Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 32
Filter
Add filters

Year range
1.
J Clin Med ; 11(24)2022 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36556074

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to evaluate the functional outcomes and quality of life (QoL) in oncologic patients with intraoral defects reconstructed with the buccinator myomucosal flap. A retrospective study was performed involving 39 patients with intraoral soft-tissue defects, reconstructed with a buccinator myomucosal flap during a six-year period. Patients completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaires, the standard questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and the head-and-neck specific module (QLQ-H&N35). Thirty-nine patients with a mean age of 61.23 ± 15.80 years were included in the study. Thirty-three patients were diagnosed with an oncological condition (84.61%). Six patients (15.38%) developed orosinusal communication and underwent extensive debridement. The median global-health-status score was 79.27 and emotional performance was the lowest scoring, with a mean score of 76.93. As for the symptom items, the most outstanding were dental problems (33.33), oral opening (31.62) and dry mouth (37.61), followed by sticky saliva (24.79), problems with social eating (21.15) and pain (19.87). The most significant symptoms were radiotherapy-related adverse effects such as pain, fatigue, dental problems and dry mouth. Patients reconstructed with the buccinator myomucosal flap develop a good quality of life for all types of activities, and a correct function and aesthetics. Postoperative radiotherapy is associated with a poorer quality of life, and can lead to impairment of several symptoms such as swallowing, oral opening and dry mouth.

2.
Int J Urol ; 2022 Sep 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36102302

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Most testicular cancer (TC) survivors have long-term survival. However, the association between financial toxicity (FT), which is an economic side effect of cancer treatment, and the quality of life (QOL) of TC survivors is still unclear. Thus, the impact of FT on the QOL of TC survivors was examined in a multi-institutional cross-sectional study. METHODS: We recruited TC survivors from eight high-volume institutions in Japan between January 2018 and March 2019. A total of 562 participants completed the EORTC QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ-TC26 and the questionnaires on demographics, including annual income. Financial difficulty in the EORTC QLQ-C30 and low income were used to assess financial distress (FD) and financial burden (FB), respectively. FT was defined as FD and FB. The QOL scores were compared, and a multivariate logistic regression analysis for FT was performed. RESULTS: With severe FD, TC survivors had more treatment side effects, physical limitations, and anxiety concerning employment and future. The TC survivors who reported low income were worried about their jobs and the future. The QOL of the survivors with FT exhibited high impairment, except for sexual activity. In particular, the TC survivors with FT were physically limited and anxious concerning the future. The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that four or more chemotherapy cycles were substantial risk factors for FT (4 cycles, odds ratio (OR) = 4.17; ≥5 cycles, OR = 6.96). CONCLUSIONS: TC survivors who received multi-cycle chemotherapy were prone to experience FT, resulting in a decline in their health-related QOL.

3.
Qual Life Res ; 31(3): 877-888, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34286416

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life-Core Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) is a widely used generic self-report measure of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for cancer patients. However, no validated voice script for interviewer-led telephone administration was previously available. The aim of this study was to develop a voice script for interviewer administration via telephone. METHODS: Following guidelines from the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) PRO Mixed Modes Good Research Practices Task Force, a randomised cross-over equivalence study, including cognitive debriefing, was conducted to assess equivalence between paper and telephone administration modes. Assuming an expected intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.70 and a minimally acceptable level of 0.50, a sample size of 63 was required. RESULTS: Cognitive interviews with five cancer patients found the voice script to be clear and understandable. Due to a protocol deviation in the first wave of testing, only 26 patients were available for analyses. A second wave of recruitment was conducted, adding 37 patients (n = 63; mean age 55.48; 65.1% female). Total ICCs for mode comparison ranged from 0.72 (nausea and vomiting, 95% CI 0.48-0.86) to 0.90 (global health status/QoL, 95% CI 0.80-0.95; pain, 95% CI 0.79-0.95; constipation, 95% CI 0.80-0.95). For paper first administration, all ICCs were above 0.70, except nausea and vomiting (ICC 0.55; 95% CI 0.24-0.76) and financial difficulties (ICC 0.60; 95% CI 0.31-0.79). For phone first administration, all ICCs were above 0.70. CONCLUSIONS: The equivalence testing results support the voice script's validity for administration of the QLQ-C30 via telephone.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Quality of Life , Female , Health Status , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone
4.
J Invest Surg ; 35(4): 841-847, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34015977

