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1.
J. appl. oral sci ; 28: e20190023, 2020. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1056577

ABSTRACT

Abstract When exposure of the pulp to external environment occurs, reparative dentinogenesis can be induced by direct pulp capping to maintain pulp tissue vitality and function. These clinical situations require the use of materials that induce dentin repair and, subsequently, formation of a mineralized tissue. Objective: This work aims to assess the effect of tricalcium silicate cements and mineral trioxide aggregate cements, including repairing dentin formation and inflammatory reactions over time after pulp exposure in Wistar rats. Methodology: These two biomaterials were compared with positive control groups (open cavity with pulp tissue exposure) and negative control groups (no intervention). The evaluations were performed in three stages; three, seven and twenty-one days, and consisted of an imaging (nuclear medicine) and histological evaluation (H&E staining, immunohistochemistry and Alizarin Red S). Results: The therapeutic effect of these biomaterials was confirmed. Nuclear medicine evaluation demonstrated that the uptake of 99mTc-Hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (HMDP) showed no significant differences between the different experimental groups and the control, revealing the non-occurrence of differences in the phosphocalcium metabolism. The histological study demonstrated that in mineral trioxide aggregate therapies, the presence of moderate inflammatory infiltration was found after three days, decreasing during follow-ups. The formation of mineralized tissue was only verified at 21 days of follow-up. The tricalcium silicate therapies demonstrated the presence of a slight inflammatory infiltration on the third day, increasing throughout the follow-up. The formation of mineralized tissue was observed in the seventh follow-up day, increasing over time. Conclusions: The mineral trioxide aggregate (WhiteProRoot®MTA) and tricalcium silicate (Biodentine™) present slight and reversible inflammatory signs in the pulp tissue, with the formation of mineralized tissue. However, the exacerbated induction of mineralized tissue formation with the tricalcium silicate biomaterial may lead to the formation of pulp calcifications


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Oxides/pharmacology , Biocompatible Materials/pharmacology , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Dentin/drug effects , Dentinogenesis/drug effects , Phosphoproteins/analysis , Pulpitis/pathology , Pulpitis/drug therapy , Sialoglycoproteins/analysis , Time Factors , Immunohistochemistry , Random Allocation , Reproducibility of Results , Extracellular Matrix Proteins/analysis , Dental Pulp Exposure/pathology , Dental Pulp Exposure/drug therapy , Rats, Wistar , Dental Pulp/pathology , Dental Pulp Capping/methods , Drug Combinations , Molecular Imaging/methods , Pulp Capping and Pulpectomy Agents/pharmacology , Odontoblasts/drug effects
2.
J. appl. oral sci ; 28: e20190105, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1056578

ABSTRACT

Abstract Calcium aluminate cement (CAC) has been highlighted as a promising alternative for endodontic use aiming at periapical tissue repair. However, its effects on dental pulp cells have been poorly explored. Objective: This study assessed the impact of calcium chloride (CaCl2) and bismuth oxide (Bi2O3) or zinc oxide (ZnO) additives on odontoblast cell response to CAC. Methodology: MDPC-23 cells were exposed for up to 14 d: 1) CAC with 2.8% CaCl2 and 25% ZnO (CACz); 2) CAC with 2.8% CaCl2 and 25% Bi2O3 (CACb); 3) CAC with 10% CaCl2 and 25% Bi2O3 (CACb+); or 4) mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), placed on inserts. Non-exposed cultures served as control. Cell morphology, cell viability, gene expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1), ALP activity, and extracellular matrix mineralization were evaluated. Data were compared using ANOVA (α=5%). Results: Lower cell density was detected only for MTA and CACb+ compared with Control, with areas showing reduced cell spreading. Cell viability was similar among groups at days one and three (p>0.05). CACb+ and MTA showed the lowest cell viability values at day seven (p>0.05). CACb and CACb+ promoted higher ALP and BSP expression compared with CACz (p<0.05); despite that, all cements supported ALP activity. Matrix mineralization were enhanced in CACb+ and MTA. Conclusion: In conclusion, CAC with Bi2O3, but not with ZnO, supported the expression of odontoblastic phenotype, but only the composition with 10% CaCl2 promoted mineralized matrix formation, rendering it suitable for dentin-pulp complex repair.


Subject(s)
Humans , Mice , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/chemistry , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/chemistry , Dental Cements/pharmacology , Dental Cements/chemistry , Dental Pulp/cytology , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Oxides/pharmacology , Oxides/chemistry , Time Factors , Zinc Oxide/pharmacology , Zinc Oxide/chemistry , Bismuth/pharmacology , Bismuth/chemistry , Materials Testing , Calcium Chloride/pharmacology , Calcium Chloride/chemistry , Gene Expression/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Reproducibility of Results , Silicates/pharmacology , Silicates/chemistry , Drug Combinations , Alkaline Phosphatase/analysis , Alkaline Phosphatase/drug effects , Odontoblasts/drug effects
3.
Int. j. morphol ; 37(3): 792-799, Sept. 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1012355

