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1.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 287-294, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-18844

ABSTRACT

Pilocarpine-induced rat epilepsy model is an established animal model that mimics medial temporal lobe epilepsy in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate neuroimaging abnormalities in various stages of epileptogenesis and to correlate them with seizure severity in pilocarpine-induced rat epilepsy model. Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subject to continuous video and electroencephalographic monitoring after inducing status epilepticus (SE) and seizure severity was estimated by frequency and total durations of class 3 to 5 spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) by modified Racine's classification. The 7.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with high resolution flurodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) was performed at 3 hours, 1, 3, 7 days and 4 weeks after the initial insult. The initial SRS was observed 9.7±1.3 days after the pilocarpine injection. MRI revealed an abnormal T2 signal change with swelling in both hippocampi and amygdala in acute (day 1 after injection) and latent phases (days 3 and 7), in association with PET hypometabolism in these areas. Interestingly, the mean frequency of class 3 to 5 SRS was positively correlated with abnormal T2 signals in hippocampal area at 3 days. SRS duration became longer with more decreased glucose metabolism in both hippocampi and amygdala at 7 days after pilocarpine injection. This study indicates that development and severity of SRS at chronic phase could be closely related with structural and functional changes in hippocampus during the latent period, a pre-epileptic stage.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Male , Rats , Amygdala , Classification , Epilepsy , Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe , Glucose , Hippocampus , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Metabolism , Models, Animal , Neuroimaging , Pilocarpine , Positron-Emission Tomography , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Seizures , Status Epilepticus
2.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 165-172, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-186108

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Reduced brain glucose metabolism and basal forebrain cholinergic neuron degeneration are common features of Alzheimer's disease and have been correlated with memory function. Although regions representing glucose hypometabolism in patients with Alzheimer's disease are targets of cholinergic basal forebrain neurons, the interaction between cholinergic denervation and glucose hypometabolism is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate glucose metabolism changes caused by cholinergic deficits. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We lesioned basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in rats using 192 immunoglobulin G-saporin. After 3 weeks, lesioned animals underwent water maze testing or were analyzed by 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography. RESULTS: During water maze probe testing, performance of the lesioned group decreased with respect to time spent in the target quadrant and platform zone. Cingulate cortex glucose metabolism in the lesioned group decreased, compared with the normal group. Additionally, acetylcholinesterase activity and glutamate decarboxylase 65/67 expression declined in the cingulate cortex. CONCLUSION: Our results reveal that spatial memory impairment in animals with selective basal forebrain cholinergic neuron damage is associated with a functional decline in the GABAergic and cholinergic system associated with cingulate cortex glucose hypometabolism.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Rats , Acetylcholine/metabolism , Alzheimer Disease , Antibodies, Monoclonal/pharmacology , Basal Forebrain/drug effects , Cholinergic Agents/administration & dosage , Cholinergic Neurons/drug effects , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 , GABAergic Neurons/drug effects , Glucose/metabolism , Gyrus Cinguli/drug effects , Injections , Maze Learning , Motor Activity/physiology , Positron-Emission Tomography , Ribosome Inactivating Proteins, Type 1/pharmacology
3.
Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society ; : 405-409, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-45406

ABSTRACT

Meningiomas are typically diagnosed by their characteristic appearance on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, detailed image findings regarding peri- and intra-tumoral anatomical structures, tumor consistency and vascularity are very important in pre-surgical planning and surgical outcomes. At the 7.0 T MRI achieving ultra-high resolution, it could be possible to obtain more useful information in surgical strategy. Four patients who were radiologically diagnosed with intracranial meningioma in 1.5 T MRI underwent a 7.0 T MRI. Three of them underwent surgery afterwards, and one received gamma knife radiosurgery. In our study, the advantages of 7.0 T MRI over 1.5 T MRI were a more detailed depiction of the peri- and intra-tumoral vasculature and a clear delineation of tumor-brain interface. In the safety issues, all patients received 7.0 T MRI without any adverse event. One disadvantage of 7.0 T MRI was the reduced image quality of skull base lesions. 7.0 T MRI in patients with meningiomas could provide useful information in surgical strategy, such as the peri-tumoral vasculature and the tumor-brain interface.


