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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-785342

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The pollen calendar is the simplest forecasting method for pollen concentrations. As pollen concentrations are liable to seasonal variations due to alterations in climate and land-use, it is necessary to update the pollen calendar using recent data. To attenuate the impact of considerable temporal and spatial variability in pollen concentrations on the pollen calendar, it is essential to employ a new methodology for its creation.METHODS: A pollen calendar was produced in Korea using data from recent observations, and a new method for creating the calendar was proposed, considering both risk levels and temporal resolution of pollen concentrations. A probability distribution was used for smoothing concentrations and determining risk levels. Airborne pollen grains were collected between 2007 and 2017 at 8 stations; 13 allergenic pollens, including those of alder, Japanese cedar, birch, hazelnut, oak, elm, pine, ginkgo, chestnut, grasses, ragweed, mugwort and Japanese hop, were identified from the collected grains.RESULTS: The concentrations of each pollen depend on locations and seasons due to large variability in species distribution and their environmental condition. In the descending order of concentration, pine, oak and Japanese hop pollens were found to be the most common in Korea. The pollen concentrations were high in spring and autumn, and those of oak and Japanese hop were probably the most common cause of allergy symptoms in spring and autumn, respectively. High Japanese cedar pollen counts were observed in Jeju, while moderate concentrations were in Jeonju, Gwangju and Busan.CONCLUSIONS: A new methodology for the creation of a pollen calendar was developed to attenuate the impact of large temporal and spatial variability in pollen concentrations. This revised calendar should be available to the public and allergic patients to prevent aggravation of pollen allergy.


Subject(s)
Alnus , Ambrosia , Artemisia , Asians , Betula , Climate , Corylus , Cryptomeria , Forecasting , Ginkgo biloba , Humans , Hypersensitivity , Korea , Methods , Poaceae , Pollen , Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal , Seasons
2.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 960-968, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762036

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Many studies have reported that pollen-food allergy syndrome (PFAS) can cause anaphylaxis. No comprehensive investigations into anaphylaxis in PFAS have been conducted, however. In this study, we investigated the clinical manifestations and risk factors for anaphylaxis in PFAS in Korean patients with pollinosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were obtained from a nationwide cross-sectional study that previously reported on PFAS in Korean patients with pollinosis. Data from 273 patients with PFAS were collected, including demographics, list of culprit fruits and vegetables, and clinical manifestations of food allergy. We analyzed 27 anaphylaxis patients and compared them with patients with PFAS with oropharyngeal symptoms only (n=130). RESULTS: The most common cause of anaphylaxis in PFAS was peanut (33.3%), apple (22.2%), walnut (22.2%), pine nut (18.5%), peach (14.8%), and ginseng (14.8%). Anaphylaxis was significantly associated with the strength of sensitization to alder, hazel, willow, poplar, timothy, and ragweed (p<0.05, respectively). Multivariable analysis revealed that the presence of atopic dermatitis [odds ratio (OR), 3.58; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25–10.23; p=0.017]; sensitization to hazel (OR, 5.27; 95% CI, 1.79–15.53; p=0.003), timothy (OR, 11.8; 95% CI, 2.70–51.64; p=0.001), or ragweed (OR, 3.18; 95% CI, 1.03–9.87; p=0.045); and the number of culprit foods (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.15–1.37; p<0.001) were related to the development of anaphylaxis in PFAS. CONCLUSION: The most common culprit foods causing anaphylaxis in PFAS were peanut and apple. The presence of atopic dermatitis; sensitization to hazel, timothy, or ragweed; and a greater number of culprit foods were risk factors for anaphylaxis in PFAS.


Subject(s)
Alnus , Ambrosia , Anaphylaxis , Arachis , Cross-Sectional Studies , Demography , Dermatitis, Atopic , Food Hypersensitivity , Fruit , Humans , Hypersensitivity , Juglans , Nuts , Panax , Pollen , Prunus persica , Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal , Risk Factors , Salix , Vegetables
3.
Journal of Rhinology ; : 91-98, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-718267

