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1.
Cancer Research and Treatment ; : 208-217, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-913821

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Hospital-based clinical studies have limitations in holistic assessment of cancer treatment and prognosis, as they omit out-of-hospital patients including elderly individuals. This study aimed to investigate trends in initial treatment and corresponding prognosis of patients with exocrine pancreatic cancer (EPC) in Korea. @*Materials and Methods@#The Korea Central Cancer Registry data of patients with EPC from 2006 to 2017 were retrospectively reviewed. We defined the first course of treatment (FT) as the cancer-directed treatment administered within four months after cancer diagnosis according to Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. @*Results@#Among 62,209 patients with EPC, localized and regional (LR) SEER stage; patients over 70 years old; and ductal adenocarcinoma excluding cystic or mucinous (DAC) accounted for 40.6%, 50.1%, and 95.9%, respectively. “No active treatment” (NT, 46.5%) was the most frequent, followed by non-surgical FT (28.7%) and surgical FT (22.0%). Among 25,198 patients with LR EPC, surgical FT increased (35.9% to 46.3%) and NT decreased (45.0% to 29.5%) from 2006 to 2017. The rate of surgical FT was inversely related to age (55.1% [< 70 years], 37.3% [70-79 years], 10.9% [≥ 80 years]). Five-year relative survival rates of LR DAC were higher after surgical FT than after NT in localized (46.1% vs. 12.9%) and regional stage (23.6% vs. 4.9%) from 2012 to 2017. @*Conclusion@#Less than half of overall patients with LR EPC underwent surgical FT, and this proportion decreased significantly in elderly individuals. Clinicians should focus attention on elderly patients with EPC to provide appropriate medical advice.

2.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : e216-2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-938052

ABSTRACT

Background@#This study aimed to analyze the current trends and predict the epidemiologic features of hepatobiliary and pancreatic (HBP) cancers according to the Korea Central Cancer Registry to provide insights into health policy. @*Methods@#Incidence data from 1999 to 2017 and mortality data from 2002 to 2018 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database and Statistics Korea, respectively. The future incidence rate from 2018 to 2040 and mortality rate from 2019 to 2040 of each HBP cancer were predicted using an age-period-cohort model. All analyses, including incidence and mortality, were stratified by sex. @*Results@#From 1999 to 2017, the age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR) of HBP cancers per 100,000 population had changed (liver, 25.8 to 13.5; gallbladder [GB], 2.9 to 2.6;bile ducts, 5.1 to 5.9; ampulla of Vater [AoV], 0.9 to 0.9; and pancreatic, 5.6 to 7.3). The age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR) per 100,000 population from 2002 to 2018 of each cancer had declined, excluding pancreatic cancer (5.5 to 5.6). The predicted ASIR of pancreatic cancer per 100,000 population from 2018 to 2040 increased (7.5 to 8.2), but that of other cancers decreased. Furthermore, the predicted ASMR per 100,000 population from 2019 to 2040 decreased in all types of cancers: liver (6.5 to 3.2), GB (1.4 to 0.9), bile ducts (4.3 to 2.9), AoV (0.3 to 0.2), and pancreas (5.4 to 4.7). However, in terms of sex, the predicted ASMR of pancreatic cancer per 100,000 population in females increased (3.8 to 4.9). @*Conclusion@#The annual incidence and mortality cases of HBP cancers are generally predicted to increase. Especially, pancreatic cancer has an increasing incidence and will be the leading cause of cancer-related death among HBP cancers.

