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1.
J. Health Biol. Sci. (Online) ; 8(1): 1-5, 01/01/2020. ilus
Article in Portuguese | LILACS (Americas) | ID: biblio-1104328

ABSTRACT

Objetivos: revisar a literatura acerca do uso de ACA no procedimento adesivo. Métodos: Realizaram-se duas buscas distintas na literatura, na base de dados PubMed, na qual a primeira se utilizou das palavras-chave "Restorative dentistry" e "Alternativeconditioning", combinadas entre si pelo operador booleno "AND". Encontraram-se 28 estudos sem restrição de período em que, após a leitura crítica de títulos e resumos, selecionaram-se três. A segunda busca utilizou as palavras-chave "Alternativeconditioning", "Adhesives" e "Dentistry", combinadas pelo operador booleano "AND", encontrando 72 estudos sem restrição de período e, após a leitura de títulos e resumos, selecionaram-se três. Entre eles, o Ácido Fosfórico (AF) foi incapaz de remover a camada hipermineralizada de dentina das Lesões Cervicais Não Cariosas (LCNC). Resultados: Notou-se a eficácia do EDTA, como alternativa ao condicionamento convencional, nas superfícies tratadas com clorexidina. Já o ácido metafosfórico a 40% dispôs de precipitação do mineral bruxita. O condicionamento com Ácido Cítrico (AC) a 5% e Cloreto Férrico Anidro (CFA) a 0,6% e 1,8%, ambos exibiram ótima microtração. O condicionamento com Ácido Nítrico (AN) a 10% e Oxalato Férrico (OF) a 3% reduziu a resistência de união. Entretanto, o resultado pode variar conforme o adesivo utilizado. Conclusão: Os estudos comprovaram a eficácia da aplicação de ACA em procedimentos adesivos, contribuindo com o aumento da retenção das restaurações.


Objective: The Alternative Conditioning Agents (ACA) aim to reduce the biodegradation of adhesive interfaces in resinous restorations. Methods: The aim was to review the literature on the use of ACA in the adhesive procedure. Two different searches were performed in the literature, in the PubMed database, in which the first one used the keywords "Restorative dentistry" and "Alternative conditioning", combined with the Boolene operator "AND". There were 28 studies without period restrictions in which, after critical reading of titles and abstracts, 3 were selected. The second search used the keywords "Alternative conditioning", "Adhesives" and "Dentistry", combined by the Boolean operator "AND", finding 72 studies without period restriction and, after reading titles and abstracts, 3 were selected. Among these, phosphoric acid (PA) was unable to remove the hypermineralized dentin layer from non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). Results: The efficacy of EDTA, as an alternative to conventional conditioning, was noted on surfaces treated with chlorhexidine. Metaphosphoric acid at 40% had precipitation of the "bruxita" bauxite/brucite mineral. The conditioning with 5% Citric Acid (CA) and 0.6% and 1.8% Anhydrous Ferric Chloride (AFC) both showed excellent microtraction. Citric Acid (CA) conditioning at 10% and Ferric Oxalate (FO) at 3% reduced the bond strength. However, the result may vary according to the adhesive used. Conclusion: Studies have proven the efficacy of ACA in adhesive procedures, contributing to increased retention of restorations.


Subject(s)
Dental Materials , Acid Etching, Dental , Adhesives
2.
Article in English | WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: wprim-811433

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength (µSBS) of four computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) blocks repaired with composite resin using three different surface treatment protocols.MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four different CAD/CAM blocks were used in this study: (1) flexible hybrid ceramic (FHC), (2) resin nanoceramic (RNC), (c) polymer infiltrated ceramic network (PICN) and (4) feldspar ceramic (FC). All groups were further divided into four subgroups according to surface treatment: control, hydrofluoric acid etching (HF), air-borne particle abrasion with aluminum oxide (AlO), and tribochemical silica coating (TSC). After surface treatments, silane was applied to half of the specimens. Then, a silane-containing universal adhesive was applied, and specimens were repaired with a composite, Next, μSBS test was performed. Additional specimens were examined with a contact profilometer and scanning electron microscopy. The data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey tests.RESULTS: The findings revealed that silane application yielded higher µSBS values (P<.05). All surface treatments were showed a significant increase in µSBS values compared to the control (P<.05). For FHC and RNC, the most influential treatments were AlO and TSC (P<.05).CONCLUSION: Surface treatment is mandatory when the silane is not preferred, but the best bond strength values were obtained with the combination of surface treatment and silane application. HF provides improved bond strength when the ceramic content of material increases, whereas AlO and TSC gives improved bond strength when the composite content of material increases.


Subject(s)
Adhesives , Aluminum Oxide , Ceramics , Clinical Protocols , Dental Bonding , Dental Restoration Repair , Hydrofluoric Acid , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Polymers , Shear Strength , Silicon Dioxide
3.
Article in English | WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: wprim-811272

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The need for proper wound closure is of paramount importance after any intra-oral surgery. Various wound closure techniques have been described in literature using traditional non-absorbable suture materials. These include like synthetic absorbable sutures, surgical staples and tissue adhesives. Cyanoacrylates are among the most commonly used biocompatible tissue adhesives. To evaluate and compare intraoral wound healing using 3-0 silk sutures and n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate after alveoloplasty.MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 20 patients requiring bilateral alveoloplasty in the same arch (upper or lower) were included in this study. Patients with any pre-existing pathology or systemic disease were excluded. After alveoloplasty was performed, the wound was closed using 3-0 braided silk sutures on one side, and using n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate bio adhesive on the other side. Patients were evaluated based on the following parameters: time required to achieve wound closure; the incidence of immediate and postoperative hemostasis; the time to the use of the first rescue medication; the side where pain first arises; and the side where wound healing begins first.RESULTS: Compared to 3-0 silk sutures, cyanoacrylate demonstrated better hemostatic properties, reduced operative time, reduced postoperative pain and better wound healing.CONCLUSION: These data suggest that cyanoacrylate glue is an adequate alternative to conventional sutures to close the surgical wound after alveoloplasty, and better than are 3-0 silk sutures.


Subject(s)
Adhesives , Alveoloplasty , Cyanoacrylates , Enbucrilate , Hemostasis , Humans , Incidence , Operative Time , Pain, Postoperative , Pathology , Silk , Sutures , Tissue Adhesives , Wound Closure Techniques , Wound Healing , Wounds and Injuries
4.
Article in English | WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: wprim-782292

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Most cell culture processes for viral vaccine production are mainly based on adherent cell culture systems using serum, which are associated with expensive and labor-intensive processes to produce large amounts of viral vaccine strains. In this study, we investigated whether Vero cells could be grown in serum-free and shaking suspension conditions. Furthermore, we assessed the ability of the Vero cell suspension culture system to produce adenovirus type 5 (Ad5), compared to that of the adhesive Vero cell culture system.MATERIALS AND METHODS: We tested the feasibility of commercial serum-free media for Vero cell culture. For the adaptation of Vero cells in suspension culture, adhesive Vero cells were added in the early phase of shaking suspension culture, and 50 days after shaking suspension culture, suspension-adapted Vero cells were subcultured continuously. To assess the virus production ability of Vero cells in suspension, the cells were infected with Ad5-green fluorescent protein and evaluated based on their fluorescence intensity.RESULTS: The Vero cells grown in OptiPRO serum-free medium showed no changes in morphology and growth rate, but MRC-5 and FRhk-4 cells showed morphological changes and decreased growth rate, respectively. The Vero cells were well adapted to the suspension culture system. The Vero cells in suspension showed a better Ad5 production ability than the adherent Vero cells.CONCLUSION: Vero cells can be grown in OptiPRO serum-free medium. Further, our suspension culture-adapted Vero cells may be suitable to produce viral vaccine strains due to their high ability to produce viruses such as Ad5.


Subject(s)
Adenoviridae , Adhesives , Cell Culture Techniques , Culture Media, Serum-Free , Fluorescence , Vero Cells
5.
Article in English | WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: wprim-750284

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of deproteinization and an additional primer treatment on the microtensile bond strength of a newly developed self-adhesive resin cement to dentin. The occlusal dentin of extracted human third molars was randomly divided into four groups according to the surface treatment: a control (CON) with no treatment; applying a deproteinizing agent (DPT) (5% sodium hypochlorite); using a primer (PRI) (G-CEM ONE Adhesive enhancing primer, GC); and applying a deproteinizing agent and a primer (DPT-PRI). Composite resin blocks with a disk shape (diameter, 10 mm; height, 4 mm) were bonded to the treated dentin using a self-adhesive resin cement (G-CEM ONE, GC). The specimens were sectioned into sticks with a cross-section of 1 mm² and tested to failure in tension mode at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. All groups showed a significantly higher microtensile bond strength compared to CON (p0.05). Within the limitations of this study, a deproteinizing agent or specific primer can enhance the microtensile bond strength of the self-adhesive resin cement to dentin. However, it is not recommended to use a primer in combination with the deproteinizing agents.


Subject(s)
Adhesives , Dentin , Humans , Molar, Third , Resin Cements , Sodium , Sodium Hypochlorite
6.
Article in English | WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: wprim-750279

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to investigate whether pre-curing the universal adhesives affect the resin bonding to zirconia ceramic. Two commercial universal adhesives (All-Bond Universal, ABU; Single Bond Universal Adhesive, SBU) were tested in comparison with a conventional zirconia primer (Z-Prime Plus, ZPP). Air-abraded zirconia specimens were divided into six groups, to which different priming agents were applied with or without photo-polymerization. After resin cylinders were built on the primed zirconia surface using a resin cement (Duo-Link), all bonded specimens were stored in water at 37℃ for 24 hours and half of them (n = 12) were additionally thermocycled 5,000 times. A shear bond strength test was performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and failure modes were assessed using an optical microscope at 25× magnification. Before thermocycling, the light-cured specimens of ABU and SBU showed higher bond strengths than the uncured ones of the materials (p 0.05). After thermal aging, there were significant decreases in the bond strength for all specimens treated with the universal adhesives (p 0.05) and attained higher bond strength values for both the pre-cured and uncured specimens when compared to the two universal adhesives (p<0.05). Adhesive failures were predominant in all test groups and thermocycling resulted in the higher incidences of adhesive failures for the uncured groups, which was not shown in the pre-cured groups.


Subject(s)
Adhesives , Aging , Ceramics , Incidence , Resin Cements , Water
7.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 1112-1115, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: wprim-762046

ABSTRACT

Direct puncture and embolization of the transverse sinus (TS) for treatment of dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) is typically performed with coils with or without glue. We report a case of DAVF at the left TS that was treated with Onyx embolization via direct puncture of the TS. A 75-year-old woman presented with tremor, festinating gait, and dysarthria. A left TS-DAVF with retrograde superior sagittal sinus and cortical venous reflux (Cognard type IIa+b) was identified on cerebral angiography, and both TSs were occluded with thrombi. We considered that achieving complete cure by transvenous embolization via the femoral vein or transarterial embolization via occipital feeders would be difficult. Thus, we performed a small craniotomy at the occipital bone to puncture the TS. The midportion of the TS was directly punctured with a 21-G microneedle under fluoroscopic guidance. We inserted a 5-F sheath into the TS. A microcatheter was then navigated into the affected sinus. Coils were placed through the microcatheter to support Onyx formation by reducing the pressure of shunting flow. Onyx embolization was performed with the same microcatheter. The DAVF was almost completely occluded except for the presence of minimal shunting flow to the proximal TS. After 1 week, time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography showed complete resolution of DAVF. The patient showed resolved tremor and markedly improved mental status at 1-month follow up. Direct puncture and embolization of the TS using coils and Onyx is effective and feasible method for the treatment of DAVF when other approaches seem difficult.


Subject(s)
Adhesives , Aged , Central Nervous System Vascular Malformations , Cerebral Angiography , Craniotomy , Dysarthria , Female , Femoral Vein , Follow-Up Studies , Gait Disorders, Neurologic , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Angiography , Methods , Occipital Bone , Punctures , Superior Sagittal Sinus , Tremor
8.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 1176-1185, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: wprim-760283

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare the elasticity of the supraspinatus tendon (SST) and infraspinatus tendon (IST) in patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder (ACS) with those in the control groups and to evaluate the relationship between age and tendon elasticity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Institutional Review Board approved this prospective, case-control study, which was conducted between November 2017 and March 2018, and informed consent was obtained from all participants. Control groups comprised healthy individuals or those with asymptomatic contralateral shoulders. Twenty-five shoulders in 20 participants in the ACS group (14 women; 53.5 ± 7.9 years) and 24 shoulders in 18 participants in the control group (6 women; 52.6 ± 10.5 years) were included. Elastography was performed in the oblique coronal plane at the neutral shoulder position. Mean/maximum/minimum velocity and stiffness from the shear-wave ultrasound elastography (SWE) and strain ratio (subcutaneous fat/target-tendon) from the strain ultrasound elastography (SE) of the SST and IST were evaluated. Statistical analyses were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and Spearman correlation. RESULTS: Both velocity and stiffness in SWE were higher, and the strain ratio in SE was lower in participants with symptomatic shoulders than in those with normal shoulders (p 0.970). The elastic modulus was little correlated with age (ρ = −0.340–0.239). CONCLUSION: SWE and SE indicated that SST and IST were stiffer in patients with ACS than in those with normal shoulders regardless of aging.


Subject(s)
Adhesives , Aging , Bursitis , Case-Control Studies , Elastic Modulus , Elasticity , Elasticity Imaging Techniques , Ethics Committees, Research , Female , Humans , Informed Consent , Prospective Studies , ROC Curve , Rotator Cuff , Shoulder , Tendons , Ultrasonography
9.
Article in English | WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: wprim-739668

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism is a common complication in patients with glioma. The clotting factor von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a highly adhesive procoagulant molecule that mediates platelet adhesion to endothelial and subendothelial surfaces. In the current analysis, we examined The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data to assess the VWF gene in patients with lower grade gliomas. METHODS: For newly diagnosed gliomas, we evaluated the association between VWF and overall survival in the Genomic Data Commons TCGA Lower Grade Glioma (LGG) dataset in TCGA. Simple statistics were calculated to identify patterns of mutual exclusivity or co-occurrence of VWF mutations. For each pair of query genes an odds ratio was calculated that indicates the likelihood that the mutations in the two genes are mutually exclusive or co-occurrent across the selected cases. To determine whether the identified relationship was significant for a gene pair, Fisher's exact test was performed. RESULTS: Lower grade gliomas with less VWF gene expression had significantly better survival than those with more VWF gene expression (hazard ratio 0.64, 95% confidence interval 0.44 to 0.92, p=0.015 log rank test). When we analyzed the data with Cox regression, VWF expression had a significant effect on survival (p=0.02) that was unrelated to the effect of IDH1 expression (p=0.062), TP53 expression (p=0.135), independent of ATRX expression (p=0.021) and histology (astrocytoma versus oligoastrocytoma and oligodendroglioma, p=0.002). VWF mutations significantly co-occur with mutations in TP53 and ATRX (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: The deleterious prognostic effect of VWF expression and its co-occurrent mutations with TP53 and ATRX in lower grade gliomas are not surprising, given VWF's role in other cancers. Therefore, VWF gene expression may be a clinically important risk marker in lower grade glioma.


Subject(s)
Adhesives , Blood Platelets , Dataset , Gene Expression , Genes, vif , Genome , Glioblastoma , Glioma , Humans , Odds Ratio , Oligodendroglioma , Venous Thromboembolism , von Willebrand Factor
10.
Article in Korean | WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: wprim-738998

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Retrospectively, the purpose of this study is to investigate the necessity for early operation for patients with rotator cuff tears and concomitant adhesive capsulitis. METHODS: From March 2013 to March 2017, we conducted a retrospective study on patients with rotator cuff tears and concomitant adhesive capsulitis. We analyzed 32 cases out of 39 cases who have small to medium rotator cuff tears, excluding patients who were unable to follow up over 1 years. We evaluated range of motion, visual analog scale (VAS) score, and Constant score. We compared patients of non-symptom and symptomatic patients related to rotator cuff tear. RESULTS: Among patients in the 32 cases, 21 cases of total patients improved without discomfort after recovering their range of motion and pain (group 1), and 11 cases were developed symptoms related to rotator cuff tear for the last 1 year (group 2). Average age of group 1 patients was 53.4 years old, and recovered from forward elevation 95.5° to 163.2°, external rotation from 8.5° to 68.7°, mean VAS score improved from 6.2 to 1.2. Average age of group 2 patients was 58.4 years old, and recovered from forward elevation 96.2° to 162.2°, external rotation from 8.1° to 67.8°, mean pain VAS score improved from 6.4 to 4.4. But there was statistically significant difference in pain reduction after restoration of motion compared to asymptomatic group. CONCLUSION: We do not need surgical treatment at the same time because the symptoms of rotator cuff tear may not be manifested in patients with rotator cuff tear associated with adhesive capsulitis. Sufficient follow-up should be considered after restoration of shoulder motion related to adhesive capsulitis.


Subject(s)
Adhesives , Bursitis , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Range of Motion, Articular , Retrospective Studies , Rotator Cuff , Shoulder , Tears , Visual Analog Scale
11.
Chinese Journal of Biotechnology ; (12): 2386-2400, 2019.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: wprim-781631

ABSTRACT

As an important auxiliary material, adhesive materials have many important applications in various fields including but not limited to industrial packaging, marine engineering, and biomedicine. Naturally occurring adhesives such as mussel foot proteins are usually biocompatible and biodegradable, but their limited sources and poor mechanical properties in physiological conditions have limited their widespread uses in biomedical field. Inspired by the underwater adhesion phenomenon of natural organisms, a series of biomimetic adhesive materials have been developed through chemical or bioengineering approaches. Notably, some of those synthetic adhesives have exhibited great promise for medical applications in terms of their biocompatibility, biodegradability, strong tissue adhesion and many other attractive functional properties. As natural adhesive materials possess distinctive "living" attributes such as environmental responsiveness, self-regeneration and autonomous repairs, the development of various biologically inspired and biomimetic adhesive materials using natural adhesives as blueprints will thus be of keen and continuous interest in the future. The emerging field of synthetic biology will likely provide new opportunities to design living glues that recapitulate the dynamic features of those naturally occurring adhesives.


Subject(s)
Adhesives , Animals , Biocompatible Materials , Biomimetic Materials , Chemistry , Biomimetics , Bivalvia
12.
Article in English | WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: wprim-787381

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to evaluate effect of saliva decontamination procedures on microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of 1-step self-etching adhesives to dentin of primary posterior teeth.63 sound primary-posterior teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups according to different kinds of 1-step self-etching adhesives: Scotchbond™ Universal Adhesive (SBU), All-Bond Universal® (ABU), and Tetric® N Bond Universal (TBU). Each group was randomly categorized into 7 subgroups: (I) application of adhesive without saliva contamination (control); (II – IV) contamination by saliva before photopolymerization; (V – VII) contamination by saliva after photopolymerization; (II, V) decontamination by drying; (III, VI) decontamination by washing and drying; (IV, VII) decontamination by washing, drying, and reapplication of adhesive. All samples were cut into the blocks. At least 15 blocks were tested for each subgroup.For SBU and ABU, the MTBS values of subgroups (I, IV, VII) were significantly higher than those of subgroups (II, III, V, VI). For TBU, the MTBS values of subgroups (I, IV) was significantly higher than those of subgroup (II, III, V, VI).The MTBS of 3 adhesives was reduced by saliva contamination. The adhesive strength on dentin of primary posterior teeth was restored by reapplication of the adhesives after washing and drying.


Subject(s)
Adhesives , Decontamination , Dentin , Saliva , Tooth
13.
Article in Korean | WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: wprim-787368

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of application time and phosphoric acid etching of 8th generation adhesives containing functional monomer on adhesive performance in primary teeth.80 extracted non-carious human primary teeth were selected and divided into 8 groups based on 3 factors: (1) adhesive: G-Premio bond and Single bond universal; (2) application time: shortened time and manufacture's instruction; (3) acid etching mode: self-etching and total-etching. Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine, and fractured surface were observed under scanning electron microscope. Microleakage was evaluated by dye penetration depth.G-Premio bond were not significant different in shear bond strength and microleakage depending on application time of adhesive and acid etching mode. In Single bond universal, shear bond strength of short application time was significantly lower than that of long adhesive application time (p = 0.014). Clinically applicable shear bond strength values (> 17 MPa) were identified in all groups.These results suggested that G-Premio bond be used clinically for a short application time without phosphoric acid etching.


Subject(s)
Adhesives , Humans , Methods , Tooth, Deciduous
14.
Article in English | WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: wprim-787361

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of adding a protective coating on the microhardness and wear resistance of glass ionomer cements (GICs).Specimens were prepared from GIC and resin-modified GIC (RMGI), and divided into 3 groups based on surface protection: (1) no coating (NC), (2) Equia coat coating (EC), and (3) un-filled adhesive coating (AD). All specimens were then placed in distilled water for 24 h. Surface hardness (n = 10) was evaluated on a Vickers hardness testing machine. Wear resistance (n = 10) was evaluated after subjecting the specimen to thermocycling for 10,000 cycles using a chewing simulator. Data were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and the Kruskal-Wallis test.Surface hardness was highest in the NC groups, followed by the EC and AD groups. The wear depth of GI + NC was significantly higher than that of all RMGI groups. EC did not significantly lower the wear depth compared to AD.Based on these results, it was concluded that although EC does not increase the surface microhardness of GIC, it can increase the wear resistance.


