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1.
J. vasc. bras ; 21: e20220012, 2022. graf
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: biblio-1386126

ABSTRACT

Abstract Accidental fish bone ingestion is a common complaint at emergency departments. The majority of cases have a benign course. However, serious complications such as esophagus perforation, cervical vessel injury and cervical abscess can occur in 7.4% of cases. Mortality rates can be as high as 50% when mediastinitis occurs. We report a case of an esophageal perforation caused by a fish bone with a lesion to the right common carotid artery after 20 days of evolution. Surgical exploration occurred with corrections of the lesion in the right common carotid and esophagus. Early identification of this kind of injury is paramount to prevent potentially fatal complications.


Abstract Accidental fish bone ingestion is a common complaint at emergency departments. The majority of cases have a benign course. However, serious complications such as esophagus perforation, cervical vessel injury and cervical abscess can occur in 7.4% of cases. Mortality rates can be as high as 50% when mediastinitis occurs. We report a case of an esophageal perforation caused by a fish bone with a lesion to the right common carotid artery after 20 days of evolution. Surgical exploration occurred with corrections of the lesion in the right common carotid and esophagus. Early identification of this kind of injury is paramount to prevent potentially fatal complications.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Adult , Carotid Artery Injuries/surgery , Eating , Esophageal Perforation/complications , Retropharyngeal Abscess , Carotid Artery Injuries/complications , Carotid Artery Injuries/diagnosis , Esophageal Perforation/mortality , Mediastinitis/mortality
2.
Rev. colomb. gastroenterol ; 36(1): 115-119, ene.-mar. 2021. graf
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-1251531

ABSTRACT

Resumen La ingesta de cuerpos extraños es una entidad clínica común en el servicio de gastroenterología; la mayoría de veces estos pasan a través del tracto digestivo de manera espontánea y, en algunos casos, pueden presentar complicaciones como obstrucción o perforación. Es importante realizar un diagnóstico temprano con el fin de definir una terapia conservadora o quirúrgica inmediata. Se presenta el caso de una paciente de 67 años de edad que ingresó al servicio de urgencias por dolor abdominal de 16 días de evolución; como había sospecha de tumor gástrico sobreinfectado, se solicitó una endoscopia digestiva alta para la toma de biopsias, pero de forma sorpresiva se extrajo una espina de pescado de 3,5 cm sin complicaciones; posteriormente, se realizó el manejo del absceso gástrico con antibióticos por 14 días, con un buen desenlace clínico.


Abstract Foreign body ingestion is a common reason for consultation to the Gastroenterology Service. Most of these bodies pass through the digestive tract spontaneously and, in some cases, may cause complications such as obstruction or perforation. Early diagnosis is crucial to establish immediate conservative or surgical therapy. The following is the case of a 67-year-old patient admitted to the Emergency Department due to abdominal pain of 16 days of evolution. Since an over-infected gastric tumor was suspected, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was requested for biopsy. Strikingly, a 3.5cm fish bone was removed without complications. Gastric abscess was treated subsequently with antibiotics for 14 days, obtaining a good clinical outcome.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Aged , Gastrointestinal Tract , Foreign Bodies , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Eating , Research Report , Literature
3.
Article | IMSEAR | ID: sea-213279

ABSTRACT

Ingested foreign bodies usually pass uneventfully through the gastrointestinal tract but few of them can cause symptoms. They can get stuck at acute angulations or narrow part of intestine and can perforate leading to localized to generalized peritonitis, collection or abscess formation. We describe a case of 59 year old gentleman who presented with pain in right iliac fossa with fever and a hard, tender lump. Initial investigation revealed a mass in right iliac fossa adherent to anterior abdominal was in right iliac fossa region with a foreign body inside. Patient was managed with exploratory laparotomy, removal of a fish bone from cacecum and limited right hemicolectomy. Fishbone perforation of caecum is a rare entity. Careful corroboration between patient’s presentation and radiological findings with a high index of suspicion is needed for pre-operative diagnosis.