ABSTRACT

The aim of the present study was to examine the short-term biocompatibility of Endosequence Root Repair Material (ERRM) paste and white Mineral Trioxide Aggregate MTA by implanting them into polyethylene tubes in the subcutaneous connective tissue of rats. twenty five male Wistar rats, 3-4 months old, weighing 300-350 g, were used. The tubes were implanted dorsally into the subcutaneous connective tissues of the rats. Five animals were sacrificed at five examination time points: 1, 3, 5, 7 and 15 days. The connective tissues containing the implants were excised. These sections were studied qualitatively and quantitatively using a light microscope. An average value for each group was obtained by averaging the sum of all inflammatory cells counted in 10 randomly selected, separate areas. For the ERRM group: There was a significant increase in the number of inflammatory cells on days 1-3 and on days 5-7 (P ≤ 0.003 and P ≤ 0.024). In the WHITE MTA group, the mean values of the sum of the inflammatory cells during the periods 1-3 days and 5-7 days were statistically significant (P ≤ 0.001 and P ≤ 0.044, respectively) and the XILOPERCHA group: Difference was observed significant in the value of the sum of inflammatory cells during the period of 3-5 days (P ≤ 0.05). According to the results it can be concluded that both, ERRM as MTA, caused an inflammatory reaction, which decreased over time; suggesting that both materials are biocompatible; showing however the presence of a higher organization of collagen fibers around the implants of ERRM.


El objetivo del presente estudio fue evaluar la biocompatibilidad a corto plazo de Material de Reparación de la Raíz Endodóntica (MRRE) y el agregado de trióxido mineral (AgTM), implantándolos dentro de tubos de polietileno en el tejido conectivo subcutáneo de ratas. Se usaron 25 ratas Wistar macho, de 3-4 meses de edad, con peso de 300 a 350 g. Los tubos fueron implantados en el tejido conectivo subcutáneo del dorso de las ratas. Cinco animales fueron sacrificados en cada uno de los siguientes períodos de tiempo: 1, 3, 5, 7, y 15 días. El tejido conectivo con los implantes fue escindido y seccionado. Los cortes se evaluaron cualitativa y cuantitativamente mediante microscopio óptico. Se obtuvo un valor para cada grupo resultado al promediar la suma de las células inflamatorias contadas en 10 áreas separadas seleccionadas aleatoriamente. Para el grupo de MRRE; hubo un incremento significativo en la cantidad de células inflamatorias entre los días 1-3 y 5-7 (p ≤ 0,003 y p ≤ 0,024). En el grupo de AgTM blanco, los valores promedio de la suma de células inflamatorias entre los períodos 1-3 días, y 5-7 días mostraron ser estadísticamente significativos (p≤ 0,001 y p ≤ 0,044 respectivamente) y en el grupo control de Xilopercha se observó diferencia significativa entre los valores de la suma de células inflamatorias entre los períodos de 3-5 días (P ≤ 0,05). De acuerdo a los resultados, puede concluirse que ambos materiales, AgTM y MRRE causaron una reacción inflamatoria que disminuyó a través del tiempo, sugiriendo que ambos materiales son biocompatibles; mostrando sin embargo una mayor organización de fibras colágenas alrededor de los implantes de MRRE.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Oxides/pharmacology , Calcium Phosphates/pharmacology , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Connective Tissue/drug effects , Root Canal Filling Materials/pharmacology , Materials Testing , Rats, Wistar , Drug Combinations
4.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180693, 2019. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1040226

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objectives: To compare the sealing ability and biocompatibility of Biodentine with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) when used as root-end filling materials. Methodology: The Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was used to compare the cytotoxicity of MTA and Biodentine. Twenty-one extracted teeth with a single canal were immersed in an acidic silver nitrate solution after root-end filling. Then, the volume and depth of silver nitrate that infiltrated the apical portion of the teeth were analyzed using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Seventy-two roots from 3 female beagle dogs were randomly distributed into 3 groups and apical surgery was performed. After six months, the volume of the bone defect surrounding these roots was analyzed using micro-CT. Results: Based on the results of the CCK-8 assay, MTA and Biodentine did not show statistically significant differences in cytotoxicity (P>0.05). The volume and the depth of the infiltrated nitrate solution were greater in the MTA group than in the Biodentine group (P<0.05). The volume of the bone defect was larger in the MTA group than in the Biodentine group. However, the difference was not significant (P>0.05). The volumes of the bone defects in the MTA and Biodentine groups were smaller than the group without any filling materials (P<0.05). Conclusions: MTA and Biodentine exhibited comparable cellular biocompatibility. Biodentine showed a superior sealing ability to MTA in root-end filling. Both Biodentine and MTA promoted periradicular bone healing in beagle dog periradicular surgery models.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Male , Adolescent , Dogs , Oxides/pharmacology , Periapical Tissue/drug effects , Periodontal Ligament/drug effects , Root Canal Filling Materials/pharmacology , Root Canal Therapy/methods , Wound Healing/drug effects , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Osteogenesis/drug effects , Periapical Tissue/cytology , Periapical Tissue/diagnostic imaging , Periodontal Ligament/diagnostic imaging , Time Factors , Tooth Root/surgery , Tooth Root/drug effects , Tooth Root/diagnostic imaging , Bone Regeneration/drug effects , Materials Testing , Cell Count , Cells, Cultured , Reproducibility of Results , Treatment Outcome , Drug Combinations , X-Ray Microtomography
5.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180550, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1012512

