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1.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-713986

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: For effective blood usage and reduction of unnecessary workload at blood banks, we established the maximum surgical blood order schedule (MSBOS) for major elective surgeries and evaluated indicators, including the rate of returned red blood cells (RBCs). METHODS: During August 2016 and May 2017, MSBOS for neurosurgery, thoracic surgery, orthopedic surgery, and general surgery was established using two formulas: the mean units of transfusion per procedure (MSBOS 1) and the mean units of transfusion in transfused patients per procedure (MSBOS 2). The crossmatch to transfusion (C/T) ratio, transfusion probability, and rate of returned RBCs were calculated and analyzed. RESULTS: Based on MSBOS 1, type and screen can be applied to all elective surgeries of the general surgery department. MSBOS 2 was higher than MSBOS 1 in most surgeries ranging from 1 to 3 units. The C/T ratio and transfusion probability of surgery exhibited similar tendencies, and the general surgery department was over-prescribed compared to the actual transfusion requirement. The rate of returned RBCs was the highest in thoracic surgery (32/101, 32%), and the total number of returned RBC unit was the highest in orthopedic surgery (276 of 1131 units). CONCLUSION: MSBOS 1 was the formula corresponding to the purpose of the maximum blood application protocol. Application of an appropriate MSBOS protocol and concurrent utilization of C/T ratio, probability of transfusion, and rate and number of returned units of RBCs will further aid the efficiency of blood bank resources.


Subject(s)
Appointments and Schedules , Blood Banks , Erythrocytes , Humans , Neurosurgery , Orthopedics , Thoracic Surgery
2.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-716935

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The ABO blood group typing test (ABO test) is an initial pre-transfusion test based on hemagglutination. Although various factors affect hemagglutination strength, few studies have examined how these factors can be applied in clinical laboratories and their effects on hemagglutination. This study was conducted to analyze the factors affecting hemagglutination strength in the ABO test using a tube method applied in many laboratories. METHODS: We conducted a detailed questionnaire survey of 51 laboratories which use the ABO test with a tube method. We also analyzed the results of the ABO test (cell and serum typing) with 40 specimens using factors affecting hemagglutination at a tube method and applied differently in each laboratory. RESULTS: Each laboratory used various methods to prepare red cell suspensions as specimens or reagents and used different reagent to sample ratios, centrifugation protocols, and shaking test tubes before evaluating hemagglutination strength. By testing various combinations of these factors, direct sampling from the red cell layer of the original specimen was found to have the largest effect on lowering hemagglutination strength in cell typing tests. In serum typing tests, various factors influenced hemagglutination strength, including shaking the tube before analysis and the concentration of a home-made red cell suspension used as a reagent. CONCLUSIONS: To achieve accurate results in the ABO test by the tube method, detailed guidelines that include the factors affecting hemagglutination strength determined in this study should be established.


Subject(s)
Centrifugation , Hemagglutination , Indicators and Reagents , Methods , Suspensions
3.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 1271-1275, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-79764

ABSTRACT

Mycoplasma hominis (M. hominis) and Ureaplasma urealyticum (U. urealyticum) are important opportunistic pathogens that cause urogenital infections and complicate pregnancy. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence, effects on pregnancy outcomes, and antimicrobial susceptibilities of M. hominis and U. urealyticum. We tested vaginal swabs obtained from 1035 pregnant women for the presence of genital mycoplasmas between June 2009 and May 2014. The laboratory and clinical aspects of genital mycoplasmas infection were reviewed retrospectively, and the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of genital mycoplasmas were determined using the Mycoplasma IST-2 kit. A total of 571 instances of M. hominis and/or U. urealyticum were detected. Of them, M. hominis was detected in two specimens, whereas U. urealyticum was detected in 472 specimens. The remaining 97 specimens were positive for both M. hominis and U. urealyticum. Preterm deliveries were frequently observed in cases of mixed infection of M. hominis and U. urealyticum, and instances of preterm premature rupture of membrane were often found in cases of U. urealyticum. The rates of non-susceptible isolates to erythromycin, empirical agents for pregnant women, showed increasing trends. In conclusion, the prevalence of M. hominis and/or U. urealyticum infections in pregnant women is high, and the resistance rate of antimicrobial agents tends to increase. Therefore, to maintain a safe pregnancy, it is important to identify the isolates and use appropriate empirical antibiotics immediately.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Middle Aged , Mycoplasma Infections/drug therapy , Mycoplasma hominis/drug effects , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/drug therapy , Pregnancy Outcome , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , Ureaplasma Infections/drug therapy , Ureaplasma urealyticum/drug effects , Young Adult
4.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-114286

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Research on RBC production from hematopoietic stem cells has been conducted competitively in many countries. However those were in vitro successes and many hurdles still remain for large scale transfusable RBC production from stem cells. A need for large volume of culture media is a crucial factor for culture condition which researchers must overcome. In this study, we evaluated the efficiency of two commercial serum-free media, StemPro(R)-34 SFM and Stemline II hematopoietic stem cell expansion medium, in RBC differentiation from cord derived stem cells. METHODS: We cultured cord derived CD34+ cells in vitro and evaluated over the periods of 7 days, 14 days, 17 days and 21 days in culture for expanded cell count, cell morphology and differential count using the Wright Giemsa stain. RESULTS: Cell expansion and RBC differentiation developed rapidly in Stemline media compared to StemPro media. Enucleated RBCs were observed at 10~14 culture days and orthochromatic erythroblasts were shown up to 50% among culture cells at 17 days in Stemline media. The enucleated RBCs were observed at 17 days in StemPro Media. Although the erythroblasts in StemPro media are slow at differentiation, they maintain continuous expansion up to 21 days. CONCLUSION: In Stemline media, the expansion and differentiation to mature RBCs are processed much faster, but the cell condition slows down after 17 days. In the RBC production aspects, Stemline media is better than StemPro media as a rapid differentiation because it reduces the cost due to in vitro short culture duration.


Subject(s)
Azure Stains , Cell Count , Culture Media , Culture Media, Serum-Free , Erythroblasts , Hematopoietic Stem Cells , Humans , Stem Cells
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-162707

ABSTRACT

In this study, we report the first Korean case of an anti-Gerbich (Ge) alloantibody to a high-incidence antigen that belongs to the Ge blood group system. The alloantibody was detected in a middle-aged Korean woman who did not have a history of transfusion. Her blood type was B+, and findings from the antibody screening test revealed 1+ reactivity in all panels except the autocontrol. The cross-matching test showed incompatible results with all 5 packed red blood cells. Additional blood type antigen and antibody tests confirmed the anti-Ge alloantibody. While rare, cases of hemolytic transfusion reaction or hemolytic disease in newborns due to anti-Ge have been recently reported in the literature. Therefore, additional further studies on alloantibodies to high-incidence antigens, including anti-Ge, are necessary in the future.

7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-125848

ABSTRACT

We report a recent case in which ciprofloxacin-resistant Shigella flexneri was isolated from a 23-yr-old female patient with a history of travel to India. Prior to her admission to our internal medicine department, she experienced symptoms of high fever and generalized weakness from continuous watery diarrhea that developed midway during the trip. S. flexneri was isolated from the stool culture. Despite initial treatment with ciprofloxacin, the stool cultures continued to show S. flexneri growth. In the susceptibility test for antibiotics of the quinolone family, the isolate showed resistance to ciprofloxacin (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC], 8 microg/mL), norfloxacin (MIC, 32 microg/mL), ofloxacin (MIC, 8 microg/mL), nalidixic acid (MIC, 256 microg/mL), and intermediate resistance to levofloxacin (MIC, 4 microg/mL). In molecular studies for quinolone resistance related genes, plasmid borne-quinolone resistance genes such as qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, aac(6')-Ib-cr, qepA, and oqxAB were not detected. Two mutations were observed in gyrA (248C-->T, 259G-->A) and 1 mutation in parC (239G-->T). The molecular characteristics of the isolated S. flexneri showed that the isolate was more similar to the strains isolated from the dysentery outbreak in India than those isolated from Korea.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , Drug Resistance, Bacterial/drug effects , Dysentery, Bacillary/microbiology , Feces/microbiology , Female , Humans , India , Mutation , Quinolones/pharmacology , Shigella flexneri/drug effects , Travel , Young Adult
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