4.
Rev. otorrinolaringol. cir. cabeza cuello ; 80(1): 75-78, mar. 2020. graf
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-1099205

ABSTRACT

Los cuerpos extraños alojados en la vía aéreodigestiva superior son un motivo de consulta frecuente para el otorrinolaringólogo. Uno de los más frecuentes son las espinas de pescado. En raras ocasiones, éstas migran hacia tejidos adyacentes y generan complicaciones importantes. Presentamos el caso de una paciente que tras la ingesta de pescado manifiesta sensación de cuerpo extraño faríngeo, odinofagia y dolor látero cervical derecho. Dada la ausencia de hallazgos a la exploración física y laringoscópica se realiza una tomografia computarizada cervical, visualizando un cuerpo extraño alojado en la glándula tiroidea. Se interviene mediante cervicotomía media, realizando la extracción de la espina sin complicaciones. El diagnóstico precoz y manejo adecuado es determinante para prevenir complicaciones en estos casos.


Foreign bodies in the aerodigestive tract are commonly confronted in otolaryngology practice. The most frequent are the fish bones. In rare cases they can move and cause numerous complications. We report the case of a patient that manifest the sensation of pharyngeal foreign body, after fish ingestion. She also referred odynophagia and right cervical pain. Physical and laryngoscopic examination were normal. A cervical CT was performed, where a foreign body lodged in the thyroid gland was visualized, median cervicotomy was done and the foreign body was extracted. Early diagnosis and adequate management are crucial to prevent complications in these cases.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Thyroid Gland/injuries , Foreign Bodies/surgery , Foreign Bodies/diagnostic imaging , Thyroid Gland/surgery , Bone and Bones , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Foreign-Body Migration/surgery , Foreign-Body Migration/diagnostic imaging , Seafood
5.
Article | IMSEAR | ID: sea-191838

ABSTRACT

Eagle syndrome is a rare condition caused by an elongated styloid process or abnormal calcification of the stylohyoid ligament complex. Patients typically present with recurrent throat pain, neck or facial pain, sensation of foreign body in the throat, or even dysphagia. The finding of an elongated styloid process is usually incidental, with patients having no related symptoms. Only patients with symptoms are diagnosed with Eagle syndrome. This condition may be difficult to diagnose due to its rarity and the nonspecific nature of signs and symptoms. Diagnosis is mainly by clinical assessment and confirmation with radiological evidence. We present a unique case of eagle syndrome in a patient who complained of acute neck pain after eating fish.

6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-780710

ABSTRACT

@#Fish bone is the commonest pharyngeal foreign body, however migrating fish bone is a rare occurrence. We report a case of a 54-year-old male who had history of fish bone ingestion over a week and presented with odynophagia and worsening neck pain. Rigid esophagoscopy revealed tip of a fish bone which was embedded in granulation tissue. The fish bone migrated further with manipulation. Aided with computed tomography scan findings, the serrated fish bone was finally removed via transcervical approach without any complication. In conclusion, high index of suspicion and prompt removal of migrating fish bone with the aid of computed tomography imaging is necessary to avoid fatal complications.

7.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-761574

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of people presenting with fish bone foreign body (FFB) is high in Asian countries, including Korea, and coastal areas around the world. Pointed linear-shaped FFBs are common in the oral cavity and upper esophageal sphincter, whereas large flat bones are more common FFBs in the esophagus. If the FFB is not found on endoscopy, residual foreign body sensation or embedded FFB is possible. In such cases, CT is helpful. However, in the case of totally embedded FFB, not only preoperative diagnosis but also localization during operation or surgery is important. If these are not performed, the initial incision site or operation method would be difficult to determine. For this purpose, no standard guideline has been established yet. We report a case of upper esophageal sphincter-embedded FFB diagnosed using CT rather than endoscopy. The bone was successfully localized using conventional ultrasonography during the operation and then removed surgically.


