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1.
Cancer Research and Treatment ; : 1337-1345, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-999822

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Outcome analysis of urachal cancer (UraC) is limited due to the scarcity of cases and different staging methods compared to urothelial bladder cancer (UroBC). We attempted to assess survival outcomes of UraC and compare to UroBC after stage-matched analyses. @*Materials and Methods@#Total 203 UraC patients from a multicenter database and 373 UroBC patients in single institution from 2000 to 2018 were enrolled (median follow-up, 32 months). Sheldon stage conversion to corresponding TNM staging for UraC was conducted for head-to-head comparison to UroBC. Perioperative clinical variables and pathological results were recorded. Stage-matched analyses for survival by stage were conducted. @*Results@#UraC patients were younger (mean age, 54 vs. 67 years; p < 0.001), with 163 patients (80.3%) receiving partial cystectomy and 23 patients (11.3%) radical cystectomy. UraC was more likely to harbor ≥ pT3a tumors (78.8% vs. 41.8%). While 5-year recurrence-free survival, cancer-specific survival (CSS) and overall survival were comparable between two groups (63.4%, 67%, and 62.1% in UraC and 61.5%, 75.9%, and 67.8% in UroBC, respectively), generally favorable prognosis for UraC in lower stages (pT1-2) but unfavorable outcomes in higher stages (pT4) compared to UroBC was observed, although only 5-year CSS in ≥ pT4 showed statistical significance (p=0.028). Body mass index (hazard ratio [HR], 0.929), diabetes mellitus (HR, 1.921), pathologic T category (HR, 3.846), and lymphovascular invasion (HR, 1.993) were predictors of CSS for all patients. @*Conclusion@#Despite differing histology, UraC has comparable prognosis to UroBC with relatively favorable outcome in low stages but worse prognosis in higher stages. The presented system may be useful for future grading and risk stratification of UraC.

2.
International Neurourology Journal ; : 324-331, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-898760

ABSTRACT

The urethral catheter is used in various clinical situations such as diagnosing urologic disease, urine drainage in patients after surgery, and for patients who cannot urinate voluntarily. However, catheters can cause numerous adverse effects, such as catheter-associated infection, obstruction, bladder stones, urethral injury, and catheter-related bladder discomfort (CRBD). CRBD symptoms vary among patients from burning sensation and pain in the suprapubic and penile areas to urinary urgency. CRBD significantly reduces patient quality of life and can lead to several complications. CRBD is caused by catheter-induced bladder irritation due to muscarinic receptor-mediated involuntary contractions of bladder smooth muscle and also can be caused by mechanical stimulus of the urethral catheter. Various pharmacologic studies for managing CRBD, including antimuscarinic and antiepileptic agents and botulinum toxin injections have been reported. If urologists can reduce patients’ CRBD, their quality of life and recovery can improve.

3.
Korean Journal of Urological Oncology ; : 78-90, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-836787

ABSTRACT

To summarize the epigenetics in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and discuss the potential use of epigenetic modifiersas RCC biomarkers and treatments. Pertinent articles available on PubMed and google scholar database pertainingto kidney cancer and epigenetics were reviewed. Metastatic RCC is one of the most difficult cancers to treat.Although RCC is commonly known to be caused by VHL mutations, it is not enough to understand the completepathophysiology of RCC. Epigenetic factors can play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of RCC. Epigeneticregulators are classified as epigenetic writers, readers, and erasers according to their role. In this review, wediscuss the potential role of epigenetic regulators as a biomarker for RCC. We also review medications thattarget epigenetic enzymes and are currently tried in RCC therapy.