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed tumor in women; globally, it accounts 23% of all cancer deaths. Breast reconstruction after oncologic surgery has become crucial to enhance patients' quality of life and alleviate the psychological distress related to the disease. The aim of this study was to assess quality of life and esthetic satisfaction of breast cancer patients undergoing muscle-sparing skin-reducing breast reconstruction (MS-SR) with pre-pectoral implants. METHODS: Sixty-three patients who met definite oncological and reconstructive criteria were enrolled in the study. Specific questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30, QLQ-BR23) were administered preoperatively, 1, and 12 months after MS-SR breast reconstruction to evaluate patients' QoL. Satisfaction with procedure and related Quality of Life were assessed through BREAST-Q questionnaire preoperatively and 12 months after surgery. RESULTS: Sixty-three breast cancer patients underwent MS-SR. Seventy-eight procedures were carried out; in 15 patients a bilateral reconstruction was performed. One month after surgery, both EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 average scores demonstrated a slight drop since preoperative values, but a significant improvement in QoL was documented 12 months after BR (p < 0.05). BREAST-Q test showed significant psychophysical and esthetic satisfaction 12 months postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS: Muscle-sparing skin-reducing breast reconstruction is an established and reliable technique. EORTC QLQ-C30, QLQ-BR23 and BREAST-Q scores showed an improvement of patients' QoL and esthetic satisfaction. Reduction of pain and other surgery-related symptoms are cornerstones of patient well-being. Both physicians and patients should build a thorough awareness of the silver lining of muscle-sparing skin-reducing breast reconstruction based on the high safety profile and highly satisfactory patient-reported results.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Mammaplasty , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Female , Humans , Mammaplasty/adverse effects , Mammaplasty/methods , Muscles/surgery , Patient Satisfaction , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
BMC Cancer ; 21(1): 1237, 2021 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34794404

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The types of outcomes measured collected in clinical studies and those required for cost-effectiveness analysis often differ. Decision makers routinely use quality adjusted life years (QALYs) to compare the benefits and costs of treatments across different diseases and treatments using a common metric. QALYs can be calculated using preference-based measures (PBMs) such as EQ-5D-3L, but clinical studies often focus on objective clinician or laboratory measured outcomes and non-preference-based patient outcomes, such as QLQ-C30. We model the relationship between the generic, preference-based EQ-5D-3L and the cancer specific quality of life questionnaire, QLQ-C30 in patients with breast cancer. This will result in a mapping that allows users to convert QLQ-C30 scores into EQ-5D-3L scores for the purposes of cost-effectiveness analysis or economic evaluation. METHODS: We use data from a randomized trial of 602 patients with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer provided 3766 EQ-5D-3L observations. Direct mapping using adjusted, limited dependent variable mixture models (ALDVMM) is compared to a random effects linear regression and indirect mapping using seemingly unrelated ordered probit models. EQ-5D-3L was estimated as a function of the summary scales of the QLQ-C30 and other patient characteristics. RESULTS: A four component mixture model outperformed other models in terms of summary fit statistics. A close fit to the observed data was observed across the range of disease severity. Simulated data from the model closely aligned to the original data and showed that mapping did not significantly underestimate uncertainty. In the simulated data, 22.15% were equal to 1 compared to 21.93% in the original data. Variance was 0.0628 in the simulated data versus 0.0693 in the original data. The preferred mapping is provided in Excel and Stata files for the ease of users. CONCLUSION: A four component adjusted mixture model provides reliable, non-biased estimates of EQ-5D-3L from the QLQ-C30, to link clinical studies to economic evaluation of health technologies for breast cancer. This work adds to a growing body of literature demonstrating the appropriateness of mixture model based approaches in mapping.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Quality of Life , Quality-Adjusted Life Years , Surveys and Questionnaires , Ado-Trastuzumab Emtansine/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic , Cost-Benefit Analysis/methods , Female , Humans , Linear Models , Middle Aged , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Severity of Illness Index , Uncertainty
6.
JMIR Cancer ; 7(4): e25776, 2021 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34636732