Subject(s)
Asians , Diagnosis , Endoscopy , Esophageal Sphincter, Upper , Esophagus , Foreign Bodies , Humans , Korea , Methods , Mouth , Pharynx , Prevalence , Sensation , Ultrasonography
8.
Singapore medical journal ; : 356-359, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-687867

ABSTRACT

<p><b>INTRODUCTION</b>Ossification of the cricoid ridge mimicking impacted upper aerodigestive tract fish bone has been described in several case reports. We performed this study to determine the prevalence of such ossification in an adult population from Singapore and to identify specific imaging features that may aid in differentiating patients with cricoid ridge ossification from those with an upper aerodigestive tract impacted fish bone.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>We retrospectively evaluated 442 lateral neck radiographs of patients aged 16 years and above that were taken at the adult emergency department at National University Hospital, Singapore, during the four-month period between 1 September 2014 and 31 December 2014.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Ossification of the cricoid ridge mimicking fish bone appeared in 3.2% of our adult patients and was more common among patients aged above 40 years (n = 11/227; 4.8%). The ossified cricoid ridge was usually located at the C6 level (n = 9) and had a mean length of 5.5 (range 2-9) mm.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>Ossified cricoid ridges may be misinterpreted on lateral neck radiography as ingested fish bones. While ossification of the cricoid ridge mimicking fish bones is rare, awareness of such ossification would reduce unnecessary further investigations of the upper aerodigestive tract in patients suspected of having an impacted foreign body.</p>

9.
Kosin Medical Journal ; : 415-421, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-739008

ABSTRACT

Cases showing complications such as esophageal injury, deep neck infection, and mediastinitis caused by accidental ingestion of fish bone are common. But ingestion of fish bone rarely causes perforation of the gastrointestinal tract or an intra-abdominal abscess. We report herein a case of a 78-year-old man with a periumbilical mesenteric abscess caused by fish bone which was ingested unconsciously. The fish bone was found in the terminal ileum and it was removed by colonoscopy. The patient improved and he was discharged after systemic antibiotic therapy. Occasionally, when patients swallow fish bone without a foreign body sensation, clinicians should suspect perforation caused by fish bone in case of an intra-abdominal abscess of unknown cause.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Abscess , Abscess , Aged , Colonoscopy , Eating , Foreign Bodies , Gastrointestinal Tract , Humans , Ileum , Mediastinitis , Neck , Sensation
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-627159

ABSTRACT

A foreign body (FB) in the upper aerodigestive tract is a common clinical problem that presents as as acute emergency. Sharp FB, such as fish bone or chicken bone, commonly lodges in the tonsil, base of tongue, vallecula or pyriform fossa. Dislodgement of a FB into the laryngopharynx is very rare and specifically onto the vocal cord is extremely uncommon. This case report illustrates a rare case of a sharp FB that was dislodged into the airway and stuck on to the right vocal cord, which was removed under local anaesthesia.

11.
CCH, Correo cient. Holguín ; 20(2): 420-425, abr.-jun. 2016. ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS-Express | LILACS | ID: lil-787153

ABSTRACT

La ingestión de cuerpos extraños durante la alimentación es frecuente, siendo en su mayoría espinas de pescado y huesos de pollo. En gran parte de los casos ocurre accidentalmente en personas alcohólicas, con enfermedad mental o que usan prótesis dentaria. Generalmente pasan a través del tubo digestivo sin causar daño y son expulsadas cerca de los 7 días de la ingestión, pero en algunos pacientes produce perforación del tubo digestivo, siendo las zonas más afectadas las regiones ileocecal y rectosigmoidea por su angulación. Presentamos un paciente masculino de 54 años de edad con perforación yeyunal por espina de pescado ingerida con 5 días de anterioridad, al que se le realizó sutura de la perforación, evolucionando satisfactoriamente.


The ingestion of foreign bodies during the intake is frequent; in the majority of the cases are fish or chicken bones. It generally occurs in alcoholics, mental illness patients or persons using dental prosthesis. Therefore its passes through the digestive tract without causing damage, a few patients present digestive perforation, and the most affected zones are the ileocecal and rectosigmoid regions. A patient with yeyunal perforation by fish bone ingested 5 days ago was presented. The patient required suture of perforation, the progress was satisfactory.