4.
International Neurourology Journal ; : 77-83, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-834345

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Although cure rate and efficacy of treatment for urinary stone disease have been improved, clinicians have been indifferent to the quality of life (QoL) of stone patients in Korea. The objective of this study was to develop a Korean version of Wisconsin questionnaire about quality of life questionnaire (K-WISQOL) of stone patients for use in Korea. @*Methods@#Linguistic validation was permitted for translation by its developers. Three bilingual nonspecialists and 11 panels who were actively involved in treating urinary stone patients performed the translation and linguistic validations. A trained interviewer and 5 Korean patients carried out cognitive debriefing. @*Results@#Noun words such as “energy” and “responsibilities” were very difficult to translate to Korean. They were substituted by more comprehensive words. After backward translation, translated sentences showed a good agreement with the original WISQOL. During backward translation and the second reconciliation, previously translated Korean version was revised in 5 sentences. In the cognitive debriefing process, all 5 patients thought that these questions explained the patient’s situation well. Most of these respondents answered that explanatory notes of questionnaire were well written and the format of the questionnaire was easy to follow. @*Conclusions@#The present study demonstrated that, despite language differences, translation and linguistic validation of the KWISQOL were successfully performed. This K-WISQOL could be useful tools for treatment plan and patient care.

5.
International Neurourology Journal ; : 324-331, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-891056

ABSTRACT

The urethral catheter is used in various clinical situations such as diagnosing urologic disease, urine drainage in patients after surgery, and for patients who cannot urinate voluntarily. However, catheters can cause numerous adverse effects, such as catheter-associated infection, obstruction, bladder stones, urethral injury, and catheter-related bladder discomfort (CRBD). CRBD symptoms vary among patients from burning sensation and pain in the suprapubic and penile areas to urinary urgency. CRBD significantly reduces patient quality of life and can lead to several complications. CRBD is caused by catheter-induced bladder irritation due to muscarinic receptor-mediated involuntary contractions of bladder smooth muscle and also can be caused by mechanical stimulus of the urethral catheter. Various pharmacologic studies for managing CRBD, including antimuscarinic and antiepileptic agents and botulinum toxin injections have been reported. If urologists can reduce patients’ CRBD, their quality of life and recovery can improve.

6.
The World Journal of Men's Health ; : 191-197, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-811460

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We evaluated the usefulness of a home-based device (SwimCount™) compared with World Health Organization (WHO) 5th semen analysis in screening for male fertility in Asian men.MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred Asian men who visited CHA Seoul Station Fertility Center for evaluation of fertility were included. Semen samples were analyzed and compared with the SwimCount™ results. An aliquot of 0.5 mL of the semen sample was added to the SwimCount™ and a WHO 5th semen analysis was performed. Results were categorized as low (<5×10⁶/mL), and normal to high (≥5×10⁶/mL) total progressively motile sperm concentration. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to evaluate the accuracy of the SwimCount™.RESULTS: The mean total progressively motile sperm concentration was 26.7×10⁶/mL. Semen analysis revealed that 28% of the samples were below the threshold count of 5 million/mL total progressively motile sperm concentration. The mean total progressively motile sperm concentration of the light color SwimCount™ result group determined by semen analysis was 7.5×10⁶/mL, and the mean total progressively motile sperm concentration of the moderate to dark color SwimCount™ result group was 34.2×10⁶/mL. An area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.85 (95% confidence interval, 0.77–0.94; p<0.001) was obtained when the SwimCount™ was compared with semen analysis. The sensitivity and specificity were obtained at a cut off value of 5.0×10⁶/mL total progressively motile sperm concentration, giving a sensitivity and specificity of 87.5% and 73.4%.CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed the reliability of the SwimCount™ as a home-based device for male fertility by evaluating the total progressively motile sperm concentration.

7.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 67-73, 2019.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-842592