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The present study evaluated the results of skin prick test using 55 allergens at 20 centers in the Republic of Korea in 2006, 2010, and 2014–2015. The aim was to assess changes in the positive rate of allergens according to temporal, regional, and environmental factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In total, 20 hospitals were selected based on the population distribution in the Republic of Korea. A skin prick test panel comprising 55 aeroallergens was distributed to 18 hospitals for this prospective study. The 2006 and 2010 skin prick test results were collected and analyzed retrospectively from 20 hospitals, while the 2014/2015 skin prick test results (from June 2014 to May 2015) were collected prospectively from 18 hospitals. RESULTS: A total of 14,897 SPT test results were analyzed: 4,319 in 2006, 7,431 in 2010, and 1,852 in 2014/2015. The overall rate of skin prick test positivity to more than two allergens was significantly higher in males than females. The positive rates of alder pollens and birch, oak and ragweed pollen positivity were increased in older patients. Several positive rates were increased according to the temperature in spring. The positive rates for beech pollen, birch pollen, hazel pollen, oak pollen, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, mugwort, cat, Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor and Tyrophagus putrescentiae were significantly increased, while those of Cult rye pollen and dandelion were significantly decreased over the three test periods. The overall positive rate for allergens in Jeju province varied significantly from Seoul and other cities. CONCLUSION: Change in the positive rate of multiple aeroallergens was evaluated in the Republic of Korea over time. Our findings can be used to recommend aeroallergens suitable for inclusion in skin prick test panels in the Republic of Korea and will facilitate further investigation of changes in the patterns of allergic diseases.


Subject(s)
Allergens , Alnus , Ambrosia , Animals , Artemisia , Betula , Cats , Demography , Fagus , Female , Humans , Korea , Male , Mites , Pollen , Prospective Studies , Republic of Korea , Retrospective Studies , Secale , Seoul , Skin , Taraxacum
4.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-716694

ABSTRACT

Weather may alter the concentrations of pollens which can subsequently influence the occurrence of allergic diseases. Many studies have demonstrated that greenhouse gases increase pollen concentration. Daily fluctuations in the pollen concentration have to do with a variety of meteorological factors such as temperature, rainfall and sunshine amount; therefore, it is complicated. At least more than 10 weather elements that affect the concentration of pollen. Earlier pollination and rising pollen concentrations have been reported in many countries. Most studies have focused on analysis of their relationships with local meteorological and climatic factors. Observed pollen data at locations representing a wide range of geographic and climatic conditions should be analyzed statistically to identify pollination date, pollen season length, and annual mean and peak values of daily concentrations of pollen. The seasonal and regional variations of pollen have also been changed in South Korea with climate change. There were evaluated sensitization rate to pollen in South Korea since 1997. Sensitization rates for weed and tree pollens are increased in Korean children, especially with increasing pollen concentration of ragweed and Japanese hop. It has been demonstrated that urbanization correlate with the increasing pollen allergies. However, the effects of environmental change on allergic diseases have not yet been completely understood. Recently there have been many epidemiological studies on the relationship between allergic diseases and climate changes. Previous studies suggest that climate changes interact with and affect pollen allergy, which in turn increases the frequency and severity of allergic disease.


Subject(s)
Ambrosia , Asians , Child , Climate Change , Climate , Epidemiologic Studies , Gases , Humans , Korea , Meteorological Concepts , Pollen , Pollination , Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal , Seasons , Sunlight , Trees , Urbanization , Weather
5.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-714757

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To identify the correlation between nasal eosinophilia and aeroallergen sensitization in children and adolescents. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of patients below 18 years of age who had a history of rhinitis that lasted more than 2 weeks or had been repeated more than once a year, received nasal eosinophil examinations, and had serum specific IgE to aeroallergens measured at an Allergy Clinic in a single tertiary teaching hospital in Seoul, Korea. The percentage of nasal eosinophils was calculated by the number of eosinophils per total leukocytes in a high-power field of 1,000×. Data was analyzed to determine the association between nasal eosinophilia and 18 aeroallergens. RESULTS: Of the 245 patients included, 156 (63.7%) were male and the mean age (±standard deviation) was 7.9 years (±3.8). In total, 175 patients (71.4%) were sensitized to at least 1 of the 18 aeroallergens tested, and sensitization to house dust mite was most common. In addition, 118 (48.2%) and 69 patients (28.2%) had nasal eosinophilia of at least 1% and 5%, respectively. There were no significant correlations between serum total IgE or age and the percentage of nasal eosinophils. However, the percentage of nasal eosinophils in the group sensitized to any aeroallergens was significantly increased compared to the nonsensitized group (P=0.002). The percentage of nasal eosinophils was significantly higher in patients who were sensitized to Birch-Alder Mix, oak white, Bermuda grass, orchard grass, timothy grass, sweet vernal grass, rye, mugwort, short ragweed, Alternaria alternata, cats, dogs or Dermatophagoides farinae compared to those nonsensitized. CONCLUSION: Nasal eosinophilia was significantly associated with sensitization to aeroallergens.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Alternaria , Ambrosia , Animals , Artemisia , Cats , Child , Cynodon , Dactylis , Dermatophagoides farinae , Dogs , Eosinophilia , Eosinophils , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Hypersensitivity , Immunoglobulin E , Korea , Leukocytes , Lolium , Male , Phleum , Pyroglyphidae , Retrospective Studies , Rhinitis , Seoul
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-714751