12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-630804

ABSTRACT

Meckel’s diverticulitis or Meckel’s associated pathology frequently presents in childhood with gastrointestinal bleeding. It is rarely seen in adults. It is a congenital abnormality that commonly goes undetected. We present a case of a perforated Meckel’s diverticulum due to fishbone ingestion in an elderly gentleman. The aim of this case report is to highlight the rare presentation of a perforation in a Meckel’s diverticulum due to an extrinsic pathology and to outline diagnostic and management options in cases of Meckel’s diverticulum.


Subject(s)
Meckel Diverticulum
13.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-652956

ABSTRACT

Sialolithiasis is the most common disorder associatd with major salivary glands. It may form in any salivary glands or ducts, but is reported to occur more often in the submandibular gland than in the parotid or sublingual gland. Although the pathogenesis is not perfectly revealed, there appear to be several factors that predispose the submandibular gland duct to be a common site of sialolithiasis. Sialolithiasis occurs as a consequence of the precipitation of calcium salts around a central nidus of desquamated epithelial cells, inflammatory cells, mucoid gels or foreign body. However, it is not a common thing that foreign body entered into the salivary duct through duct orifice may act as the initiating factor. We have recently experienced a case in a 52-year-old female, in which sialolithiasis seems to have formed due to a a foreign body, a fish bone, in the right submandibular gland duct.


Subject(s)
Calcium , Epithelial Cells , Female , Foreign Bodies , Gels , Humans , Middle Aged , Salivary Ducts , Salivary Gland Calculi , Salivary Glands , Salts , Sublingual Gland , Submandibular Gland
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-201258

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The management and clinical course in pediatric patients who had ingested foreign body were investigated retrospectively to evaluate the frequency and factor associated with successful removal of fishbone foreign body. METHODS: Based on the medical records of patients younger than 15 years old who visited emergency room because of foreign body ingestion from January 1999 to December 2012, the authors reviewed clinical characteristics including type of ingested foreign bodies, time to visits, managements and complications. RESULTS: Fishbone (50.1%) was the most common ingested foreign body in children. Among 416 patients with ingested fishbone, 245 (58.9%) were identified and removed using laryngoscope, rigid or flexible endoscope from pharynx or upper esophagus by otolaryngologists and pediatric gastroenterologists. The kind of ingested fish bone in children was diverse. The mean age of identified and removed fishbone group was 7.39 years old, and higher than that of unidentified fishbone group (5.81 years old, p<0.001). Identified and removed fishbone group had shorter time until hospital visit than the unidentified fishbone group (2.03 vs. 6.47 hours, p<0.001). No complication due to ingested fishbone or procedure occurred. CONCLUSION: Older age and shorter time from accident to hospital visit were the different factors between success and failure on removal of ingested fish bone in children.


Subject(s)
Child , Eating , Emergency Service, Hospital , Endoscopes , Esophagus , Foreign Bodies , Humans , Laryngoscopes , Medical Records , Pharynx , Retrospective Studies
15.
Singapore medical journal ; : 329-quiz 333, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-337139

ABSTRACT

<p><b>INTRODUCTION</b>Ingestion of fish bones is a common clinical complaint among adult patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiological and behavioural risk factors for fish bone ingestion.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Between 2009 and 2010, a physician-administered questionnaire was administered to 112 consecutive patients who presented to the emergency department of an adult tertiary hospital with the complaint of fish bone ingestion.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The wearing of dentures, the use of utensils to eat fish and the practice of deboning fish in one's mouth were found to be associated with an increased risk of fish bone ingestion.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>To prevent the occurrence of fish bone ingestion and its possible complications, at-risk populations should be advised on the precautions to take when eating boned fish.</p>