Subject(s)
Adhesives , Glass Ionomer Cements , Hardness , Hardness Tests , Mastication , Water
15.
Rev. odontol. UNESP (Online) ; 48: e20180132, 2019. tab, ilus
Article in Portuguese | LILACS (Americas), BBO | ID: biblio-991494

ABSTRACT

Resumo Introdução Os cimentos resinosos são extensivamente utilizados na fixação de restaurações indiretas de cerâmica e cerômero, sendo classificados em duas categorias: os cimentos resinosos convencionais, que não apresentam uma adesão inerente à estrutura dental e requerem o uso de um sistema adesivo e os cimentos resinosos autoadesivos, que não requerem um tratamento adesivo prévio do substrato dentário. Objetivo Avaliar a resistência de união de dois cimentos resinosos, convencional e autoadesivo, quando utilizados na cimentação de restaurações cerâmicas e ceroméricas, trazendo elementos para propiciar melhor compreensão da interação adesiva em procedimentos de cimentação com as referidas categorias de cimentos resinosos. Material e método Dentes humanos (n=20), cedidos pelo banco de dentes da Universidade Federal de Alfenas (UNIFAL), foram preparados para que cilindros de cerâmica ou de cerômero fossem cimentados utilizando-se dois tipos de cimentos resinosos (autoadesivo e convencional). Após a cimentação, 20 palitos foram obtidos e submetidos ao teste de tração, avaliando-se a força necessária para a fratura. Os valores obtidos foram submetidos à análise estatística empregando-se a análise de variância (ANOVA) e o teste de Tukey. Resultado As forças mínimas e máximas necessárias ao rompimento do cimento convencional foram superiores às mesmas requeridas para o rompimento da união promovida pelo cimento autoadesivo, bem como as medianas e as médias aritméticas, independentemente do material restaurador empregado. O teste de Tukey demonstrou que as diferenças entre os cimentos empregados são estatisticamente significantes, independentemente do material restaurador. Conclusão Os resultados deste trabalho sugerem que o material utilizado para a confecção dos corpos de prova (cerâmica ou cerômero) não influenciou na resistência à tração, sendo que o cimento convencional apresentou valores superiores de resistência.


Abstract Introduction Resin cements are extensively used in the fixation of indirect restorations of ceramics and ceramics, divided into two categories: conventional resin cements, which do not present an inherent adhesion to the dental structure and require the use of an adhesive system, and the self-adhesive resin cements, which do not require a prior adhesive treatment of the dental substrate. Objective: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength of two resin-based cements, conventional and self-adhesive, according to required operating protocols, when luting ceramic and indirect composite restorations. Material and method Human molars (n=20) donated by UNIFAL teeth bank were prepared and, after being divided into two groups, ceramic or composite cylinders were luted to them with two resin-based cements (conventional and self-adhesive). Prepared teeth were sectioned vertically in both buccal-lingual and mesio-distal directions, to obtain 8 mm high, square-shaped "sticks" that were subject to microtensile bond strength test, and the necessary force to fracture them was evaluated. Results were subject to two-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Result Minimum and maximum forces to disrupt conventional cement were greater than the required one for self-adhesive cement, as well as mean bond strength, despíte of the restorative material. Tukey test showed that diferences were statistically significant, regardless the restorative material. Conclusion Restorative materials did not influence microtensile bond strength values, with no statistically significant differences. The difference between microtensile bond strength values of resin cements tested was statistically significant.


Subject(s)
Tensile Strength , Adhesives , Analysis of Variance , Resin Cements , Dental Porcelain , Shear Strength , Dental Restoration, Permanent
16.
Rev. odontol. UNESP (Online) ; 48: e20190007, 2019. tab
Article in Portuguese | LILACS (Americas), BBO | ID: biblio-991492

ABSTRACT

Resumo Introdução Os adesivos autocondicionantes apresentam técnica adesiva simplificada e diminuição na sensibilidade pós-operatória. Quando aplicados sobre a dentina, atuam sobre a smear layer, cuja efetiva remoção ainda constitui um desafio. Uma substância utilizada como pré-tratamento dentinário na ajuda da remoção da smear layer é o etilenodiamino tetracético dissódico (EDTA). Objetivo Avaliar os efeitos do EDTA em associação com sistemas adesivos autocondicionantes na resistência de união ao microcisalhamento. Material e método Foram seccionadas as superfícies oclusais de 72 terceiros molares humanos extraídos, para expor superfície dentinária plana. Os dentes preparados foram divididos em: dentina sem pré-tratamento; dentina tratada com EDTA 0,1M; dentina tratada com EDTA 0,5M. Cada grupo recebeu tratamento de três sistemas adesivos autocondicionantes: Single Bond Universal (SBU), AdheSE (AdheSE) e Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB). Foi delimitada a área adesiva e assim posicionada uma matriz transparente, para inserção com resina composta Z250XT seguida de polimerização por 40 segundos. Após 24 horas de armazenamento, os dentes foram submetidos ao ensaio de microcisalhamento. Os dados obtidos foram analisados estatisticamente, utilizando-se os testes Two-Way ANOVA e Bonferroni, e sendo considerado nível de significância de 5%. Resultado Não houve diferença estatística significante na resistência de união entre os pré-tratamentos dentinários (p=0,8353), porém houve diferença significativa entre os adesivos (p<0,05) CSEB e AdheSE, mostrando semelhança entre CSEB e SBU, e entre SBU e AdheSE. Conclusão O pré-tratamento dentinário com solução de EDTA não afetou a resistência de união com nenhum dos sistemas adesivos autocondicionantes utilizados.


Abstract Introduction Self-etching adhesives have simplified adhesive technique and decreased the postoperative sensitivity. When applied on dentin, it acts on the smear layer, but it is still a challenge in the effectiveness of this removal. A substance used as a pre-treatment for the removal of the smear layer is disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Objective To evaluate the effects of EDTA in association with self-etching adhesive systems on micro-shear bond strength. Material and method The occlusal surfaces of 72 extracted human third molars were sectioned to expose a flat dentin surface. The prepared teeth were divided into: dentin without pre-treatment; dentin treated with 0.1M EDTA; dentin treated with 0.5M EDTA. Each group received treatment of 3 self-etching adhesive systems: Single Bond Universal (SBU), AdheSE (AdheSE), and Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB). The adhesive area was delimited and positioned a transparent matrix for insertion with Z250XT composite resin followed by polymerization for 40 seconds. After 24h of storage, the teeth were submitted to the micro-shear test. The data were analyzed statistically using the Two-Way ANOVA and Bonferroni tests, considering a level of significance of 5%. Result There was no statistically significant difference in bond strength between dentin pre-treatments (p = 0.8353), but showed a significant difference between CSEB and AdheSE adhesives (p <0.05), showing similarity between CSEB and SBU, and between SBU and AdheSE. Conclusion Dentin pretreatment with EDTA solution did not affect bond strength with any of the self-etching adhesive systems used.


Subject(s)
Pretreatment , Adhesives , Treatment Outcome , Edetic Acid , Dentin , Sodium Hypochlorite , Efficacy , Shear Strength , Dentin Sensitivity , Polymerization
17.
Article in English | WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: wprim-766025

ABSTRACT

Necrobiotic xanthogranulomatous reaction is a multiorgan, non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis with an unknown etiology. Occurrence in the salivary gland is extremely rare. We recently identified a case of necrobiotic xanthogranulomatous sialadenitis in a 73-year-old Korean woman who presented with a painless palpable lesion in the chin. There was no accompanying cutaneous lesion. Partial resection and subsequent wide excision with neck dissection were performed. Pathological examination showed a severe inflammatory lesion that included foamy macrophages centrally admixed with neutrophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes, plasma cells, and scattered giant cells, as well as necrobiosis. During the 12-month postoperative period, no grossly remarkable change in size was noted. Necrobiotic xanthogranulomatous inflammation may be preceded by or combined with hematologic malignancy. Although rare, clinicians and radiologists should be aware that an adhesive necrobiotic xanthogranuloma in the salivary gland may present with a mass-like lesion. Further evaluation for hematologic disease and close follow-up are needed when a pathologic diagnosis is made.


Subject(s)
Adhesives , Aged , Chin , Diagnosis , Eosinophils , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Giant Cells , Hematologic Diseases , Hematologic Neoplasms , Histiocytosis , Humans , Inflammation , Lymphocytes , Macrophages , Neck Dissection , Necrobiotic Disorders , Necrobiotic Xanthogranuloma , Neutrophils , Plasma Cells , Postoperative Period , Salivary Glands , Sialadenitis , Skin , Submandibular Gland
18.
Article in Korean | WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: wprim-764719

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study is to determine methods of dental caries prevention by investigating the use of compounds of Diospyros kaki (D. kaki) peel, Momordica charantia (M. charantia), and Canavalia gladiata (C. gladiata) extracts to limit the cariogenic traits of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), such as their ability to proliferate and adhere to the tooth surface. METHODS: Broth microdilution and the agar spreading assay were used to determine the antimicrobial effect and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of S. mutans extracts. In order to identify the adhesive ability of S. mutans at varying concentrations, culture plates were first stained with 1 ml of 0.01% crystal violet for 15 minutes at room temperature, and then eluted with 1 ml of EtOH:Acetone (8:2) solution for 15 minutes in a 37℃ incubator. Eluted solutions were then evaluated by use of a spectrophotometer at 575 nm. RESULTS: Experiments were conducted in order to investigate the effectiveness of D. kaki peel, M. charantia, and C. gladiata extracts on limiting the proliferation of S. mutans. The MIC was measured as an indication of whether the antibacterial activity of D. kaki peel, M. charantia, and C. gladiata extracts had a significant bacteriostatic effect on S. mutans. M. charantia extract was effective for growth inhibition on S. mutans at a minimum concentration of 0.25%. From the adhesion ability assay, M. charantia extract had an anti-adhesive effect. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that M. charantia extract demonstrates antibacterial activity and has an anti-adhesive effect on S. mutans. Due to these properties, M. charantia extract may be used to prevent dental caries.


Subject(s)
Adhesives , Agar , Canavalia , Dental Caries , Diospyros , Gentian Violet , Incubators , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Momordica charantia , Momordica , Streptococcus mutans , Streptococcus , Thiram , Tooth
19.
Article in Korean | WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: wprim-764433

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to compare and analyze the shear bond strength and fracture pattern in different enamel tooth surface treatments for resin splinting materials. MATERIALS AND METHODS: G-FIX and LightFix were used as tooth splinting materials. Twenty bovine mandibular incisors were used for the preparation of the specimens. The exposed enamel surface was separated into four parts. Each tooth was treated with 37% phosphoric acid, 37% phosphoric acid + adhesive resin, 37% phosphoric acid + G-premio bond, and G-premio bond for each fraction. Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. After measuring the shear bond strength, the fractured surface of the specimen was magnified with a microscope to observe the fracture pattern. Two-way ANOVA was used to verify the interaction between the material and the surface treatment method. Oneway ANOVA was used for comparison between the surface treatment methods of each material and post-hoc test was conducted with Scheffe's test. An independent t-test was conducted to compare shear bond strengths between materials in each surface treatment method. All statistics were conducted at 95% significance level. RESULTS: G-FIX, a tooth splinting resin, showed similar shear bonding strength when additional adhesive resins were used when material was applied after only acid etching, and LightFix showed the highest shear bonding strength when additional adhesive resins were used after the acid etching. In addition, both G-FIX and LightFix showed the lowest shear bond strength when only self-etching adhesive was applied without additional acid etching. Verification of interactions observed interconnection between resins and surface treatment methods. Most of the mixed failure was observed in all counties. CONCLUSION: When using G-FIX and LightFix, which are tooth-splinting materials, it is considered that sufficient adhesion will be achieved even after applying only acid etching as instructed by the manufacturer.


Subject(s)
Adhesives , Dental Enamel , Incisor , Methods , Splints , Tooth Mobility , Tooth
20.
Article in English | WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: wprim-759992

ABSTRACT

Pseudoaneurysm of internal maxillary artery (IMA) after trauma is rare, and most cases reported are caused by maxilla-facial blunt trauma. Pseudoaneurysm is discontinuity in the vascular wall leading to an extravascular hematoma that freely communicates with the intravascular space producing pulsatile hematoma rapidly. A 44-years-old woman presented with a pulsatile swelling and pain in the left parotid region. She underwent the masticatory muscle reduction using needle injection in dentistry 1 month ago. The left facial pulsatile swelling developed after the procedure immediately and uncontrolled bleeding occurred on the day of visit to our institution. We performed emergency angiography and diagnosed pseudoaneurysm of left IMA. We treated by embolization with Histoacryl Glue through left IMA. IMA total occlusion was confirmed and symptoms improved. Pseudoaneurysm following blunt trauma of the face have been reported but are few. Furthermore, there is no report of IMA pseudoaneurysm due to direct injury by needle. Recently, many cosmetic surgery procedures using injection techniques have been performed, and it is necessary to pay attention to the direct vessel injury by the needle. And endovascular therapies can give early recovery with minimal morbidity and avoids injury to the facial nerve and its branches.


Subject(s)
Adhesives , Aneurysm, False , Angiography , Dentistry , Emergencies , Enbucrilate , Facial Nerve , Female , Hematoma , Hemorrhage , Humans , Masticatory Muscles , Maxillary Artery , Needles , Parotid Region , Surgery, Plastic
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