ABSTRACT

Although atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO₂) has no apparent direct effect on human health, it does have direct effects on plants. The present study evaluated the influence of increased CO₂ levels on the concentration of allergens from common ragweed pollen by setting up a chamber study to model future air conditions and a field study to evaluate current air conditions. For the chamber study, we established 20 ragweed plants in an open-top chamber under different CO₂ levels (380–400, 500–520, 600–620, and 1,000–1,100 parts per million [ppm]). For the field study, we established ragweed plants in rural (Pocheon, Gyeonggi-do; mean CO₂ 320±54.8 ppm) and urban (Gangnam, Seoul; mean CO₂ 440±78.5 ppm) locations. Seeds of the common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) were obtained from Daejin University. The Amb a 1 protein content of pollen extracts was quantified using a double sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In our chamber study, the median concentration of Amb a 1 in pollen increased with increasing in CO₂ concentration (1.88 ng/µg in 380–400 ppm CO₂; 3.14 ng/µg in 500–520 ppm CO₂; 4.44 ng/µg in 600–620 ppm CO₂; and 5.36 ng/µg in 1,000–1,100 ppm CO₂). In our field study, we found no significantly different concentration of Amb a 1 between the pollen extracts at the Pocheon (mean±standard deviation, 1.63±0.3 ng/µg pollen in 320±54.8 ppm CO₂) and the Gangnam (2.04±0.7 ng/µg pollen in CO₂ in 440±78.5 ppm CO₂) locations, although the concentration of Amb a 1 was increased in the Gangnam than in the Pocheon locations. Our results suggest that future increases in CO₂ levels to more than 600 ppm will significantly elevate the Amb a 1 content in common ragweeds, although the current different CO₂ levels do not cause differences in the Amb a 1 content of ragweed pollen.


Subject(s)
Allergens , Ambrosia , Carbon Dioxide , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Humans , Pollen , Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal , Seoul
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-713707

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We developed skin prick test (SPT) reagents for common inhalant allergens that reflected the real exposure in Korea. The study aim was to evaluate diagnostic usefulness and allergen potency of our inhalant SPT reagents in comparison with commercial products. METHODS: We produced eight common inhalant allergen SPT reagents using total extract (Prolagen): Dermatophagoides farinae, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, oak, ragweed, mugwort, Humulus japonicus pollens, as well as cat and dog allergens. We compared the newly developed reagents with three commercially available SPT reagents (Allergopharma, Hollister-Stier, Lofarma). We measured total protein concentrations, sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), major allergen concentration, and biological allergen potencies measured by immunoglobulin E (IgE) immunoblotting and ImmunoCAP inhibition test. RESULTS: Diagnostic values of these SPT reagents were expressed as positivity rate and concordance rate of the results from ImmunoCAP allergen-specific IgE test in 94 allergic patients. In vitro analysis showed marked differences in protein concentrations, SDS-PAGE features, major allergen concentrations, and biological allergen potencies of four different SPT reagents. In vivo analysis showed that positive rates and concordance rates of Prolagen® SPT reagents were similar compared to the three commercial SPT reagents. CONCLUSION: The newly developed Prolagen® inhalant SPT reagents are not inferior to the commercially available SPT reagents in allergy diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Allergens , Allergy and Immunology , Ambrosia , Animals , Artemisia , Cats , Dermatophagoides farinae , Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus , Diagnosis , Dogs , Electrophoresis , Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel , Humans , Humulus , Hypersensitivity , Immunoblotting , Immunoglobulin E , Immunoglobulins , In Vitro Techniques , Indicators and Reagents , Korea , Methods , Pollen , Skin , Sodium
8.
Asia Pacific Allergy ; (4): 138-147, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-750109

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pollen allergens are one of the main contributors to the development and/or aggravation of allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, and asthma. OBJECTIVE: An examination of the airborne pollen in residential areas should be conducted to aid the diagnosis and treatment of allergic diseases. METHODS: Airborne pollen samples were collected from 2 sites in Incheon and 2 in Seoul from 2015 to 2016. RESULTS: The highest monthly concentration of airborne pollen was observed in May and September each year. Pollen from 32 families and 50 genera was identified over the 2 years; of these, Pinus spp. showed the highest pollen concentration (41.6%), followed by Quercus spp. (25.3%), and Humulus spp. (15.3%), the latter of which had the highest concentration among weed pollen. The total pollen concentration was significantly higher in Incheon than in Seoul (p = 0.001 in 2015, p < 0.001 in 2016) and higher in 2016 than in 2015. The concentrations of pollen from weed species (Cupressaceae, Humulus spp., Artemisia spp., Ambrosia spp., and Chenopodiaceae) and grass species (Gramineae) were significantly higher (p < 0.001) than those from tree species. Pollen was distributed from February to November. The first pollen identified in both regions in each year was Alnus spp. Overall, the total concentration of Quercus spp., Betula spp., Humulus spp., Artemisia spp., Ambrosia spp., and Chenopodiaceae pollen increased significantly over the 2 years. CONCLUSION: Region-specific differences exist in the pollen of major allergenic plants. Continuous monitoring of pollen is thus essential for management of pollen-related allergic disorders in each region.


Subject(s)
Allergens , Alnus , Ambrosia , Artemisia , Asthma , Betula , Chenopodiaceae , Conjunctivitis, Allergic , Diagnosis , Humans , Humulus , Hypersensitivity , Pinus , Poaceae , Pollen , Quercus , Rhinitis, Allergic , Seoul , Trees
9.
Asia Pacific Allergy ; (4): 29-36, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-750089

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Specific IgE antibodies against the low-molecular-weight carbohydrate antigen that does not bridge IgE molecules on mast cells are not associated with clinical symptoms. Cross reactivity can be determined in allergen-specific IgE detection assays when the carbohydrate structures between pollen allergens and plant derived food allergens are similar; in such cases, false positive results for grain or legume allergens can be reported for pollen allergic patients who are not sensitized to those allergens. This phenomenon arises owing to the presence of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCDs). OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the impact of CCD interference on the results for pollen allergen-specific IgE antibodies in the general adult population and to perform CCD inhibition tests evaluating the involvement of CCD on samples positive to pollen allergens. METHODS: Serum samples from 322 subjects were tested for IgE antibodies to pollens and CCD. The research subjects were given questionnaires about pollen allergic symptoms to help assess the presence of allergies. Allergen IgE antibodies for Japanese cedar, Japanese cypress, orchard grass, ragweed, MUXF, bromelain, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and ascorbate oxidase (ASOD) were analyzed. RESULTS: It was observed that among individuals who tested positive to any of the pollen allergens, the positive ratio of CCD-specific IgE antibody was the highest for HRP (13.5%–50.0%). The results from the inhibition tests revealed that CCD was marginally present. Although IgE antibodies for cedar pollen did not react with CCD, IgE antibodies for Japanese cypress, orchard grass, and ragweed might be detected by the presence of CCD. CONCLUSION: The results of the inhibition tests revealed the obvious presence of CCD suggesting its involvement. Considering these findings, careful evaluation of patient IgE results should be performed for Japanese cypress, orchard grass, and ragweed.


Subject(s)
Adult , Allergens , Ambrosia , Antibodies , Ascorbate Oxidase , Asians , Bromelains , Cryptomeria , Cupressus , Dactylis , Fabaceae , False Positive Reactions , Horseradish Peroxidase , Humans , Hypersensitivity , Immunoglobulin E , Mast Cells , Plants , Pollen , Research Subjects , Rhinitis, Allergic , Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-118515

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to investigate role of common pollen in Korean school-aged children with allergic rhinitis (AR) in 5 provinces (Incheon Metropolitan City-Gyeonggi Province, Chungcheongbuk-do, Gwangju Metropolitan City, Busan Metropolitan City, and Jeju Special Self-Governing Province), using a questionnaire and skin prick test, and to assess the differences among the residential regions. Among the enrolled 14,678 total children, 1,641 (22.0%) had AR. The sensitization rate to pollen (38.7%) was the second highest among examined allergens and significant differences were in the sensitization rates to trees, weeds, and grasses among the 5 provinces (P < 0.05). The sensitization to trees (25.2%) was the highest common among the pollen types and significant differences also were observed in the sensitization rates to alder, birch, Japanese cedar, oak, and elm among the 5 provinces. The sensitization rate to weeds (19.9%) was the second highest and significant differences were observed in the sensitization rate to Japanese hop, mugwort, and ragweed among the 5 provinces. The sensitization rate to house dust mite was 86.8%, the highest among examined allergens and that to Dermatophagoides farinae exhibited regional differences (P = 0.003) but not to D. farinae (P = 0.584). The sensitization rate to mold (13.5%) was the highest in Jeju and lowest in Busan, and a statistically significant difference was detected among the 5 provinces. These results support that examined pollen allergens are strongly associated with residential region due to regional causative pollen differences among children with AR within Korea to investigate the main pollen allergens.


Subject(s)
Allergens , Alnus , Ambrosia , Artemisia , Asians , Betula , Child , Cryptomeria , Dermatophagoides farinae , Fungi , Humans , Korea , Poaceae , Pollen , Pyroglyphidae , Rhinitis , Rhinitis, Allergic , Skin , Trees
11.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 786-792, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-21748

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The AdvanSure™ AlloScreen assay is an advanced multiplex test that allows for simultaneous detection of specific IgE (sIgE) against multiple allergens. For precise identification of causative allergens in allergic patients, we compared this new multiplex sIgE assay with the ImmunoCAP assay, which is currently the gold-standard method for sIgE detection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Serum samples from 218 Korean allergic disease patients were used to compare the ImmunoCAP and AlloScreen assays with respect to the following 13 allergens: Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae, cat and dog dander, Alternaria, birch, oak, ragweed, mugwort, rye grass, and food allergens (egg white, cow's milk, peanuts). RESULTS: A total of 957 paired tests using the 13 allergens were compared. The total agreement ratio ranged from 0.74 (oak) to 0.97 (Alternaria). With respect to class association analyses, the gamma index ranged from 0.819 (rye grass) to 0.990 (Alternaria). The intra-class correlation coefficients for house dust mites, cat and dog dander, Alternaria, birch, ragweed, egg white, cow's milk, and peanut sIgE titers were >0.8. CONCLUSION: The AlloScreen and ImmunoCAP assays exhibited similar diagnostic performance. However, due to methodological differences between the two systems, careful interpretation of their results is needed in clinical applications.


Subject(s)
Allergens , Alternaria , Ambrosia , Animals , Arachis , Artemisia , Betula , Cats , Dander , Dermatophagoides farinae , Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus , Dogs , Egg White , Humans , Immunoassay , Immunoglobulin E , Lolium , Methods , Milk , Pyroglyphidae
12.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-18294

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study focused on the evaluation of the relation between pollen concentration and the outbreak of allergic disease (symptom index), and this outcome would be necessary to upgrade risk grade for the pollen forecasting system. METHODS: Airborne particles carrying allergens, such as pollen, were collected daily at the Seoul and Guri area by using 7-day Burkard samplers for 6 years. A total of 596 Subjects were recruited from Hanyang University Seoul Hospital (n=144 for spring, n=139 for autumn), and Hanyang University Guri Hospital (n=157 for spring, n=156 for autumn). Symptom index was evaluated and recorded by phone calling to study subjects daily or asking questionnaire when they visit outpatient clinic every week. Statistical analysis of data was performed by using correlation coefficients and regression models with time series graph. RESULTS: Two peak seasons of pollen concentration were May and September in Korea. In skin prick tests, the sensitization rate to ragweed pollen was gradually increased in children. In the same period, sensitization rates to airborne pollen, especially oak, birch for spring, and Japanese hop for autumn were increased annually. There was a significantly relationship between symptom index of allergic patients and allergic pollen concentrations in this study. Especially symptom index was significantly correlated to the concentration of oak pollen of day 1 in spring and to the concentration of Japanese hop pollen of day 0 in autumn. CONCLUSION: Sensitization rates to pollens increased annually. There is a significant relationship between allergy symptom index and pollen concentration. There remains to confirm the Korean own risk grade of pollen allergy.


Subject(s)
Allergens , Ambrosia , Ambulatory Care Facilities , Asians , Betula , Child , Forecasting , Humans , Hypersensitivity , Korea , Pollen , Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal , Seasons , Seoul , Skin
13.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-18287

ABSTRACT

Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) is caused by cross-reactivity between certain pollens and plant foods, including vegetables, nuts, or fruits. Here, we experienced 2 cases of OAS patients associated with mugwort pollinosis without sensitization to Fagales. A 54-year-old female repeatedly experienced skin rashes, perioral edema, nasal obstruction after eating fresh vegetables (celery, lettuce, chicory, radish sprouts, ginseng, etc.). She had suffered from allergic rhinitis worsening in autumn for 5 years. Specific IgE (sIgE) titers to ragweed and mugwort were elevated to 54.1 and 24.9 kU/L, respectively. With regard to the allergen component of pollens, sIgE to Art v 1 (mugwort) and Amb a 1 (ragweed) were elevated to 21.9 and 36.1 kU/L, respectively. Birch sIgE (including Bet v 1 and Bet v 2) was not detected. A 35-year-old male suffered from abdominal pain, skin rashes after eating mango and kiwi. In addition, systemic allergic reaction developed after consumption of tomato and ginseng. He had chronic rhinitis. The sIgE levels to ragweed, mugwort, and tomato were elevated to 0.55, 6.39, and 0.78 kU/L, respectively. The sIgE test results were all negative for Amb a 1, Bet v 1, and Bet v 2 sIgE. Specific IgE levels to Art v 1, Art v 2 sIgE were 3.51 and 4.46 kU/L, respectively. Based on the history and sIgE test results, 2 cases OAS were related to mugwort. We experienced 2 cases of weed pollinosis related to OAS. Culprit foods of OAS can vary depending on their cuisine cultures.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Pain , Adult , Ambrosia , Apium , Artemisia , Betula , Chicory , Eating , Edema , Exanthema , Female , Food Hypersensitivity , Fruit , Humans , Hypersensitivity , Immunoglobulin E , Lettuce , Lycopersicon esculentum , Male , Mangifera , Middle Aged , Nasal Obstruction , Nuts , Panax , Plants , Pollen , Raphanus , Rhinitis , Rhinitis, Allergic , Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal , Vegetables
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-106568

ABSTRACT

Bee pollen is pollen granules packed by honey bees and is widely consumed as natural healthy supplements. Bee pollen-induced anaphylaxis has rarely been reported, and its allergenic components have never been studied. A 40-year-old male came to the emergency room with generalized urticaria, facial edema, dyspnea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea 1 hour after ingesting one tablespoon of bee pollen. Oxygen saturation was 91%. His symptoms resolved after injection of epinephrine, chlorpheniramine, and dexamethasone. He had seasonal allergic rhinitis in autumn. Microscopic examination of the bee pollen revealed Japanese hop, chrysanthemum, ragweed, and dandelion pollens. Skin-prick with bee pollen extracts showed positive reactions at 0.1 mg/mL (A/H ratio > 3+). Serum specific IgE to ragweed was 25.2, chrysanthemum 20.6, and dandelion 11.4 kU/L; however, Japanese hop, honey-bee venom and yellow-jacket venom were negative (UniCAP(R), Thermo Fisher Scientific, Uppsala, Sweden). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed serum specific IgE to bee-pollen extracts, and an ELISA inhibition assay for evaluation of cross-allergenicity of bee pollen and other weed pollens showed more than 90% of inhibition with chrysanthemum and dandelion and ~40% inhibition with ragweed at a concentration of 1 microg/mL. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and IgE-immunoblot analysis revealed 9 protein bands (11, 14, 17, 28, 34, 45, 52, 72, and 90 kDa) and strong IgE binding at 28-34 kDa, 45 and 52 kDa. In conclusion, healthcare providers should be aware of the potential risk of severe allergic reactions upon ingestion of bee pollen, especially in patients with pollen allergy.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Pain , Adult , Ambrosia , Anaphylaxis , Asians , Bees , Chlorpheniramine , Chrysanthemum , Dexamethasone , Diarrhea , Dyspnea , Eating , Edema , Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel , Emergency Service, Hospital , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Epinephrine , Health Personnel , Honey , Humans , Humulus , Hypersensitivity , Immunoglobulin E , Male , Nausea , Oxygen , Pollen , Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal , Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate , Taraxacum , Urticaria , Venoms , Vomiting
15.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-114310

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The prevalence of pollinosis is increasing, and it is expected to increase further with climate change. Mugwort and ragweed pollens are well known as prevalent allergenic weed pollens in Korea. However, the clinical significance of dandelion pollen as an inhalant allergen has not yet been studied. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance and cross-allergenicity between dandelion and major weed pollens. METHODS: Ninety-seven patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma or with allergic rhinitis alone who were sensitized to dandelion pollens on skin prick tests (allergen/histamine ratio>3) were enrolled between December, 2012 and November, 2013. Serum specific IgE levels to dandelion pollen extracts were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). ELISA inhibition tests were performed to evaluate cross allergenecity with other weed pollens. RESULTS: When the positive cutoff value for serum specific IgE was set at the mean+/-3 standard deviation of absorbance values, 52 patients (53.6%) had a high serum specific IgE antibody level. ELISA inhibition tests showed significant inhibitions with serial addition of dandelion pollen extracts, and 5 different inhibition patterns were noted with addition of 4 weed pollen extracts: significant inhibitions with pollens of mugwort, ragweed, chenopodium and Hop J (25%, 13 of 52), inhibitions with pollens of mugwort, ragweed and chenopodium (17.3%, 9 of 52), inhibitions with 2 pollens of mugwort and ragweed (32.6%, 17 of 52), inhibitions with mugwort pollen (21.1%, 11 of 52), and inhibitions with dandelion pollen alone (4%, 2 of 52). CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that dandelion pollen may be a causative inhalant allergen to induce pollinosis in the autumn season. Cross-allergenicity with other weed pollens showed individual differences; most patients had cross-reactivity with mugwort, ragweed, and chenopodium pollens, while some with Hop J pollen. Few patients were sensitized to dandelion pollen alone.