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Animals , Bone and Bones , Child , Cooking and Eating Utensils , Dentures , Eating , Emergency Service, Hospital , Feeding Behavior , Female , Fishes , Foreign Bodies , Epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Singapore , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
16.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-646917

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to gather three-dimensional data to detect fish bones as an esophageal foreign body model and to assess the possibility that this method could be applied for cases of real fish bone foreign body (FBFB). MATERIALS AND METHOD: Fish bones from two species were collected and sizes were measured. Pork meat loaf was placed flat into a plastic box containing plaster cast and bones were laid over the meat layer. Another layer of meat was placed on the bones, then another layer of plaster cast, and the final layer of meat were placed. The meat-bone sandwich was regarded as a fish bone foreign body model of esophagus. The model was imaged using computed tomography (CT) scan and the CT data were reconstructed three-dimensionally making multi-planar reconstruction, maximal intensity projection, and volume rendering images. We tried to find tools to detect the shape and lying position of the FBFB model. The above tools were applied to 3 FBFB cases to verify effectiveness of the tools. RESULTS: Multi-planar reconstruction, maximal intensity projection, and volume rendering images were reconstructed easily. After single or more processing, all of the bones could be detected. The shape and lying positions could be detected using tools made from FBFB models. CONCLUSION: Reconstructed images of CT data readily enabled the detection of fish bone in the esophageal model and real cases.


Subject(s)
Casts, Surgical , Deception , Esophagus , Foreign Bodies , Meat , Plastics
17.
Journal of Gastric Cancer ; : 204-206, 2014.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-33943

ABSTRACT

Gastric complications following unintentional foreign body ingestion are extremely rare. Here, we report the case of a 59-year-old healthy woman who presented with nonspecific abdominal pain and an apparent gastric submucosal tumor that was incidentally detected by gastrofiberscopy. The patient underwent laparoscopic surgery, which revealed an intact gastric wall with no tumor invasion, deformity, or evidence of a gastric submucosal lesion. However, an impacted fish bone was found.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Pain , Congenital Abnormalities , Eating , Female , Foreign Bodies , Humans , Laparoscopy , Middle Aged , Stomach Neoplasms
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-80217

ABSTRACT

A sharp, impacted fish bone in the esophagus is an indication for urgent endoscopy. Endoscopic removal of such an object is a challenging task. An endoscopic protector hood is then used to remove the object. However, an endoscopic hood protector is not always available. In a patient with a large hiatal hernia, the protector hood may not return to the original shape when it passes through the gastroesophageal junction and therefore may not properly protect the esophageal mucosa from the sharp foreign body. In our case, it was impossible to deploy the endoscopic hood protector through the gastroesophageal junction despite multiple attempts. We propose an alternative solution for such cases. We safely removed a large sharp-edged flat fish bone that was folded and compressed using a detachable snare after releasing and pushing the fish bone into the stomach using an endoscope equipped with a transparent cap used for dilating the esophageal wall. This method of using an endoscopic cap and detachable snare is a safe, useful alternative for endoscopically removing a large sharp-edged flat foreign body from the upper gastrointestinal tract. This alternative technique has not been reported in the English medical literature.


Subject(s)
Aged, 80 and over , Esophagoscopy/instrumentation , Esophagus , Foreign Bodies/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Male
19.
GEN ; 66(2): 120-123, jun. 2012. ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-664213