3.
Clinical and Molecular Hepatology ; : 242-253, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-925748

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Primary liver cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality worldwide. However, the causes of death have not been studied in detail in patients with liver cancer. @*Methods@#The causes of death and cause-specific mortality risks in patients with primary liver cancer, diagnosed during 2000–2016, were investigated using the nationwide population-based cancer registry data in South Korea (n=231,388). The cumulative incidence function and Fine-Gray models were used to estimate the cause-specific mortality under the competing risks. Risks of non-cancer deaths relative to the general population were compared by standardized mortality ratios (SMRs). @*Results@#Among 179,921 total deaths, 92.4%, 1.7%, and 6.0% of patients died of primary liver cancer, cancer from other sites, and non-cancer illnesses, respectively. Proportionate mortality from liver cancer remained high. The 5-year competing risks probability of death from liver cancer varied by tumor stage, from 42% to 94%, and it remained high 10 years after the diagnosis (61–95%). Competing mortality from other causes has continuously increased. The most common non-cancer causes of death were underlying liver diseases (SMR, 15.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 15.1–16.1) and viral hepatitis (SMR, 46.5; 95% CI, 43.9–49.2), which demonstrated higher mortality risks compared to the Korean general population. Higher mortality risks of suicide (SMR, 2.6; 95% CI, 2.4–2.8) was also noted. @*Conclusions@#Patients with liver cancer are most likely to die from liver cancer and related liver disease, even 10 years after the diagnosis, highlighting a need for specialized long-term follow-up care.

4.
Cancer Research and Treatment ; : 590-596, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-925680

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Due to low incidence, epidemiologic data of Ewing sarcoma in the Asian population are scarce. We aimed to examine the incidence pattern and outcome of patients with Ewing sarcoma in the Republic of Korea. @*Materials and Methods@#Data of patients with Ewing sarcoma diagnosed between 1999 and 2017 were obtained from the Korea Central Cancer Registry (KCCR). Incidence, clinical characteristics, and survival rates were analyzed and compared between different age groups. @*Results@#There were 788 cases (459 males, 329 females), with a median age at diagnosis of 20 years. The age-standardized rate of Ewing sarcoma was 1.01. The number of cases and incidence rates in each age group were as follows: children, 1.6; adolescents and young adults (AYA), 0.93; adults, 0.44; and elderly, 0.53. There were more male cases in children and the AYA group (p < 0.001). Extraskeletal tumors (p < 0.001), primary sites other than extremity (p=0.007), and presence of metastasis at diagnosis (p=0.031) were more frequent in the adults and elderly group. With a median survival time of 78 months, the 5-year overall survival (OS) rate of the entire cohort was 52%. Children fared best (5-year OS, 75%), and the 5-year OS of AYA patients (51%) approximated the OS of the entire cohort. A two-fold difference of 5-year OS was observed between adults and elderly patients (42% vs. 19%). On univariate and multivariate analyses, age ≥ 15 years and presence of metastasis were adverse prognostic factors. @*Conclusion@#This was the first epidemiologic study of Ewing sarcoma using the KCCR data. With a similar incidence to other Asian countries, the survival rate was slightly lower than that of Euro-American cases. Collaborative clinical studies are necessary to improve the outcome of Ewing sarcoma in low-incidence populations.

5.
Cancer Research and Treatment ; : 330-344, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-925664

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The current study provides national cancer statistics and their secular trends in Korea, including incidence, mortality, survival, and prevalence in 2019. @*Materials and Methods@#Incidence, survival, and prevalence rates of cancer were calculated using the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, from 1999 to 2019, with survival follow-up until December 31, 2020. Deaths from cancer were assessed using causes-of-death data obtained from Statistics Korea. @*Results@#In 2019, newly diagnosed cancer cases and deaths from cancer were reported as 254,718 (ASR, 275.4 per 100,000) and 81,203 (ASR, 72.2 per 100,000), respectively. For the first time, lung cancer (n=29,960) became the most frequent cancer in Korea, excluding thyroid cancer. The overall cancer incidence rates increased by 3.3% annually from 1999 to 2012, and decreased by 5.3% annually from 2012 to 2015, thereafter, followed by nonsignificant changes. The incidence of thyroid cancer increased again from 2016 (annual percentage change, 6.2%). Cancer mortality rates have been decreasing since 2002, with more rapid decline in recent years (annual decrease of 2.7% from 2002 to 2013; 3.3% from 2013 to 2019). The 5-year relative survival between 2015 and 2019 was 70.7%, which contributed to prevalent cases reaching over 2 million in 2019. @*Conclusion@#Cancer survival rates have improved over the past decades, but the number of newly diagnosed cancers is still increasing, with some cancers showing only marginal improvement in survival outcomes. As the number of cancer survivors increases, a comprehensive cancer control strategy should be implemented in line with the changing aspects of cancer statistics.