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose To compare, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the inflammatory cells, vascular density and IL-6 immunolabeled cells present in the pulp after pulpotomy with white MTA versus 15.5% ferric sulfate (FS). Methodology Forty-eight mandibular first molars from 24 Wistar rats were divided into MTA or FS groups and subdivided according to the period after pulpotomy procedure (24, 48 and 72 hours). Four teeth (sound and untreated) were used as controls. Histological sections were obtained and assessed through the descriptive analysis of morphological aspects of pulp tissue and the quantification of inflammatory cells, vascular density and interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression. Data were statistically analyzed (p<0.05). Results The number of inflammatory cells was similar in both groups, being predominantly localized at the cervical radicular third. In the MTA group, increased inflammation was observed at 48 hours. Vascular density was similar in both groups and over time, being predominant in the medium radicular third. No correlation was found between the number of inflammatory cells and the vascular density. Pulp tissue was more organized in MTA-treated teeth. In both groups, a weak to moderate IL-6 expression was detected in odontoblasts and inflammatory cells. Comparing both groups, there was a greater IL-6 expression in the cervical radicular third of teeth treated with MTA at 24 hours and in the medium and apical thirds at 72 hours, while in the FS group a greater IL-6 expression was found in the apical third at 24 hours. Conclusion The MTA group presented better histological features and greater IL-6 expression than the FS group. However, no difference was observed between the groups regarding the inflammatory status and vascularization, suggesting the usefulness of FS as a low-cost alternative to MTA.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Oxides/pharmacology , Pulpotomy/adverse effects , Ferric Compounds/pharmacology , Interleukin-6/analysis , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Inflammation/immunology , Time Factors , Rats, Wistar , Statistics, Nonparametric , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Dental Pulp/pathology , Drug Combinations
6.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180247, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-975879

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective This study aimed to investigate the effects of dodecacalcium hepta-aluminate (C12A7) content on some physicochemical properties and cytocompatibility of tricalcium silicate (C3S) cement using human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). Material and Methods High purity C3S cement was manufactured by a solid phase method. C12A7 was mixed with the cement in proportions of 0, 5, 8, and 10 wt% (C12A7-0, −5, −8, and −10, respectively). Physicochemical properties including initial setting time, compressive strength, and alkalinity were evaluated. Cytocompatibility was assessed with cell viability tests and cell number counts. Statistical analysis was performed by using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (p<0.05). Results The initial setting time of C3S-based cement was shorter in the presence of C12A7 (p<0.05). After 1 day, C12A7-5 showed significantly higher compressive strength than the other groups (p<0.05). After 7 days, the compressive strength of C12A7-5 was similar to that of C12A7-0, whereas other groups showed strength lower than C12A7-0. The pH values of all tested groups showed no significant differences after 1 day (p>0.05). The C12A7-5 group showed similar cell viability to the C12A7-0 group (p>0.05), while the other experimental groups showed lower values compared to C12A7-0 group (p<0.05). The number of cells grown on the C12A7-5 specimen was higher than that on C12A7-8 and −10 (p<0.05). Conclusions The addition of C12A7 to C3S cement at a proportion of 5% resulted in rapid initial setting time and higher compressive strength with no adverse effects on cytocompatibility.


Subject(s)
Humans , Silicates/chemistry , Calcium Compounds/chemistry , Aluminum Compounds/chemistry , Dental Cements/chemistry , Dental Pulp Cavity/cytology , Particle Size , Reference Values , Time Factors , X-Ray Diffraction , Biocompatible Materials/pharmacology , Biocompatible Materials/chemistry , Materials Testing , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Reproducibility of Results , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Compressive Strength , Dental Cements/pharmacology , Dental Pulp Cavity/drug effects
7.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 33: e117, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1132651

ABSTRACT

Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Brazilian propolis on the cell viability, mineralization, anti-inflammatory ability, and migration of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). The cell viability was evaluated with CCK-8 kit after 1, 5, 7, and 9 days. The deposition of calcified matrix and the expression of osteogenesis-related genes were evaluated by Alizarin Red staining and real-time PCR after incubation in osteogenic medium for 21 days. The expression of inflammation-related genes in cells was determined after exposure to 1 μg/mL LPS for 3 h. Finally, the numbers of cells that migrated through the permeable membranes were compared during 15 h. Propolis and MTA significantly increased the viability of hDPCscompared to the control group on days 7 and 9. In the propolis group, significant enhancement of osteogenic potential and suppressed expression of IL-1β and IL-6 was observed after LPS exposure compared to the MTA and control groups. The number of migration cells in the propolis group was similar to that of the control group, while MTA significantly promoted cell migration. Propolis showed comparable cell viability to that of MTA and exhibited significantly higher anti-inflammatory and mineralization promotion effects on hDPCs.