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is used to evaluate the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. In a long-term therapy setting, HRQoL can be used as an important benchmark for treatment success. With the help of digital apps, HRQoL monitoring can be extended to more remote areas and be administered on a more frequent basis. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate 3 common HRQoL questionnaires in metastasized breast cancer in terms of TTD in a digital, web-based setting. We further aim to examine the development of the HRQoL in different systemic treatment groups in each of these evaluation instruments. METHODS: A total of 192 patients with metastatic breast cancer were analyzed in this bicentric prospective online cohort study at two German university hospitals. Patients completed questionnaires on HRQoL (EuroQol Visual Analog Scale [EQ-VAS], EuroQol 5 Dimension 5 Level [EQ-5D-5L], European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 item [EORTC QLQ-C30]) via an online platform over a 6-month period. Treatment schedules and medical history were retrieved from medical records. Unadjusted Cox regression analysis on treatment-related factors was performed. We conducted subgroup analyses in regard to TTD events between different treatments. RESULTS: The EQ-VAS showed a higher rate of deterioration after 8 weeks (84/179, 46.9%) than the EQ-5D-5L (47/163, 28.8%) and EORTC QLQ-C30 (65/176, 36.9%). Unadjusted Cox regression revealed significant connections between known metastases in the liver (P=.03, HR 1.64, 95% CI 1.06-2.52) and pleura (P=.04, HR 0.42, 95% CI 0.18-0.96) in the EQ-VAS. Significant relations between EQ-VAS events and single EQ-5D-5L items and the EQ-5D-5L summary score were demonstrated. All treatment groups significantly differed from the CDK4/6 inhibition subgroup in the EQ-VAS. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to the EQ-5D-5L and QLQ-C30, the EQ-VAS showed a higher rate of deterioration after 8 weeks. Significant connections to certain metastatic locations were only detected in the EQ-VAS. The EQ-VAS is capable of reflecting the distinctive HRQoL profiles of different systemic treatments as well as the different aspects of HRQoL presented in the EQ-5D-5L. TTD with the EQ-VAS is an adequate mean of examining longitudinal development of HRQoL among breast cancer patients.

7.
Health Qual Life Outcomes ; 18(1): 240, 2020 Jul 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32690011

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cost-effectiveness models require quality of life utilities calculated from generic preference-based questionnaires, such as EQ-5D. We evaluated the performance of available algorithms for QLQ-C30 conversion into EQ-5D-3L based utilities in a metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patient population and subsequently developed a mCRC specific algorithm. Influence of mapping on cost-effectiveness was evaluated. METHODS: Three available algorithms were compared with observed utilities from the CAIRO3 study. Six models were developed using 5-fold cross-validation: predicting EQ-5D-3L tariffs from QLQ-C30 functional scale scores, continuous QLQ-C30 scores or dummy levels with a random effects model (RE), a most likely probability method on EQ-5D-3L functional scale scores, a beta regression model on QLQ-C30 functional scale scores and a separate equations subgroup approach on QLQ-C30 functional scale scores. Performance was assessed, and algorithms were tested on incomplete QLQ-C30 questionnaires. Influence of utility mapping on incremental cost/QALY gained (ICER) was evaluated in an existing Dutch mCRC cost-effectiveness model. RESULTS: The available algorithms yielded mean utilities of 1: 0.87 ± sd:0.14,2: 0.81 ± 0.15 (both Dutch tariff) and 3: 0.81 ± sd:0.19. Algorithm 1 and 3 were significantly different from the mean observed utility (0.83 ± 0.17 with Dutch tariff, 0.80 ± 0.20 with U.K. tariff). All new models yielded predicted utilities drawing close to observed utilities; differences were not statistically significant. The existing algorithms resulted in an ICER difference of €10,140 less and €1765 more compared to the observed EQ-5D-3L based ICER (€168,048). The preferred newly developed algorithm was €5094 higher than the observed EQ-5D-3L based ICER. Disparity was explained by minimal diffences in incremental QALYs between models. CONCLUSION: Available mapping algorithms sufficiently accurately predict utilities. With the commonly used statistical methods, we did not succeed in developping an improved mapping algorithm. Importantly, cost-effectiveness outcomes in this study were comparable to the original model outcomes between different mapping algorithms. Therefore, mapping can be an adequate solution for cost-effectiveness studies using either a previously designed and validated algorithm or an algorithm developed in this study.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Colorectal Neoplasms/psychology , Quality of Life , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quality-Adjusted Life Years , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards
8.
Qual Life Res ; 29(9): 2485-2495, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32458409