6.
Cancer Research and Treatment ; : 345-351, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-925663

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study aimed to report the projected cancer incidence and mortality for the year 2022 to estimate Korea’s current cancer burden. @*Materials and Methods@#Cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2019 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and cancer mortality data from 1993 to 2020 were acquired from Statistics Korea. Cancer incidence and mortality were projected by fitting a linear regression model to observed age-specific cancer rates against their respective years and then by multiplying the projected age-specific rates by the anticipated age-specific population for 2022. A joinpoint regression model was used to determine the year in which the linear trend changed significantly; we only used the data of the latest trend. @*Results@#In total, 274,488 new cancer cases and 81,277 cancer deaths are expected to occur in Korea in 2022. The most common cancer site is expected to be the thyroid, followed by the lung, colon and rectum, breast, and stomach. These five cancers are expected to represent half of the overall burden of cancer in Korea. The most common type of cancer leading to death is expected to be lung cancer, followed by liver, colorectal, pancreatic, and gallbladder cancers. @*Conclusion@#The incidence rates for all types of cancer in Korea are estimated to gradually decrease. These up-to-date estimates of the cancer burden in Korea could be an important resource for planning and evaluating cancer-control programs.

7.
Cancer Research and Treatment ; : 355-366, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897440

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The purpose of this study was to determine the epidemiologic characteristics and survival of patients with primary brain and other central nervous system (CNS) tumors in Korea and to compare our findings with those from the United States. @*Materials and Methods@#We collected data on primary brain and CNS tumors diagnosed between 2007 and 2016 from the Korea Central Cancer Registry. The age-standardized incidence rates (ASRs) and 5-year relative survival rates (RSRs) were evaluated. We applied the classification and definitions of the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States to our analysis for direct comparison with United States data. @*Results@#A total of 115,050 primary brain and CNS tumors were identified, and the ASR of all tumors was 22.01 per 100,000 individuals, which was lower than the 23.41 in the United States. However, the ASR of malignant tumors was significantly lower herein (4.27) than in the United States (7.08). Meningeal tumors were the most common histologic group among all tumors (ASR, 8.32). The 5-year RSR of all primary brain and other CNS tumors was 86.4%, and that of all malignant tumors was 44.1%, which was higher than the 35.8% observed in the United States. Among malignant tumors, glioblastomas had the lowest 5-year RSR (12.1%). @*Conclusion@#In Korea, malignant brain and other CNS tumors have a lower incidence and better survival outcome.

8.
Cancer Research and Treatment ; : 355-366, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-889736

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The purpose of this study was to determine the epidemiologic characteristics and survival of patients with primary brain and other central nervous system (CNS) tumors in Korea and to compare our findings with those from the United States. @*Materials and Methods@#We collected data on primary brain and CNS tumors diagnosed between 2007 and 2016 from the Korea Central Cancer Registry. The age-standardized incidence rates (ASRs) and 5-year relative survival rates (RSRs) were evaluated. We applied the classification and definitions of the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States to our analysis for direct comparison with United States data. @*Results@#A total of 115,050 primary brain and CNS tumors were identified, and the ASR of all tumors was 22.01 per 100,000 individuals, which was lower than the 23.41 in the United States. However, the ASR of malignant tumors was significantly lower herein (4.27) than in the United States (7.08). Meningeal tumors were the most common histologic group among all tumors (ASR, 8.32). The 5-year RSR of all primary brain and other CNS tumors was 86.4%, and that of all malignant tumors was 44.1%, which was higher than the 35.8% observed in the United States. Among malignant tumors, glioblastomas had the lowest 5-year RSR (12.1%). @*Conclusion@#In Korea, malignant brain and other CNS tumors have a lower incidence and better survival outcome.