Subject(s)
Humans , Oxides/pharmacology , Propolis/pharmacology , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Dental Pulp/cytology , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Brazil , Cell Movement/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Reproducibility of Results , Anthraquinones , Interleukin-6/analysis , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha , Statistics, Nonparametric , Drug Combinations , Interleukin-1beta/analysis , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Odontoblasts/drug effects
8.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 33: e060, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1011656

ABSTRACT

Abstract This study evaluated the effect of hypertension on tissue response and biomineralization capacity of white Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA), High-plasticity MTA (MTA HP), and Biodentine® (BDT) in rats. Polyethylene tubes filled with MTA, MTA HP, BDT, and the control group (empty tubes) were placed into the dorsal subcutaneous tissue of 32 male rats (16 normotensive (NT) and 16 hypertensive rats - 8 per group). After 7 and 30 days, the polyethylene tubes surrounded by connective tissue were removed, fixed, and embedded in histological resin. The mean number of inflammatory cells was estimated in HE-stained sections, biomineralization was quantified as area (µm2) by Kossa (VK) staining, and examination by polarized light (LP) microscopy was performed. The differences amongst the groups were analyzed statistically by the Mann-Whitney or Student's t test, according to Shapiro-Wilk test of normality (p < 0.05). The inflammatory responses to all materials were greater in hypertensive rats than in NT rats (p < 0.05). Positive VK staining in MTA and BDT were more pronounced in NT rats at 7 and 30 days (p < 0.05). Birefringent structures in LP for MTA, MTA HP, and BDT were more pronounced in NT rats at 7 days (p<0.05). In rats, hypertension was able to increase inflammatory infiltrate and decrease biomineralization of the tested materials.


Subject(s)
Oxides/pharmacology , Biocompatible Materials/pharmacology , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Subcutaneous Tissue/drug effects , Subcutaneous Tissue/physiopathology , Biomineralization/physiology , Hypertension/physiopathology , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Reproducibility of Results , Rats, Wistar , Subcutaneous Tissue/pathology , Drug Combinations , Hypertension/complications , Inflammation/physiopathology , Inflammation/pathology , Microscopy, Polarization
9.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 32: e103, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-974462

ABSTRACT

Abstract The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of cytokines in response to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) plus selenium in germ-free mice with experimental furcal perforation. The first left maxillary molar was opened, and the furcal area was perforated and treated with post-MTA-Se (experimental group). The same surgical intervention was performed for the maxillary right first molar, which was treated with MTA (control group). Fifteen mice were sacrificed 7, 14, and 21 days after furcal perforation, and periapical tissue samples were collected. The mRNA expression levels of the cytokines TGF-β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, HPRT, IL-10, IL-4, RANK, RANKL, IL-1, and IL-17 were assessed by using real-time polymerase chain reaction. In the experimental group, at 21-days post-MTA-Se sealing, the mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-10 were upregulated compared with those in the control group (p < 0.05). Futher assessment revealed basal mRNA expression levels of IL-1α, IFN-γ, RANK, RANKL, IL-17A, IL-4, and TGF-β, over long experimental times, in both the experimental and control groups (p > 0.05). In conclusion, MTA+Se sealing favoured increased expression of IL-10 and TNF-α at later time points (day 21).


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Female , Oxides/pharmacology , Root Canal Filling Materials/pharmacology , Selenium/pharmacology , Cytokines/analysis , Silicates/pharmacology , Furcation Defects/drug therapy , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Dental Pulp Cavity/injuries , Root Canal Therapy/methods , Time Factors , Reproducibility of Results , Treatment Outcome , Furcation Defects/immunology , Dental Pulp Cavity/drug effects , Dental Pulp Cavity/immunology , Drug Combinations , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Molar/drug effects , Molar/injuries
10.
Rio de janeiro; s.n; 2018. 76 p. ilus.
Thesis in Portuguese | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1016644

ABSTRACT

Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a biocompatibilidade, através de análise histopatológica e de imuno-histoquímica, de um novo cimento reparador à base de MTA com alta plasticidade: MTA HP (Angelus Londrina, PR). O MTA branco (Angelus Londrina, PR), e um material a base de óxido de zinco e eugenol (IRM, Dentsply, Petrópolis, RJ) foram utilizados como referências para comparação. Para isso, trinta ratos machos de linhagem Wistar tiveram inoculados no tecido subcutâneo um tubo de polietileno vazio (controle negativo) e mais três tubos, cada um preenchido com um dos materiais testados. Os animais foram eutanasiados após 7, 30 e 60 dias da implantação dos tubos e as amostras foram fixadas e incluídas em parafina. Os cortes histológicos foram corados com hematoxilina e eosina e tricômico de gomori para avaliação das reações inflamatórias e a presença de angiogênese foi realizada utilizando o marcador VEGF (do inglês vascular endothelial growth factor). Os cortes também foram corados com Picrosirius Red para quantificar as fibras colágenas do tipo I e tipo III, assim como a coloração de Weigert foi realizada para observar as fibras elásticas. Os dados não-paramétricos foram analisados usando o ensaio de Kruskal-Wallis seguido do teste de Dunn. Os níveis de significância adotados foram de 5% (P < 0,05). Os resultados mostraram diferença significativa da resposta inflamatória após 60 dias entre os grupos IRM e tubo vazio (P < 0,05). O MTA HP apresentou biocompatibilidade similar ao MTA branco e ao grupo controle negativo em todos os períodos experimentais. Além disso, após 7 dias o MTA HP estimulou a angiogênese de forma menos acentuada que o MTA branco, assim como apresentou inicialmente um remodelamento mais lento da matriz extracelular quando comparado ao MTA branco e o IRM. Foi observado uma diminuição da espessura da cápsula fibrosa, da quantidade de fibras elásticas e da imonumarcação com VEGF em todos os grupos experimentais e controle negativo ao longo do processo de cicatrização. Após 60 dias os grupos experimentais apresentaram matriz extracelular com tecido conjuntivo mais maduro, com predominância de fibras colágenas do tipo I. De acordo com os resultados obtidos no presente estudo, pode-se concluir que o novo cimento reparador com alta plasticidade, MTA HP, apresentou-se biocompatível em todos os períodos experimentais, com resultados similares aos grupos controle negativo e experimentais com MTA branco e IRM.