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To develop Austrian, Italian, and Polish general population value sets for the EORTC QLU-C10D, a cancer-specific utility instrument based on the EORTC QLQ-C30, and to descriptively compare their index scores for distinct health states. METHODS: The QLU-C10D descriptive system comprises 10 health attributes and each can take on 4 levels. A standardised and pre-tested methodology has been applied for valuations including a web-based discrete choice experiment (DCE). It was administered in 1000 general population respondents per country recruited via online panels, aiming at representativeness for core socio-demographic variables. RESULTS: In all three countries, the attributes with the largest impact on utility were physical functioning, pain, and role functioning. Cancer-specific dimensions with the largest impact were nausea and fatigue or bowel problems. Utility values of the worst health state (i.e. severe problems on all 10 dimension) were -0.111 (Austria), 0.025 (Italy), and 0.048 (Poland). Country-specific utilities differed for a selection of health states across the continuum. Austrian utilities were systematically lower for moderately and severely impaired health states. CONCLUSION: QLU-C10D cancer-specific utilities can now be calculated in three more countries. Differences between countries indicate that careful consideration is required when using non-country-specific value sets in economic evaluations.


Subject(s)
Quality of Life/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Austria , Cost-Benefit Analysis/methods , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Poland , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
9.
Radiol Oncol ; 53(3): 337-347, 2019 09 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31553711

ABSTRACT

Background The impact of disease and treatment on the patient's overall well-being and functioning is a topic of growing interest in clinical research and practice. The aim of this study is to obtain reference data on quality of life of Croatian general population. Further, we aim to assess the impact of the disease and its primary systemic treatment on their health related quality of life (HrQoL) in multiple myeloma (MM) patients. Patients and methods Participants for the first part of the study were randomly selected from adult Croatian population. In the clinical part of the study MM patients were included as prospectively diagnosed within two years in two major Croatian haematological centres. The EORTC QLQ-C30 in both trials and QLQ-MY20 in MM patients only were applied for HrQoL assessment. Results Gender, age and place of residence have great impact on quality of life scores in Croatian population. The MM patients at the time of diagnosis have lower QLQ-C30 scores for global quality of life, functional and symptom scale scores, as well as single items. The type of disease followed by the choice of therapy options are important HrQoL determinants. Conclusions The norm values available now for Croatian population will help to interpret HrQoL for clinicians and aid in planning cancer care interventions. This study identified treatment effect consistent with those from other observational studies and provided new data on HrQoL across two different treatment choices for MM patients.


Subject(s)
Health Status Indicators , Multiple Myeloma/therapy , Population Health/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Life , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Chi-Square Distribution , Croatia , Health Status , Health Surveys/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Middle Aged , Multiple Myeloma/complications , Prospective Studies , Reference Values , Residence Characteristics , Sex Factors , Statistics, Nonparametric , Stem Cell Transplantation/statistics & numerical data
11.
Expert Rev Pharmacoecon Outcomes Res ; 19(1): 89-96, 2019 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30173585

