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1.
Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion ; (12): 197-202, 2023.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-969971

ABSTRACT

The paper introduces GAO Wei-bin's clinical experience in acupuncture treatment for neurogenic bladder. In association with the etiology, the location and types of neurogenic bladder and in accordance with nerve anatomy and meridian differentiation, the acupoints are selected accurately in treatment. Four acupoint prescriptions are allocated. For frequent urination and urinary incontinence, the foot-motor-sensory area of scalp acupuncture, Shenshu (BL 23) and Huiyang (BL 35) are used. For all kinds of urine retention, especially the patients who are not suitable for acupuncture at the lumbar region, Zhongji (CV 3), Qugu (CV 2), Henggu (KI 11) and Dahe (KI 12) are selected. For all kinds of urine retention, Zhongliao (BL 33) and Ciliao (BL 32) are applicable. For the patients with both dysuria and urinary incontinence, Zhongliao (BL 33), Ciliao (BL 32) and Huiyang (BL 35) are chosen. In treatment of neurogenic bladder, both biao (root causes) and ben (primary symptoms) are considered, as well as the accompanying symptoms; and electroacupuncture is combined accordingly. During the delivery of acupuncture, the sites where the acupoints located are detected and palpated so as to rationally control the depth of needle insertion and the operation of reinforcing and reducing needling techniques.


Subject(s)
Humans , Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic/etiology , Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects , Meridians , Electroacupuncture , Acupuncture Points , Urinary Retention , Urinary Incontinence
2.
Chinese journal of integrative medicine ; (12): 534-539, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-982288

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To observe the clinical efficacy of transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) combined with warm acupuncture in treating breast cancer associated with upper limb lymphedema (BCRL).@*METHODS@#This was a retrospective cohort study using a paired control design. Fifty-two BCRL patients were assigned to the control group (27 cases) and the treatment group (25 cases). The patients in the control group were treated with lymphedema comprehensive detumescence treatment (CDT) for 4 weeks, including systematic therapy composed of manual lymphatic drainage, compression bandage, skincare, and functional exercise. The patients in the treatment group were treated with TEAS combined with warm acupuncture based on the control group methods. Each treatment lasted for 30 min and was applied twice a week for 4 weeks. The arm circumference (AC) of different positions of the affected limb and the degree of swelling of the affected limb were evaluated before the first treatment and after the last treatment. The clinical efficacy was evaluated according to the degree of edema before and after treatment. All adverse events during treatment were recorded.@*RESULTS@#The patients' AC and the swelling feeling of the affected limb in the treatment group and the control group were both reduced compared with those before treatment. Compared with the control group, AC of the wrist joint transverse stria, the midpoint between the wrist joint transverse stria and the elbow joint transverse stria in the treatment group were significantly reduced (P<0.05). The decrease in AC diameter at the midpoint between the elbow joint transverse stria and the axillary transverse stria was the most significant (P<0.01). The swelling degree of the affected limbs in the treatment group was significantly lower than before treatment, and was significantly lower compared with the control group after treatment (P<0.01). The total effective rate was 72% in the treatment group, significantly higher than that in the control group (55.56%, P<0.05). No serious adverse events occured in either group.@*CONCLUSIONS@#TEAS combined with warm acupuncture can effectively reduce AC and swelling feeling of the affected limb in patients with BCRL. The effect is better than that of CDT therapy alone. (Registration No. ChiCTR2200062075).


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Acupuncture Points , Retrospective Studies , Lymphedema/complications , Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects , Upper Extremity , Treatment Outcome
3.
Journal of Integrative Medicine ; (12): 136-148, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-971649