ABSTRACT

This study comprises a systematic review and meta-Analysis of microsurgical vasoepididymostomy outcomes in epididymal obstructive azoospermia. A comprehensive literature search was performed using Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane library that included all studies related to microsurgical vasoepididymostomy. Keywords included "vasoepididymostomy," "epididymovasostomy," "epididymal obstruction," and "epididymis obstruction." Event rate and risk ratio (RR) were estimated. Patency rate and pregnancy rate were investigated. The analysis comprised 1422 articles, including 42 observational studies with 2298 enrolled patients performed from November 1978 to January 2017. The overall mean patency rate was 64.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 58.5%-69.3%; I2=83.0%), and the overall mean pregnancy rate was 31.1% (95% CI: 26.9%-35.7%; I2=73.0%). We performed a meta-Analysis comparing the patency rate of bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy and unilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy and found an RR of 1.38% (95% CI: 1.21%-1.57%; P < 0.00001). A comparison of the site of microsurgical vasoepididymostomy showed that caudal or corpus area was favorable for patency rate (RR = 1.17%; 95% CI: 1.01%-1.35%; P = 0.04). Patients with motile sperm in epididymal fluid exhibited an RR of 1.53% (95% CI: 1.11%-2.13%; P = 0.01) with respect to patency rate. Microsurgical vasoepididymostomy is an effective treatment for epididymal obstructive azoospermia that can improve male fertility. We find that performing microsurgical vasoepididymostomy bilaterally, anastomosing a larger caudal area, and containing motile sperm in epididymis fluid can potentially achieve a superior patency rate.

8.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 67-73, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1009643

ABSTRACT

This study comprises a systematic review and meta-analysis of microsurgical vasoepididymostomy outcomes in epididymal obstructive azoospermia. A comprehensive literature search was performed using Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane library that included all studies related to microsurgical vasoepididymostomy. Keywords included "vasoepididymostomy," "epididymovasostomy," "epididymal obstruction," and "epididymis obstruction." Event rate and risk ratio (RR) were estimated. Patency rate and pregnancy rate were investigated. The analysis comprised 1422 articles, including 42 observational studies with 2298 enrolled patients performed from November 1978 to January 2017. The overall mean patency rate was 64.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 58.5%-69.3%; I2=83.0%), and the overall mean pregnancy rate was 31.1% (95% CI: 26.9%-35.7%; I2=73.0%). We performed a meta-analysis comparing the patency rate of bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy and unilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy and found an RR of 1.38% (95% CI: 1.21%-1.57%; P < 0.00001). A comparison of the site of microsurgical vasoepididymostomy showed that caudal or corpus area was favorable for patency rate (RR = 1.17%; 95% CI: 1.01%-1.35%; P = 0.04). Patients with motile sperm in epididymal fluid exhibited an RR of 1.53% (95% CI: 1.11%-2.13%; P = 0.01) with respect to patency rate. Microsurgical vasoepididymostomy is an effective treatment for epididymal obstructive azoospermia that can improve male fertility. We find that performing microsurgical vasoepididymostomy bilaterally, anastomosing a larger caudal area, and containing motile sperm in epididymis fluid can potentially achieve a superior patency rate.

9.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 388-394, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-174322

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Distinguishing infiltrative renal cell carcinoma (RCC) from transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is a challenging issue due to their radiologic similarities. We evaluated systemic inflammatory biomarkers as parameters for distinguishing tumor types. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A computerized search of medical records from November 2005 to October 2015 identified 116 patients with infiltrative renal masses who were difficult to diagnose confirmatively in radiological study. We investigated the diagnostic efficacy among these patients with their preoperative absolute neutrophil counts (ANC), absolute lymphocyte counts (ALC), absolute monocyte counts (AMC), neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), and lymphocyte-monocyte ratio (LMR). RESULTS: The infiltrative RCC group demonstrated significantly lower ALC {1449/µL (1140–1896), median [interquartile range (IQR)]} than the TCC group [1860/µL (1433–2342), p=0.016]. LMR [median (IQR)] also was lower in the infiltrative RCC group [2.98 (2.32–4.14) vs. TCC group 4.10 (2.86–6.09); p=0.011]. In subgroup analysis, non-metastatic infiltrative RCC showed lower ALC and LMR and higher NLR than non-metastatic TCC. Within non-metastatic infiltrative renal masses, multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that younger patient age and lower LMR were associated with infiltrative RCC [odds ratios (OR) 0.874, p=0.024 and OR 0.461, p=0.048, respectively]. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that younger age and lower LMR were highly predictive of non-metastatic RCC (area under the curve=0.919, p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Age and LMR were significantly different between patients with infiltrative renal mass. These are potential markers for distinguishing between infiltrative RCC and TCC without metastasis.


