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1.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-880776

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To investigate the protective effect of arctiin with anti-inflammatory bioactivity against triptolide-induced nephrotoxicity in rats and explore the underlying mechanism.@*METHODS@#Forty SD rats were divided into 4 groups for gastric lavage of normal saline, arctiin (500 mg/kg), triptolide (500 μg/kg), or both arctiin (500 mg/kg) and triptolide (500 μg/kg). Blood samples were collected for analysis of biochemical renal parameters, and the renal tissues were harvested for determining the kidney index and for pathological evaluation with HE staining. In the @*RESULTS@#In SD rats, arctiin significantly antagonized triptolide-induced elevation of BUN, Scr and kidney index (@*CONCLUSIONS@#Arctiin can protect the kidney from triptolide-induced damages in rats possibly through the anti-inflammatory pathway.


Subject(s)
Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents , Diterpenes/toxicity , Epoxy Compounds/toxicity , Furans , Glucosides , Kidney/drug effects , Phenanthrenes/toxicity , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley
2.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-773462

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To explore the effect of the composition ratio on substitution of sulfate group in sulfated exopolysaccharide (EPS) from and how sulfate modification affects the anti-tumor activity of EPS.@*METHODS@#We used a chlorosulfonic acid-pyridine method to modify EPS and analyzed the effect of esterification ratio on the degree of sulfate substitution using barium chloride turbidimetry. The sulfate groups binding with EPS were analyzed with infrared spectrum analysis. CCK-8 assay was used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of EPS sulfate (SEPS) on the proliferation of human colon cancer HCT 116 cells, and annexin V-FITC/PI double staining was used to assess the pro-apoptotic effect of SEPS in the cells.@*RESULTS@#The esterifying agent and EPS at the composition ratios of 1:1 and 2:1 resulted in sulfate substitution of 0.98% (SEPS-1) and 1.18% (SEPS-2), respectively, and the substitution was improved by increasing the ratio of the esterifying agent ( < 0.05). Infrared spectrum analysis showed that the S=O stretching vibration absorption peak of -OSO appeared near 1249 cm, indicating that the sulfate group combined with EPS to form sulfate. CCK-8 assay showed that SEPS-1 produced stronger inhibitory effects on the proliferation of HCT 116 cells than EPS within the concentration range of 0.02-0.10 mg/L ( < 0.05). At the concentrations of 0.04-0.08 mg/L, SEPS-2 showed a lower anti-tumor activity than SEPS-1 ( < 0.05). SEPS-1 also showed stronger pro-apoptotic effect than EPS, and as its concentration increased, SEPS-1 dose-dependently increased the ratio of early apoptotic cells and necrotic cells; the cells treated with 0.06, 0.08 and 0.10 mg/mL SEPS-1 showed early apoptotic rates of 6.38%, 11.8% and 12.5%, and late apoptotic and necrotic rates of 5.26%, 8.04% and 6.80%, respectively.@*CONCLUSIONS@#The composition ratio of the esterifying agent has a direct impact on the degree of substitution of EPS, which can be improved by increasing the ratio of the esterifying agent. Sulfate modification of EPS can enhance its antitumor activity, which, however, is not directly related with the degree of substitution.

3.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-691224

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate the protective effect of monoside against triptolide-induced liver injury and explore its molecular mechanism.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>BALB/C mice treated with gastric lavage with triptolide and monoside, either alone or in combination, were examined for changes of hepatic biochemical parameters using the serological method. The growth inhibition rate of HepG2 cells treated with triptolide or monoside or both was assessed with MTT assay, and the cell morphological changes were observed using laser confocal microscopy; the expressions of the target proteins in the antioxidative stress pathway were detected using flow cytometry and Western blotting.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>In BALB/C mice, gastric lavage of triptolide induced obvious hepatic damage. In HepG2 cells, treatment with triptolide significantly inhibited the cell growth, resulting in a cell viability as low as 72.83% at 24 h; triptolide also induced obvious cell apoptosis and cell nucleus deformation, causing an apoptosis rate of 43.1% in the cells at 24 h. Triptolide significantly reduced the expressions of Nrf2 and HO-1 proteins related with the oxidative stress pathway. Combined treatment with morroniside obviously reversed these changes, resulting in significantly decreased hepatic biochemical parameters and the liver index in BALB/C mice and in significantly lowered cell apoptosis rate, improved cell morphology, and increased Nrf2 and HO-1 protein expressions in HepG2 cells.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>Monoside protects against triptolide-induced liver injury possibly by relieving oxidative stress.</p>