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND@#Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the primary cause of anovulatory infertility, bringing serious harm to women's physical and mental health. Acupuncture may be an effective treatment for PCOS. However, systematic reviews (SRs) on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for PCOS have reported inconsistent results, and the quality of these studies has not been adequately assessed.@*OBJECTIVE@#To summarize and evaluate the current evidence on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for PCOS, as well as to assess the quality and risks of bias of the available SRs.@*SEARCH STRATEGY@#Nine electronic databases (Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Data, Chongqing VIP Chinese Science and Technology Periodical Database, and China Biology Medicine disc) were searched from their establishment to July 27, 2022. Based on the principle of combining subject words with text words, the search strategy was constructed around search terms for "acupuncture," "polycystic ovary syndrome," and "systematic review."@*INCLUSION CRITERIA@#SRs of randomized controlled trials that explored the efficacy and (or) safety of acupuncture for treating patients with PCOS were included.@*DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS@#Two authors independently extracted study data according to a predesigned form. Tools for evaluating the methodological quality, risk of bias, reporting quality, and confidence in study outcomes, including A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews 2 (AMSTAR 2), Risk of Bias in Systematic Reviews (ROBIS), Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses for Acupuncture (PRISMA-A), and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE), were used to score the included SRs.@*RESULTS@#A total of 885 studies were retrieved, and 11 eligible SRs were finally included in this review. The methodological quality of 2 SRs (18.18%) was low, while the other 9 SRs (81.82%) were scored as extremely low. Four SRs (36.36%) were considered to be of low risk of bias. As for reporting quality, the reporting completeness of 9 SRs (81.82%) was more than 70%. Concerning the confidence in study results, 2 study results were considered to have a high quality of evidence (3.13%), 14 (21.88%) a "moderate" quality, 28 (43.75%) a "low" quality, and 20 (31.24%) considered a "very low" quality. Descriptive analyses suggested that combining acupuncture with other medicines can effectively improve the clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) and ovulation rate, and reduce luteinizing hormone/follicle-stimulating hormone ratio, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and body mass index (BMI). When compared with medicine alone, acupuncture alone also can improve CPR. Further, when compared with no intervention, acupuncture had a better effect in promoting the recovery of menstrual cycle and reducing BMI. Acupuncture was reported to cause no adverse events or some adverse events without serious harm.@*CONCLUSION@#The efficacy and safety of acupuncture for PCOS remains uncertain due to the limitations and inconsistencies of current evidence. More high-quality studies are needed to support the use of acupuncture in PCOS.


Subject(s)
Pregnancy , Humans , Female , Polycystic Ovary Syndrome/etiology , Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects , Infertility, Female/etiology , China
4.
Chinese journal of integrative medicine ; (12): 253-257, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-971317

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To evaluate the effect of wrist-ankle acupuncture (WAA) in pain and functional recovery after total knee arthroplasty (TKA).@*METHODS@#From June to September 2020, 94 participants were included from the Second Hospital of Tangshan and randomly assigned to the WAA group (47 cases) and the sham WAA group (47 cases) by a random number table, receiving real or sham WAA treatment, respectively. The primary outcome measure involved the visual analogue scale (VAS) scores at rest and in motion. The secondary outcomes involved the range of motion (ROM) of the knee joints, straight-leg raising time, postoperative weight-bearing time, sufentanil consumption within 48 h of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pump, length of hospital stay, and postoperative complications.@*RESULTS@#The VAS scores on the 3rd, 5th, and 7th postoperative days at rest and in motion was significantly lower in the WAA group than that of the sham WAA group (P<0.01). The ROM on the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd PODs was significantly higher in the WAA group than that of the sham WAA group (P<0.01). In comparison to the sham WAA group, the sufentanil consumption within 48 h of PCA pump was significantly less in the WAA group (156.3 ± 12.2 µg vs. 128.8 ± 9.8 µg, P<0.01). There was no significant difference in active straight-leg raising time, postoperative weight-bearing time, length of hospital stay, and postoperative complications between the two groups (P>0.05).@*CONCLUSIONS@#WAA could alleviate post-TKA pain, improve knee joint function, and reduce the sufentanil consumption within 48 h of PCA pump. WAA is a safe and effective treatment in the perioperative analgesic management for TKA.


Subject(s)
Humans , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , Ankle , Wrist , Sufentanil , Pain, Postoperative/therapy , Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects , Analgesia , Knee Joint
5.
Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion ; (12): 726-730, 2022.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-939524