Subject(s)
Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Meningioma , Radiosurgery , Skull Base
4.
Investigative Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; : 141-151, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-82813

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Advances of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially that of the Ultra-High Field (UHF) MRI will be reviewed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Diffusion MRI data was obtained from a healthy adult young male of age 30 using a 7.0T research MRI scanner (Magnetom, Siemens) with 40 mT/m maximum gradient field. The specific imaging parameters used for the data acquisition were a single shot DW echo planar imaging. RESULTS: Three areas of the imaging experiments are focused on for the study, namely the anatomy, angiography, and tractography. CONCLUSION: It is envisioned that, in near future, there will be more 7.0T MRIs for brain research and explosive clinical application research will also be developed, for example in the area of connectomics in neuroscience and clinical neurology and neurosurgery.


Subject(s)
Adult , Humans , Male , Angiography , Brain , Connectome , Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Echo-Planar Imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Neurology , Neurosciences , Neurosurgery
5.
Investigative Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; : 31-36, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-145441

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To compare the depiction of brain metastases on contrast-enhanced images with 7.0 tesla (T) and at 1.5T MRI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four consecutive patients with brain metastases were scanned on 7.0T whole-body scanner and 1.5T MRI. A 3D T1-weighted gradient echo sequence (3D T1-GRE) at 1.5T (voxel size = 0.9 x 0.9 x 1.5 mm3 after double-dose, gadoterate meglumine, Gd-DOTA) was compared to a 7.0T 3D T1-GRE sequence (voxel size = 0.4 x 0.4 x 0.8 mm3, single-dose Gd-DOTA) in four patients after a 5 minute delay. The number of contrast-enhancing metastases in MPRAGE images was compared in each patient by two radiologists in consensus. We measured contrast ratio of enhancing brain metastases and white matter in 1.5T and 7.0T. RESULTS: In all four patients 7.0T 3D T1-GRE images after single-dose Gd-DOTA and 1.5T after double-dose Gd-DOTA depicted 11 brain metastases equally. In the quantitative analysis of contrast ratios of enhancing brain metastases and white matter, the 1.5T 3D T1-GRE after double-dose showed an increased contrast ratio compared to 7.0T 3D T1-GRE after single-dose (0.961 +/- 0.571 versus 0.885 +/- 0.494; n = 11 metastases). But this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.711). CONCLUSION: Our preliminary results indicate that 7.0T single-dose Gd-enhanced images were not different to 1.5T double-dose Gd-enhanced images for the detection of brain metastases.


Subject(s)
Humans , Brain , Consensus , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Meglumine , Neoplasm Metastasis
6.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : 1012-1017, 2014.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-70741

ABSTRACT

A 45-yr-old female patient was admitted with one-month history of headache and progressive left hemiparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a mass lesion in her right frontal lobe. Her brain tumor was confirmed as a small cell glioblastoma. Her follow-up brain MRI, taken at 8 months after her initial surgery demonstrated tumor recurrence in the right frontal lobe. Contrast-enhanced 7.0T brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was safely performed before surgery and at the time of recurrence. Compared with 1.5T and 3.0T brain MRI, 7.0T MRI showed sharpened images of the brain tumor contexture with detailed anatomical information. The fused images of 7.0T and 1.5T brain MRI taken at the time of recurrence demonstrated no significant discrepancy in the positions of the anterior and the posterior commissures. It is suggested that 7.0T MRI can be safely utilized for better images of the maligant gliomas before and after surgery.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Brain Neoplasms/pathology , Frontal Lobe/diagnostic imaging , Glioblastoma/pathology , In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , ErbB Receptors/genetics
7.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : 1416-1424, 2014.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-23615