This study evaluated the biocompatibility, through histopathological analysis and immunohistochemistry of a new repair cement based on MTA with high plasticity: MTA HP (Angelus Londrina, PR). White MTA (Angelus Londrina, PR), and a material based on zinc oxide and eugenol (IRM, Dentsply, Petrópolis, RJ) were used as references for comparison. Thirty male Wistar rats had inoculated into the subcutaneous tissue an empty polyethylene tube (negative control) and three more tubes, each filled with one of the tested materials. The animals were euthanized after 7, 30 and 60 days of tube implantation and the specimens were fixed and embedded in paraffin. The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and gomori trichrome to assess inflammatory reactions, and the presence of angiogenesis was performed using the VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) marker. The sections were also stained with Picrosirius Red to quantify as type I and type III collagen fibers, as well as a Weigert staining was performed to observe elastic fibers. Non-parametric data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis assay followed Dunn's test. The significance levels adopted were 5% (P < 0.05). The results demonstrated a significant difference in inflammatory response after 60 days between IRM and empty tube groups (P < 0.05). MTA HP showed similar biocompatibility to the White MTA and the negative control group in all experimental periods. Furthermore, after 7 days MTA HP stimulated less pronounced angiogenesis than White MTA, as it initially exhibited slower extracellular matrix remodeling when compared to White MTA and IRM. A decrease in the thickness of the fibrous capsule, the amount of elastic fibers and the immunostaining with VEGF in all experimental groups and control throughout the healing process was observed. After 60 days, the experimental groups presented extracellular matrix with more mature connective tissue, with predominance of type I collagen fibers. According to the results obtained in the present study, it can be concluded that the new repair cement with high plasticity, MTA HP, was biocompatible in all the experimental periods, presenting similar results to the control and experimental groups with White MTA and IRM.


Subject(s)
Animals , Rats , Oxides/pharmacology , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Subcutaneous Tissue/drug effects , Dental Cements , Materials Testing , Immunohistochemistry , Rats, Wistar , Statistics, Nonparametric , Drug Combinations
11.
J. appl. oral sci ; 26: e20160629, 2018. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-893696

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of the capping materials mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium hydroxide (CH) and BiodentineTM (BD) on stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) in vitro. Material and Methods: SHED were cultured for 1 - 7 days in medium conditioned by incubation with MTA, BD or CH (1 mg/mL), and tested for viability (MTT assay) and proliferation (SRB assay). Also, the migration of serum-starved SHED towards conditioned media was assayed in companion plates, with 8 μm-pore-sized membranes, for 24 h. Gene expression of dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1) was evaluated by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Regular culture medium with 10% FBS (without conditioning) and culture medium supplemented with 20% FBS were used as controls. Results: MTA, CH and BD conditioned media maintained cell viability and allowed continuous SHED proliferation, with CH conditioned medium causing the highest positive effect on proliferation at the end of the treatment period (compared with BD and MTA) (p<0.05). In contrast, we observed increased SHED migration towards BD and MTA conditioned media (compared with CH) (p<0.05). A greater amount of DMP-1 gene was expressed in MTA group compared with the other groups from day 7 up to day 21. Conclusion: Our results show that the three capping materials are biocompatible, maintain viability and stimulate proliferation, migration and differentiation in a key dental stem cell population.


Subject(s)
Humans , Oxides/pharmacology , Stem Cells/drug effects , Tooth, Deciduous/cytology , Calcium Hydroxide/pharmacology , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Pulp Capping and Pulpectomy Agents/pharmacology , Phosphoproteins/analysis , Stem Cells/physiology , Time Factors , Tooth, Deciduous/drug effects , Materials Testing , Cell Differentiation/drug effects , Cell Movement/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Extracellular Matrix Proteins/analysis , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Dental Pulp Capping/methods , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Drug Combinations , Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenases/drug effects
12.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 32(supl.1): e68, 2018. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-974474

ABSTRACT

Abstract: Endodontic medicine, which addresses the bidirectional relationship between endodontic infections and systemic diseases, has gained prominence in the field of endodontics. There is much evidence showing that while systemic disease may influence the pathogenesis of endodontic infection, endodontic infection can also cause systemic alterations. These alterations include more severe bone resorption and inflammation in the periapical area as well as enhanced systemic disease symptoms. Similarly, many reports have described the impact of systemic diseases on the tissue responses to dental materials. Conversely, the local use of dental materials may show systemic effects in the form of altered production of biomarkers. Thus, studies to better understand the mechanisms related to those connections are extremely important. In this context, the objective of this review was to analyze and discuss the current literature regarding the connections among these three factors—systemic diseases, endodontic infection, and endodontic dental materials—and determine how these connections may interfere in the systemic health status and the endodontic treatment outcomes, which are represented by periapical wound healing.