Subject(s)
Humans , Biomarkers , Carcinoma, Renal Cell , Carcinoma, Transitional Cell , Diagnosis, Differential , Logistic Models , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphocytes , Medical Records , Monocytes , Neoplasm Metastasis , Neutrophils , ROC Curve
10.
Korean Journal of Urology ; : 695-702, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-128355

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To investigate and distinguish the computed tomography (CT) characteristics of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (chRCC) and renal oncocytoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-one patients with renal oncocytoma and 120 patients with chRCC, diagnosed by surgery between November 2005 and June 2015, were studied retrospectively. Two observers, who were urologists and unaware of the pathological results, reviewed the preoperative CT images. The tumors were evaluated for size, laterality, tumor type (ball or bean pattern), central stellate scar, segmental enhancement inversion, and angular interface pattern and tumor complexity. To accurately analyze the mass-enhancing pattern of renal mass, we measured Hounsfield units (HUs) in each phase and analyzed the mean, maximum, and minimum HU values and standard deviations. RESULTS: There were 51 renal oncocytomas and 120 chRCCs in the study cohort. No differences in clinical and demographic characteristics were observed between the two groups. A central stellate scar and segmental enhancement inversion were more likely in oncocytomas. However, there were no differences in ball-/bean-type categorization, enhancement pattern, and the shape of the interface between the groups. Higher HU values tended to be present in the corticomedullary and nephrogenic phases in oncocytomas than in chRCC. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the presence of a central stellate scar and higher mean HU values in the nephrogenic phase were highly predictive of renal oncocytoma (area under the curve=0.817, p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The appearance of a central stellate scar and higher mean HU values in the nephrogenic phase could be useful to distinguish renal oncocytomas from chRCCs.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Adenoma, Oxyphilic/pathology , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/pathology , Diagnosis, Differential , Kidney Neoplasms/pathology , Retrospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
11.
Korean Journal of Urology ; : 41-47, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-148911

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To evaluate the impact of adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) in patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) after radical nephroureterectomy (RNU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical records and clinicopatholgic outcomes of patients (n=552) treated with RNU between 1986 and 2013. Patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and those for whom LVI status was not recorded were excluded. Patients were divided into two groups according to LVI (n=86) or no LVI (n=256). RESULTS: The study included 344 patients (240 men and 104 women) with a median of 53.9 months of follow-up (range, 1-297 months) after RNU. Tumors were organ confined (T2/N0) in 211 (61.3%) and tumor grade high in 291 (84.6%). AC was administered in 64 patients (18.6%). A total of 280 patients (81.4%) were treated with surgery alone. Patients with LVI tended to be older (p=0.049), have a higher pT stage (pT3/T4, p<0.001), be pN+ (p<0.001), have a high tumor grade (p<0.001), and experience recurrence (p<0.001). In the multivariate analysis, LVI was an independent prognostic factor for cancer-specific survival and overall survival (p=0.002 and p<0.001, respectively). The multivariate analysis demonstrated that in the subgroup of patients with LVI, AC was a significant prognostic factor for cancer-specific survival and overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.51; p=0.027 and hazard ratio, 0.50; p=0.025, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: AC does not seem to reduce mortality in patients with advanced upper tract urothelial carcinoma after RNU. In the subgroup of patients with LVI, AC had a positive impact on cancer-specific survival and overall survival. LVI would be helpful for selecting patients who are appropriate for AC.


Subject(s)
Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Carcinoma, Transitional Cell/drug therapy , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Follow-Up Studies , Kidney Neoplasms/drug therapy , Lymphatic Metastasis , Multivariate Analysis , Neoplasm Grading , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Neoplasm Staging , Nephrectomy , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Survival Rate , Ureter/pathology , Ureteral Neoplasms/drug therapy , Urinary Tract/pathology
12.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 1359-1365, 2014.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-44329

