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1.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-806459

ABSTRACT

A growing body of diversified antibiotic resistances raises a significant challenge to anti-infection clinical therapeutics. The emergence of superbugs carrying MCR-1/2 or NDM-1 determinants underlines the importance and urgency in elucidation of molecular mechanisms shared by antibiotic resistances. It is aware that different classes of bactericidal antibiotics consistently stimulate the production of deleterious reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are accompanied with metabolic disturbance. The different destinations of ROS determine its consequence on bacterial fate. Here, we review antibiotic-induced production, progression and transformation of ROS, as well as its role in the development of antibiotic resistance. Additionally, we anticipate that mesosome-like structures-aided exclusion of hydrogen peroxide might represent a previously-unknown mechanism for antibiotic resistance. This mini-review is aiming to present an update overview on antibiotic resistance and provide clues to the development of novel antibiotics.

2.
Chinese Journal of Biotechnology ; (12): 1246-1258, 2018.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-687692

ABSTRACT

Antimicrobial resistance is a common problem in both veterinary and human medicine. The increasing incidence of multi-drug resistance and even pan-drug resistance is posing serious threat to public health and food safety. This review aimed to present an updated overview on antimicrobial resistance, covering the transmission mechanisms and its potential controlling strategies.

3.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 667-679, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-757566

ABSTRACT

The Escherichia coli fadR protein product, a paradigm/prototypical FadR regulator, positively regulates fabA and fabB, the two critical genes for unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis. However the scenario in the other Ɣ-proteobacteria, such as Shewanella with the marine origin, is unusual in that Rodionov and coworkers predicted that only fabA (not fabB) has a binding site for FadR protein. It raised the possibility of fad regulon contraction. Here we report that this is the case. Sequence alignment of the FadR homologs revealed that the N-terminal DNA-binding domain exhibited remarkable similarity, whereas the ligand-accepting motif at C-terminus is relatively-less conserved. The FadR homologue of S. oneidensis (referred to FadR_she) was over-expressed and purified to homogeneity. Integrative evidence obtained by FPLC (fast protein liquid chromatography) and chemical cross-linking analyses elucidated that FadR_she protein can dimerize in solution, whose identity was determined by MALDI-TOF-MS. In vitro data from electrophoretic mobility shift assays suggested that FadR_she is almost functionally-exchangeable/equivalent to E. coli FadR (FadR_ec) in the ability of binding the E. coli fabA (and fabB) promoters. In an agreement with that of E. coli fabA, S. oneidensis fabA promoter bound both FadR_she and FadR_ec, and was disassociated specifically with the FadR regulatory protein upon the addition of long-chain acyl-CoA thioesters. To monitor in vivo effect exerted by FadR on Shewanella fabA expression, the native promoter of S. oneidensis fabA was fused to a LacZ reporter gene to engineer a chromosome fabA-lacZ transcriptional fusion in E. coli. As anticipated, the removal of fadR gene gave about 2-fold decrement of Shewanella fabA expression by β-gal activity, which is almost identical to the inhibitory level by the addition of oleate. Therefore, we concluded that fabA is contracted to be the only one member of fad regulon in the context of fatty acid synthesis in the marine bacteria Shewanella genus.


Subject(s)
Amino Acid Sequence , Bacterial Proteins , Chemistry , Metabolism , Base Sequence , Binding Sites , DNA, Bacterial , Metabolism , Escherichia coli , Genetics , Metabolism , Fatty Acid Synthase, Type II , Genetics , Metabolism , Fatty Acids , Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial , Molecular Sequence Data , Oleic Acid , Pharmacology , Protein Binding , Regulon , Genetics , Repressor Proteins , Chemistry , Metabolism , Shewanella , Genetics , Metabolism
4.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 928-939, 2014.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-757630

ABSTRACT

Escherichia coli (E. coli) FadR regulator plays dual roles in fatty acid metabolism, which not only represses the fatty acid degradation (fad) system, but also activates the unsaturated fatty acid synthesis pathway. Earlier structural and biochemical studies of FadR protein have provided insights into interplay between FadR protein with its DNA target and/or ligand, while the missing knowledge gap (esp. residues with indirect roles in DNA binding) remains unclear. Here we report this case through deep mapping of old E. coli fadR mutants accumulated. Molecular dissection of E. coli K113 strain, a fadR mutant that can grow on decanoic acid (C10) as sole carbon sources unexpectedly revealed a single point mutation of T178G in fadR locus (W60G in FadRk113). We also observed that a single genetically-recessive mutation of W60G in FadR regulatory protein can lead to loss of its DNA-binding activity, and thereby impair all the regulatory roles in fatty acid metabolisms. Structural analyses of FadR protein indicated that the hydrophobic interaction amongst the three amino acids (W60, F74 and W75) is critical for its DNA-binding ability by maintaining the configuration of its neighboring two β-sheets. Further site-directed mutagenesis analyses demonstrated that the FadR mutants (F74G and/or W75G) do not exhibit the detected DNA-binding activity, validating above structural reasoning.


Subject(s)
3-Oxoacyl-(Acyl-Carrier-Protein) Synthase , Genetics , Metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Bacterial Proteins , Chemistry , Genetics , Metabolism , DNA, Bacterial , Chemistry , Metabolism , Escherichia coli , Genetics , Metabolism , Escherichia coli Proteins , Genetics , Metabolism , Fatty Acid Synthase, Type II , Genetics , Metabolism , Fatty Acids , Metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial , Hydro-Lyases , Genetics , Metabolism , Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions , Lipid Metabolism , Models, Molecular , Molecular Sequence Data , Mutation , Protein Binding , Protein Structure, Secondary , Repressor Proteins , Chemistry , Genetics , Metabolism , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Signal Transduction
5.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 761-769, 2014.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-757468

ABSTRACT

Bacterial cell division is strictly regulated in the formation of equal daughter cells. This process is governed by a series of spatial and temporal regulators, and several new factors of interest to the field have recently been identified. Here, we report the requirement of gluconate 5-dehydrogenase (Ga5DH) in cell division of the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis. Ga5DH catalyzes the reversible reduction of 5-ketogluconate to D-gluconate and was localized to the site of cell division. The deletion of Ga5DH in S. suis resulted in a plump morphology with aberrant septa joining the progeny. A significant increase was also observed in cell length. These defects were determined to be the consequence of Ga5DH deprivation in S. suis causing FtsZ delocalization. In addition, the interaction of FtsZ with Ga5DH in vitro was confirmed by protein interaction assays. These results indicate that Ga5DH may function to prevent the formation of ectopic Z rings during S. suis cell division.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Proteins , Chemistry , Genetics , Metabolism , Cell Division , Cell Shape , Cytoskeletal Proteins , Chemistry , Genetics , Metabolism , Mutation , Oxidoreductases , Genetics , Metabolism , Protein Binding , Streptococcus suis
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