ABSTRACT

The two basic scripts of the Korean writing system, Hanja (the logography of the traditional Korean character) and Hangul (the more newer Korean alphabet), have been used together since the 14th century. While Hanja character has its own morphemic base, Hangul being purely phonemic without morphemic base. These two, therefore, have substantially different outcomes as a language as well as different neural responses. Based on these linguistic differences between Hanja and Hangul, we have launched two studies; first was to find differences in cortical activation when it is stimulated by Hanja and Hangul reading to support the much discussed dual-route hypothesis of logographic and phonological routes in the brain by fMRI (Experiment 1). The second objective was to evaluate how Hanja and Hangul affect comprehension, therefore, recognition memory, specifically the effects of semantic transparency and morphemic clarity on memory consolidation and then related cortical activations, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) (Experiment 2). The first fMRI experiment indicated relatively large areas of the brain are activated by Hanja reading compared to Hangul reading. The second experiment, the recognition memory study, revealed two findings, that is there is only a small difference in recognition memory for semantic transparency, while for the morphemic clarity was much larger between Hanja and Hangul. That is the morphemic clarity has significantly more effect than semantic transparency on recognition memory when studies by fMRI in correlation with behavioral study.


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Brain/physiology , Brain Mapping/methods , Brain Waves/physiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Neurolinguistic Programming , Recognition, Psychology/physiology , Writing
8.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 653-661, 2013.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-72362

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The anterior commissure (AC) and posterior commissure (PC) are the two distinct anatomic structures in the brain which are difficult to observe in detail with conventional MRI, such as a 1.5T MRI system. However, recent advances in ultra-high resolution MRI have enabled us to examine the AC and PC directly. The objective of the present study is to standardize the shape and size of the AC and PC using a 7.0T MRI and to propose a new brain reference line. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-four, 21 males and 13 females, healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. After determining the center of each AC and PC, we defined the connection of these centers as the central intercommissural line (CIL). We compared the known extra- and intra-cerebral reference lines with the CIL to determine the difference in the angles. Additionally, we obtained horizontal line from flat ground line of look front human. RESULTS: The difference in angle of the CIL and the tangential intercommissural line (TIL) from the horizontal line was 8.7 +/- 5.1 (11 +/- 4.8) and 17.4 +/- 5.2 (19.8 +/- 4.8) degrees in males and females, respectively. The difference in angle between the CIL and canthomeatal line was 10.1 in both male and female, and there was no difference between both sexes. Likewise, there was no significant difference in angle between the CIL and TIL between both sexes (8.3 +/- 1.1 in male and 8.8 +/- 0.7 in female). CONCLUSION: In this study, we have used 7.0T MRI to define the AC and PC quantitatively and in a more robust manner. We have showed that the CIL is a reproducible reference line and serves as a standard for the axial images of the human brain.


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Young Adult , Brain/anatomy & histology , Brain Mapping/methods , Healthy Volunteers , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Reproducibility of Results
9.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : 1362-1372, 2013.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-44047

ABSTRACT

We investigated the safety and clinical applicability of 7.0 Tesla (T) brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with brain tumors. Twenty-four patients with intraaxial or extraaxial brain tumors were enrolled in this study. 7.0T MRIs of T2*-weighted axial and T1-weighted coronal or sagittal images were obtained and compared with 1.5T brain MRIs. The T2*-weighted images from 7.0T brain MRI revealed detailed microvasculature and the internal contents of supratentorial brain tumors better than that of 1.5T brain MRI. For brain tumors located in parasellar areas or areas adjacent to major cerebral vessels, flow-related artifacts were exaggerated in the 7.0T brain MRIs. For brain tumors adjacent to the skull base, susceptibility artifacts in the interfacing areas of the paranasal sinus and skull base hampered the aquisition of detailed images and information on brain tumors in the 7.0T brain MRIs. This study shows that 7.0T brain MRI can provide detailed information on the intratumoral components and margins in supratentorial brain tumors. Further studies are needed to develop refined MRI protocols for better images of brain tumors located in the skull base, parasellar, and adjacent major cerebrovascular structures.