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Economic evaluation of healthcare interventions usually needs accurate data on utility and health-related quality-of-life scores. The aim of this study is to map QLQ-C30 scale score onto EQ-5D-5L and SF-6D utility values in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. METHODS: EQ-5D-5L, SF-6D, and QLQ-C30 were completed by 252 patients with CRC who were referred to three cancer centers in Tehran between May and September 2017. Moreover, OLS, Tobit, and CLAD models were used to predict EQ-5D-5L and SF-6D values. The goodness of fit of models was evaluated using Pred R2 and Adj R2. In addition, their predictive performance was assessed by MAE, RMSE, ICC, MID, and Spearman's correlation coefficients between observed and predicted EQ-5D-5L and SF-6D values. Models were validated using a 10-fold cross-validation method. RESULTS: Considering the goodness of fit and predictive ability of models, the OLS Model 2 performed best for EQ-5D-5L (Adj R2 = 58.09%, Pred R2 = 58.93%, MAE = 0.0932, RMSE = 0.129) and the OLS Model 3 performed best for SF-6D (Adj R2 = 54.90%, Pred R2 = 55.62%, MAE = 0.0485, RMSE = 0.0634). CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrated that algorithms developed based on OLS Models 1 and 2 are the best for predicted EQ-5D-5L and SF-6D values, respectively.


Subject(s)
Colorectal Neoplasms/psychology , Models, Statistical , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Aged , Algorithms , Colorectal Neoplasms/economics , Colorectal Neoplasms/therapy , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Female , Humans , Iran , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Statistics, Nonparametric
12.
Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg ; 48(2): 163-172, 2019 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30100204

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to compare the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients treated for parotid carcinoma (PC) and parotid adenoma (PA). The impact of demographic, treatment, and pathological factors was analyzed within the PC group. The EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-H&N35 questionnaires were completed by 45 PC patients and 46 PA patients. A number of HRQoL domains were significantly worse in the PC group than in the PA group: global health status, pain, insomnia, loss of appetite, mouth opening, swallowing problems, dry mouth, sticky saliva, problems with senses and speech, social eating, and cognitive functioning (P<0.05). In the PC group, significantly worse scores were found for age >55years, radical parotidectomy, neck dissection, radiotherapy, recurrence of the disease, pT3/T4 stage, pN+ status, and high-grade tumour (P<0.05). Worse results were related to global health status, social contact, mouth opening, weight and appetite loss, physical, role, emotional, and social functioning, fatigue, speech problems, social eating, and financial difficulties. The study results demonstrate worse HRQoL in PC patients in comparison to PA patients. Older age, radical parotidectomy, neck dissection, radiotherapy, T3/T4 stage, pN+, high-grade tumours, and recurrence had a significant influence on HRQoL in PC patients.


Subject(s)
Adenoma/psychology , Parotid Neoplasms/psychology , Quality of Life , Adenoma/pathology , Adenoma/therapy , Age Factors , Aged , Female , Health Status Indicators , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neck Dissection , Neoplasm Grading , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Neoplasm Staging , Parotid Neoplasms/pathology , Parotid Neoplasms/therapy , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Health Qual Life Outcomes ; 16(1): 183, 2018 Sep 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30217200

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL Core Questionnaire 30 (EORTC QLQ-30) and the Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) are the two most widely used measures of cancer-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL). This study aims to assess whether the two instruments measure the same constructs of HRQOL in patients with total laryngectomy. METHODS: The EORTC QLQ-30 and the FACT-G was completed by 132 patients with total laryngectomy. Convergent, discriminant, and construct validity of the EORTC QLQ-C30 and the FACT-G were assessed by Spearman's correlation and explanatory factor analysis. RESULTS: The results of factor analysis showed that the EORTC QLQ-C30 and the FACT-G measure different aspects of HRQOL. Moreover, both instruments showed excellent convergent and discriminant validity, except for nausea and vomiting symptom subscale in the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. The internal consistency was close or greater than 0.7 for all domains of both instruments except for functional wellbeing in FACT-G. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed that neither of the two instruments can be replaced by the other in the assessment of HRQOL in Iranian patients with total laryngectomy. Accordingly, clinicians should exactly define their research questions related to patient-reported outcomes before choosing which instrument to use.