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To compare the clinical efficacy between Jiao's scalp acupuncture combined with virtual reality (VR) rehabilitation training and VR rehabilitation training alone for motor dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD).@*METHODS@#A total of 52 patients with PD were randomly divided into an observation group and a control group, 26 cases in each group. The patients in both groups were treated with routine basic treatment, and the patients in the control group were treated with VR rehabilitation training. The patients in the observation group were treated with Jiao's scalp acupuncture on the basis of the control group. The scalp points included the movement area, balance area and dance tremor control area. Both groups were treated once a day, 5 times a week for a total of 8 weeks. Before treatment and 4 and 8 weeks into treatment, the gait parameters (step distance, step width, step speed and step frequency), timed "up and go" test (TUGT) time and unified Parkinson's disease rating scale part Ⅲ (UPDRS-Ⅲ) score were compared between the two groups, and the clinical efficacy was evaluated.@*RESULTS@#Four weeks into treatment, except for the step width in the control group, the gait parameters of the two groups were improved, the TUGT time was shortened, and the UPDRS-Ⅲ scores were reduced (P<0.01, P<0.05); the step distance in the observation group was better than that in the control group, and the UPDRS-Ⅲ score in the observation group was lower than that in the control group (P<0.05). Eight weeks into treatment, the gait parameters of the two groups were improved, the TUGT time was shortened, and the UPDRS-Ⅲ scores were reduced (P<0.01); the step distance and step speed in the observation group were better than those in the control group, the TUGT time in the observation group was shorter than that in the control group, and the UPDRS-Ⅲ score in the observation group was lower than that in the control group (P<0.05, P<0.01). The total effective rate was 92.3% (24/26) in the observation group, which was higher than 69.2% (18/26) in the control group (P<0.05).@*CONCLUSION@#Jiao's scalp acupuncture combined with VR rehabilitation training could improve the gait parameters, walking ability and motor function in patients with PD. The clinical effect is better than VR rehabilitation training alone.


Subject(s)
Humans , Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects , Gait , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Scalp , Virtual Reality
6.
Chinese journal of integrative medicine ; (12): 947-955, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-922109

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To evaluate the safety of thread embedding acupuncture therapy (TEAT) and discuss the prevention and treatment of some adverse events (AEs).@*METHODS@#Review of databases, including China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), CBMdisc, Wanfang, VIP databases and English literature published in PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science, were searched from their inception to January 2020, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and case reports in which AEs with TEAT were included. Cochrane Collaboration's tool and RevMan V.5.3.3 software were used to evaluate the quality of the studies.@*RESULTS@#A total of 61 studies (45 RCTs and 16 case reports) with 620 cases of AEs were included in this review. These studies were published in two countries: China and South Korea. Twenty eight kinds of AEs were summarized. The most common AEs were induration, bleeding and ecchymosis, redness and swelling, fever, and pain. They were accounted for 75.35% (425/564) in the review, and most of them were mild. The rarest AEs were epilepsy, irregular menstruation, skin ulcer, thread malabsorption, and fat liquefaction, with 1 case each. But not all of them had clear causal relationship with TEAT. Most of the AEs were local reactions [with incidence of 9.83% (480/4,882)] and systemic reactions accounted for only 1.27% (62/4,882). Although the included studies showed that AEs were very commonly encountered (11.09%), only 5 cases of severe AEs reported from 2013 to 2017 (0.1%) by using catgut thread, which are rarely seen nowdays with the wide use of new absorbable surgical suture. All of the severe AEs were recovered after symptomatic treatment with no sequelae.@*CONCLUSIONS@#The evidence showed that TEAT is a relatively safe and convenient therapy especially since application of new absorbable surgical suture. Improving practitioner skills, regulating operations, and paying attention to the patients' conditions may reduce the incidence of AEs and improve safety of TEAT.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects , Catgut , China , Pain , Software
7.
Rev. bras. med. trab ; 18(1): 109-112, jan-mar.2020.
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: biblio-1116156

ABSTRACT

Introdução: A acupuntura integra o escopo das práticas integrativas e complementares em saúde, sendo de extrema importância o uso das normas de biossegurança durante essa técnica. Objetivo: Refletir sobre biossegurança em acupuntura visando diminuir riscos ocupacionais relacionados ao evento adverso de infecção, tanto para o profissional quanto para o paciente. Método: Para a elaboração desta reflexão teórica, utilizaram-se estudos da literatura selecionados de forma intencional. As reflexões sobre biossegurança em acupuntura ocorreram no período de junho a outubro de 2019. Resultados: As infecções constituem os efeitos adversos associados à acupuntura mais relatados na literatura. Nessa prática, verifica-se elevado potencial de inoculação de microrganismos. Assim, devem-se seguir os princípios de promoção em biossegurança conscientizando os profissionais sobre a importância de tais cuidados para a própria segurança e a do paciente, sem minimizar a eficácia do tratamento. Conclusões: Recomenda-se adoção das práticas universais de biossegurança durante a realização de procedimentos de acupuntura.