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Brain Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Dizziness/etiology , Headache/etiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/adverse effects , Muscle Contraction/radiation effects
10.
Clinical and Experimental Otorhinolaryngology ; : S19-S23, 2012.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-77641

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In this study, we compared the magnetic resonance (MR) image artifacts caused by a conventional metal-based cochlear implant and a newly developed liquid crystal polymer (LCP)-based device. METHODS: The metal-based cochlear implant system (Nurobiosys Co.) was attached to side of the head of a subject and the LCP-based device was attached to opposite side. In both devices, alignment magnets were removed for safety. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on a widely used 3.0 T and an ultra-high 7.0 T MRI machine. 3.0 and 7.0 T MR images were acquired using T1- and T2*-weighted gradient echo sequences, respectively. RESULTS: In the 3.0 T images, the metal-based device on the left side generated the significant amount of artifacts. The MR images in the proximity of the metal package were obscured by the artifacts in both axial and sagittal views. On the other hand, the MR images near the LCP-based device were relatively free from the artifacts and clearly showed the brain structures. 7.0 T MR images showed the more severe distortion in the both sides but the metal-based cochlear implant system caused a much larger obscure area than the LCP-based system. CONCLUSION: The novel LCP-based cochlear implant provides a good MRI compatibility beyond present-day cochlear implants. Thus, MR images can be obtained from the subjects even with the implanted LCP-based neural prosthetic systems providing useful diagnostic information. Furthermore, it will be also useful for functional MRI studies of the auditory perception mechanism after cochlear implantations as well as for positron emission tomography-MRI hybrid imaging.


Subject(s)
Artifacts , Auditory Perception , Brain , Chimera , Cochlear Implantation , Cochlear Implants , Electrons , Hand , Head , Liquid Crystals , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Magnetics , Magnets , Polymers
11.
Journal of the Korean Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine ; : 103-114, 2012.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-114399

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In an attempt to further improve the radiofrequency (RF) magnetic (B1) field strength in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) imaging, a 4-channel spiral-loop coil array with RF circuitry was designed and compared with a 4-channel single-loop coil array in terms of B1 field, RF transmit (B1+), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and applicability to TMJ imaging in 7T MRI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The single- and 4-channel spiral-loop coil arrays were constructed based on the electromagnetic (EM) simulation for the investigation of B1 field. To evaluate the computer simulation results, the B1 field and B1 + maps were measured in 7T. RESULTS: In the EM simulation result and MRI study at 7T, the 4-channel spiral-loop coil array found a superior B1 performance and a higher B1 + profile inside the human head as well as a slightly better SNR than the 4-channel single-loop coil array. CONCLUSION: Although B1 fields are produced under the influence of the dielectric properties of the subject rather than the coil configuration alone at 7T, each RF coil exhibited not only special but also specific characteristics that could make it suited for specific application such as TMJ imaging.


Subject(s)
Humans , Computer Simulation , Head , Magnetics , Magnets , Signal-To-Noise Ratio , Temporomandibular Joint
12.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : 839-843, 2011.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-58112

ABSTRACT

In the study we assessed the distortion of 7.0 T magnetic resonance (MR) images in reference to 1.5 T MR images in the radiosurgery of metastatic brain tumors. Radiosurgery with Gamma Knife Perfexion(R) was performed for the treatment of a 54-yr-old female patient with multiple brain metastases by the co-registered images of the 7.0 T and 1.5 T magnetic resonance images (MRI). There was no significant discrepancy in the positions of anterior and posterior commissures as well as the locations of four metastatic brain tumors in the co-registered images between 7.0 T and 1.5 T MRI with better visualization of the anatomical details in 7.0 T MR images. This study demonstrates for the first time that 7.0 T MR images can be safely utilized in Perfexion(R) Gamma Knife radiosurgery for the treatment of metastatic brain tumors. Furthermore 7.0 T MR images provide better visualization of brain tumors without image distortion in comparison to 1.5 T MR images.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Adenocarcinoma/pathology , Brain Neoplasms/pathology , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Radiosurgery , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
13.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : 135-141, 2010.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-64129

ABSTRACT

Sectional anatomy of human brain is useful to examine the diseased brain as well as normal brain. However, intracerebral reference points for the axial, sagittal, and coronal planes of brain have not been standardized in anatomical sections or radiological images. We made 2,343 serially-sectioned images of a cadaver head with 0.1 mm intervals, 0.1 mm pixel size, and 48 bit color and obtained axial, sagittal, and coronal images based on the proposed reference system. This reference system consists of one principal reference point and two ancillary reference points. The two ancillary reference points are the anterior commissure and the posterior commissure. And the principal reference point is the midpoint of two ancillary reference points. It resides in the center of whole brain. From the principal reference point, Cartesian coordinate of x, y, z could be made to be the standard axial, sagittal, and coronal planes.


Subject(s)
Aged , Humans , Male , Anatomy, Cross-Sectional , Brain/anatomy & histology , Brain Mapping , Cadaver , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
14.
Journal of Clinical Neurology ; : 167-182, 2010.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-139701

ABSTRACT

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery has been performed in over 75,000 people worldwide, and has been shown to be an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, tremor, dystonia, epilepsy, depression, Tourette's syndrome, and obsessive compulsive disorder. We review current and emerging evidence for the role of DBS in the management of a range of neurological and psychiatric conditions, and discuss the technical and practical aspects of performing DBS surgery. In the future, evolution of DBS technology may depend on several key areas, including better scientific understanding of its underlying mechanism of action, advances in high-spatial resolution imaging and development of novel electrophysiological and neurotransmitter microsensor systems. Such developments could form the basis of an intelligent closed-loop DBS system with feedback-guided neuromodulation to optimize both electrode placement and therapeutic efficacy.


Subject(s)
Brain , Deep Brain Stimulation , Depression , Dystonia , Electrodes , Epilepsy , Neurotransmitter Agents , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder , Parkinson Disease , Tourette Syndrome , Tremor
15.
Journal of Clinical Neurology ; : 167-182, 2010.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-139700

ABSTRACT

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery has been performed in over 75,000 people worldwide, and has been shown to be an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, tremor, dystonia, epilepsy, depression, Tourette's syndrome, and obsessive compulsive disorder. We review current and emerging evidence for the role of DBS in the management of a range of neurological and psychiatric conditions, and discuss the technical and practical aspects of performing DBS surgery. In the future, evolution of DBS technology may depend on several key areas, including better scientific understanding of its underlying mechanism of action, advances in high-spatial resolution imaging and development of novel electrophysiological and neurotransmitter microsensor systems. Such developments could form the basis of an intelligent closed-loop DBS system with feedback-guided neuromodulation to optimize both electrode placement and therapeutic efficacy.


Subject(s)
Brain , Deep Brain Stimulation , Depression , Dystonia , Electrodes , Epilepsy , Neurotransmitter Agents , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder , Parkinson Disease , Tourette Syndrome , Tremor
16.
Journal of the Korean Medical Association ; : 182-188, 2009.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-139683

ABSTRACT

The study of pain has recently received much attention, especially in understanding its neurophysiology by using new brain imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), both of which allow us to visualize brain function in vivo. Also the new brain imaging devices allow us to evaluate the patients pain status and plan to treat patients objectively. Functional activation of brain regions are thought to be reflected by increases in the regional cerebral blood flow in the brain imaging studies. Regional cerebral blood flow increases to noxious stimuli are observed in second somatic (SII) and insular regions and in the anterior cingulate cortex and with slightly less consistency in the first somatic area (S1), motor area, supplementary motor area, prefrontal area, amygdala and contralateral thalamus. These data suggest that pain has multidimensions such as sensory-discrimitive, motivational-affective and cognitive-evaluative.