Subject(s)
Health Status Indicators , Laryngectomy , Quality of Life , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Factor Analysis, Statistical , Female , Humans , Iran , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Period , Reproducibility of Results
14.
Qual Life Res ; 27(11): 2823-2839, 2018 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30173314

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to compare alternative statistical techniques to find the best approach for converting QLQ-C30 scores onto EQ-5D-5L and SF-6D utilities, and to estimate the mapping algorithms that best predict these health state utilities. METHODS: 772 cancer patients described their health along the cancer-specific instrument (QLQ-C30) and two generic preference-based instruments (EQ-5D-5L and SF-6D). Seven alternative regression models were applied: ordinary least squares, generalized linear model, extended estimating equations (EEE), fractional regression model, beta binomial (BB) regression, logistic quantile regression and censored least absolute deviation. Normalized mean absolute error (NMAE), normalized root mean square error (NRMSE), r-squared (r2) and concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) were used as model performance criteria. Cross-validation was conducted by randomly splitting internal dataset into two equally sized groups to test the generalizability of each model. RESULTS: In predicting EQ-5D-5L utilities, the BB regression performed best. It gave better predictive accuracy in terms of all criteria in the full sample, as well as in the validation sample. In predicting SF-6D, the EEE performed best. It outperformed in all criteria: NRMSE = 0.1004, NMAE = 0.0798, CCC = 0.842 and r2 = 72.7% in the full sample, and NRMSE = 0.1037, NMAE = 0.0821, CCC = 0.8345 and r2 = 71.4% in cross-validation. CONCLUSIONS: When only QLQ-C30 data are available, mapping provides an alternative approach to obtain health state utility data for use in cost-effectiveness analyses. Among seven alternative regression models, the BB and the EEE gave the most accurate predictions for EQ-5D-5L and SF-6D, respectively.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Cost-Benefit Analysis/methods , Quality of Life/psychology , Research Design/standards , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Eur J Cancer ; 100: 8-16, 2018 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29936066

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To optimise measurement precision, relevance to patients and flexibility, patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) should ideally be adapted to the individual patient/study while retaining direct comparability of scores across patients/studies. This is achievable using item banks and computerised adaptive tests (CATs). The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 (QLQ-C30) is one of the most widely used PROMs in cancer research and clinical practice. Here we provide an overview of the research program to develop CAT versions of the QLQ-C30's 14 functional and symptom domains. METHODS: The EORTC Quality of Life Group's strategy for developing CAT item banks consists of: literature search to identify potential candidate items; formulation of new items compatible with the QLQ-C30 item style; expert evaluations and patient interviews; field-testing and psychometric analyses, including factor analysis, item response theory calibration and simulation of measurement properties. In addition, software for setting up, running and scoring CAT has been developed. RESULTS: Across eight rounds of data collections, 9782 patients were recruited from 12 countries for the field-testing. The four phases of development resulted in a total of 260 unique items across the 14 domains. Each item bank consists of 7-34 items. Psychometric evaluations indicated higher measurement precision and increased statistical power of the CAT measures compared to the QLQ-C30 scales. Using CAT, sample size requirements may be reduced by approximately 20-35% on average without loss of power. CONCLUSIONS: The EORTC CAT Core represents a more precise, powerful and flexible measurement system than the QLQ-C30. It is currently being validated in a large independent, international sample of cancer patients.


Subject(s)
Health Status Indicators , Neoplasms/psychology , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Quality of Life , Software Design , Activities of Daily Living , Cost of Illness , Europe , Female , Health Status , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasms/physiopathology , Psychometrics , Taiwan
16.
Breast Cancer (Auckl) ; 12: 1178223418758031, 2018.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29511355

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Trastuzumab, a humanized anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (anti-HER2) antibody delivered intravenously, has revolutionized the treatment of patients with breast cancer overexpressing HER2 protein. Recently, a newer subcutaneous formulation was shown to have comparable efficacy to the initial intravenous trastuzumab. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of subcutaneous trastuzumab on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients diagnosed with early or metastatic HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. METHODS: Patients were provided with the EORTC QLQ-C30 (European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30) and the BR-23 questionnaires. The scoring of questionnaires and patient's sociodemographic and clinicopathologic characteristics were recorded and analyzed by descriptive and correlation statistics employing t test and 2-way analysis of variance. RESULTS: A total of 163 patients agreed to participate in the study. About 90 of 163 patients (55.21%) received subcutaneous trastuzumab and 21 patients intravenous trastuzumab (12.88%). A control group of 52 HER2+ patients received chemotherapy without trastuzumab (31.90%). Patients receiving subcutaneous trastuzumab were older and of more advanced disease stage compared with those receiving chemotherapy (58.5 vs 51 years, 39.8% vs 28.8% advanced disease). In univariate analysis, subcutaneous trastuzumab was associated with less nausea and vomiting (P = .002) but worse cognitive function (P = .013) and dyspnea (P = .042). Patients who have received >8 cycles of subcutaneous trastuzumab reported less diarrhea (P = .049) and systemic therapy side effects (P = .015). Multivariate analysis showed that patients without comorbidity receiving subcutaneous trastuzumab had less treatment side effects, less upset by hair loss, and higher emotional functioning. Of note, mastectomy and subcutaneous trastuzumab were associated with improved role functioning (P = .021). In metastatic disease, no negative impact of subcutaneous trastuzumab on HRQoL was found. CONCLUSIONS: The administration of subcutaneous trastuzumab improved certain symptoms and did not adversely affect most of the assessed functional scales. Particularly, in the metastatic setting, subcutaneous trastuzumab had no negative impact on HRQoL.

17.
BMC Womens Health ; 18(1): 7, 2018 01 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29304790

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Being diagnosed with gynaecologic malignancy certainly will have different sequelae which can hamper quality of life (QOL).This study aimed to assess health related quality of life (HRQOL) among gynaecologic cancer patients attending at Tikur Anbesa Specialized Hospital (TASH), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. METHODS: This study employed facility-based cross-sectional study design on 153 gynaecological cancer patients attending TASH using the Amharic version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Core Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30). We used descriptive statistics, independent t test and one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) in statistical analysis. RESULTS: The mean Global Health Status (GHS) was 40.95(SD ± 24.35) and of the functional scores, social function was most affected (42.26, SD ± 32.08), whereas cognitive function is the least affected domain (mean = 88.21, SD ± 18.49). The highest score on the symptom scores was found to be financial difficulties (mean = 64.76, SD ± 32.43) followed by pain (mean = 55.12, SD ± 29.64) and fatigue (mean = 53.97, SD ± 28.54); the lowest score on the contrary was scored for diarrhea (mean = 1.19, SD ± 7.38). As stage increases there was a statistically significant reduction in GHS (p = 0.005) and in all functional score domains except the physical and emotional function. Advancement in stage of the disease has also affected significantly the symptom score domains except financial difficulties, nausea /vomiting and diarrhea. Patients who never went to school have scored a statistically significant lower score in GHS, physical function, role function and social function (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: GHS, social function, financial difficulties, pain and fatigue were the most affected domains; however, cognitive function and diarrhea were less affected components of HRQOL of gynaecologic cancer patients. Place of residence, educational status, marital status, payment type, cancer type and stage of the disease were associated with different quality of life scores.


