disabled or vegetative state. Forty of sixty patients (66.7%) had died, and two patients (3.3%) showed good outcomes at last follow-up. CONCLUSION: Ultra-early decompressive craniectomy for intracranial hypertension did not improve patient outcome when compared with "early or late" decompressive craniectomy for managing severe TBI.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries , Brain , Classification , Decompression , Decompressive Craniectomy , Follow-Up Studies , Glasgow Coma Scale , Humans , Intracranial Hypertension , Intracranial Pressure , Mortality , Persistent Vegetative State , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-141659

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: There is no clear treatment strategy for the management of multiple intracranial aneurysms because of variable anatomical distribution, difficult identification of the aneurysm ruptured, and poor overall outcomes. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of single-session coil embolization for multiple intracranial aneurysms. METHODS: Between September 2008 and December 2012, 209 aneurysms in 117 patients were treated at our institute. Twenty eight among the 117 patients had multiple aneurysms with a total of 71, and 60 of the 71 aneurysms underwent coil embolization in a single-session. RESULTS: A total of 60 aneurysms were treated with a single-session coil embolization, of which the most frequent locations were in the posterior communicating artery, followed by the middle cerebral artery. Immediate post-embolization angiographies showed total occlusion in 49 (81.7%) aneurysms, remnant neck in 6 (10%), and body-filling in 5 (8.3%). Procedure-related complications had developed in 2 (3.3%) of the 60 embolized aneurysms: an asymptomatic thromboembolic event, and a partial coil protrusion without a subsequent thromboembolic complication. CONCLUSION: With careful evaluation of individual aneurysm characteristics and configuration, multiple intracranial aneurysms previously thought to require multimodality therapy can be safely treated in a single-session coil embolization.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Angiography , Arteries , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Middle Cerebral Artery , Neck
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-141658

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: There is no clear treatment strategy for the management of multiple intracranial aneurysms because of variable anatomical distribution, difficult identification of the aneurysm ruptured, and poor overall outcomes. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of single-session coil embolization for multiple intracranial aneurysms. METHODS: Between September 2008 and December 2012, 209 aneurysms in 117 patients were treated at our institute. Twenty eight among the 117 patients had multiple aneurysms with a total of 71, and 60 of the 71 aneurysms underwent coil embolization in a single-session. RESULTS: A total of 60 aneurysms were treated with a single-session coil embolization, of which the most frequent locations were in the posterior communicating artery, followed by the middle cerebral artery. Immediate post-embolization angiographies showed total occlusion in 49 (81.7%) aneurysms, remnant neck in 6 (10%), and body-filling in 5 (8.3%). Procedure-related complications had developed in 2 (3.3%) of the 60 embolized aneurysms: an asymptomatic thromboembolic event, and a partial coil protrusion without a subsequent thromboembolic complication. CONCLUSION: With careful evaluation of individual aneurysm characteristics and configuration, multiple intracranial aneurysms previously thought to require multimodality therapy can be safely treated in a single-session coil embolization.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Angiography , Arteries , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Middle Cerebral Artery , Neck
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-63156

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate and compare the incidence of diffusion-weighted image (DWI) lesions between the Guglielmi detachable coil (GDC) and the Target coil for treating unruptured intracranial aneurysm. METHODS: From 2010 to 2011, consecutive 222 patients with an intracranial aneurysm underwent coil embolization. Inclusion criterias were : 1) unruptured intracranial aneurysm, 2) one or more GDC or Target coils used with or without other coils, 3) DWI examination within 24 hours after coiling, and 4) coiling performed without a balloon or stent. RESULTS: Ninety patients (92 cases) met the inclusion criteria. DWI lesions were detected in 55 (61.1%) of 90 patients. In the GDC group (n=44), DWI lesions were detected in 31 (70.5%). The average number of DWI lesions was 5.0+/-8.7 (mean+/-SD; range, 1-40) in aneurysm-related territory. In the Target coil group (n=48), DWI lesions were detected in 24 (50.0%). The number of DWI lesion was 2.1+/-5.4 (range, 1-32) in aneurysm-related territory. There was no significant correlation between a number of coils and DWI lesions. No significant differences were also observed in the number of DWI lesions in each group. CONCLUSION: The GDC and Target coils, which have an electrolytic detachable system, showed no differences in the incidence of DWI lesion.


