Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 11 de 11
Filter
1.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(4): 679-685, July-Aug. 2022. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS-Express | LILACS | ID: biblio-1385136

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose To characterize the most common presentation and clinical risk factors for artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) cuff erosion to distinguish the relative frequency of symptoms that should trigger further evaluation in these patients. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed our tertiary center database to identify men who presented with AUS cuff erosion between 2007 - 2020. A similar cohort of men who underwent AUS placement without erosion were randomly selected from the same database for symptom comparison. Risk factors for cuff erosion - pelvic radiation, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), high-grade prostate cancer (Gleason score ≥ 8) - were recorded for each patient. Presenting signs and symptoms of cuff erosion were grouped into three categories: obstructive symptoms, worsening incontinence, and localized scrotal inflammation (SI). Results Of 893 men who underwent AUS placement during the study interval, 61 (6.8%) sustained cuff erosion. Most erosion patients (40/61, 66%) presented with scrotal inflammatory changes including tenderness, erythema, and swelling. Fewer men reported obstructive symptoms (26/61, 43%) and worsening incontinence (21/61, 34%). Men with SI or obstructive symptoms presented significantly earlier than those with worsening incontinence (SI 14 ± 18 vs. obstructive symptoms 15 ± 16 vs. incontinence 37 ± 48 months after AUS insertion, p<0.01). Relative to the non-erosion control group (n=61), men who suffered erosion had a higher prevalence of pelvic radiation (71 vs. 49%, p=0.02). Conclusion AUS cuff erosion most commonly presents as SI symptoms. Obstructive voiding symptoms and worsening incontinence are also common. Any of these symptoms should prompt further investigation of cuff erosion.

2.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 47(2): 415-422, Mar.-Apr. 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1154456

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose: Patient-reported history of pads per day (PPD) is widely recognized as a fundamental element of decision-making for anti-incontinence procedures. We hypothesize that SUI severity is often underestimated among men with moderate SUI. We sought to compare patient history of incontinence severity versus objective in-office physical examination findings. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed our single-surgeon male SUI surgical database from 2007-2019. We excluded patients with incomplete preoperative or postoperative data and those who reported either mild or severe SUI, thus having more straightforward surgical counseling. For men reported to have moderate SUI, we determined the frequency of upgrading SUI severity by recording the results of an in-office standing cough test (SCT) using the Male Stress Incontinence Grading Scale (MSIGS). The correlation of MSIGS with sling success rate was calculated. Failure was defined as >1 PPD usage or need for additional incontinence procedure. Results: Among 233 patients with reported moderate SUI (2-3 PPD), 89 (38%) had MSIGS 3-4 on SCT, indicating severe SUI. Among patients with 2-3 PPD preoperatively, sling success rates were significantly higher for patients with MSIGS 0-2 (76/116, 64%) compared to MSIGS 3-4 (6/18, 33%) (p <0.01). Conclusions: Many men with self-reported history of moderate SUI actually present severe SUI observed on SCT. The SCT is a useful tool to stratify moderate SUI patients to more accurately predict sling success.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Urinary Incontinence, Stress/surgery , Urinary Incontinence, Stress/diagnosis , Suburethral Slings , Prostatectomy , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Cough
3.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 46(4): 632-639, 2020. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1134196

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective To investigate the effect of perioperative complications involving artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) implantation on rates of explantation and continence as well as health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Materials and methods Inclusion criteria encompassed non-neurogenic, moderate-to-severe stress urinary incontinence (SUI) post radical prostatectomy and primary implantation of an AUS performed by a high-volume surgeon (>100 previous implantations). Reporting complications followed the validated Clavien-Dindo scale and Martin criteria. HRQOL was assessed by the validated IQOL score, continence by the validated ICIQ-SF score. Statistical analysis included Chi (2) test, Mann-Whitney-U test, and multivariate regression models (p <0.05). Results 105 patients from 5 centers met the inclusion criteria. After a median follow-up of 38 months, explantation rates were 27.6% with a continence rate of 48.4%. In the age-adjusted multivariate analysis, perioperative urinary tract infection was confirmed as an independent predictor of postoperative explantation rates [OR 24.28, 95% CI 2.81-209.77, p=0.004). Salvage implantation (OR 0.114, 95% CI 0.02-0.67, p=0.016) and non-prostatectomy related incontinence (OR 0.104, 95% CI 0.02-0.74, p=0.023) were independent predictors for worse continence outcomes. Low visual analogue scale scores (OR 9.999, 95% CI 1,42-70.25, p=0.021) and ICIQ-SF scores, respectively (OR 0.674, 95% CI 0.51-0.88, p=0.004) were independent predictors for increased HRQOL outcomes. Perioperative complications did not significantly impact on continence and HRQOL outcomes. Conclusion Findings show postoperative infections adversely affect device survival after AUS implantation. However, if explantation can be avoided, the comparative long-term functional results and HRQOL outcomes are similar between patients with or without perioperative complications.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Aged , Urinary Incontinence, Stress/surgery , Urinary Incontinence, Stress/etiology , Urinary Sphincter, Artificial , Prostatectomy/adverse effects , Quality of Life , Treatment Outcome , Middle Aged
4.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 45(5): 989-998, Sept.-Dec. 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1040081