Subject(s)
Ambrosia , Artemisia , Asthma , Chenopodium , Climate Change , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Humans , Humulus , Immunoglobulin E , Individuality , Korea , Pollen , Prevalence , Rhinitis , Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal , Seasons , Skin , Taraxacum
16.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-83775

ABSTRACT

Pollen reactivity in respiratory allergic diseases has recently increased in Korea. According to changes in allergen sensitization over the last 30 years, tree pollen sensitization in the 2010s markedly increased in oak, birch, alder, and pine. The sensitization to grasses and most weeds in the 2010s decreased in comparison with the 90s results. Oak Pollen allergens have increased in air during the last 30 years, and this increment has been correlated with increased oak reactivity. The number of birch trees is not so many as oak, but skin reactivity to birch pollen is as same as that to oak pollen. Because there are many chestnut near the residence, sensitization to Castanea spp. has to be evaluated. Maidenhair tree and Japanese elm are regarded as offending allergens of pollenosis. There are many maindenhair trees (Ginkgo biloba) and Japanese elm (Zelkova serrata) on streets and in park areas, and they produce a large amount of anemophilous pollen in spring. There is little wide grassland in Korea except the rice fields. Therefore, we do not have dominant grasses for pollenosis. There are a few peculiar grasses, such as orange foxtail, common reed, Korean lawn grass, Chinese silver grass, and green bristle grass. These pollens should be evaluated for cross-allergenicity with known allergenic pollens, such as timothy and Bermuda grass. In Korea, sagebrush, ragweed, and hop Japanese are prominent plants in autumn. Chrysanthemum spp. should be further evaluated because of persistently increased sensitization during the last 30 years, which are widely distributed in wild fields and bloom massively during late autumn. Recent climate changes and air pollution increase pollen production and alter pollen allergenicity. Therefore, continuous monitoring of plant ecology and pollen sensitization is necessary in effectively controlling pollen allergy for human health.


Subject(s)
Air Pollution , Allergens , Alnus , Ambrosia , Artemisia , Asians , Betula , Chrysanthemum , Citrus sinensis , Climate Change , Cynodon , Ecology , Ginkgo biloba , Humans , Humulus , Hypersensitivity , Korea , Plants , Poaceae , Pollen , Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal , Silver , Skin
17.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-83771

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We investigated the prevalence and risk factors of allergic rhinitis (AR), nationwide in random children and adolescents of Korea. METHODS: A modified International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire survey was done in 1,820 children from elementary, middle, and high school nationwide in Korea. The subjects were selected by the stratifying sampling method by school grade and five regions. Current AR was defined as having AR symptoms during the last 12 months with a history of physician-diagnosed AR. Skin prick tests for 18 common allergens were performed. RESULTS: The number of males was 945, and that of females was 875. The mean age of the patients was 12.61+/-3.40 years. The prevalence of current AR and atopic current AR were 29.0% and 18.7%, respectively. Risk factors for current AR were male (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.486; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.189-1.856), family history of paternal AR (aOR, 3.208; 95% CI, 2.460-4.182), family history of maternal AR (aOR, 3.138; 95% CI, 2.446-4.025), antibiotic use in infancy (aOR, 1.547; 95% CI, 1.228-1.949), mold exposure during infancy (aOR, 1.416; 95% CI, 1.103-1.819), mold exposure during the last 12 months (aOR, 1.285; 95% CI, 1.012-1.630), and sensitization on skin prick tests (aOR, 2.596; 95% CI, 2.055-3.279). Risk factors for atopic current AR were the same as those of current AR, whereas breast-milk feeding (aOR, 0.720; 95% CI, 0.530-0.976) was a protective factor. Sensitized allergens as risk factors for current AR were Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farina, ragweed, mugwort, oak, alder, birch, Japanese hop, cat, and dog. CONCLUSION: The prevalences of current AR and atopic current AR were 29.0% and 18.7%, respectively. Male, sex parental AR, antibiotic use in infancy, mold exposure during the last 12 months, mold exposure during infancy, and atopic sensitization were risk factors for current AR. Breast-milk feeding was a protective factor for atopic current AR. Aeroallergen sensitization was an important risk factor for AR.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Allergens , Alnus , Ambrosia , Animals , Artemisia , Asians , Asthma , Betula , Cats , Child , Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus , Dogs , Female , Fungi , Humans , Humulus , Hypersensitivity , Korea , Male , Odds Ratio , Parents , Prevalence , Pyroglyphidae , Rhinitis , Risk Factors , Skin
18.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-99821

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Allergic rhinitis (AR) is one of the most common childhood diseases in Korea. In this study, we aimed to investigate the prevalence and allergens of childhood AR in Gwangju. METHODS: From April 2013 to September 2013 in Gwangju, skin prick test and questionnaire survey were performed targeting 2,330 children in total (350 kindergartners, 930 elementary school students, 589 middle school students, and 461 high school students). RESULTS: The overall prevalence of AR was 23.5% (female 21.3%, male 26.1%). According to age groups, prevalence of AR was 14.9% (female 10.7%, male 19.8%) in kindergartners, 24.5% (female 18.8%, male 29.4%) in elementary school students, 23.3% (female 18.1%, male 27.6%) in middle school students, 26.2% (female 27.7%, male 23.2%) in high school students. The most common allergen was Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (79.7%), followed by Dermatophagoides farina (72.2%), birch (14.0%), alder (12.0%), Japanese hop (9.2%), Alternaria (8.9%), cat fur (7.2%), Japanese cedar (6.9%), ryegrass (6.6%), willow (6.0%), pine (5.4%), oak (4.9%), mugwort (4.3%), orchard grass (4.0%), sheep fescue (3.7%), fat hen (3.4%), ragweed (3.4%), and maple (3.4%). CONCLUSION: This research figures out the prevalence and the detailed allergens of AR in Gwangju children. We suggest that more vegetation data of Japanese cedar should be surveyed in recent future.


Subject(s)
Acer , Adolescent , Allergens , Alnus , Alternaria , Ambrosia , Animals , Artemisia , Asians , Betula , Cats , Child , Cryptomeria , Dactylis , Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus , Humans , Humulus , Korea , Lolium , Male , Prevalence , Pyroglyphidae , Rhinitis , Salix , Sheep , Skin , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Mycobiology ; : 458-466, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-729590

ABSTRACT

Oak tree death caused by symbiosis of an ambrosia beetle, Platypus koryoensis, and an ophiostomatoid filamentous fungus, Raffaelea quercus-mongolicae, has been a nationwide problem in Korea since 2004. In this study, we surveyed the yeast species associated with P. koryoensis to better understand the diversity of fungal associates of the beetle pest. In 2009, a total of 195 yeast isolates were sampled from larvae and adult beetles (female and male) of P. koryoensis in Cheonan, Goyang, and Paju; 8 species were identified by based on their morphological, biochemical and molecular analyses. Meyerozyma guilliermondii and Candida kashinagacola were found to be the two dominant species. Among the 8 species, Candida homilentoma was a newly recorded yeast species in Korea, and thus, its mycological characteristics were described. The P. koryoensis symbiont R. quercusmongolicae did not show extracelluar CM-cellulase, xylanase and avicelase activity that are responsible for degradation of wood structure; however, C. kashinagacola and M. guilliermondii did show the three extracellular enzymatic activities. Extracelluar CM-cellulase activity was also found in Ambrosiozyma sp., C. homilentoma, C. kashinagacola, and Candida sp. Extracelluar pectinase activity was detected in Ambrosiozyma sp., C. homilentoma, Candida sp., and M. guilliermondii. All the 8 yeast species displayed compatible relationships with R. quercus-mongolicae when they were co-cultivated on yeast extract-malt extract plates. Overall, our results demonstrated that P. koryoensis carries the yeast species as a symbiotic fungal associate. This is first report of yeast diversity associated with P. koryoensis.


Subject(s)
Adult , Ambrosia , Coleoptera , Candida , Cellulases , Fungi , Humans , Korea , Larva , Platypus , Polygalacturonase , Quercus , Symbiosis , Wood , Yeasts
20.
Egyptian Journal of Hospital Medicine [The]. 2014; 57 (October): 612-629
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-160257

ABSTRACT

Diabetes mellitus is one of the common and widely distributed metabolic diseases all over the world. This disease is characterized by hyperglycemia that results from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action or both. Different medicinal plant species are used as a traditional treatment for diabetes mellitus e.g. Ambrosia maritima, L. [Damsissa] which is one of these plants that its extract was used to treat diabetic patients long times ago. This work was aimed to investigate the antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and antioxidant effects of the aqueous extract of Ambrosia maritima, L. [Damsissa] on the alloxan-induced diabetic male albino rats. This study was performed on thirty male albino rats with an average 100-110 g body weight. The animals were divided into three groups [10 /cage]; Group I [Control untreated-group], Group II [Alloxan-induced diabetic group] and Group III [diabetic group treated orally with "28.5 mg/ kg body wt. twice/ day" of the plant extract]. The biochemical results showed marked decline [p<0.01] in the levels of the serum insulin, body weight, total proteins, albumin, globulin and HDL accompanied with marked elevation [p<0.001] in the levels of fasting blood glucose, levels of HOMA_IR, AST, ALT, GGT, urea, creatinine, uric acid, serum TC, TG, LDL, VLDL and ratios of TC/HDL and LDL/HDL [risk factors] in diabetic rats in comparison with the control group. Daily management of the diabetic rates with aqueous extract of Damsissa showed significant improvement in most of these parameters. Histologically, considerable improvement in the morphological changes that was observed in diabetic groups had been detected after treatment with Damsissa in liver, kidney and pancreatic tissues in comparison to the control group. It could be concluded that Ambrosia maritima, L. [Damsissa] can be used as an antidiabetic drug that can lower blood glucose concentration and guard against the negative effects of diabetes


Subject(s)
Male , Animals, Laboratory , Protective Agents , Ambrosia/adverse effects , Rats , Liver/ultrastructure , Kidney/ultrastructure , Pancreas/ultrastructure , Treatment Outcome
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