Subject(s)
Humans , Amygdala , Brain , Gyrus Cinguli , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Neuroimaging , Neurophysiology , Positron-Emission Tomography , Thalamus
17.
Journal of the Korean Medical Association ; : 182-188, 2009.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-139682

ABSTRACT

The study of pain has recently received much attention, especially in understanding its neurophysiology by using new brain imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), both of which allow us to visualize brain function in vivo. Also the new brain imaging devices allow us to evaluate the patients pain status and plan to treat patients objectively. Functional activation of brain regions are thought to be reflected by increases in the regional cerebral blood flow in the brain imaging studies. Regional cerebral blood flow increases to noxious stimuli are observed in second somatic (SII) and insular regions and in the anterior cingulate cortex and with slightly less consistency in the first somatic area (S1), motor area, supplementary motor area, prefrontal area, amygdala and contralateral thalamus. These data suggest that pain has multidimensions such as sensory-discrimitive, motivational-affective and cognitive-evaluative.


Subject(s)
Humans , Amygdala , Brain , Gyrus Cinguli , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Neuroimaging , Neurophysiology , Positron-Emission Tomography , Thalamus
18.
Journal of Veterinary Science ; : 369-376, 2007.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-211000

ABSTRACT

The aim of the present study was to assess the clinical and histopathological findings in a canine model of ischemic stroke. Cerebral ischemic stroke was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in four healthy beagle dogs using silicone plugs. They showed neurological signs of forebrain dysfunction such as reduced responsiveness, head turning, circling, postural reaction deficits, perceptual deficits, and hemianopsia. These signs gradually regressed within 4 weeks without therapy. On magnetic resonance imaging, T2 hyperintensity and T1 hypointensity were found in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia. These lesions were well-defined and sharply demarcated from adjacent brain parenchyma with a homogenous appearance. No abnormalities of the cerebrospinal fluid were observed. At necropsy, atrophic and necrotic lesions were observed in the cerebral cortex. The cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, and thalamus were partially unstained with triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride. Histopathologically, typical features of infarction were identified in cortical and thalamic lesions. This study demonstrates that our canine model resembles the conditions of real stroke patients.


Subject(s)
Animals , Dogs , Male , Behavior, Animal/physiology , Brain/metabolism , Cerebral Infarction/etiology , Cerebrospinal Fluid/chemistry , Disease Models, Animal , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/complications , Magnetic Resonance Imaging
19.
Korean Circulation Journal ; : 665-672, 1988.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-115833

ABSTRACT

In order to observe the pattern of a flow image on multisection MR imaging technique, a flow phantom experiment was preformed using a superconducting high filed 2.0 Tesla MRI scanner. The pattren of the first section images was homogeneous round at all flow velocities until the turbulence forming level. The patterns of the second section images,however,changed into a homogeneous round shape, a ring shape, a target shape, and a small round shape as the velocity increased. When scanned at velocities higher than the trubulence forming level, the images become distored and irregular, and eventually disappeared after the cut-off velocity. The homogeneous round image senn at the lower velocity levels in throught to be due to the overwhelming effects of fully managetized spins influxed into the imaging section during the prior repetition time(TR). Later in the higer velocity levels the effects of the partially saturated spins and fully magnetized spins influxed during the section transit time(TR/slice number) are added, and result in ring, target, and small round patterns in the second section image.


Subject(s)
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
20.
Journal of the Korean Radiological Society ; : 1015-1026, 1986.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-770663

ABSTRACT

Magnetic Resonance Imaging(MRI) with 2.0 Tesla superconductive magnet developed by Korea Advanced Institute ofScience was performed in 25 patients with various abdominal diseases and compared with x-ray CT. MRI was obtainedwith spin echo technique using a variety of pulse sequence and various slice orientation including axial, sgittaland coronal section in order to evaluate the diagnostic value, limitation and to determine the optimal pulsesequency in various abdominal diseases. MRI demonstrated the capability of detecting the lesions shown on CT inall cases and also detected one case of diffuse hepatocellular carcinoma which was not seen on CT. MRI showedcapability of differentiation of various liver mass including hepatocellular carcinoma, hemangnioma and simplecyst. MRI showed better anatomical resolution of tumor in retroperitoneum and pelvis, however CT delineatedalimentary tract disease better than MRI did.


Subject(s)
Humans , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Korea , Liver , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Pelvis
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