Subject(s)
Humans , Periapical Periodontitis/physiopathology , Root Canal Filling Materials/pharmacology , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Subcutaneous Tissue/drug effects , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Diabetes Mellitus/physiopathology , Oxides/pharmacology , Risk Factors , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Dental Pulp Diseases/physiopathology , Drug Combinations , Metabolic Diseases/physiopathology
13.
J. appl. oral sci ; 25(6): 620-630, Nov.-Dec. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-893669

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective: Several studies reported the local tissue reaction caused by mineral aggregate-based cements. However, few studies have investigated the systemic effects promoted by these cements on liver and kidney when directly applied to connective tissue. The purpose of this in vivo study was to investigate the systemic effect of mineral aggregate-based cements on the livers and kidneys of rats. Material and Methods: Samples of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and a calcium aluminate-based cement (EndoBinder) containing different radiopacifiers were implanted into the dorsum of 40 rats. After 7 and 30 d, samples of subcutaneous, liver and kidney tissues were submitted to histopathological analysis. A score (0-3) was used to grade the inflammatory reaction. Blood samples were collected to evaluate changes in hepatic and renal functions of animals. Results: The moderate inflammatory reaction (2) observed for 7 d in the subcutaneous tissue decreased with time for all cements. The thickness of inflammatory capsules also presented a significant decrease with time (P<.05). Systemically, all cements caused adverse inflammatory reactions in the liver and kidney, being more evident for MTA, persisting until the end of the analysis. Liver functions increased significantly for MTA during 30 d (P<.05). Conclusion: The different cements induced to a locally limited inflammatory reaction. However, from the systemic point of view, the cements promoted significant inflammatory reactions in the liver and kidney. For MTA, the reactions were more accentuated.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Oxides/pharmacology , Root Canal Filling Materials/pharmacology , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Dental Cements/pharmacology , Kidney/drug effects , Liver/drug effects , Time Factors , Biocompatible Materials , Materials Testing , Drug Combinations , Kidney/pathology , Liver/pathology
14.
J. appl. oral sci ; 25(6): 680-688, Nov.-Dec. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-893667

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives: Methylcellulose (MC) is a chemical compound derived from cellulose. MTA mixed with MC reduces setting time and increases plasticity. This study assessed the influence of MC as an anti-washout ingredient and CaCl2 as a setting time accelerator on the physical and biological properties of MTA. Material and Methods: Test materials were divided into 3 groups; Group 1(control): distilled water; Group 2: 1% MC/CaCl2; Group 3: 2% MC/CaCl2. Compressive strength, pH, flowability and cell viability were tested. The gene expression of bone sialoprotein (BSP) was detected by RT-PCR and real­ time PCR. The expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and mineralization behavior were evaluated using an ALP staining and an alizarin red staining. Results: Compressive strength, pH, and cell viability of MTA mixed with MC/CaCl2 were not significantly different compared to the control group. The flowability of MTA with MC/CaCI2 has decreased significantly when compared to the control (p<.05). The mRNA level of BSP has increased significantly in MTA with MC/CaCl2 compared to the control (p<.05). This study revealed higher expression of ALP and mineralization in cells exposed to MTA mixed with water and MTA mixed with MC/CaCl2 compared to the control (p<.05). Conclusions: MC decreased the flowability of MTA and did not interrupt the physical and biological effect of MTA. It suggests that these cements may be useful as a root-end filling material.


Subject(s)
Animals , Mice , Oxides/pharmacology , Oxides/chemistry , Root Canal Filling Materials/chemistry , Calcium Chloride/pharmacology , Silicates/pharmacology , Silicates/chemistry , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/chemistry , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/chemistry , Methylcellulose/pharmacology , Materials Testing , Cells, Cultured/drug effects , Compressive Strength , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Drug Combinations
15.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 31: e81, 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-952090

ABSTRACT

Abstract Calcium silicate-based materials have been widely studied due to their resemblance to, and similar applicability of, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Among these, Biodentine™ (BD) was specifically designed as a "dentin replacement" material for applications such as root perforations, apexification, treatment of resorptive lesions, and as a retrograde filling material. The present study aimed to assess the in vitro response of human primary osteoblasts to BD using MTA AngelusTM as a reference material, by simultaneously analyzing three different cell viability parameters, namely mitochondrial activity, membrane integrity, and cell density. BD and MTA extracts were prepared by incubation on culture media for 24 h or 42 days after mixing. Primary human osteoblasts were exposed to extracts for 24 h, at 37oC with 5% CO2, and cell viability was evaluated by the XTT, NRU, and CVDE assays. Both materials induced cell viability levels higher than 70% when extracted for 24 h. However, when cells were exposed to extracts with increased conditioning times, MTA presented significant cytotoxic effects (p < 0.05) in comparison to the control and MTA at 24 h. After 42 days, the XTT assay identified a significant reduction in cell viability by BD when compared to the control (p<0.05), despite the fact that levels above the 70% viability cutoff were attained for biocompatible materials. It can be concluded that BD is cytocompatible with human primary osteoblasts, indicating its adequacy in direct contact with bone tissues.