9.
Cancer Research and Treatment ; : 541-548, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-889719

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#A prior history of breast cancer is a risk factor for the subsequent development of primary peritoneal, epithelial ovarian, and fallopian tubal (POFT) cancers. This study aimed to estimate the incidence of secondary POFT malignancy in breast cancer patients and the clinical outcomes of primary and secondary POFT cancer. @*Materials and Methods@#We searched the Korea Central Cancer Registry to find patients with primary and secondary POFT cancer who had breast cancer in 1999-2017. The incidence rate and standardized incidence ratio were calculated. Additionally, we compared the overall survival of patients with primary and secondary POFT cancer. @*Results@#Based on the age-standardized rate, the incidence of second primary POFT cancer after breast cancer was 0.0763 per 100,000 women, which increased in Korea between 1999 and 2017. Among the 30,366 POFT cancer patients, 25,721 were primary POFT cancer only, and 493 had secondary POFT cancer after a breast cancer diagnosis. Second primary POFT cancer patients were older at the time of diagnosis (55 vs. 53, p < 0.001) and had a larger proportion of serous histology (68.4% vs. 51.2%, p < 0.001) than patients with primary POFT. There were no differences between the two groups in tumor stage at diagnosis. The 5-year overall survival rates were 60.2% and 56.3% for primary and secondary POFT cancer, respectively (p=0.216). @*Conclusion@#The incidence of second primary POFT cancer after breast cancer increased in Korea between 1999 and 2017. Besides, second primary POFT cancer patients were diagnosed at older ages and had more serous histology.

10.
Cancer Research and Treatment ; : 301-315, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-889711

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The current study provides national cancer statistics and their secular trends in Korea, including incidence, mortality, survival, and prevalence in 2018. @*Materials and Methods@#Incidence, survival, and prevalence rates of cancer were calculated using the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, from 1999 to 2018, with survival follow-up until December 31, 2019. Deaths from cancer were assessed using causes-of-death data obtained from Statistics Korea. Crude and age-standardized rates (ASRs) for incidence, mortality, prevalence, and 5-year relative survival rates were calculated, and temporal trends for incidence and mortality rates were evaluated, with annual percentage changes. @*Results@#In 2018, newly diagnosed cancer cases and deaths from cancer were reported as 243,837 (ASR, 270.4 per 100,000) and 79,153 (ASR, 73.3 per 100,000), respectively. The overall cancer incidence rates increased by 3.3% annually from 1999 to 2012, and decreased by 5.4% annually from 2012 to 2015, thereafter, followed by nonsignificant changes. Cancer mortality rates have been decreasing since 2002, with more rapid decline in recent years (annual decrease of 2.7% from 2007 to 2014; 3.7% from 2014 to 2018). The 5-year relative survival between 2014 and 2018 was 70.3%, which contributed to prevalent cases reaching over 2 million by the end of 2018. @*Conclusion@#Cancer statistics have improved significantly during the past two decades. However, there remain important challenges to be solved, such as controlling cancers with low survival rates. Cancer statistics can be used to discover blind spots in cancer control, and as evidence for developing and implementing future cancer control strategies.