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the subjective and objective outcomes of Macroplastique® (MPQ) in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) secondary to intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD). Materials and Methods Following Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, charts of non-neurogenic women with SUI secondary to ISD who underwent MPQ injection and had 6 months minimum follow-up were reviewed from a prospectively maintained database. Patients were divided into 3 groups: Naïve (Group I), Prior Anti-Incontinence Surgery (Group II), and combined Prior Bulking Agent and Anti-Incontinence Surgery (Group III). Data collected included SUI self-report, Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6) Question 3, and VAS Quality of Life (QoL) Questionnaire scores at baseline and in follow-up. Three-dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) evaluated volume/configuration of MPQ. Success was defined after the last MPQ injection as a UDI-6 Question 3 score of 0 (dry) or 1, and no reoperation for SUI. Results From 2011-2017, 106 of 142 women met study criteria. At a median follow-up of 20 months (mean=26 months; range: 6-71), success rate was 41% for Group I, 40% for Group II, and 65% for Group III (p = 0.22). QoL scores were significantly improved over baseline in all groups. There was no significant difference in clinical outcome between the asymmetrical and symmetrical group on 3DUS. The completely dry rate was highest in Group III at 29%, compared to 4% for Group I and 15% for Group II (p = 0.05). Conclusion Macroplastique® improved subjective and objective outcome measures for SUI secondary to ISD as both a primary and secondary treatment option in women.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Urethral Diseases/complications , Urinary Incontinence, Stress/surgery , Urinary Incontinence, Stress/etiology , Dimethylpolysiloxanes/therapeutic use , Quality of Life , Reoperation , Time Factors , Prospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Reproducibility of Results , Collagen/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome , Injections , Middle Aged
5.
Chinese Journal of Geriatrics ; (12): 582-585, 2019.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-745563

ABSTRACT

Objective To investigate an initial therapeutic effect and safety of an implantation of artificial urinary sphincter(AUS)for treatment of male incontinence.Methods Clinical data of 5 male patients hospitalized in our center from November 2013 to November 2017 and treated with AUS were retrospectively analyzed.The usage of pads and the improvement of relevant score were compared before and after operation.Results The 5 males had incontinence secondary to post-prostatectomy,aged 71-78 years with an average of 75.4 years.All AUS devices were successfully activated and manipulated.After implantation,patients were followed up for a mean of 28.4 months.A social continence was got in four cases,a totally dry in one case.Complications occurred in 2 cases:1 case had mechanical failure and reached the standard of social urine control after replacing devices;another case had an unknown cause.Conclusions AUS implantation is a safe and effective treatment for male patients with the moderate to severe urinary incontinence.

6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-785855

ABSTRACT

Male stress urinary incontinence (SUI) can undoubtedly reduce quality of life and promote personal distress and psychosocial alienation. The frequency of postprostatectomy urinary incontinence (PPI) counts on the characterization of urinary incontinence and the periods of patient follow-up. Operational therapeutics, for instance, urethral male slings and artificial urinary sphincters, are well-chosen as adequate and secure surgeries for male SUI in men with continual PPI when conservative treatment is ineffective. Over the former 2 decades, surgery has progressed regarding both operative approach and sling architecture. However, there are no guidelines about when surgery should be carried out and which is the most appropriate surgical option. In this review, we summarize recent advances in implantable devices for PPI and also discuss traditional surgical care. When we are planning the male PPI surgery, careful preoperative work-up should be performed and surgical method should be chosen according to the severity of the disease. Male sling is preferred in mild and moderate symptomatic patients with normal detrusor pressure and it is recommended to select traditional artificial urinary sphincter device in those with severe symptoms. It is expected that effective devices without adverse events will be developed with technical advances in near future.