Subject(s)
Humans , Osteoblasts/drug effects , Biocompatible Materials/pharmacology , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Pulp Capping and Pulpectomy Agents/pharmacology , Oxides/pharmacology , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Cell Count , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Reproducibility of Results , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Statistics, Nonparametric , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Drug Combinations
16.
J. appl. oral sci ; 24(3): 204-210, tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: lil-787546

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) is a calcium silicate cement composed of Portland cement (PC) and bismuth oxide. Hydroxyapatite has been incorporated to enhance mechanical and biological properties of dental materials. This study evaluated physicochemical and mechanical properties and antibiofilm activity of MTA and PC associated with zirconium oxide (ZrO2) and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HAn). Material and Methods White MTA (Angelus, Brazil); PC (70%)+ZrO2 (30%); PC (60%)+ZrO2 (30%)+HAn (10%); PC (50%)+ZrO2 (30%)+HAn (20%) were evaluated. The pH was assessed by a digital pH-meter and solubility by mass loss. Setting time was evaluated by using Gilmore needles. Compressive strength was analyzed by mechanical test. Samples were radiographed alongside an aluminum step wedge to evaluate radiopacity. For the antibiofilm evaluation, materials were placed in direct contact with E. faecalis biofilm induced on dentine blocks. The number of colony-forming units (CFU mL-1) in the remaining biolfilm was evaluated. The results were submitted to ANOVA and the Tukey test, with 5% significance. Results There was no difference in pH levels of PC+ZrO2, PC+ZrO2+HAn (10%) and PC+ZrO2+HAn (20%) (p>0.05) and these cements presented higher pH levels than MTA (p<0.05). The highest solubility was observed in PC+ZrO2+HAn (10%) and PC+ZrO2+HAn (20%) (p<0.05). MTA had the shortest initial setting time (p<0.05). All the materials showed radiopacity higher than 3 mmAl. PC+ZrO2 and MTA had the highest compressive strength (p<0.05). Materials did not completely neutralize the bacterial biofilm, but the association with HAn provided greater bacterial reduction than MTA and PC+ZrO2 (p<0.05) after the post-manipulation period of 2 days. Conclusions The addition of HAn to PC associated with ZrO2 harmed the compressive strength and solubility. On the other hand, HAn did not change the pH and the initial setting time, but improved the radiopacity (HAn 10%), the final setting time and the E. faecalis antibiofilm activity of the cement.


Subject(s)
Oxides/chemistry , Zirconium/chemistry , Enterococcus faecalis/drug effects , Silicates/chemistry , Durapatite/chemistry , Calcium Compounds/chemistry , Aluminum Compounds/chemistry , Biofilms/drug effects , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Oxides/pharmacology , Solubility , Time Factors , Zirconium/pharmacology , Bismuth/pharmacology , Bismuth/chemistry , Materials Testing , Colony Count, Microbial , Analysis of Variance , Enterococcus faecalis/growth & development , Silicates/pharmacology , Durapatite/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Compressive Strength , Dental Cements/pharmacology , Dental Cements/chemistry , Drug Combinations , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
17.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 30(1): e25, 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-952016

ABSTRACT

Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of diabetes mellituson tissue response and mineralization ability of Sealapex®and MTA Fillapex® sealers. Twenty-four Wistar rats were divided into two groups: diabetic and non-diabetic. The materials were placed in polyethylene tubes and implanted into dorsal connective tissue of rats for 7 and 30 days. Six animals from each group received injection of calcein, alizarin, and oxytetracycline on days 7, 14, and 21, respectively. The animals were killed after 7 and 30 days and specimens were prepared for histologic analysis by staining with hematoxylin and eosin or Von Kossa or left unstained for polarized light or fluorescence microscopy. On day 7, inflammatory reactions were characterized. Moderate inflammatory responses were observed for all groups and on day 30, a mild inflammatory response against MTA Fillapex® and a moderate inflammatory response against Sealapex® were observed. Von Kossa-positive structures were observed in response to both materials and birefringent structures were observed upon polarized light analysis; these had no relation to the diabetic condition (p > 0.05). The fluorescence intensity was unaffected in diabetic rats (p > 0.05). In conclusion, diabetes mellitus did not influence the tissue response or mineralization stimulated by Sealapex® or MTA Fillapex®.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Oxides/pharmacology , Calcium Hydroxide/pharmacology , Salicylates/pharmacology , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Subcutaneous Tissue/drug effects , Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/physiopathology , Time Factors , Biocompatible Materials/pharmacology , Materials Testing , Rats, Wistar , Subcutaneous Tissue/pathology , Drug Combinations , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/pathology , Microscopy, Fluorescence
18.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 30(1): e54, 2016. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-952061