11.
Cancer Research and Treatment ; : 316-322, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-889710

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study aimed to report the projected cancer incidence and mortality for the year 2021 to estimate Korea’s current cancer burden. @*Materials and Methods@#Cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2018 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and cancer mortality data from 1993 to 2019 were acquired from Statistics Korea. Cancer incidence and mortality were projected by fitting a linear regression model to observed age-specific cancer rates against their respective years and then by multiplying the projected age-specific rates by the anticipated age-specific population for 2021. A joinpoint regression model was used to determine the year in which the linear trend changed significantly; we only used the data of the latest trend. @*Results@#In total, 259,999 new cancer cases and 81,567 cancer deaths are expected to occur in Korea in 2021. The most common cancer site is expected to be the lung, followed by the thyroid, colon and rectum, breast, and stomach. These five cancers are expected to represent half of the overall burden of cancer in Korea. The most common type of cancer leading to death is expected to be lung cancer, followed by liver, colorectal, pancreatic, and stomach cancers. @*Conclusion@#The incidence rates for all types of cancer in Korea are estimated to gradually decrease. These up-to-date estimates of the cancer burden in Korea could be an important resource for planning and evaluating cancer-control programs.

12.
Obstetrics & Gynecology Science ; : 444-453, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-902972

ABSTRACT

Objective@#The three major gynecologic cancers are cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancer. This study aimed to describe the 19-year trends and survival rates in cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancer in a Korean female population. @*Methods@#We searched the Korea Central Cancer Registry to identify patients with gynecologic cancer between 1999 and 2017. Age-standardized rates and annual percent changes were calculated. The relative survival rate (RSR) was reported by histology, age, and stage for each gynecological cancer. @*Results@#The total number of cervical, endometrial, primary peritoneal, ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube (POFT) cancer was 134,863, with the number of cases increasing every year: 6,077 in 1999 to 8,011 in 2017. The incidence of cervical cancer has decreased; however, that of POFT and endometrial cancer has increased. The 5-year RSR of cervical, POFT, and endometrial cancer was reported to be 80.8%, 61.4%, and 88.1%, respectively. In the case of cervical cancer, squamous cell carcinoma showed better survival than other histology (82.8% vs. 73.5%). Furthermore, in the case of endometrial cancer, endometrioid histology had substantially better 5-year RSR than the others (93.2% vs. 76.5%). Contrastingly, in the case of ovarian cancer, serous carcinoma had worse 5-year RSR than other types of histology. @*Conclusion@#The incidence rates for gynecologic cancers increased from 2005 to 2017, with an annual increase of 2.76 per year until 2017. Endometrial cancer had the highest RSR, while ovarian cancer had the lowest. Active cancer screening and the introduction of effective treatments might have contributed to the improved RSRs of gynecologic cancers.

13.
Journal of the Korean Radiological Society ; : 708-714, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-901358

ABSTRACT

Intussusception and acute appendicitis are common emergency conditions in children. They should be promptly differentiated in pediatric patients presenting with suggestive symptoms.However, both diseases may occur simultaneously. Herein, we present two cases of intussusception of the appendix accompanied with appendicitis.

14.
Journal of Liver Cancer ; : 58-68, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-900268

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in Korea. This study evaluated the characteristics of Korean patients newly diagnosed with HCC in 2015. @*Methods@#Data from the Korean Primary Liver Cancer Registry (KPLCR), a representative sample of patients newly diagnosed with HCC in Korea, were analyzed. A total of 1,558 patients with HCC registered in the KPLCR in 2015 were investigated. @*Results@#The median age was 61.0 years (interquartile range, 54.0-70.0 years), and men accounted for 79.7% of the subjects. Hepatitis B virus infection was the most common underlying liver disease (58.1%). According to the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system, stage 0, A, B, C, and D HCCs accounted for 14.2%, 26.3%, 12.7%, 39.0%, and 7.8% of patients, respectively. Transarterial therapy (29.5%) was the most commonly performed initial treatment, followed by surgical resection (25.1%), best supportive care (20.2%), and local ablation therapy (10.5%). Overall, 42.4% of patients were treated in accordance with the BCLC guidelines: 61.7% in stage 0/A, 39.0% in stage B, 18.1% in stage C, and 71.6% in stage D. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS rates were 66.5%, 49.0%, and 17.0%, respectively. @*Conclusions@#In 2015, approximately 40% of Korean HCC cases were diagnosed at a very early or early stage, and 35% of patients underwent potentially curative initial treatment. BCLC guidance was followed in 42.4% of patients; in patients with stage B or C disease, there was relatively low adherence.

15.
Cancer Research and Treatment ; : 541-548, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897423

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#A prior history of breast cancer is a risk factor for the subsequent development of primary peritoneal, epithelial ovarian, and fallopian tubal (POFT) cancers. This study aimed to estimate the incidence of secondary POFT malignancy in breast cancer patients and the clinical outcomes of primary and secondary POFT cancer. @*Materials and Methods@#We searched the Korea Central Cancer Registry to find patients with primary and secondary POFT cancer who had breast cancer in 1999-2017. The incidence rate and standardized incidence ratio were calculated. Additionally, we compared the overall survival of patients with primary and secondary POFT cancer. @*Results@#Based on the age-standardized rate, the incidence of second primary POFT cancer after breast cancer was 0.0763 per 100,000 women, which increased in Korea between 1999 and 2017. Among the 30,366 POFT cancer patients, 25,721 were primary POFT cancer only, and 493 had secondary POFT cancer after a breast cancer diagnosis. Second primary POFT cancer patients were older at the time of diagnosis (55 vs. 53, p < 0.001) and had a larger proportion of serous histology (68.4% vs. 51.2%, p < 0.001) than patients with primary POFT. There were no differences between the two groups in tumor stage at diagnosis. The 5-year overall survival rates were 60.2% and 56.3% for primary and secondary POFT cancer, respectively (p=0.216). @*Conclusion@#The incidence of second primary POFT cancer after breast cancer increased in Korea between 1999 and 2017. Besides, second primary POFT cancer patients were diagnosed at older ages and had more serous histology.

16.
Cancer Research and Treatment ; : 301-315, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897415

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The current study provides national cancer statistics and their secular trends in Korea, including incidence, mortality, survival, and prevalence in 2018. @*Materials and Methods@#Incidence, survival, and prevalence rates of cancer were calculated using the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, from 1999 to 2018, with survival follow-up until December 31, 2019. Deaths from cancer were assessed using causes-of-death data obtained from Statistics Korea. Crude and age-standardized rates (ASRs) for incidence, mortality, prevalence, and 5-year relative survival rates were calculated, and temporal trends for incidence and mortality rates were evaluated, with annual percentage changes. @*Results@#In 2018, newly diagnosed cancer cases and deaths from cancer were reported as 243,837 (ASR, 270.4 per 100,000) and 79,153 (ASR, 73.3 per 100,000), respectively. The overall cancer incidence rates increased by 3.3% annually from 1999 to 2012, and decreased by 5.4% annually from 2012 to 2015, thereafter, followed by nonsignificant changes. Cancer mortality rates have been decreasing since 2002, with more rapid decline in recent years (annual decrease of 2.7% from 2007 to 2014; 3.7% from 2014 to 2018). The 5-year relative survival between 2014 and 2018 was 70.3%, which contributed to prevalent cases reaching over 2 million by the end of 2018. @*Conclusion@#Cancer statistics have improved significantly during the past two decades. However, there remain important challenges to be solved, such as controlling cancers with low survival rates. Cancer statistics can be used to discover blind spots in cancer control, and as evidence for developing and implementing future cancer control strategies.

17.
Cancer Research and Treatment ; : 316-322, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897414

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study aimed to report the projected cancer incidence and mortality for the year 2021 to estimate Korea’s current cancer burden. @*Materials and Methods@#Cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2018 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and cancer mortality data from 1993 to 2019 were acquired from Statistics Korea. Cancer incidence and mortality were projected by fitting a linear regression model to observed age-specific cancer rates against their respective years and then by multiplying the projected age-specific rates by the anticipated age-specific population for 2021. A joinpoint regression model was used to determine the year in which the linear trend changed significantly; we only used the data of the latest trend. @*Results@#In total, 259,999 new cancer cases and 81,567 cancer deaths are expected to occur in Korea in 2021. The most common cancer site is expected to be the lung, followed by the thyroid, colon and rectum, breast, and stomach. These five cancers are expected to represent half of the overall burden of cancer in Korea. The most common type of cancer leading to death is expected to be lung cancer, followed by liver, colorectal, pancreatic, and stomach cancers. @*Conclusion@#The incidence rates for all types of cancer in Korea are estimated to gradually decrease. These up-to-date estimates of the cancer burden in Korea could be an important resource for planning and evaluating cancer-control programs.

