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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-892243

ABSTRACT

Background@#South Korea has been experiencing a third wave of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) since mid-November 2020. Our hospital in Gwangju metropolitan city experienced a healthcare-associated COVID-19 outbreak early in the third wave. The first confirmed COVID-19 patient was a symptomatic neurosurgery resident with high mobility throughout the hospital. We analyzed the transmission routes of nosocomial COVID-19 and discussed infection control strategies. @*Methods@#We retrospectively analyzed the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing results according to time point and evaluated transmission routes. @*Results@#Since COVID-19 was first confirmed in a healthcare worker (HCW) on 11/13/2020, we performed RT-PCR tests for all patients and caregivers and four complete enumeration surveys for all HCWs. We detected three clusters of nosocomial spread and several sporadic cases. The first cluster originated from the community outbreak spot, where an asymptomatic HCW visited, which led to a total of 22 cases. The second cluster, which included patient-to-patient transmission, originated from a COVID-19 positive caregiver before diagnosis and the third cluster involved a radiologist and a banker. We took measures to isolate Building 1 of the hospital for 17 days and controlled the outbreak during a period of increasing community COVID-19 prevalence. Universal screening of all inpatients upon admission and resident caregivers was made mandatory and hospital-related employees are now screened monthly. @*Conclusion@#Infection control strategies to prevent the nosocomial transmission of emerging infectious diseases must correspond with community disease prevalence. Our data reinforce the importance of multi-time point surveillance of asymptomatic HCWs and routine surveillance of patients and caregivers during an epidemic.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-899947

ABSTRACT

Background@#South Korea has been experiencing a third wave of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) since mid-November 2020. Our hospital in Gwangju metropolitan city experienced a healthcare-associated COVID-19 outbreak early in the third wave. The first confirmed COVID-19 patient was a symptomatic neurosurgery resident with high mobility throughout the hospital. We analyzed the transmission routes of nosocomial COVID-19 and discussed infection control strategies. @*Methods@#We retrospectively analyzed the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing results according to time point and evaluated transmission routes. @*Results@#Since COVID-19 was first confirmed in a healthcare worker (HCW) on 11/13/2020, we performed RT-PCR tests for all patients and caregivers and four complete enumeration surveys for all HCWs. We detected three clusters of nosocomial spread and several sporadic cases. The first cluster originated from the community outbreak spot, where an asymptomatic HCW visited, which led to a total of 22 cases. The second cluster, which included patient-to-patient transmission, originated from a COVID-19 positive caregiver before diagnosis and the third cluster involved a radiologist and a banker. We took measures to isolate Building 1 of the hospital for 17 days and controlled the outbreak during a period of increasing community COVID-19 prevalence. Universal screening of all inpatients upon admission and resident caregivers was made mandatory and hospital-related employees are now screened monthly. @*Conclusion@#Infection control strategies to prevent the nosocomial transmission of emerging infectious diseases must correspond with community disease prevalence. Our data reinforce the importance of multi-time point surveillance of asymptomatic HCWs and routine surveillance of patients and caregivers during an epidemic.

3.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-830298

ABSTRACT

Background@#Tension pneumothorax on the contralateral lung during one-lung ventilation (OLV) can be life-threatening if not rapidly diagnosed and managed. However, diagnosis is often delayed because the classic signs of tension pneumothorax are similar to clinical manifestations commonly observed during OLV.Case: We report a case of contralateral tension pneumothorax in a patient undergoing right upper lobectomy during OLV. The patient suffered from sudden cardiac arrest and was assisted by extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation. @*Conclusions@#Contralateral pneumothorax during OLV is rare but can occur at any time. Therefore, anesthesiologists should consider this critical complication.

4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-195326

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of this work was to investigate the beneficial effects of rhamnazin against inflammation, reactive oxygen species (ROS)/reactive nitrogen species (RNS), and anti-oxidative activity in murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells. METHODS: To examine the beneficial properties of rhamnazin on inflammation, ROS/ RNS, and anti-oxidative activity in the murine macrophage RAW264.7 cell model, several key markers, including COX and 5-LO activities, NO•, ONOO-, total reactive species formation, lipid peroxidation, •O₂ levels, and catalase activity were estimated. RESULTS: Results show that rhamnazin was protective against LPS-induced cytotoxicity in macrophage cells. The underlying action of rhamnazin might be through modulation of ROS/RNS and anti-oxidative activity through regulation of total reactive species production, lipid peroxidation, catalase activity, and •O₂, NO•, and ONOO• levels. In addition, rhamnazin down-regulated the activities of pro-inflammatory COX and 5-LO. CONCLUSION: The plausible action by which rhamnazin renders its protective effects in macrophage cells is likely due to its capability to regulate LPS-induced inflammation, ROS/ RNS, and anti-oxidative activity.


Subject(s)
Arachidonate 5-Lipoxygenase , Catalase , Inflammation , Lipid Peroxidation , Macrophages , Nitrogen , Reactive Nitrogen Species , Reactive Oxygen Species
5.
Korean Journal of Medicine ; : S122-S126, 2009.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-105017

ABSTRACT

Insulin autoimmune syndrome is an uncommon cause of hypoglycemia. According to the type of antibody, it can be classified as caused by insulin or insulin receptor autoantibodies. Generally, insulin autoimmune syndrome develops following exposure to exogenous insulin or sulfhydryl medications, although insulin or insulin receptor antibody may also occur spontaneously. We treated a 54-year-old woman who developed spontaneous hypoglycemia. The patient had repeated hypoglycemia despite the infusion of dextrose solution. Her serum insulin, c-peptide, and insulin autoantibody were elevated, even during the hypoglycemic periods. Insulin receptor autoantibody and HLA-cw4/B62/DR4 were positive. After steroid and diazoxide treatment, the hypoglycemic symptoms improved gradually. No further hypoglycemic episodes occurred after tapering the medication over 1 year. We present a case of insulin autoimmune syndrome with positive insulin and insulin receptor autoantibodies.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies , C-Peptide , Diazoxide , Female , Glucose , Humans , Hypoglycemia , Insulin , Middle Aged , Receptor, Insulin
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