ABSTRACT

Abstract The development of biomaterials capable of driving dental pulp stem cell differentiation into odontoblast-like cells able to secrete reparative dentin is the goal of current conservative dentistry. In the present investigation, a biomembrane (BM) composed of a chitosan/collagen matrix embedded with calcium-aluminate microparticles was tested. The BM was produced by mixing collagen gel with a chitosan solution (2:1), and then adding bioactive calcium-aluminate cement as the mineral phase. An inert material (polystyrene) was used as the negative control. Human dental pulp cells were seeded onto the surface of certain materials, and the cytocompatibility was evaluated by cell proliferation and cell morphology, assessed after 1, 7, 14 and 28 days in culture. The odontoblastic differentiation was evaluated by measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, total protein production, gene expression of DMP-1/DSPP and mineralized nodule deposition. The pulp cells were able to attach onto the BM surface and spread, displaying a faster proliferative rate at initial periods than that of the control cells. The BM also acted on the cells to induce more intense ALP activity, protein production at 14 days, and higher gene expression of DSPP and DMP-1 at 28 days, leading to the deposition of about five times more mineralized matrix than the cells in the control group. Therefore, the experimental biomembrane induced the differentiation of pulp cells into odontoblast-like cells featuring a highly secretory phenotype. This innovative bioactive material can drive other protocols for dental pulp exposure treatment by inducing the regeneration of dentin tissue mediated by resident cells.


Subject(s)
Humans , Stem Cells/drug effects , Biocompatible Materials/pharmacology , Collagen/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Dental Pulp/chemistry , Chitosan/pharmacology , Membranes, Artificial , Time Factors , Biocompatible Materials/chemistry , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Gene Expression , Cell Differentiation/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Collagen/chemistry , Calcium Compounds/chemistry , Aluminum Compounds/chemistry , Dentin/drug effects , Dentinogenesis , Chitosan/chemistry , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Alkaline Phosphatase , Odontoblasts/drug effects
19.
Braz. oral res ; 27(4): 324-330, Jul-Aug/2013. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-679211

ABSTRACT

This study evaluated the pH, calcium ion release and antimicrobial activity of EndoBinder (EB), containing different radiopacifiers: bismuth oxide (Bi2O3), zinc oxide (ZnO) or zirconium oxide (ZrO2), in comparison to MTA. For pH and calcium ion release tests, 5 specimens per group (n = 5) were immersed into 10 mL of distilled and deionized water at 37°C. After 2, 4, 12, 24, 48 h; 7, 14 and 28 days, the pH was measured and calcium ion release quantified in an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. For antimicrobial activity, the cements were tested against S. aureus, E. coli, E. faecalis and C. albicans, in triplicate. MTA presented higher values for pH and calcium ion release than the other groups, however, with no statistically significant difference after 28 days (p > 0.05); and the largest inhibition halos for all strains, with no significant difference (E. coli and E. faecalis) for pure EB and EB + Bi2O3 (p > 0.05). EB presented similar performance to that of MTA as regards pH and calcium ion release; however, when ZnO and ZrO2 were used, EB did not present antimicrobial activity against some strains.


Subject(s)
Aluminum Compounds/chemistry , Anti-Infective Agents/chemistry , Calcium Compounds/chemistry , Dental Cements/chemistry , Analysis of Variance , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Bismuth/chemistry , Bismuth/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Candida albicans/drug effects , Drug Combinations , Dental Cements/pharmacology , Enterococcus faecalis/drug effects , Escherichia coli/drug effects , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Materials Testing , Oxides/chemistry , Oxides/pharmacology , Spectrophotometry, Atomic , Silicates/chemistry , Silicates/pharmacology , Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Time Factors , Zinc Oxide/chemistry , Zinc Oxide/pharmacology , Zirconium/chemistry , Zirconium/pharmacology
20.
J. appl. oral sci ; 20(2): 139-145, Mar.-Apr. 2012. ilus
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-626411

ABSTRACT

Microorganisms remaining in dentin following cavity preparation may induce pulp damage, requiring the use of pulp-capping agents with antimicrobial activity underneath permanent restorations. OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to analyze the bacteriological status of carious dentin and to assess the efficacy of different base underneath silver amalgam restorations. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was conducted on 50 patients aged 13 to 30 years. Sterile swabs were used to take samples after cavity preparation, which was assessed by microbiological culture to identify the microorganisms present. Following this, cavities were restored with silver amalgam, using one of the materials being investigated, as the base: calcium hydroxide (Group II), polyantibiotic paste (Group III), a novel light-cured fluoride-releasing hydroxyapatite-based liner (Group IV) and mineral trioxide aggregate - MTA (Group V). In Group I, the cavities were restored with silver amalgam, without any base. After 3 months, the amalgam was removed and samples taken again and analyzed for the microbial flora. RESULTS: Lactobacilli were the most commonly isolated microorganisms in the samples of carious dentin. Groups IV and V showed negative culture in the 3-month samples. There was no statistically significant difference between Groups I, II and III. There was no significant difference between Groups IV and V (p>0.05). Both Groups IV and V showed significantly better results when compared to Groups I, II and III (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The hydroxyapatite-based liner and MTA performed significantly better in terms of antibacterial activity than the other materials.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Young Adult , Dental Pulp Capping , Dental Amalgam/chemistry , Dental Caries/microbiology , Dentin/microbiology , Pulp Capping and Pulpectomy Agents/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Biocompatible Materials/pharmacology , Bone Cements/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Calcium Hydroxide/pharmacology , Dental Restoration, Permanent , Drug Combinations , Dental Caries/therapy , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Dentin/drug effects , Durapatite/pharmacology , Oxides/pharmacology , Silicates/pharmacology , Time Factors
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