Subject(s)
Emigrants and Immigrants , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Methods , Prostatectomy , Quality of Life , Suburethral Slings , Urinary Incontinence , Urinary Incontinence, Stress , Urinary Sphincter, Artificial
7.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 44(2): 355-361, Mar.-Apr. 2018. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-892977

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose We present a novel AUS implantation technique using a single perineal incision for single device placement or in combination with an inflatable penile prosthesis (IPP). Urinary and sexual dysfunction following the management of prostate cancer has a significant impact on the quality of life of our patients. While there are marginal changes in the prosthetic devices, we strive to reduce post-operative morbidity while maximizing efficacy. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 6 patients who underwent single perineal incision placement of a virgin AUS in 2014, 3 with simultaneous IPP placement. In all cases, the pressure regulating balloons (PRB) were placed in a high sub-muscular ectopic position and the pumps were placed into a sub-dartos pouch through the perineal incision, which was also validated using a cadaveric model. Results The mean patient age was 61 (SD, 7.5 years) with mean body mass index of 31 (SD, 5.9). The average pre-operative pad usage was 7.7 (SD 1.63) pads per day. The mean follow-up was 13.9 months (SD 9.45). Four out of the six patients reported utilizing ≤1 pad daily at follow-up. The one patient who was not initially dry required downsizing of his cuff to 3.5cm; the remaining patient was lost to follow-up. There were no identifiable perioperative or post-operative complications. Conclusions We present our initial report of using a single perineal incision for AUS implantation with a validated sub-dartos pump location, which is safe and effective for implantation of an AUS as a single or double implantation in well-selected patients.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Urinary Incontinence, Stress/surgery , Urinary Sphincter, Artificial , Prosthesis Implantation/methods , Cadaver , Feasibility Studies , Retrospective Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Treatment Outcome , Penile Implantation/methods , Middle Aged
8.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 43(2): 264-270, Mar.-Apr. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-840822

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective To compare outcomes for single urethral cuff downsizing versus tandem cuff placement during artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) revision for urethral atrophy. Materials and Methods We identified 1778 AUS surgeries performed at our institution from 1990-2014. Of these, 406 were first AUS revisions, including 69 revisions for urethral atrophy. Multiple clinical and surgical variables were evaluated for potential association with device outcomes following revision, including surgical revision strategy (downsizing a single urethral cuff versus placing tandem urethral cuffs). Results Of the 69 revision surgeries for urethral atrophy at our institution, 56 (82%) were tandem cuff placements, 12 (18%) were single cuff downsizings and one was relocation of a single cuff. When comparing tandem cuff placements and single cuff downsizings, the cohorts were similar with regard to age (p=0.98), body-mass index (p=0.95), prior pelvic radiation exposure (p=0.73) and length of follow-up (p=0.12). Notably, there was no difference in 3-year overall device survival compared between single cuff and tandem cuff revisions (60% versus 76%, p=0.94). Likewise, no significant difference was identified for tandem cuff placement (ref. single cuff) when evaluating the risk of any tertiary surgery (HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.32-4.12, p=0.94) or urethral erosion/device infection following revision (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.20-5.22, p=0.77). Conclusions There was no significant difference in overall device survival in patients undergoing single cuff downsizing or tandem cuff placement during AUS revision for urethral atrophy.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Reoperation/methods , Urethra/pathology , Urinary Incontinence, Stress/surgery , Urinary Sphincter, Artificial , Prosthesis Implantation/methods , Prosthesis Design , Atrophy , Time Factors , Urethra/surgery , Prosthesis Failure , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Follow-Up Studies , Treatment Outcome , Statistics, Nonparametric
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-54249

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To analyze perioperative complications and postoperative explantation rates for selected readjustable male sling systems and the perineal single-cuff artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) in a large, contemporary, multi-institutional patient cohort. METHODS: Two hundred eighty-two male patients who underwent implantation between 2010 and 2012 in 13 participating institutions were included in the study (n=127 adjustable male sling [n=95 Argus classic, n=32 Argus T], n=155 AUS). Perioperative characteristics and postoperative complications were analyzed. The explantation rates of the respective devices were assessed using the Fisher exact test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. A Kaplan-Meier curve was generated. Potential features associated with device explantation were analyzed using a multiple logistic regression model (P<0.05). RESULTS: We found significantly increased intraoperative complication rates after adjustable male sling implantation (15.9% [adjustable male sling] vs. 4.2% [AUS], P=0.003). The most frequent intraoperative complication was bladder perforation (n=17). Postoperative infection rates did not vary significantly between the respective devices (P=0.378). Device explantation rates were significantly higher after AUS implantation (9.7% [adjustable male sling] vs. 21.5% [AUS], P=0.030). In multivariate analysis, postoperative infection was a strong independent predictor of decreased device survival (odds ratio, 6.556; P=0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Complication profiles vary between adjustable male slings and AUS. Explantation rates are lower after adjustable male sling implantation. Any kind of postoperative infections are independent predictors of decreased device survival. There is no significant effect of the experience of the implanting institution on device survival.


Subject(s)
Cohort Studies , Humans , Intraoperative Complications , Logistic Models , Male , Multivariate Analysis , Postoperative Complications , Suburethral Slings , Urinary Bladder , Urinary Incontinence , Urinary Incontinence, Stress , Urinary Sphincter, Artificial
10.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 40(1): 80-86, Jan-Feb/2014. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-704170

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the long term outcomes of permanent Memotherm urethral stent in the treatment of recurrent bulbar urethral stricture. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients who underwent permanent Memotherm urethral stent implantation due to recurrent bulbar urethral stricture following previous unsuccessful surgical procedure from 1996 to 2002 were included in the study. Long-term outcomes of the patients were evaluated. Results: The overall success rate was 87.5% at the end of the tenth year. There was discomfort in implantation area in eight patients about 1 month following the procedure. These patients were treated with alpha-blocker and anti-inflammatory drugs. Stone formation was observed at the urethral stent implantation area in two patients. Post-void dripping has been observed in 15 patients up to the postoperative 3rd month. Stress urinary incontinence was observed in a patient with a 1-year follow-up. Partial stent migration was observed in two patients. None of the patients experienced pain during erection. Conclusion: Memotherm urethral stent is a minimal invasive surgical procedure which can be safely and effectively used in patients with recurrent urethral stricture. .


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Stents , Urethral Stricture/surgery , Urinary Catheterization/methods , Follow-Up Studies , Postoperative Complications , Prosthesis Implantation/methods , Recurrence , Stents/adverse effects , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Urethral Stricture/complications , Urinary Catheterization/adverse effects , Urinary Incontinence, Stress/etiology
11.
Chinese Journal of Urology ; (12): 274-277, 2009.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-395674

ABSTRACT

Objective To evaluate the long-term outcome of reconstruction for urinary conti-nence function by using implantation of artificial urinary sphincter (AUS). Methods From 2002 to 2005,15 incontinent patients (14 men and 1 woman) with age range of 19-75 years treated with im-plantation of AUS were followed up. In 15 eases, there were 5 cases with traumatic urinary inconti-nence, 1 with neurogenic stress incontinence, 1 with neurogenic urgent incontinence,6 with postpros-tatectomy incontinence and 2 with neurogenie voiding dysfunction. Three eases had taken urethro-stenotomy, 3 had sphineterotomy and 1 had enterocystoplasty and ureterovesieostomy before the im-plantation for AUS. The patients were followed up for 13-55 months with mean of 37 months. The information about the continence status and pads usage, also the complications were collected. Results After implantation, 13 cases(87%)used AUS device normally, 12(92%)beeame dry and 1 (8%) got social continence. Eleven cases (85%) got continence depending on the original implanted AUS and 15% did continence by reoperation. There were 4 cases(27%) with complications including erosion of skin and urethral in 1, graft rejection in 1, urethral atrophy in 1, and voiding dysfunction in 1. Durability of 11 cases with original implanted devices was 13-55 months with mean of 38 months.Conclusion The implantation of AUS is a long-term reliable method in reconstruction for lower uri-nary tract function.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL