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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-915548

ABSTRACT

Background@#Attention should be paid to endoscopy-related complications and safety-related accidents that may occur in the endoscopy unit. This study investigated the current status of complications associated with diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy in Korea. @*Methods@#A questionnaire survey on endoscopy-related complications was conducted in a total of 50 tertiary or general hospitals in Korea. The results were compared to the population-level claims data from the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service (HIRA), which analyzed endoscopy procedures conducted in 2017 in Korea. @*Results@#The incidences of bleeding associated with diagnostic and therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and with diagnostic and therapeutic colonoscopy were 0.224% and 3.155% and 0.198% and 0.356%, respectively, in the 2017 HIRA claims data, compared to 0.012% and 1.857%, and 0.024% and 0.717%, in the 50 hospitals surveyed.The incidences of perforation associated with diagnostic and therapeutic EGD and with diagnostic and therapeutic colonoscopy were 0.023% and 0.613%, and 0.007% and 0.013%, respectively, in the 2017 HIRA claims data compared to 0.001% and 0.325%, and 0.017% and 0.206%, in the 50 hospitals surveyed. In the HIRA claims data, the incidence of bleeding/perforation after diagnostic colonoscopy in clinics, community hospitals, general hospitals, and tertiary hospitals was 0.129%/0.000%, 0.088%/0.004%, 0.262%/0.009%, and 0.479%/0.030% respectively, and the corresponding incidence of bleeding/perforation after therapeutic colonoscopy was 0.258%/0.004%, 0.401%/0.007%, 0.408%/0.024%, and 0.731%/0.055%. @*Conclusion@#The incidences of complications associated with diagnostic and therapeutic EGD or colonoscopy tended to increase with the hospital volume in Korea.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-900412

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) enables the comprehensive evaluation of the esophageal motor function. However, protocols are not uniform and clinical practices vary widely among institutions. This study aims to understand the current HRM practice in Korea. @*Methods@#The survey was sent via email through the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility. The questions covered descriptive information, preparation, techniques, analysis, and reporting of esophageal HRM. @*Results@#The survey was completed in 32 (74.4%) out of 43 centers, including 24 tertiary and 8 secondary referral centers. Of the 32 centers, 25 (78.1%) performed HRM in a sitting position, while 7 centers (21.9%) reported performing HRM in a supine position. All the centers utilized single wet swallows as a standard, but the volume, frequency, and interval between swallows varied widely. Sixteen centers (50.0%) applied adjunctive tests, including multiple rapid swallows (n = 16) and rapid drink challenges (n = 9). Parameters assessed and documented in the report were similar. In addition to the assessment of the esophagogastric junction and esophageal body, 27 centers (84.8%) and 18 centers (56.3%) included measurements for the upper esophageal sphincter and the pharynx, respectively, in the HRM protocol. @*Conclusions@#We found a variation in the available HRM practice among centers, even though they broadly agreed in the data analysis. Efforts are needed to develop a standardized protocol for HRM measurement.

3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-900385

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#S-isomer (S) pantoprazole is more bioavailable and less dependent on cytochrome 2C19 than is racemic pantoprazole. We aim to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 10 mg S-pantoprazole for treatment of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). @*Methods@#In this phase 3, double-blind, randomized placebo controlled, multicenter study, 174 NERD patients were randomized to one of both treatment groups: 10 mg S-pantoprazole, or placebo once daily for 4 weeks. Symptoms and safety were assessed. The efficacy endpoints were complete relief of symptoms, > 50% improvement of all reflux symptoms and recurrence. @*Results@#Eighty-eight patients were assigned to the S-pantoprazole group (25 males, mean 43.7 years old) and 86 to the placebo group (32 males, mean 43.0 years old), and 163 patients were subjected to full Analysis Set. A higher proportion of patients in the S-pantoprazole group had complete symptom relief (42.0 % [34/81] vs 17.1% [14/82], P 50% symptom responses (66.0% vs 50.0%, P = 0.010 for heartburn; 64.2% vs 28.0%, P = 0.010 for acid regurgitation; and 51.9% vs 30.5%, P = 0.03 for epigastric discomfort) compared to the placebo group. The factors associated with poor responsiveness to PPI were older age, female, greater body mass index, and severe baseline symptoms. @*Conclusions@#Low dose of S-pantoprazole (10 mg) for 4 weeks was more efficacious than placebo in providing reflux symptom relief in patients with NERD, especially acid regurgitation. More doses or longer periods of treatment with S-pantoprazole would be needed to completely eliminate symptoms.

4.
Gut and Liver ; : 528-536, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-898438

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Point mutations in the 23S ribosomal RNA gene have been associated with Helicobacter pylori clarithromycin resistance. This study aimed to detect the prevalence of these point mutations and to investigate the role of different point mutations in the success of eradication therapy. @*Methods@#We retrospectively investigated a total of 464 consecutive patients who underwent an endoscopic examination and dual-priming oligonucleotide-based multiplex polymerase chain reaction for H. pylori between June 2014 and October 2019. For 289 patients with negative point mutations, standard triple therapy was used in 287 patients, and the bismuth-quadruple regimen was used in two patients. For 175 patients with positive point mutations (A2142G, A2143G, and both mutations), standard triple and bismuth-quadruple therapies were used in 37 patients and 138 patients, respectively. @*Results@#The eradication rates of standard triple and bismuth-quadruple therapies showed no significant difference in mutation-negative patients or those with the A2142G point mutation.However, the eradication rate with bismuth-quadruple therapy was significantly higher than that with standard triple therapy in the group with the A2143G mutation or with the double mutation.The eradication rates for standard triple and bismuth-quadruple therapies, respectively, were 25.8% and 92.1% in the per-protocol group (p<0.001) and 24.2% and 85.2% in the intention-totreat analysis (p<0.001). @*Conclusions@#The A2143G point mutation is the most prevalent cause of clarithromycin resistance. Bismuth-quadruple therapy is superior to standard triple therapy in patients with the A2143G or double point mutation.

5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-892708

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) enables the comprehensive evaluation of the esophageal motor function. However, protocols are not uniform and clinical practices vary widely among institutions. This study aims to understand the current HRM practice in Korea. @*Methods@#The survey was sent via email through the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility. The questions covered descriptive information, preparation, techniques, analysis, and reporting of esophageal HRM. @*Results@#The survey was completed in 32 (74.4%) out of 43 centers, including 24 tertiary and 8 secondary referral centers. Of the 32 centers, 25 (78.1%) performed HRM in a sitting position, while 7 centers (21.9%) reported performing HRM in a supine position. All the centers utilized single wet swallows as a standard, but the volume, frequency, and interval between swallows varied widely. Sixteen centers (50.0%) applied adjunctive tests, including multiple rapid swallows (n = 16) and rapid drink challenges (n = 9). Parameters assessed and documented in the report were similar. In addition to the assessment of the esophagogastric junction and esophageal body, 27 centers (84.8%) and 18 centers (56.3%) included measurements for the upper esophageal sphincter and the pharynx, respectively, in the HRM protocol. @*Conclusions@#We found a variation in the available HRM practice among centers, even though they broadly agreed in the data analysis. Efforts are needed to develop a standardized protocol for HRM measurement.

6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-892681

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#S-isomer (S) pantoprazole is more bioavailable and less dependent on cytochrome 2C19 than is racemic pantoprazole. We aim to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 10 mg S-pantoprazole for treatment of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). @*Methods@#In this phase 3, double-blind, randomized placebo controlled, multicenter study, 174 NERD patients were randomized to one of both treatment groups: 10 mg S-pantoprazole, or placebo once daily for 4 weeks. Symptoms and safety were assessed. The efficacy endpoints were complete relief of symptoms, > 50% improvement of all reflux symptoms and recurrence. @*Results@#Eighty-eight patients were assigned to the S-pantoprazole group (25 males, mean 43.7 years old) and 86 to the placebo group (32 males, mean 43.0 years old), and 163 patients were subjected to full Analysis Set. A higher proportion of patients in the S-pantoprazole group had complete symptom relief (42.0 % [34/81] vs 17.1% [14/82], P 50% symptom responses (66.0% vs 50.0%, P = 0.010 for heartburn; 64.2% vs 28.0%, P = 0.010 for acid regurgitation; and 51.9% vs 30.5%, P = 0.03 for epigastric discomfort) compared to the placebo group. The factors associated with poor responsiveness to PPI were older age, female, greater body mass index, and severe baseline symptoms. @*Conclusions@#Low dose of S-pantoprazole (10 mg) for 4 weeks was more efficacious than placebo in providing reflux symptom relief in patients with NERD, especially acid regurgitation. More doses or longer periods of treatment with S-pantoprazole would be needed to completely eliminate symptoms.

7.
Gut and Liver ; : 528-536, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-890734

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Point mutations in the 23S ribosomal RNA gene have been associated with Helicobacter pylori clarithromycin resistance. This study aimed to detect the prevalence of these point mutations and to investigate the role of different point mutations in the success of eradication therapy. @*Methods@#We retrospectively investigated a total of 464 consecutive patients who underwent an endoscopic examination and dual-priming oligonucleotide-based multiplex polymerase chain reaction for H. pylori between June 2014 and October 2019. For 289 patients with negative point mutations, standard triple therapy was used in 287 patients, and the bismuth-quadruple regimen was used in two patients. For 175 patients with positive point mutations (A2142G, A2143G, and both mutations), standard triple and bismuth-quadruple therapies were used in 37 patients and 138 patients, respectively. @*Results@#The eradication rates of standard triple and bismuth-quadruple therapies showed no significant difference in mutation-negative patients or those with the A2142G point mutation.However, the eradication rate with bismuth-quadruple therapy was significantly higher than that with standard triple therapy in the group with the A2143G mutation or with the double mutation.The eradication rates for standard triple and bismuth-quadruple therapies, respectively, were 25.8% and 92.1% in the per-protocol group (p<0.001) and 24.2% and 85.2% in the intention-totreat analysis (p<0.001). @*Conclusions@#The A2143G point mutation is the most prevalent cause of clarithromycin resistance. Bismuth-quadruple therapy is superior to standard triple therapy in patients with the A2143G or double point mutation.

8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-875408

ABSTRACT

Patients with esophageal dysphagia need a step-by-step approach for diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopic with biopsy and barium esophagogram are the essential tests evaluating anatomical abnormality and esophageal bolus stasis. Further imaging or esophageal function tests such as high-resolution esophageal manometry, functional endoluminal imaging probe, CT or endoscopic ultrasound are required. In the case of dysphagia due to esophageal motility disorder, whether it is the major motility disorder or minor motility disorder should be identified in high resolution manometry. Major motility disorders show esophagogastric junction obstruction or major peristaltic defects. In this case, the severity of the symptoms should be assessed and patients who need endoscopic or surgical treatment targeting lower esophageal sphincter should be screened. Impaired lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (achalasia, esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, esophageal spasm or abnormal hypercontraction (jackhammer esophagus), hypotensive contraction (ineffective esophageal motility, failed peristalsis), esophageal hypersensitivity (noncardiac chest pain), gastroesophageal reflux disease and esophageal bolus stasis are the possible mechanisms causing dysphagia symptoms. The proper medical treatment depends on underlying mechanisms.

9.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-834120

ABSTRACT

The Korean guidelines for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced peptic ulcers were previously developed under co-work with the Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research and Korean Society of Gastroenterology at 2009. On the other hand, the previous guidelines were based mainly on a literature review and expert opinions. Therefore, the guidelines need to be revised. In this study, a guideline development committee for drug-induced peptic ulcers was organized under the Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research in 2017. Nine statements were developed, including four for NSAID, three for aspirin and other antiplatelet agents, and two for anticoagulants through de novo processes based on evidence-based medicine, such as a literature search, meta-analysis, and the consensus was established using the modified Delphi method. The primary target of this guideline was adult patients taking long-term NSAIDs, aspirin, or other antiplatelet agent and anticoagulants. The revised guidelines reflect the consensus of expert opinions and are intended to assist relevant clinicians in the management and prevention of drug-induced peptic ulcers and associated conditions.

10.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-834110

ABSTRACT

Esophageal manometry is the gold standard test for diagnosing primary esophageal motility disorder. With the various metrics of the high-resolution esophageal manometry, the Chicago classification provides a standard approach for the manometric diagnosis of esophageal motor disorders. In the Chicago classification, the esophagogastric junction dysfunction is an important major motor disorder, which includes achalasia subtypes and esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. Esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction is defined manometrically as normal or weak esophageal peristalsis with incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. It is a heterogeneous disorder and usually has a benign clinical course. The small portion of an esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction is early or variant achalasia. In such cases, treatments directing the lower esophageal sphincter, such as balloon dilatation or per oral endoscopic myotomy, may be necessary. An adjunctive high-resolution manometry provocation test or other esophageal function tests, such as timed barium esophagogram, can help select those patients and predict the treatment outcomes.

11.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-833871

ABSTRACT

During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, practices of gastrointestinal procedures within the digestive tract require special precautions due to the risk of contraction of severe acute respiratoy syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Many procedures in the gastrointestinal motility laboratory may be considered moderate to high-risk for viral transmission. Healthcare staff working in gastrointestinal motility laboratories are frequently exposed to splashes, air droplets, mucus, or saliva during the procedures. Moreover, some are aerosol-generating and thus have a high risk of viral transmission. There are multiple guidelines on the practices of gastrointestinal endoscopy during this pandemic. However, such guidelines are still lacking and urgently needed for the practice of gastrointestinal motility laboratories. Hence, the Asian Neurogastroenterology and Motility Association had organized a group of gastrointestinal motility experts and infectious disease specialists to produce a position statement paper based-on current available evidence and consensus opinion with aims to provide a clear guidance on the practices of gastrointestinal motility laboratories during the COVID-19 pandemic. This guideline covers a wide range of topics on gastrointestinal motility activities from scheduling a motility test, the precautions at different steps of the procedure to disinfection for the safety and well-being of the patients and the healthcare workers. These practices may vary in different countries depending on the stages of the pandemic, local or institutional policy, and the availability of healthcare resources. This guideline is useful when the transmission rate of SARS-CoV-2 is high. It may change rapidly depending on the situation of the epidemic and when new evidence becomes available.

12.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-833835

ABSTRACT

Esophageal achalasia is a primary motility disorder characterized by insufficient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and loss of esophageal peristalsis. Achalasia is a chronic disease that causes progressive irreversible loss of esophageal motor function. The recent development of high-resolution manometry has facilitated the diagnosis of achalasia, and determining the achalasia subtypes based on high-resolution manometry can be important when deciding on treatment methods. Peroral endoscopic myotomy is less invasive than surgery with comparable efficacy. The present guidelines (the “2019 Seoul Consensus on Esophageal Achalasia Guidelines”) were developed based on evidence-based medicine; the Asian Neurogastroenterology and Motility Association and Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility served as the operating and development committees, respectively. The development of the guidelines began in June 2018, and a draft consensus based on the Delphi process was achieved in April 2019. The guidelines consist of 18 recommendations: 2 pertaining to the definition and epidemiology of achalasia, 6 pertaining to diagnoses, and 10 pertaining to treatments. The endoscopic treatment section is based on the latest evidence from meta-analyses. Clinicians (including gastroenterologists, upper gastrointestinal tract surgeons, general physicians, nurses, and other hospital workers) and patients could use these guidelines to make an informed decision on the management of achalasia.

13.
Gut and Liver ; : 707-726, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-833160

ABSTRACT

Korean guidelines for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced peptic ulcer were previously developed in 2009 with the collaboration of the Korean College of Helico-bacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research and Korean So-ciety of Gastroenterology. However, the previous guidelines were based mainly upon a review of the relevant literature and expert opinion. Therefore, the guidelines need to be revised. We organized a guideline Development Commit-tee for drug-related peptic ulcer under the auspices of the Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research in 2017 and developed nine statements, includ-ing four for NSAIDs, three for aspirin and other antiplatelet agents, and two for anticoagulants through a de novo process founded on evidence-based medicine that included a literature search and a meta-analysis, A consensus was reached through the application of the modified Delphi method. The primary target of these guidelines is adult pa-tients undergoing long-term treatment with NSAIDs, aspirin or other antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants. The revised guidelines reflect the expert consensus and is intended to assist clinicians in the management and prevention of druginduced peptic ulcer and associated conditions.

14.
Gut and Liver ; : 57-66, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-833104

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Although acid suppressants are widely used for the prevention or treatment of drug-induced upper gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), evidence regarding the prevention of anticoagulant-related GIB is scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of acid suppressants against anticoagulant-related GIB. @*Methods@#A systematic review was conducted of studies that evaluated the protective effect of acid suppressants against anticoagulant-related GIB found in PubMed, the Cochrane library, Embase, and KoreaMed from the date of database inception to April 2018. Random effect model meta-analyses with sensitivity analyses were conducted. The methodological quality of each included publication was evaluated using the Risk of Bias Assessment Tool for Nonrandomized Studies. Publication bias was assessed. @*Results@#In total, six nested case-control or cohort studies were identified and analyzed. Proton-pump inhibitors (PPI) had a protective effect against upper GIB in patients on dicumarinics (risk ratio [RR], 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.83; I2, 0%); however, the histamine-2 receptor antagonist did not have the same effect (RR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.52 to 1.81; I2, 0%). Acid suppressants did not have a protective effect against GIB in patients on dabigatran (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.44 to 1.37; I2, 81.8%). @*Conclusions@#The protective effect of PPIs against dicumarinics-related upper GIB was clear, while there was no evidence supporting the protective effect of acid suppressants against dabigatran-related GIB. However, in the absence of randomized trials demonstrating a lack of bias, solid conclusions cannot be drawn.

15.
16.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 426-430, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-763478

ABSTRACT

The Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy introduced the Accredited Endoscopy Unit Program to enhance endoscopy unit quality through systematic quality management in 2012. It was gradually expanded from training hospitals to institutions with 100+ beds, and the criteria for certification were applied according to the actual conditions of each institution. On the basis of the continuous communication with the institutions and feedback, the Accredited Endoscopy Unit Program certification criteria were revised in 2019 and introduced as follows: (1) the qualification criteria for endoscopy doctors and nurses; (2) facilities and equipment; (3) endoscopic examination process; (4) performance; (5) disinfection and infection control; and (6) endoscopic sedation. The assessment items consist of essential and recommended items. All essential items must be met for accreditation to be awarded. The assessment criteria for each evaluation area were revised as follows: (1) upgrading assessment criteria; (2) qualification of endoscopists and reinforcement of quality control education; (3) detailed standards for safety, disinfection, endoscopic sedation, and management instructions; and (4) presentation of new performance measurement of endoscopy and colonoscopy.


Subject(s)
Accreditation , Awards and Prizes , Certification , Colonoscopy , Disinfection , Education , Endoscopy , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Infection Control , Korea , Quality Control
17.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 239-252, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-714598

ABSTRACT

Gastroscopy and colonoscopy are widely used for the early diagnosis of stomach and colorectal cancer. The present revision integrates recent data regarding previous quality indicators and novel indicators suggested for gastroscopy and colonoscopy procedures for the National Cancer Screening Program in Korea. The new indicators, developed by the Quality Improvement Committee of the Korean Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, vary in the level of supporting evidence, and most are based solely on expert opinion. Updated indicators validated by clinical research were prioritized, but were chosen by expert consensus when such studies were absent. The resultant quality indicators were graded according to the levels of consensus and recommendations. The updated indicators will provide a relevant guideline for high-quality endoscopy. The future direction of quality indicator development should include relevant outcome measures and an evidence-based approach to support proposed performance targets.


Subject(s)
Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms , Consensus , Early Detection of Cancer , Early Diagnosis , Endoscopy , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Expert Testimony , Gastroscopy , Korea , Mass Screening , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Quality Improvement , Stomach
18.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-714521

ABSTRACT

Gastroscopy and colonoscopy are widely used for the early diagnosis of stomach and colorectal cancer. The present revision integrates recent data regarding previous quality indicators and novel indicators suggested for gastroscopy and colonoscopy procedures for the National Cancer Screening Program in Korea. The new indicators, developed by the Quality Improvement Committee of the Korean Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, vary in the level of supporting evidence, and most are based solely on expert opinion. Updated indicators validated by clinical research were prioritized, but were chosen by expert consensus when such studies were absent. The resultant quality indicators were graded according to the levels of consensus and recommendations. The updated indicators will provide a relevant guideline for high-quality endoscopy. The future direction of quality indicator development should include relevant outcome measures and an evidence-based approach to support proposed performance targets.


Subject(s)
Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms , Consensus , Early Detection of Cancer , Early Diagnosis , Endoscopy , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Expert Testimony , Gastroscopy , Korea , Mass Screening , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Quality Improvement , Stomach
19.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-96173

ABSTRACT

Supragastric belching is the most important factor in the etiology of excessive belching complaints. Supragastric belching is a belching disorder with a behavioral origin. The standard diagnosis is made by monitoring the esophageal impedance. Supragastric belching has been shown to be associated with globus, as well as reflux symptoms in proton pump inhibitor non-responders in gastroesophageal reflux disease; however, the pathophysiology of supragastric belching in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease or functional dyspepsia has not been clarified. Patient education with behavioral therapy is the treatment of choice in isolated supragastric belching. On the other hand, the best management of supragastric belching associated with globus, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and dyspepsia remains to be studied.


Subject(s)
Diagnosis , Dyspepsia , Electric Impedance , Eructation , Esophagus , Gastroesophageal Reflux , Hand , Humans , Patient Education as Topic , Proton Pumps
20.
Gut and Liver ; : 821-827, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-82305

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: The adoption of colonoscopy as a primary colorectal cancer (CRC) screening technique has been argued for in Korea, without evidence of patient preferences. This study aimed to investigate patients’ preferences for the primary CRC screening test for the National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP). METHODS: Between June and August 2016, 414 individuals aged ≥50 years who participated in the NCSP were prospectively invited to complete a questionnaire regarding their preferences for the primary CRC screening test and the reasons for their selection. RESULTS: Among the 396 respondents who completed the questionnaire, 124 individuals (31.3%) preferred the fecal immunochemical test (FIT), whereas 272 individuals (68.7%) preferred colonoscopy. Elderly participants preferred the FIT (p < 0.001), whereas participants with a higher education level (p=0.030), a higher income level (p=0.009), or individuals with a family member (p=0.028) or acquaintance (p=0.013) with a history of CRC preferred colonoscopy. Only 12.9% of participants had a bad experience with a previous FIT; however, 39.3% of participants had a bad experience with a previous colonoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Colonoscopy was preferred to FIT in a 2.2:1 ratio as the primary CRC screening test for the NCSP. Patients’ preference for colonoscopy should be considered for the NCSP in Korea.


Subject(s)
Aged , Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms , Early Detection of Cancer , Education , Humans , Korea , Mass Screening , Patient Preference , Prospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
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