Subject(s)
Genital Neoplasms, Female/complications , Genital Neoplasms, Female/psychology , Quality of Life , Adult , Aged , Cancer Pain/etiology , Cost of Illness , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diarrhea/etiology , Educational Status , Emotions , Ethiopia , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/economics , Genital Neoplasms, Female/pathology , Health Status , Humans , Marital Status , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Quality of Life/psychology , Residence Characteristics , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Qual Life Res ; 27(1): 115-124, 2018 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28917029

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Based on improvements of progression-free survival (PFS), new agents for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) have been approved. It is assumed that one of the benefits is a delay in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) deterioration as a result of a delay in progression of disease. However, little data are available supporting this relationship. This study aims to provide insight into the most important determinants of HRQoL (including progression of disease) of patients with mRCC. METHODS: A patient registry (PERCEPTION) was created to evaluate treatment of patients with (m)RCC in the Netherlands. HRQoL was measured, using the EORTC QLQ-C30 and EQ-5D-5L, every 3 months in the first year of participation in the study, and every 6 months in the second year. Participation started as soon as possible following a diagnosis of (m)RCC. Random effects models were used to study associations between HRQoL and patient and disease characteristics, symptoms and treatment. RESULTS: Eighty-seven patients with mRCC completed 304 questionnaires. The average EORTC QLQ-C30 global health status was 69 (SD, 19) before progression and 61 (SD, 22) after progression of disease. Similarly, the average EQ-5D utility was 0.75 (SD, 0.19) before progression and 0.66 (SD, 0.30) after progression of disease. The presence of fatigue, pain, dyspnoea, and the application of radiotherapy were associated with significantly lower EQ-5D utilities. CONCLUSIONS: Key drivers for reduced HRQoL in mRCC are disease symptoms. Since symptoms increase with progression of disease, targeted therapies that increase PFS are expected to postpone reductions in HRQoL in mRCC.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Renal Cell/psychology , Cost-Benefit Analysis/methods , Health Status , Quality of Life/psychology , Adult , Aged , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/economics , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/pathology , Disease-Free Survival , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Metastasis , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
World J Hepatol ; 9(20): 867-883, 2017 Jul 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28804570

ABSTRACT

Health related quality of life (HRQOL) is increasingly recognized as an important clinical parameter and research endpoint in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HRQOL in HCC patients is multifaceted and affected by medical factor which encompasses HCC and its complications, oncological and palliative treatment for HCC, underlying liver disease, as well as the psychological, social or spiritual reaction to the disease. Many patients presented late with advanced disease and limited survival, plagued with multiple symptoms, rendering QOL a very important aspect in their general well being. Various instruments have been developed and validated to measure and report HRQOL in HCC patients, these included general HRQOL instruments, e.g., Short form (SF)-36, SF-12, EuroQoL-5D, World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment 100 (WHOQOL-100), World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment abbreviated version; general cancer HRQOL instruments, e.g., the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT)-General, Spitzer Quality of Life Index; and liver-cancer specific HRQOL instruments, e.g., EORTC QLQ-HCC18, FACT-Hepatobiliary (FACT-Hep), FACT-Hep Symptom Index, Trial Outcome Index. Important utilization of HRQOL in HCC patients included description of symptomatology and HRQOL of patients, treatment endpoint in clinical trial, prognostication of survival, benchmarking of palliative care service and health care valuation. In this review, difficulties regarding the use of HRQOL data in research and clinical practice, including choosing a suitable instrument, problems of missing data, data interpretation, analysis and presentation are examined. Potential solutions are also discussed.

20.
Head Neck ; 39(10): 2036-2047, 2017 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28708279

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to establish population-based norms for the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Head and Neck 35 (EORTC QLQ-HN35) to be used as references to facilitate the interpretation of results from health-related quality of life (HRQOL) studies of patients with head and neck cancer. METHODS: The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and QLQ-HN35 were sent to a random sample representing the Swedish general population. RESULTS: The response rate was 69% (1504 participants of 2200 invited). The scores for the QLQ-C30 were comparable to previously published reference values. The reference values for the QLQ-HN35 were low, indicating few head and neck-specific problems in the population. For illustrative purposes, we also compared these reference values to our previously published HRQOL results obtained from patients with head and neck cancer at diagnosis and from 3-year survivors. CONCLUSION: These new reference values for EORTC QLQ-HN35 may be useful in future HRQOL studies.


Subject(s)
Head and Neck Neoplasms/psychology , Health Status Indicators , Quality of Life , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Europe , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Reference Values , Registries , Surveys and Questionnaires , Sweden , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL