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1.
Rev. Méd. Clín. Condes ; 31(3/4): 256-269, mayo.-ago. 2020. ilus, tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-1223737

ABSTRACT

Las vacunas son altamente efectivas en prevenir enfermedades infecciosas a través del desarrollo en el individuo de una respuesta inmune protectora, sin desarrollar la enfermedad. Los distintos tipos de vacunas producen diferentes tipos de respuestas inmunes y variadas estrategias se han desarrollado para mejorar esta respuesta. El sistema inmune sufre cambios con la edad y esta inmunosenecencia altera la capacidad de responder frente a ellas. Por otro lado, si bien el sistema inmune puede reconocer elementos presentes en las vacunas y montar respuestas de hipersensibilidad ante ellos, las alergias a las vacunas son raras, teniendo que distinguirlas adecuadamente de otro tipo de reacciones. En caso que un paciente presente una reacción compatible con alergia, es importante conocer todos los componentes de la vacuna para realizar un estudio adecuado.


Vaccines are highly effective in preventing infectious diseases through the development in the individual a protective immune response, without developing the disease. Different types of vaccines produce different types of immune responses, and varied strategies have been developed to improve this response. The immune system undergoes changes with age, and this inmunosenescence alters the ability to respond to them. On the other hand, although the immune system can recognize elements present in vaccines and establish hypersensitivity responses to them, vaccine allergies are rare, having to properly distinguish them from other types of reactions. In the event that a patient has an allergy-compatible reaction, it is important to know all the components of the vaccine to conduct a proper study.


Subject(s)
Humans , Vaccines/adverse effects , Vaccines/immunology , Immunization/adverse effects , Hypersensitivity/immunology , Immunity/immunology , Vaccines, Attenuated/adverse effects , Vaccines, Attenuated/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/adverse effects , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Immunosenescence , Anaphylaxis/immunology , Antigens/immunology
2.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 50(7): e6071, 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-951705

ABSTRACT

Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is an anthropozoonotic disease with worldwide distribution and is caused by the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. Anaphylactic shock induced by CE rupture is a serious complication especially in patients with hydatid infections, as the resulting leakage of fluid contains highly toxic endogenous antigen. We aimed to isolate and identify the antigens of specific IgE and IgG1 (sIgE and sIgG1) in E. granulosus cyst fluid (EgCF). Crude antigen for EgCF was prepared from E. granulosus-infected sheep liver. Antigens were separated and identified by one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (1D SDS-PAGE), two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and immunoblotting. Results of 1D SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting showed that 40.5 kDa protein was the major antigen of sIgE, and 35.5 kDa protein was the major antigen of sIgG1 in EgCF. Results of 2-DE and immunoblotting showed that main antigens of sIgE in EgCF were four proteins with pI values ranging from 6.5 to 9.0 and a molecular weight of 40.5 kDa. Main antigens of sIgG1 in EgCF were five proteins with pI values ranging from 6.5 to 9.0 and a molecular weight of 35.5 kDa. The antigens identified for sIgE and sIgG1 can provide critical insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying anaphylactic shock induced by CE.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Male , Female , Child , Adolescent , Adult , Young Adult , Immunoglobulin E/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Echinococcus granulosus/immunology , Echinococcosis/complications , Anaphylaxis/parasitology , Antigens, Helminth/immunology , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Immunoblotting , Case-Control Studies , Echinococcosis/immunology , Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel , Anaphylaxis/immunology , Antigens, Helminth/blood
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-148453

ABSTRACT

Specific IgE to gliadin was proposed as a marker for wheat dependent exercise induced anaphylaxis, while Tri a 14 was found to induce IgE response in baker's asthma. We evaluated whether these components could be used for discriminating phenotypes of wheat allergy. Twenty-nine patients who were wheat-induced anaphylaxis and/or urticaria (n=21, group I) and baker's asthma (n=8, group II) were enrolled. The prevalence of serum specific IgE to Tri a 14 was higher in group II (25%) than in group I (4.8%), while the serum specific IgE to gliadin was significantly higher in group I (70%) than in group II (12.5%). The cutoff value for predicting the baker's asthma using the ratio of serum specific IgE to Tri a 14 to gliadin was 742.8 optical densityx1,000/(kU/L) with high sensitivity and specificity. These findings suggest that Tri a 14/gliadin may be a potential marker for predicting baker's asthma.


Subject(s)
Adult , Anaphylaxis/immunology , Antigens, Plant/immunology , Asthma/blood , Biomarkers/blood , Carrier Proteins/immunology , Female , Gliadin/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin E/blood , Male , Phenotype , Triticum/immunology , Urticaria/immunology , Wheat Hypersensitivity/diagnosis
4.
Indian J Biochem Biophys ; 2010 Apr; 47(2): 90-95
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-135249

ABSTRACT

The mast cell-mediated allergic reactions are involved in many allergic diseases, such as asthma, allergic rhinitis and sinusitis. Stimulation of mast cells initiates the process of degranulation, resulting in the release of mediators such as histamine and an array of inflammatory cytokines. In this report, we investigated the effect of gossypin (a biflavonoid) and suramin (a synthetic polysulphonated naphtylurea) on the mast cell-mediated allergy model, and studied the possible mechanism of their action. Both gossypin and suramin inhibited (P<0.001) compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis reactions, antiprurities (P<0.001) and reduced the histamine release in rats. Further, both showed significant (P<0.001) protection against rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80. Thus, our findings provide evidence that gossypin and suramin inhibit mast cell-derived allergic reactions.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , Anaphylaxis/drug therapy , Anaphylaxis/immunology , Animals , Anti-Allergic Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Allergic Agents/therapeutic use , Antipruritics/pharmacology , Antipruritics/therapeutic use , Ascitic Fluid/drug effects , Ascitic Fluid/metabolism , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , Disease Models, Animal , Flavonoids/pharmacology , Flavonoids/therapeutic use , Histamine Release/drug effects , Histamine Release/immunology , Hypersensitivity/blood , Hypersensitivity/drug therapy , Hypersensitivity/immunology , Hypersensitivity/metabolism , Mast Cells/drug effects , Mast Cells/immunology , Mast Cells/metabolism , Mice , Nitrogen Oxides/blood , Nitrogen Oxides/metabolism , Rats , Suramin/pharmacology , Suramin/therapeutic use , p-Methoxy-N-methylphenethylamine/pharmacology
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-111408

ABSTRACT

Anisakidae larvae can cause anisakiasis when ingested by humans. Although several groups have reported a gastrointestinal Anisakis allergy among people in Spain and Japan, our report is the first to summarize the clinical features of 10 Anisakis allergy cases in Korea. We enrolled 10 Korean patients (6 men and 4 women) who complained of aggravated allergic symptoms after ingesting raw fish or seafood. Sensitization to Anisakis was confirmed by detecting serum specific IgE to Anisakis simplex. The most common manifestation of anisakiasis was urticaria (100%), followed by abdominal pain (30%) and anaphylaxis (30%). All patients presenting with these symptoms also exhibited high serum specific IgE (0.45 to 100 kU/L) to A. simplex. Nine patients (90%) exhibited atopy and increased total serum IgE levels. The fish species suspected of carrying the Anisakis parasite were flatfish (40%), congers (40%), squid (30%), whelk (10%), and tuna (10%). Anisakis simplex should be considered as a possible causative food allergen in adult patients presenting with urticaria, angioedema, and anaphylaxis following the consumption of raw fish or seafood.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Pain/immunology , Adult , Aged , Anaphylaxis/immunology , Angioedema/immunology , Animals , Anisakiasis/complications , Anisakis/immunology , Antibodies, Helminth/blood , Asians , Female , Food Hypersensitivity/complications , Humans , Immunoglobulin E/blood , Korea/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Seafood/adverse effects , Urticaria/immunology , Young Adult
7.
P. R. health sci. j ; 25(2): 143-147, Jun. 2006.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-472188

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine the clinical characteristics of patients with anaphylactic reactions evaluated at the Puerto Rico Medical Center over a ten year period. BACKGROUND: Anaphylaxis, an immunologic reaction classically initiated by the combination of an antigen and a mast cell fixed antibody (usually IgE), still carries a fatality rate of 500 to 1000 cases per year in the United States. It constitutes a medical emergency that needs to be identified promptly in order to install appropriate treatment. No studies of this condition have been conducted in Puerto Rico, specifically to assess the clinical presentation, main causes and outcome. METHODS: Eighty-three records of patients with a diagnosis of anaphylaxis were screened by retrospective and concurrent analysis. Of these, only 51 fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of anaphylaxis. Specific data gathered from those records assessed the clinical characteristics of each case, precipitating factors, severity of the reaction and outcome. A standard form was used for data gathering. A grading system was utilized to classify the severity of the clinical episodes. RESULTS: Cutaneous features were the most commonly found manifestations of anaphylactic reactions in the studied group. Only reactions graded 2 and 3 were identified. Reactions to medications were the most frequent identifiable causes of the entity. Multiple sensitivities to different allergens were not predictive of this clinical condition. CONCLUSIONS: The identification in this study that only cases with the more severe grades of anaphylaxis were evaluated and treated at our center, the inability to recognize an inciting cause in about one third of the patient sample and the fact that a minority of the treated patients received subsequent follow-up by an allergist, reflect the need to promote the training of physicians in the field of allergy in Puerto Rico and the continued education of all physicians in the Island regarding this clinical disorder.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Anaphylaxis , Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , Anaphylaxis/classification , Anaphylaxis/complications , Anaphylaxis/diagnosis , Anaphylaxis/etiology , Anaphylaxis/immunology , Anaphylaxis/therapy , Cyanosis/etiology , Data Interpretation, Statistical , Diagnosis, Differential , Hypotension/etiology , Mast Cells/immunology , Puerto Rico , Retrospective Studies , Receptors, IgE/immunology
9.
Indian J Exp Biol ; 2003 Dec; 41(12): 1460-2
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-63457

ABSTRACT

Extract of gum resin of B. serrata containing 60% acetyl 11-keto beta boswellic acid (AKBA) along with other constituents such as 11-keto beta-boswellic acid (KBA), acetyl beta-boswellic acid and beta-boswellic acid has been evaluated for antianaphylactic and mast cell stabilizing activity using passive paw anaphylaxis and compound 48/80 induced degranulation of mast cell methods. The extract inhibited the passive paw anaphylaxis reaction in rats in dose-dependant manner (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg, po). However, the standard dexamethasone (0.27 mg/kg, po) revealed maximum inhibition of edema as compared to the extract. A significant inhibition in the compound 48/80 induced degranulation of mast cells in dose-dependant manner (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg, po) was observed thus showing mast cell stabilizing activity. The standard disodium cromoglycate (50 mg/kg, ip) was found to demonstrate maximum per cent protection against degranulation as compared to the extract containing 60% AKBA. The results suggest promising antianaphylactic and mast cell stabilizing activity of the extract.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Immunologic/pharmacology , Anaphylaxis/immunology , Animals , Boswellia/chemistry , Cell Degranulation/drug effects , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Male , Mast Cells/drug effects , Rats , Rats, Wistar , Triterpenes/pharmacology
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-94088

ABSTRACT

It has recently been reported that interleukin-4 (IL-4) is required for the production of IgE, and anti-IL-4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) inhibits in vivo IgE responses. These suggest that blocking of IL-4 activity may be useful for the prevention or treatment of immediate hypersensitivity disorders. In this study we investigated whether anti-IL-4 has a regulatory role in chicken-gamma globulin (CGG)-induced active systemic anaphylaxis. Multiple injections of anti-IL-4 (up to 40 mg/mouse) failed to protect the mice from fatal anaphylaxis. Anti-IL-4 strongly suppressed CGG-specific IgE response (>90%) without any suppressive effect on CGG-specific IgG (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3) responses. Because these data suggest the possibility that fatal anaphylaxis could be induced by IgG antibodies, we examined the possibility using anti-CGG polyclonal and the subclasses of IgG monoclonal antibodies. Passive sensitization of mice with polyclonal antibodies elicited severe and fatal anaphylactic shock; about 50% of the mice died. The activity of antibodies was not diminished by heat treatment (56 degrees C, 2h), suggesting that the anaphylaxis was not mediated by IgE. Shock was also elicited by each subclass of IgG mAb; of these, IgG1 was the most effective. Combination of the IgG subclasses elicited more exaggerated shock; about 30% of mice died. These data indicate that IgG antibodies are themselves sufficient to induce systemic anaphylaxis. Therefore, the failure of anti-IL-4 to prevent active anaphylaxis is probably due to the inability of anti-IL-4 to suppress the production of IgG antibodies.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Chickens , Female , gamma-Globulins , Immunoglobulin E/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Interleukin-4/immunology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C
14.
Indian J Physiol Pharmacol ; 1989 Jan-Mar; 33(1): 47-52
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-107143

ABSTRACT

Mechanism of inhibition of mast cell anaphylaxis by P. kurroa-extract (PK) treatment in rats was investigated. Mast cell-IgE binding, assessed from induction of passive sensitization, was not affected. Calcium-independent early activation events in mast cell anaphylaxis indicated on inhibitory influence of PK-treatment. Inhibition of membrane-protease release by PK-treatment was suggested by study of gastric secretion and exhibition of saturable synergism with Di-isopropyl fluoro phosphate on inhibition of anaphylactic degranulation. pH-independence of mast cell stabilizing effect negates any PK-influence on phospholipid transmethylation. The results complement findings of earlier studies on indirect effects of PK through alteration of membrane structure/function.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis/immunology , Animals , Antigens/immunology , Gastric Juice/drug effects , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Isoflurophate/pharmacology , Male , Mast Cells/drug effects , Peptide Hydrolases/analysis , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Rats , Rats, Inbred Strains
16.
Bol. Asoc. Méd. P. R ; 78(4): 149-51, abr. 1986. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-35001

ABSTRACT

Se presenta un repaso sobre los aspectos inmunológicos en tres formas del síndrome clínico de shock: anafiláctico, séptico y cardiogénico. Se hace una discusión de la participación de los derivados del ácido araquidónico, de la activación del sistema de complemento y de los efectos de los mediadores producidos por diferentes células que explican el origen de varias de las manifestaciones clínicas de estas tres entidades


Subject(s)
Humans , Anaphylaxis/immunology , Shock, Cardiogenic/immunology , Shock, Septic/immunology
17.
Asunciòn; Sociedad Paraguaya de medicina interna, Instituto para Investigaciones en Ciencias de la salud, Sociedad Paraguaya de Pediatrìa; s.f. 32 p.
Monography in Spanish | LILACS, BDNPAR | ID: biblio-1018336
18.
Asunciòn; Sociedad Paraguaya de medicina interna. Instituto para Investigaciones en Ciencias de la salud; s.f. 32 p.
Monography in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-244089
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