ABSTRACT

La ingestión accidental o voluntaria de cuerpos extraños orgánicos o inorgánicos, redondeados, romos o puntiagudos, es la segunda causa de endoscopia digestiva superior de urgencia. Puede ocasionar complicaciones, más los puntiagudos, produciendo perforación esofágica, secundariamente absceso retro-faríngeo, fístula aorta-esofágica o mediastinitis. Se presenta caso de lactante de 17 meses de edad, quien presentó odinofagia y sialorrea posterior a ingesta de pescado. En radiografía se evidenció imagen radio opaca proyectada al nivel de esófago cervical y en estudio endoscópico edema de partes blandas, imagen erosiva en esfínter esofágico superior y ausencia de cuerpo extraño. En nueva radiología se observó imagen similar a la inicial por lo que se realizó tomografía de cuello confirmando imagen de cuerpo extraño en espacio para-esofágico izquierdo. Se realizó cervicotomia con hallazgo de edema en plano muco-cutáneo, pus retro faríngeo, y espina de pescado en cara posterior de esófago. Durante período postoperatorio mostró descompensación hemodinámica y ventilatoria, shock séptico, y fístula faringo-cutánea manejada conservadoramente. Se inició vía oral posterior a realización de radiología de esófago, que resultó normal, egresa en aparentes buenas condiciones. Conclusión: la no visualización del cuerpo extraño en estudio endoscópico no descarta la posibilidad de penetración esofágica seguido de absceso, fístula o mediastinitis


The voluntary or accidental ingestion of foreign bodies organic or inorganic, rounded, blunt or sharp, is the second cause of upper endoscopy of urgency. It may cause complications, more sharp, producing esophageal perforation, secondarily retro-pharynx abscess, aorta-esophageal fistula or mediastinitis. Case of 17month-old infant, who presents odynophagia and drooling after intake of fish, is presented. In x-ray image opaque radio projected at the level of the cervical esophagus and endoscopic study of soft tissue edema, erosive image in upper esophageal sphincter and absence of foreign body was evident. New radiology noted similar to the initial image by what took place CT of neck confirming foreign body in left para-esophageal space image. He was cervicotomia with finding of edema at mucous-cutaneous level, pharyngeal retro pus, and fish bone on back side of esophagus. During postoperative period are decompensation hemodynamic and ventilatory, septic shock, and pharynx-cutaneous fistula managed conservatively. Starts by mouth after realization of esophagus radiology, which was normal, it emerges in apparent good condition. Conclusion: the visualization of the foreign body in endoscopic study does not rule out the possibility of esophageal penetration followed by abscess, fistula or mediastinitis


Subject(s)
Female , Infant , Diagnostic Imaging , Digestive System Fistula , Endoscopy , Esophageal Perforation/complications , Gastroenterology , Pediatrics
20.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-114619

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study was conducted in order to identify the clinical characteristics of fish bone impaction among children in three tertiary hospitals and to investigate the usefulness of plain radiographs. METHODS: Children with suspected fish bone impaction in their aerodigestive tract were enrolled in this study. Data on patient's sex and age, characteristics of the allegedly ingested fish bone, utilization rate and result of neck radiographs, and removal procedures were collected retrospectively from three university-affiliated hospitals. RESULTS: A total of 270 children, from Seoul National University College of Medicine (n=113), Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (n=114), and Seoul National University Boramae Hospital (n=43) were enrolled consecutively. A total of 162 patients (60.0%) were male; the mean age of subjects was 6.9+/-4.1 years. The most commonly suspected source of fish bones was mackerel (n=58, 21.5%), followed by yellow corbina (n=57, 21.1%), and cutlass fish (n=22, 8.2%). Results of initial oropharyngeal inspections by emergency physicians (EP) were negative in 213 patients (78.9%). Among these patients, 173(64.1%) underwent simple neck radiography (radiograph group) and 40(14.8%) patients did not (non-radiograph group). In the radiograph group, no fish bone (0.0%) was observed on plain radiographs. Additional throat examinations were consulted to otolaryngologists (OL), and fish bones were detected in 62(35.8%) and 15(37.5%) patients, from the radiograph group and non-radio group, respectively. Among oropharyngeal inspections performed by EP or OL (130 patients), the most common impacted site of fish bones was the paratonsillar area (n=92, 71.5%). CONCLUSION: Mackerel and corbina are common sources of fish bone impaction in Korean children. Due to poor visualization and no additional information for use in management, the usefulness of plain radiographs is questionable.


Subject(s)
Child , Emergencies , Gastrointestinal Tract , Humans , Neck , Perciformes , Pharynx , Retrospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers
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