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Postoperative ileus (POI) is common following bowel resection for radical cystectomy with ileal conduit (RCIC). We investigated perioperative factors associated with prolonged POI following RCIC, with specific focus on opioid-based analgesic dosage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From March 2007 to January 2013, 78 open RCICs and 26 robot-assisted RCICs performed for bladder carcinoma were identified with adjustment for age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists grade, and body mass index (BMI). Perioperative records including operative time, intraoperative fluid excess, estimated blood loss, lymph node yield, and opioid analgesic dose were obtained to assess their associations with time to passage of flatus, tolerable oral diet, and length of hospital stay (LOS). Prior to general anaesthesia, patients received epidural patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) consisted of fentanyl with its dose adjusted for BMI. Postoperatively, single intravenous injections of tramadol were applied according to patient desire. RESULTS: Multivariate analyses revealed cumulative dosages of both PCA fentanyl and tramadol injections as independent predictors of POI. According to surgical modality, linear regression analyses revealed cumulative dosages of PCA fentanyl and tramadol injections to be positively associated with time to first passage of flatus, tolerable diet, and LOS in the open RCIC group. In the robot-assisted RCIC group, only tramadol dose was associated with time to flatus and tolerable diet. Compared to open RCIC, robot-assisted RCIC yielded shorter days to diet and LOS; however, it failed to shorten days to first flatus. CONCLUSION: Reducing opioid-based analgesics shortens the duration of POI. The utilization of the robotic system may confer additional benefit.


Subject(s)
Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Analgesics, Opioid/administration & dosage , Carcinoma/surgery , Cystectomy/adverse effects , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Ileus/epidemiology , Length of Stay , Linear Models , Multivariate Analysis , Robotic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Time Factors , Tramadol/administration & dosage , Treatment Outcome , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/surgery , Urinary Diversion/adverse effects
13.
Korean Journal of Urology ; : 870-875, 2013.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-13285

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We propose an equation that predicts graft function after kidney transplantation by using donated kidney volume and recipient body surface area (BSA). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Included were 261 cases of living kidney transplantation between 2007 and 2009. Preoperative computed tomography scans were performed and the donated kidney volume was measured by use of a three-dimensional reconstruction program (Ripidia). The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated by using the modification of diet in renal disease formula. Donated kidney volume, preoperative renal function, and demographic factors of both donors and recipients were evaluated as predictors. RESULTS: The mean ages of the donors and recipients were 40.8 and 41.6 years, respectively. The mean donated kidney volume and donated kidney volume/recipient BSA ratio were 153.4 mL and 96.9 mL/m2, respectively. Mean preoperative and postoperative 12-month eGFR of recipients were 7.1 and 59.7 mL/min, respectively, and the mean preoperative eGFR of donors was 92.2 mL/min. Donated kidney volume/recipient BSA ratio, donor age, and recipient gender were the significant predictors of eGFR level (p<0.001) and eGFR<45 mL/min at postoperative 12 months (p=0.005, p<0.001, and p=0.006). From the multiple linear regression equation and predicted probability from logistic regression, we could calculate the equation for the ratio of living donor kidney volume to recipient BSA on graft function. CONCLUSIONS: Graft kidney volume/recipient BSA ratio, donor age, and recipient gender were predictors of graft function 12 months after kidney transplantation. Although we are concerned only with the preoperative, this equation model could help physicians to counsel patients concerning their postoperative prognosis and to avoid insufficient volume donations.


Subject(s)
Humans , Body Surface Area , Delayed Graft Function , Demography , Diet , Glomerular Filtration Rate , Kidney Transplantation , Kidney , Linear Models , Living Donors , Logistic Models , Organ Size , Prognosis , Tissue Donors , Transplantation , Transplants
14.
Korean Journal of Urology ; : 963-968, 2009.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-155601

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Recent studies have reported the association between metabolic syndrome and benign prostatic hyperplasia. This study was conducted to evaluate the relation between metabolic syndrome and prostate-specific antigen (PSA). MATERIALS AND METHODS: From January 2004 to December 2007, a total of 4,115 male outpatients (aged 40 to 79 years) who visited the health care center at our medical center were examined. Eligible men were classified according to the presence or absence of metabolic syndrome and the number of components of the metabolic syndrome. The association between the sum of metabolic syndrome components and PSA level was evaluated. The association between each metabolic syndrome component and PSA level was also evaluated. RESULTS: The PSA level of metabolic syndrome patients was lower than that of the control group (p=0.022). An increased number of metabolic syndrome components was significantly associated with a linear, decreasing trend in PSA levels (p-trend=0.040). When a Pearson's correlation was performed, only obesity was inversely associated with PSA level in the metabolic syndrome group. There was no significant factor that was related to having a PSA level greater than or equal to 2.5 ng/ml. CONCLUSIONS: Metabolic syndrome should be considered as a factor associated with reduced PSA levels. If the patient with metabolic syndrome is obese, the PSA cutoff value should be lower than 4 ng/ml.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Delivery of Health Care , Metabolic Syndrome , Obesity , Outpatients , Prostate-Specific Antigen , Prostatic Hyperplasia
15.
Korean Journal of Urology ; : 976-981, 2009.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-155599

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We performed this study to investigate the predictive factors that are related to recovery from acute urinary retention after non-urogenital surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the records of 160 patients who were referred to the department of urology because of lasting acute urinary retention after non-urogenital surgery at our institution between January 2004 and December 2006. Patients were divided into two groups: a transient retention group, which included patients who recovered voiding capability after urinary catheterization for 7 days, and the unresponsive retention group, which included patients who did not recover voiding capability. Surgical factors, patient factors, use of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), amount of residual urine, and medications during catheterization were analyzed. RESULTS: In the chi-square analysis, gender (female, p=0.006), age (> or=60 years old, p or =4,000 ml, p=0.002), and intraoperative indwelling of Foley catheter (p=0.026) were found to differ significantly between the two groups. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, gender (female, p=0.002; OR=5.6), age (> or=60 years old, p=0.001; OR=5.9), hypertension (p=0.049; OR=2.6), location of surgery (pelvic cavity, p or =4,000 ml, p=0.001; OR=8.5) were found to increase the risk of unresponsive urinary retention. The residual urine volume of the unresponsive urinary retention group was larger than that of the transient urinary retention group (741+/-306 ml vs. 614+/-222 ml, p=0.003). CONCLUSIONS: Use of a preoperative indwelling catheter and careful management of urination is necessary to prevent unresponsive urinary retention in patients with risk factors such as female gender, old age, hypertension, surgery in the pelvic cavity, and a large amount of intraoperative fluid injection.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Analgesia, Patient-Controlled , Catheterization , Catheters , Catheters, Indwelling , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus , Hypertension , Logistic Models , Postoperative Care , Retention, Psychology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Urinary Catheterization , Urinary Catheters , Urinary Retention , Urination , Urology
16.
Korean Journal of Urology ; : 893-898, 2008.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-222894

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Dihydrotestosterone(DHT) is key to the initiation and maintenance of abnormal prostatic growth in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Five alpha-reductase inhibitor reduces prostatic growth and serum prostate-specific antigen(PSA) by blocking the conversion of testosterone to DHT. Dutasteride is a dual(type 1 and 2) 5alpha-reductase inhibitor. We evaluated the effects of dutasteride on prostate volume, PSA, and PSA density in men with BPH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 83 men with a clinical diagnosis of BPH were treated with dutasteride and an alpha-blocker. We investigated the change in prostate volume, PSA, and PSA density 6 and 12 months after initiation of dutasteride therapy. RESULTS: After 6 months of dutasteride therapy, the total prostate volume was reduced from baseline by a mean of 15.46%, the PSA was reduced by a mean of 48.24%, and the PSA density was reduced by a mean of 37.97%(p<0.001). After 12 months of dutasteride therapy, the total prostate volume was reduced from baseline by a mean of 23.3%, the PSA was reduced by a mean of 52.57%, and the PSA density was reduced by a mean of 36.2%(p<0.001). There were no differences in the regression rate of PSA and PSA density, in contrast to prostate volume, between 6 and 12 months of dutasteride therapy by repeated measures ANOVA. CONCLUSIONS: The findings in this study demonstrate that the actual PSA in men receiving dutasteride would be multiplied by 2 considering the PSA regression rate after 12 months.


Subject(s)
Male , Humans
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