18.
Obstetrics & Gynecology Science ; : 444-453, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-895268

ABSTRACT

Objective@#The three major gynecologic cancers are cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancer. This study aimed to describe the 19-year trends and survival rates in cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancer in a Korean female population. @*Methods@#We searched the Korea Central Cancer Registry to identify patients with gynecologic cancer between 1999 and 2017. Age-standardized rates and annual percent changes were calculated. The relative survival rate (RSR) was reported by histology, age, and stage for each gynecological cancer. @*Results@#The total number of cervical, endometrial, primary peritoneal, ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube (POFT) cancer was 134,863, with the number of cases increasing every year: 6,077 in 1999 to 8,011 in 2017. The incidence of cervical cancer has decreased; however, that of POFT and endometrial cancer has increased. The 5-year RSR of cervical, POFT, and endometrial cancer was reported to be 80.8%, 61.4%, and 88.1%, respectively. In the case of cervical cancer, squamous cell carcinoma showed better survival than other histology (82.8% vs. 73.5%). Furthermore, in the case of endometrial cancer, endometrioid histology had substantially better 5-year RSR than the others (93.2% vs. 76.5%). Contrastingly, in the case of ovarian cancer, serous carcinoma had worse 5-year RSR than other types of histology. @*Conclusion@#The incidence rates for gynecologic cancers increased from 2005 to 2017, with an annual increase of 2.76 per year until 2017. Endometrial cancer had the highest RSR, while ovarian cancer had the lowest. Active cancer screening and the introduction of effective treatments might have contributed to the improved RSRs of gynecologic cancers.

19.
Journal of the Korean Radiological Society ; : 708-714, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-893654

ABSTRACT

Intussusception and acute appendicitis are common emergency conditions in children. They should be promptly differentiated in pediatric patients presenting with suggestive symptoms.However, both diseases may occur simultaneously. Herein, we present two cases of intussusception of the appendix accompanied with appendicitis.

20.
Journal of Liver Cancer ; : 58-68, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-892564

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in Korea. This study evaluated the characteristics of Korean patients newly diagnosed with HCC in 2015. @*Methods@#Data from the Korean Primary Liver Cancer Registry (KPLCR), a representative sample of patients newly diagnosed with HCC in Korea, were analyzed. A total of 1,558 patients with HCC registered in the KPLCR in 2015 were investigated. @*Results@#The median age was 61.0 years (interquartile range, 54.0-70.0 years), and men accounted for 79.7% of the subjects. Hepatitis B virus infection was the most common underlying liver disease (58.1%). According to the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system, stage 0, A, B, C, and D HCCs accounted for 14.2%, 26.3%, 12.7%, 39.0%, and 7.8% of patients, respectively. Transarterial therapy (29.5%) was the most commonly performed initial treatment, followed by surgical resection (25.1%), best supportive care (20.2%), and local ablation therapy (10.5%). Overall, 42.4% of patients were treated in accordance with the BCLC guidelines: 61.7% in stage 0/A, 39.0% in stage B, 18.1% in stage C, and 71.6% in stage D. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS rates were 66.5%, 49.0%, and 17.0%, respectively. @*Conclusions@#In 2015, approximately 40% of Korean HCC cases were diagnosed at a very early or early stage, and 35% of patients underwent potentially curative initial treatment. BCLC guidance was followed in 42.4% of patients; in patients with stage B or C disease, there was relatively low adherence.

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