Background: Acupuncture is an integrative and complementary practice for which biosafety standards are essential. Objective: To elicit a reflection on biosafety in acupuncture to reduce occupational hazards associated with infection as adverse effect for both provider and patient. Methods: The present theoretical essay is grounded on references intentionally selected from June through October 2019. Results: Infection is the adverse effect most frequently reported for acupuncture practice, which involves considerable risk of microorganism inoculation. Provider awareness should be raised to comply with biosafety principles and thus ensure their and patient safety without any negative implications for the effectiveness of treatment. Conclusion: We recommended providers to adopt universal biosafety practices during acupuncture procedures.


Subject(s)
Humans , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Acupuncture Therapy , Patient Safety , Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects
8.
Rev. Asoc. Argent. Ortop. Traumatol ; 84(4): 420-426, dic. 2019.
Article in Spanish | LILACS, BINACIS | ID: biblio-1057066

ABSTRACT

La acupuntura es una técnica de origen chino que surge hace aproximadamente 2000 años. Es una modalidad terapéutica que ha cobrado gran importancia en el mundo occidental para el tratamiento de diversos cuadros, incluida la lumbalgia. Comunicamos el caso de un hombre de 74 años de edad, que consulta por reagudización de la lumbalgia crónica, luego de un tratamiento alternativo, a quien se le diagnostica una complicación infecciosa. Si bien, en manos experimentadas e instruidas, es una técnica con relativamente escasas complicaciones, se han publicado diversos reportes que describen complicaciones, en su mayoría, menores y asociadas a una técnica estéril insuficiente o a falta de conocimiento por parte del acupunturista. El auge de estas técnicas alternativas puso el foco en las medidas de seguridad, por lo cual entes, como la Organización Mundial de la Salud han creado guías para su correcto uso. Conocer las posibles complicaciones facilita el diagnóstico temprano y el tratamiento. Se analiza la presentación clínica y se realiza una revisión bibliográfica del cuadro. Nivel de Evidencia: IV


Acupuncture originated in China approximately 2000 years ago and is a growing treatment modality worldwide. Patients resort to acupuncture for a variety of conditions, including lower back pain. We discuss the case of a 74-year-old man who received acupuncture to treat lower back pain, after which the pain increased. An infection was detected and treated. Despite the fact that acupuncture can be considered generally safe if performed by well-trained practitioners, literature from around the world reports all kinds of complications, most of which are minor and usually a result of an inappropriate technique. The popularity of this alternative treatment has driven some organizations, such as World Health Organization (WHO) to draft guidelines about its safety. Being aware of possible complications allows for an early diagnosis and treatment. On this paper, we discuss the aforementioned case and include a review of the related literature. Level of Evidence: IV


Subject(s)
Aged , Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects , Low Back Pain/complications , Low Back Pain/therapy , Infections/diagnosis
10.
Gut and Liver ; : 126-132, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-111608

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: The prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Busan, Gyeongnam, and Jeonnam Provinces in Korea is more than twice the national average. This study aimed to examine whether demographic and lifestyle characteristics are associated with HCV infection in these areas. METHODS: A case control study was performed at three study hospitals. HCV cases were matched with two controls for sex and age. Patient controls were selected from non-HCV patients at the same hospital. Healthy controls were subjects participating in medical checkups. Conditional logistic regression models were used. RESULTS: A total of 234 matched-case and patient- and healthy-control pairs were analyzed. The significant risk factors for both controls were sharing razors (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.39 and 3.29, respectively) and having more than four lifetime sexual partners (aOR, 2.15 and 6.89, respectively). Contact dockworkers (aOR, 1.91) and tattoos (aOR, 2.20) were significant risk factors for the patient controls. Transfusion (aOR, 5.38), a bloody operation (aOR, 5.02), acupuncture (aOR, 2.08), and piercing (aOR, 5.95) were significant risk factors for the healthy controls. Needle stick injuries and intravenous drug abuse were significant in the univariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: More education concerning the dangers of sharing razors, tattoos and piercings is required to prevent HCV infection. More attention should be paid to needle stick injuries in hospitals and the community.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects , Blood Transfusion/adverse effects , Body Piercing/adverse effects , Case-Control Studies , Equipment Reuse , Hepacivirus , Hepatitis C/epidemiology , Life Style , Logistic Models , Needlestick Injuries/complications , Odds Ratio , Prevalence , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Sexual Behavior , Sexual Partners , Tattooing/adverse effects , Workplace
12.
Rev. latinoam. enferm ; 21(1): 450-458, Jan.-Feb. 2013. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS, BDENF | ID: lil-669598