Subject(s)
Humans , Incidence , Intracranial Aneurysm , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Retrospective Studies , Thromboembolism
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-207517

ABSTRACT

Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis of the small and medium vessels, associated with extravascular eosinophilic granulomas, peripheral eosinophilia, and asthma. The exact etiology of CSS is unknown. This syndrome commonly affects the lungs, peripheral nerves, skin, heart, and gastrointestinal tract, but rarely the central nervous system. Subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage in CSS patients is extremely rare; however, clinicians should consider that CSS may be a cause of intracranial hemorrhage and its high rate of mortality and morbidity. The authors report on two cases of subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage with CSS and discuss a brief review of CSS.


Subject(s)
Asthma , Central Nervous System , Cerebral Hemorrhage , Churg-Strauss Syndrome , Eosinophilia , Eosinophilic Granuloma , Gastrointestinal Tract , Heart , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages , Lung , Peripheral Nerves , Skin , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Vasculitis
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-177459

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to evaluate the clinical presentation and outcomes of patients with an intracerebral hematoma (ICH) associated with a ruptured middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm, and the correlation factors associated with the aneurysm and characteristics of the hematoma. METHODS: A retrospective evaluation of clinical and radiologic characteristics and outcomes was conducted for 24 patients (11 men and 13 women; mean age, 53 years) with ruptured MCA aneurysms associated with ICH between September 2008 and December 2011. RESULTS: Thirteen (54%) of the 24 patients had a favorable outcome, four (17%) suffered from severe disability, and seven (29%) died. Based on Hunt and Hess grade, one patient was classified as Grade II, three as Grade III, 12 as Grade IV, and eight as Grade V. Patients with an unfavorable outcome had significantly larger aneurysms (p = 0.047) and ICH volumes (p = 0.002), compared with patients in the group with a favorable outcome. The most frequent rupture point of aneurysms was the lateral aspect of the aneurysm (54.2%). When the rupture point is toward the lateral direction, the distribution of ICH tended to be located at the temporal lobe and intrasylvian. CONCLUSION: Results of the present study suggest an association of the initial clinical state, the size of the aneurysm, and ICH volume with outcome. Although no difference was observed between the location of the rupture point and patient outcomes, an accurate assessment of ICH patterns and the rupture point in angiography may help to ensure surgical exposure and a safe aneurysm clipping.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Angiography , Dietary Sucrose , Hematoma , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Male , Middle Cerebral Artery , Retrospective Studies , Rupture , Temporal Lobe
15.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-101030

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Intracranial pressure (ICP) is one of the critical parameter for the patients of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) to determine the treatment modalities and predict clinical outcomes. Hence, the ICP monitoring with accuracy and safety is essential for the TBI patients. The purpose of this study is to compare its safety and clinical usefulness of intraventricular ICP monitoring method to the parenchymal type. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and imaging data of 18 severe TBI patients. We used intraventricular ICP monitoring in 10 patients and parenchymal 8 patients. We compared the clinical findings of the two type ICP monitoring methods including procedure time, neurological status, outcome, complications and mortality. RESULTS: The initial Glasgow Coma Scale of intraventricular ICP monitoring and parenchymal ICP monitoring patients were 5.8 (range: 4-7) and 6.5 (range: 3-7) respectively. The Glasgow Outcome Scale after 6 months was a little higher in intraventricular monitoring patients than parenchymal monitoring patients (2.8 vs. 2.0, p=0.25). We could not find any intraventricular catheter related complication in intraventricular ICP monitoring patients. There was no difference in mortality in both groups (p=0.56). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that intraventricular catheter insertion for ICP monitoring is relatively a safe procedure in the severe TBI patients. We could not demonstrate the significant benefit of intraventricular type ICP monitoring compared with parenchymal type ICP monitoring. Considering intraventricular type ICP monitoring have advantages of the accuracy and extraventricular drainage, intraventricular type ICP monitoring could be considered for severe TBI patients, regardless of hydrocephalus.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries , Catheters , Drainage , Glasgow Coma Scale , Glasgow Outcome Scale , Humans , Hydrocephalus , Intracranial Pressure , Medical Records , Retrospective Studies
16.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-124996

ABSTRACT

Intracranial mycotic aneurysms due to Aspergillus species are extremely uncommon but fatal. A medium-sized ruptured intracranial aneurysm at the middle cerebral artery bifurcation was identified in a 50-year-old female patient. Proper microsurgical clipping was not feasible due to the aneurysm's friable nature. Microsuture and wrapping were done instead. Histological findings confirmed a mycotic aneurysm caused by Aspergillus. Herein, we report on the clinical course and histopathological findings with a relevant literature review.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, Infected , Aspergillus , Female , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Middle Aged , Middle Cerebral Artery , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-212249

ABSTRACT

In the 2009 edition of the Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society, we published an article entitled "Ideal Internal Carotid Artery Trapping Technique without Bypass in a Patient with Insufficient Collateral Flow" (Volume 45, Pages 260-263), which was written by Joon Ho Chung, M.D.,1 Yong Sam Shin, M.D.,1 Yong Cheol Lim, M.D.,2 Minjung Park, M.D.3. The first author's name is mistyped. Thus, we correct the first author's name from Joon Ho Chung to Joonho Chung.

18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-201690

ABSTRACT

Oculomotor nerve palsy (ONP) with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) occurs usually when oculomotor nerve is compressed by growing or budding of posterior communicating artery (PcoA) aneurysm. Midbrain injury, increased intracranial pressure (ICP), or uncal herniation may also cause it. We report herein a rare case of ONP associated with SAH which was caused by middle cerebral artery (MCA) bifurcation aneurysm rupture. A 58-year-old woman with clear consciousness suffered from headache and sudden onset of unilateral ONP. Computed tomography showed SAH caused by the rupture of MCA aneurysm. The unilateral ONP was not associated with midbrain injury, increased ICP, or uncal herniation. The patient was treated with coil embolization, and the signs of oculomotor nerve palsy completely resolved after a few days. We suggest that bloody jet flow from the rupture of distant aneurysm other than PcoA aneurysm may also be considered as a cause of sudden unilateral ONP in patients with SAH.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Arteries , Consciousness , Female , Headache , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Intracranial Pressure , Mesencephalon , Middle Aged , Middle Cerebral Artery , Oculomotor Nerve , Oculomotor Nerve Diseases , Rupture , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-79599

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome of 75 consecutive patients with cervical carotid artery stenosis and who were treated by carotid artery stenting (CAS) only. METHODS: From February 2003 to June 2008, there were 78 stents placed in 75 symptomatic patients (mean age : 67.3 years); 69 patients had carotid stenosis > or =70%, and 6 patients had asymptomatic stenosis > or =80%. No carotid endarterectomy (CEA) was performed during the same period. The patients were clinically followed-up for a mean of 20.1 months. RESULTS: The procedures were technically successful in all cases. Three (3.8%) patients had procedure-related complications. During the 30-day postprocedural period, there were no restenosis or major stroke. Minor stroke was noticed in 3 (3.8%) patients and 1 (1.3%) of the 75 patients suddenly expired 2 days after discharge. There were no new neurological symptoms that developed during the clinical follow-up period. The results of our series were not inferior to those the previously published in CAS studies, and in fact they were better. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that CAS may be safe and useful for the treatment of cervical carotid artery stenosis when it is used as the first line treatment in those institutions that lack enough experience with CEA.


Subject(s)
Carotid Arteries , Carotid Stenosis , Constriction, Pathologic , Endarterectomy, Carotid , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Stents , Stroke
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-42874

ABSTRACT

Internal carotid artery (ICA) trapping can be used for treating intracranial giant aneurysm, blood blister-like aneurysms and ICA rupture during the surgery. We present a novel ICA trapping technique which can be used with insufficient collaterals flow via anterior communicating artery (AcoA) and posterior communicating artery (PcoA). A patient was admitted with severe headache and the cerebral angiography demonstrated a typical blood blister-like aneurysm at the contralateral side of PcoA. For trapping the aneurysm, the first clip was placed at the ICA just proximal to the aneurysm whereas the distal clip was placed obliquely proximal to the origin of the PcoA to preserve blood flow from the PcoA to the distal ICA. The patient was completely recovered with good collaterals filling to the right ICA territories via AcoA and PcoA. This technique may be an effective treatment option for trapping the aneurysm, especially when the PcoA preservation is mandatory.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Arteries , Carotid Artery, Internal , Cerebral Angiography , Headache , Humans , Rupture , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
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