4.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-814944

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To determine the combined cytotoxic effect and the molecular basis of triptolide and sodium cantharidinate on hepatoma cell line 7721.
@*METHODS@#After treating the hepatoma cell line 7721 with triptolide(9, 18, or 36 μg/mL) and/or sodium cantharidinate (2, 5, or 10 μg/mL), cell viability assay and apoptosis were examined by MTT and flocytometry, respectively. The protein levels of caspase 3 and nuclear factor κB were analyzed by Western blot.
@*RESULTS@#Viability of hepatoma cell line 7721 was inhibited by either the therapy of triptolide and/or sodium cantharidinate (P<0.05) in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The combined effects of both drugs were better than those of the single drug (P<0.05). The combined therapy down-regulated the expression of NF-κB p65 (P<0.05) while up-regulated the expression of caspase-3 (P<0.05).
@*CONCLUSION@#Triptolide and sodium cantharidinate exert a synergistic toxic effect on hepatoma cell line 7721, which is related to increasing capase-3 activity and suppression of NF- κB.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis , Cantharidin , Pharmacology , Therapeutic Uses , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Drug Therapy , Caspase 3 , Cell Line, Tumor , Diterpenes , Pharmacology , Therapeutic Uses , Down-Regulation , Drug Therapy, Combination , Epoxy Compounds , Pharmacology , Therapeutic Uses , Humans , Liver Neoplasms , Drug Therapy , NF-kappa B , Phenanthrenes , Pharmacology , Therapeutic Uses , Transcription Factor RelA
5.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-232735

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To establish a method for detecting plasma concentration of corn polysaccharide iron complex (CPIC) and investigate its absorption, distribution and elimination in rats.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Using radioactivity isotope tracing method, we detected the radioactivity of (59)Fe-CPIC in the plasma of rats at different time points by gavages of 3 doses (28.0, 14.0, and 7.0 mg/kg) (59)Fe-CPIC in SD rats. The pharmacokinetic parameters was obtained using DAS 2.0 program for analysis of tissue distribution and elimination of (59)Fe-CPIC.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The standard curve was linear within the range of 0.14-141 µg/ml (r=0.9999, n=5). The average recovery was 95% with a relative standard deviation no more than 15%. The pharmacokinetic parameters at 3 doses obtained, namely t1/2 and AUC (0-), were 214∓104, 231∓110, and 181∓81 min, and 1986.3∓513.3, 737.0∓467.0, and 315.1∓226.1 mg·min-1·L(-)1, respectively. (59)Fe-CPIC were detected in all the 13 tissues types examined and high radioactivity intensity was found in the gastrointestinal tract, hematogenic organs and other organs rich in blood. (59)Fe-CPIC was eliminated after intragastric administration primarily via the feces in rats.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>The method we established is easy and specific, and the pharmacokinetic parameters of (59)Fe-CPIC fit the two- compartment open model.</p>


Subject(s)
Administration, Oral , Animals , Area Under Curve , Coordination Complexes , Pharmacokinetics , Urine , Feces , Chemistry , Female , Intestinal Absorption , Iron , Pharmacokinetics , Urine , Iron Radioisotopes , Male , Polysaccharides , Pharmacokinetics , Urine , Random Allocation , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Tissue Distribution , Zea mays , Chemistry
6.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-814711

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To evaluate the clinical effect of letrozole (LE) alone on the ovulation induction in endometrial preparation for frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET).@*METHODS@#Totally 253 FET cycles were analyzed by case control study from October 2010 to June 2011. We divided ovulation disorders or menstrual disorders divided into 2 groups: a LE group on ovulation induction cycle (n=85), and a hormone replacement therapy (HRT) cycle group (n=84). Meanwhile those who ovulated normally were included in a natural cycle group (n=84). Demographics and clinical parameters of reproductive correlation of all patients were observed among these groups.@*RESULTS@#The average clinical pregnancy rate of the LE group was higher than that of HRT cycle group (54.1% vs 44.04%; P0.05). The estradiol level on human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) administration day in the natural cycle group [(341.19±113.14) pg/mL] was higher than that of the LE group [(279.70±127.80) pg/mL] (P0.05).@*CONCLUSION@#Ovulation induction with LE alone for endometrial preparation is superior to HRT cycle in FET and has similar clinical process and outcome to those of the natural cycle. It can be applied in endometrial preparation for FET effectively for those with anovulation or menstrual disorder.


Subject(s)
Case-Control Studies , Cryopreservation , Embryo Transfer , Endometrium , Physiology , Female , Fertility Agents, Female , Therapeutic Uses , Fertilization in Vitro , Humans , Letrozole , Nitriles , Therapeutic Uses , Ovulation Induction , Methods , Triazoles , Therapeutic Uses
7.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 193-195, 2004.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-357050

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To make a comparatively analysis of the effects of 10% KCl injection into the fatal cardiac area and yolk-sac aspiration on multifetal pregnancy reduction.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Twenty-three patients with multifetus were selected in the investigation. Eight of the patients accepted 10% KCl injection into the fatal cardiac area, and 15 of them received yolk-sac aspiration. The average number of punctures, average time of reduction operation, failure rate of operation, abortion rate, and infection rate were observed.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The average time of reduction operation[(2.8 +/- 0.7) min] of aspiration was significantly lower than that of 10% KCl injection [(5.11 +/- 1.35) min] (P < 0.05). The infection rate of yolk-sac aspiration was 6.7%, lower than that of 10% KCl injection (37.5%) (P > 0.05). Cardic area injection showed a higher infection rate, and no significant difference was observed in the average number of punctures, failure rate of operation and abortion rate(P > 0.05).</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>Although both yolk-sac aspiration and cardiac area injection were safe and reliable methods for multifetal pregnancy reduction, the former is worth recommending for its shorter operation time heeded and lower infection rate, especially for the multifetal patients within 60 gestation days.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Postoperative Complications , Potassium Chloride , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Reduction, Multifetal , Methods , Ultrasonography, Prenatal
8.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 1175-1178, 2003.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-294139

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To study the efficacy of the low standard oral anticoagulation therapy following St Jude Medical (SJM) valve implantation for Chinese patients.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Totally 805 patients with a mean age of 42.70 +/- 11.09 years, enrolled into this study. Among them, 230 underwent aortic valve replacements (AVR), 381 mitral valve replacements (MVR), 189 double valve replacements (DVR) and 5 tricuspid valve replacements (TVR). All patients received postoperative oral anticoagulation therapy based on a low standard of international normalized ratio (INR, 2.0 - 2.5). Of the 805 patients, 710 were followed up for 0.25 - 13 years (a median, 4.15 years).</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Postoperatively, 17 adverse events occurred. Operative mortality was 2.11%. The most frequent cause of operative mortality was a low cardiac output. During follow-up, there were 47 anticoagulant-induced hemorrhages [1.59%/patient-year (pt-yr)], 10 cases of thromboembolism (0.34%/pt-yr), and 3 mechanical valve thromboses (0.19%/pt-yr). There were 44 late deaths and the linearized late mortality rates were 0.51%pt-yr. Estimates of actuarial survival for all patients at 5 and 10 years was 97.45% (0.70%) and 77.96% (17.44%), respectively.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>A low target INR range of 2.0 - 2.5 is preferable for Chinese patients so as to reduce the severe bleeding complications in those with conventionally higher levels of INR. The long-term results were satisfactory in terms of the numbers of those who suffered thrombosis, embolism and bleeding.</p>


Subject(s)
Administration, Oral , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anticoagulants , Asian Continental Ancestry Group , Child , China , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Heart Valve Prosthesis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications
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