ABSTRACT

AIM: to evaluate evidence concerning sources or mechanisms of infection transmission of atypical mycobacteria associated with acupuncture, and the species causing infections. METHOD: research was performed in December 2011 in the databases of LILACS, MEDLINE, EMBASE, OvidSP and the Cochrane Library, without restrictions regarding publication date, study type or language. RESULTS: of the 16 publications, only one identified the contamination source: diluted glutaraldehyde solution used to clean equipment. Three established likely sources: towels, hot packs or boiling tank water, and the reuse of reprocessed needles. Four indicated possible sources: contaminated needles, reuse of personal needles, patient's skin colonized by mycobacteria and reuse of needles at different sites in the same patient. Eight of the studies did not mention the sources. CONCLUSION: among 295 cases, M. abscessus was the pathological agent in over 96%. Well-established control practices for infection prevention should be implemented and adapted for complementary and alternative medicine.


OBJETIVO: avaliar evidências relativas às principais fontes ou mecanismos de transmissão de infecções causadas por micobactérias atípicas associadas à acupuntura e espécies causadoras de infecção. MÉTODO: revisão integrativa, realizada em dezembro de 2011, com descritores indexados nas bases Lilacs, Medline, Embase, OvidSP e Cochrane Library, sem restrições de ano, tipo de estudo ou idioma. RESULTADOS: dentre 16 publicações, uma identificou a fonte de contaminação - solução de glutaraldeído diluída, usada para limpar equipamentos. Três estabeleceram fontes prováveis: toalhas, bolsas de água quente ou tanque para ferver água, reutilização de agulhas reprocessadas. Quatro indicaram fontes possíveis: agulhas contaminadas, reutilização de agulhas, pele do paciente colonizada por micobactérias e reutilização de agulhas, em diferentes sítios no mesmo paciente. Oito não citaram nada sobre fontes. CONCLUSÃO: dos 295 casos, M. abscessus prevaleceu em mais de 96%. Práticas bem estabelecidas, recomendadas por controladores de infecção, como enfermeiros, para prevenção de infecções, devem ser implementadas e adaptadas às práticas complementares.


OBJETIVO: evaluar la evidencia existente sobre las principales fuentes o mecanismos de transmisión de la infección por micobacterias atípicas asociadas con la acupuntura, y las especies causantes de infecciones. MÉTODO: investigación que llevó a cabo en Diciembre de 2011 con descriptores indexados en las bases de datos LILACS, MEDLINE, EMBASE, OvidSP y la Biblioteca Cochrane, sin restricciones en cuanto a la fecha de publicación, tipo de estudio o de idioma. RESULTADOS: de las 16 publicaciones, sólo una identificó la fuente de contaminación: la solución de glutaraldehído diluido utilizada para limpiar el equipo. Tres publicaciones establecieron como fuentes probables: las toallas, compresas calientes o el agua hervida, y la reutilización de las agujas reprocesadas. Cuatro publicaciones indicaron como fuentes posibles: las agujas contaminadas, la reutilización de agujas personales, la piel del paciente colonizada por micobacterias y la reutilización de agujas en sitios diferentes en el mismo paciente. Ocho de los estudios no mencionaron nada acerca de las fuentes. CONCLUSIÓN: Entre los 295 casos, M. abscessus fue el agente patológico en más del 96% de los mismos. Se deben llevar a cabo medidas bien establecidas de control recomendadas por organismos reguladores, como el de enfermería, para la prevención de la infección, y adaptarlas a la medicina complementaria y alternativa.


Subject(s)
Humans , Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects , Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous/transmission , Nontuberculous Mycobacteria/isolation & purification
14.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 788-790, 2013.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-211905

ABSTRACT

We report a case of 62-year-old man with cardiac tamponade due to coronary artery injury after acupuncture into the substernum. After resuscitation of cardiac arrest, we performed emergent pericardiocentesis. Nevertheless, the cardiac arrest recurred, and the emergent operation on cardiopulmonary bypass was performed. We identified hemopericardium due to shredded acute marginal branch of right coronary artery, and it was ligated leading to termination of bleeding. The patient was discharged without any other complications.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects , Cardiac Tamponade/diagnosis , Coronary Vessels/injuries , Pericardial Effusion/diagnosis
15.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 267-269, 2012.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-130100
16.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 267-269, 2012.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-130085
17.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : 281-284, 2012.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-73179

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to introduce the experience of diagnosis and treatment for patients with migrated acupuncture needle to pleural cavity and or lung parenchyma. We had treated 5 patients who had acupuncture needles in their thoracic cavity from January 2000 to September 2009. The mean age was 55.8 yr old. All patients suffered from the sequelae of the cerebrovascular accident and had been treated with acupuncture. They had drowsiness and hemiplegic or quadriplegic motor activity. Fever and dyspnea were main symptoms when referred to us. Diagnosis was made by the chest radiography and chest computed tomography which revealed straight metallic materials in their thoracic cavity. The needles were removed via thoracotomy or thoracoscopic procedures. Pleural decortications were also needed in four patients. Thoracoscopic surgery was successfully performed in two patients. After the removal all patients became symptomless. Although we experienced only five patients who have migrated acupuncture needles in thoracic cavity, we suggest that thoracoscopic removal of the needle with or without pleural decortication is the most optimal modality of treatment in those patients.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects , Foreign-Body Migration/diagnosis , Needles/adverse effects , Pleural Cavity/diagnostic imaging , Radiography, Thoracic , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/therapy , Thoracic Cavity/surgery , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted , Thoracotomy , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
18.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 207-209, 2011.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-136357

ABSTRACT

Acupuncture-related hemopericardium is a rare but potentially fatal complication. We describe a hemopericardium that occurred shortly after acupuncture in a 55-year-old woman. A chest CT scan and echocardiography revealed a hemopericardium, and pericardiocentesis was then immediately and successfully performed. Subsequently, her clinical course improved. This case increases the attention of emergency physicians for acupuncture-related complications, especially hemopericardium, and the necessity of rapid diagnosis and management.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects , Echocardiography , Pericardial Effusion/diagnosis , Pericardiocentesis
19.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 207-209, 2011.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-136356

ABSTRACT

Acupuncture-related hemopericardium is a rare but potentially fatal complication. We describe a hemopericardium that occurred shortly after acupuncture in a 55-year-old woman. A chest CT scan and echocardiography revealed a hemopericardium, and pericardiocentesis was then immediately and successfully performed. Subsequently, her clinical course improved. This case increases the attention of emergency physicians for acupuncture-related complications, especially hemopericardium, and the necessity of rapid diagnosis and management.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects , Echocardiography , Pericardial Effusion/diagnosis , Pericardiocentesis
20.
Sudan Medical Journal. 2010; 46 (2): 91-94
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-118038

ABSTRACT

We report a case of multiregional abscesses following acupuncture. A 56-year-old female who had received acupuncture to treat lower back pain, subsequently develops lumbar septic arthritis, epidural abscess, bilateral iliopsoas, and subcutaneous abscesses. Streptococcus milleri was isolated from the peripheral blood, subcutaneous tissue and psoas abscess. Surgical drainage of the subcutaneous abscess, CT guided drainage of the intraabdominal abscess and intravenous ceftriaxone resulted in a good clinical recovery, resolution of the infection, and prevention of complications. The case is discussed in detail, and pertinent review of literature is included. Streptococcus milleri naturally occurs as normal flora of the mouth, nasopharynx, gastrointestinal tract, and vagina. They were first described by Dr O Guthof in 1956 in honour of Dr WD Miller, an oral microbiologist. They are generally sensitive to penicillins, cephalosporins, vancomycin, and clindamycin. They are resistant to bacitracin, and sulphonamides. Infections caused by streptococcus milleri include oral infections, deep abscesses in liver, brain, spinal cord, and lung. They rarely occur in the pericardium, pleura, surgical wounds, endocarditis, and can cause bacteremia in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent hoste[l]. We present a case of a 56-year-old female who developed lumbar septic arthritis, epidural abscess, bilateral iliopsoas, and subcutaneous abscesses due to streptococcus milleri infection after receiving lower back and gluteal acupuncture for relief of musculoskeletal back pain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case in the literature


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Streptococcus milleri Group/pathogenicity , Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects , Arthritis, Infectious/etiology , Psoas Abscess , Streptococcus milleri Group/isolation & purification
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