Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 138
Filter
2.
Braz. J. Vet. Res. Anim. Sci. (Online) ; 57(2): e163783, mai. 2020. tab
Article in English | LILACS, VETINDEX | ID: biblio-1122177

ABSTRACT

Soil contamination by dog and cat feces can become a public health problem due to the transmission of various etiologic agents that cause zoonoses. This study aimed to verify the occurrence of geohelminths in the soil of some public square areas of the municipality of Rio Branco, Acre State, Western Brazilian Amazon. Five public squares were selected, and soil samples collection was performed from April 2014 to March 2015. The samples were processed by using the Baermann-Moraes and centrifugal-flotation methods. Geohelminths positivity was of 25% for Tox o c ara spp., 6.6% for the Ancylostomatoidea Superfamily and 1.6 for Trichuris spp.. Measures should be implemented to prevent the free access of animals to these places, as well as deworming of stray dogs and cats and the implementation of population control and policies for such animals.(AU)


A contaminação do solo por fezes de cães e gatos pode se tornar um problema de saúde pública devido à transmissão de vários agentes etiológicos que causam zoonoses. Este estudo objetivou verificar a ocorrência de geohelmintos no solo de praças públicas do município de Rio Branco, estado do Acre, Brasil. Cinco praças públicas foram selecionadas e amostras de solo foram colhidas entre abril de 2014 e março de 2015. As amostras foram processadas pelos métodos de Baermann-Moraes e centrífugo-flutuação. A positividade observada para geohelmintos foi de 25% para Tox o c ara spp., 6,6% para a Superfamília Ancylostomatoidea e 1,6% para Trichuris spp.. Medidas devem ser implementadas para prevenir a livre circulação de animais nestes locais, bem como a desverminação de cães e gatos de rua e a implementação de políticas de adoção e controle populacional de cães e gatos.(AU)


Subject(s)
Animals , Cats , Dogs , Soil Microbiology , Toxocara/isolation & purification , Ancylostomatoidea/isolation & purification , Environmental Pollution , Brazil , Zoonoses , Disease Transmission, Infectious , Amazonian Ecosystem , Gardens
3.
Infectio ; 23(1): 33-38, Jan.-Mar. 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, COLNAL | ID: biblio-975560

ABSTRACT

Abstract Intestinal parasitosis (IP) is a public health problem in developing countries affecting one fourth of the global population. IP are common studied in children, ne glecting the adults that are also at high risk and source of transmission. A screening study was performed with a convenience sample in three Colombian regions: Guachené (Cauca), Quibdó (Chocó), and Urabá (Antioquia). Feces samples from 284 volunteers (older than 18 years old) were tested by microscopy to identify para site ova and cysts. The IP frequency was 14.5%, and 52.1% were males. 63.2% of the parasitized patients exhibited diarrhea, and/or abdominal pain with significant association. 39.5% had single parasitic infection and 60.5% had multiple parasites: Blastocystis hominis (63.9%), Entamoeba hystolitica/dispar (39.4%), Endolimax nana (33.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (22.2%), Giardia lamblia (19.4%), Entamoeba coli (13.9%), Trichuris trichiura (11.1%), hookworm species (11.1%), Strongyloides stercolaris (5.6%), and Iodamoeba butschlii (2.8%). A multivariate approach was used to determine predictor factors for IP: male gender, rainwater as drinking sour ce, and feces disposal different to toilet, latrine or septic tank were positively associated with infection. This study evidences that adult population, not only children from vulnerable areas of Colombia, must have to include as a risk for intestinal parasitism.


Resumen La parasitosis intestinal (PI) es un problema de salud pública en países en desarrollo que afecta un cuarto de la población mundial. Las PI son comúnmente estudia das en niños, olvidando que los adultos están también en riesgo y a su vez pueden ser fuentes de transmisión. Se realizó un estudio de tamizaje con una muestra escogida por conveniencia en tres regiones de Colombia: Guachené (Cauca), Quibdó (Chocó) y Urabá (Antioquia). Las muestras de materia fecal de 284 voluntarios mayores de 18 años, fueron estudiadas por microscopía para identificar parásitos, huevos y quistes. La frecuencia de las PI fue del 14.5%, 52.1% de los positivos fueron hombres. 63.2% de los individuos parasitados tenían asociación significativa con diarrea, y/o dolor abdominal. 39.5% tuvieron infección por un solo parásito y 60.5% fueron positivos para varios parásitos: Blastocystis hominis (63.9%), Entamoeba hystolitica/dispar (39.4%), Endolimax nana (33.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (22.2%), Giardia lamblia (19.4%), Entamoeba coli (13.9%), Trichuris trichiura (11.1%), Strongyloides stercolaris (5.6%), y Iodamoeba butschlii (2.8%). Se realizó un aná lisis multivariado para determinar factores predictores para PI: el género masculino, el agua lluvia para consumo, y la disposición de excretas diferente a sanitario, letrina o pozo séptico, están asociados positivamente a la PI. Este estudio evidencia que la población adulta, no solo la infantil, residentes en áreas vulnerables de Colombia, deben incluirse como población de riesgo al parasitismo intestinal.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Parasites , Parasitic Diseases , Mass Screening , Helminthiasis , Toilet Facilities , Ancylostomatoidea , Water , Abdominal Pain , Septic Tanks , Giardia lamblia , Blastocystis hominis , Ascaris lumbricoides , Colombia , Diarrhea , Drinking , Coliforms
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-742312

ABSTRACT

Melting temperature shift (T(m)-shift) is a new detection method that analyze the melting curve on real-time PCR thermocycler using SYBR Green I fluorescent dye. To establish a T(m)-shift method for the detection of Ancylostoma ceylanicum and A. tubaeforme in cats, specific primers, with GC tail of unequal length attached to their 5′ end, were designed based on 2 SNP loci (ITS101 and ITS296) of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) sequences. The standard curve of T(m)-shift was established using the standard plasmids of A. ceylanicum (AceP) and A. tubaeforme (AtuP). The T(m)-shift method stability, sensitivity, and accuracy were tested with reference to the standard curve, and clinical fecal samples were also examined. The results demonstrated that the 2 sets of primers based on the 2 SNPs could accurately distinguish between A. ceylanicum and A. tubaeforme. The coefficient of variation (CV) of T(m)-values of AceP and AtuP was 0.07% and 0.06% in ITS101 and was 0.06% and 0.08% in ITS296, respectively. The minimum detectable DNA concentration was 5.22×10⁻⁶ and 5.28×10⁻⁶ ng/μl samples of AceP and AtuP, respectively. The accuracy of T(m)-shift method reached 100% based on examination of 10 hookworm DNA samples with known species. In the clinical detection of hookworm in 69 stray cat fecal sample, the T(m)-shift detection results were consistent with the microscopic examination and successfully differentiated between the 2-hookworm species. In conclusion, the developed method is a rapid, sensitive and accurate technique and can provide a promising tool for clinical detection and epidemiological investigation of cat-derived hookworms.


Subject(s)
Ancylostoma , Ancylostomatoidea , Animals , Cats , DNA , Freezing , Methods , Plasmids , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Tail
5.
Gut and Liver ; : 388-393, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-763862

ABSTRACT

Artificial intelligence is likely to perform several roles currently performed by humans, and the adoption of artificial intelligence-based medicine in gastroenterology practice is expected in the near future. Medical image-based diagnoses, such as pathology, radiology, and endoscopy, are expected to be the first in the medical field to be affected by artificial intelligence. A convolutional neural network, a kind of deep-learning method with multilayer perceptrons designed to use minimal preprocessing, was recently reported as being highly beneficial in the field of endoscopy, including esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy, and capsule endoscopy. A convolutional neural network-based diagnostic program was challenged to recognize anatomical locations in esophagogastroduodenoscopy images, Helicobacter pylori infection, and gastric cancer for esophagogastroduodenoscopy; to detect and classify colorectal polyps; to recognize celiac disease and hookworm; and to perform small intestine motility characterization of capsule endoscopy images. Artificial intelligence is expected to help endoscopists provide a more accurate diagnosis by automatically detecting and classifying lesions; therefore, it is essential that endoscopists focus on this novel technology. In this review, we describe the effects of artificial intelligence on gastroenterology with a special focus on automatic diagnosis, based on endoscopic findings.


Subject(s)
Ancylostomatoidea , Artificial Intelligence , Capsule Endoscopy , Celiac Disease , Colonoscopy , Diagnosis , Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted , Endoscopy , Endoscopy, Digestive System , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Gastroenterology , Helicobacter pylori , Humans , Intestine, Small , Learning , Methods , Neural Networks, Computer , Pathology , Polyps , Stomach Neoplasms
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-761767

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to determine the prevalence of intestinal helminth parasitic infections and associated risk factors for the human infection among the people of Samarkand, Uzbekistan. Infection status of helminths including Echinococcus granulosus was surveyed in domestic and wild animals from 4 sites in the Samarkand region, Uzbekistan during 2015–2018. Fecal samples of each animal were examined with the formalin-ether sedimentation technique and the recovery of intestinal helminths was performed with naked eyes and a stereomicroscope in total 1,761 animals (1,755 dogs, 1 golden jackal, and 5 Corsac foxes). Total 658 adult worms of E. granulosus were detected in 28 (1.6%) dogs and 1 (100%) golden jackal. More than 6 species of helminths, i.e., Taenia hydatigena, Dipylidium caninum, Diplopylidium nolleri, Mesocestoides lineatus, Toxocara canis, and Trichuris vulpis, were found from 18 (1.0%) dogs. Six (T. hydatigena, Toxascaris leonina, Alaria alata, Uncinaria stenocephala, D. caninum, and M. lineatus) and 2 (D. nolleri and M. lineatus) species of helminths were also detected from 5 Corsac foxes and 1 golden jackal, respectively. Taeniid eggs were found in 2 (20%) out of 10 soil samples. In the present study, it was confirmed that the prevalences of helminths including E. granulosus are not so high in domestic and wild animals. Nevertheless, the awareness on the zoonotic helminth infections should be continuously maintained in Uzbekistan for the prevention of human infection.


Subject(s)
Adult , Ancylostomatoidea , Animals , Animals, Wild , Dogs , Echinococcus granulosus , Eggs , Foxes , Helminths , Humans , Jackals , Mesocestoides , Ovum , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Soil , Taenia , Toxascaris , Toxocara canis , Trichuris , Uzbekistan
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-761750

ABSTRACT

Adult specimens of Echinochasmus caninus n. comb. (Verma, 1935) (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) (syn. Episthmium caninum Yamaguti, 1958) were recovered from 11 riparian people who resided along the Mekong River in Khammouane Province, Lao PDR. In fecal examinations done by the Kato-Katz technique, the cases revealed eggs of Opisthorchis viverrini/minute intestinal flukes, hookworms, and in 2 cases echinostome eggs. To recover the adult helminths, praziquantel 30–40 mg/kg and pyrantel pamoate 10–15 mg/kg in a single dose were given and purged with magnesium salts. Various species of trematodes (including O. viverrini and Haplorchis spp.), cestodes, and nematodes were recovered from their diarrheic stools. Among the trematodes, small echinostome flukes (n=42; av. 3.8 specimens per case) of 0.7–1.2 mm in length are subjected in this study. They are morphologically characterized by having 24 collar spines interrupted dorsally and anterior extension of vitellaria from the cirrus sac or genital pore level to the posterior end of the body. Particularly based on this extensive distribution of vitellaria, the specific diagnosis was made as Echinochasmus caninus. The cases were co-infected with various other helminth parasites; thus, clinical manifestations specific for this echinostome infection were difficult to determine. The present paper describes for the first time human E. caninus infections in Lao PDR. Our cases marked the 4–14th human infections with this echinostome around the world following the 3 previous cases reported from Thailand.


Subject(s)
Adult , Ancylostomatoidea , Animals , Cestoda , Comb and Wattles , Diagnosis , Eggs , Helminths , Humans , Magnesium , Opisthorchis , Ovum , Parasites , Praziquantel , Pyrantel Pamoate , Rivers , Salts , Spine , Thailand , Trematoda
8.
Rev. méd. hered ; 29(4): 211-216, oct.-dic 2018. ilus, tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS, LIPECS | ID: biblio-1014325

ABSTRACT

Objetivos: Describir las características morfológicas diferenciales más relevantes de los estadios larvarios de uncinarias (Ancylostoma duodenale y Necator americanus), y S. stercoralis, para su identificación específica en laboratorio clínico convencional. Material y métodos: Estudio observacional durante julio del 2015 a agosto del 2016. Se realizaron cultivos en placa de agar de muestras fecales positivas por microscopía a larvas de nematodos o huevos de uncinaria. Las larvas desarrolladas en cultivo fueron descritas morfológicamente mediante claves, se identificaron las características morfológicas diferenciales más relevantes y se ilustraron mediante microfotografías. Resultados: Las características morfológicas más relevantes para la diferenciación específica fueron la longitud de la cavidad bucal y la prominencia del poro genital en el estadio rabditiforme; y la forma del cuerpo, el extremo terminal de la cola y el diámetro del extremo anterior del intestino en relación al esófago en el estadio filariforme. Conclusiones: Las uncinarias A. duodenale y N. americanus, y S. stercoralis pueden identificarse específicamente por microscopía óptica mediante el análisis morfológico de sus estadíos larvarios desarrollados en cultivo. Debido al requerimiento de equipos e insumos de uso común en laboratorio de microbiología, se recomienda esta metodología para uso en laboratorios clínicos convencionales. (AU)


Objectives: To determine the most relevant morphologic differences of larval stages of hookworms (Ancylostoma duodenale y Necator americanus) and S. stercoralis for their specific identification in a conventional laboratory. Methods: An observational study was carried-out between July and August 2016. Positive fecal samples at microscopy to nematode larvae or to eggs of hookworms were cultured in agar plate. Larvae that developed in culture were described morphologically using passwords. We identified the most relevant differential morphologic features and illustrated them using microphotography. Results: The most relevant morphologic features that allow differentiating these nematodes were the longitude of the oral cavity and the prominence of the genital primordium for the rabditiform larva; the shape of the body, the terminal end of the tail and the diameter of the anterior extreme of the intestine in relation to the esophagus for the filariform larvae. Conclusions: Hookworms and S. stercoralis can be specifically identified by optic microscopic examination of their larval stages developed in culture. We recommend this methodology for conventional microbiology laboratories due to the requirement of simple equipment. (AU)


Subject(s)
Ancylostomatoidea , Strongyloides stercoralis , Necator americanus , Ancylostoma , Observational Studies as Topic
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-742225

ABSTRACT

Intestinal parasitic infections remain a major public health problem in many parts of Thailand, particularly in rural areas. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections and associated risk factors among the people living in Huai Sai sub-district, Bang Khla district, Chachoengsao Province, central Thailand. A cross-sectional survey was carried out from June 2017 to August 2017 which included a total of 224 participants. Stool samples were examined using a simple direct smear and formalin ethyl acetate concentration technique. Association between risk factors and intestinal parasitic infections was assessed using multivariate logistic regression analysis. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections was 16.1%. Soil-transmitted helminth infections (14.3%) were more common than protozoan infections (1.8%). The most common intestinal parasites were hookworms (6.7%) followed by Strongyloides stercoralis, (5.0%), Ascaris lumbricoides (1.3%) and Trichuris trichiura (1.3%). Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (1.0%), Giardia intestinalis (0.4%), and Blastocystis hominis (0.4%) were the protozoans identified. A high prevalence of infections was found in male participants of ≥40 years who raised dogs in the households and did not wear boots while working fields. Multivariate analysis showed a significant association of intestinal parasitic infections with gender with the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 2.4 and 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.1–5.2 (P=0.020). The results showed a high prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth infections among adults in rural communities which were particularly apparent regarding the skin-penetrating species of nematodes. A greater focus on intervention is required by improving sanitation and personal hygiene to prevent the spread of intestinal parasitic infections.


Subject(s)
Adult , Ancylostomatoidea , Animals , Ascaris lumbricoides , Blastocystis hominis , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dogs , Entamoeba , Entamoeba histolytica , Family Characteristics , Formaldehyde , Giardia lamblia , Helminths , Humans , Hygiene , Logistic Models , Male , Multivariate Analysis , Odds Ratio , Parasites , Prevalence , Protozoan Infections , Public Health , Risk Factors , Rural Population , Sanitation , Strongyloides stercoralis , Thailand , Trichuris
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-742219

ABSTRACT

Adult specimens of Echinostoma ilocanum (Garrison, 1908) Odhner, 1911 (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) were recovered from 2 riparian people who resided along the Mekong River in Savannakhet Province, Lao PDR. In fecal examinations done by the Kato-Katz technique, they revealed echinostome eggs together with eggs of Opisthorchis viverrini (and minute intestinal fluke eggs) and hookworms. To recover the adult flukes, they were treated with praziquantel 30–40 mg/kg in a single dose and purged with magnesium salts. A total of 658 adult fluke specimens were recovered from the 2 people; 456 from case 1 and 202 from case 2. Specimens from case 1 consisted of 335 echinostomes (301 E. ilocanum and 34 species undetermined), 120 O. viverrini, and 1 Haplorchis taichui, and those from case 2 consisted of 36 E. ilocanum, 134 O. viverrini, and 32 H. taichui. Thus, the number of E. ilocanum specimens was 337 in total (average per person, 168.5). From this study, it is suggested that foodborne intestinal flukes and liver flukes are highly prevalent along the Mekong River in Savannakhet Province. The present report describes for the first time human infections with E. ilocanum in Lao PDR.


Subject(s)
Adult , Ancylostomatoidea , Echinostoma , Echinostomiasis , Eggs , Fasciola hepatica , Humans , Magnesium , Opisthorchis , Ovum , Praziquantel , Rivers , Salts , Trematoda
11.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-738950

ABSTRACT

A 20-year-old Cambodian male living in Korea for 2 years as a foreign worker visited our gastroenterology outpatient clinic. He had a small farm in Cambodia. He complained of postprandial upper abdominal pain with nausea and vomiting for 2 years. Gastroduodenoscopy showed hyperemic mucosa near the major papilla in the duodenum and two small and slender reddish worms. These were removed with endoscopic biopsy forceps. Under microscopy, these were identified as Ancylostoma duodenale by the characteristic morphology of 2 pairs of cutting teeth in the buccal cavity and 3 lobes in the copulatory bursa. After removal of two worms, his symptom improved. Soil-transmitted helminths (STH) present a global health problem. In the Republic of Korea, STH, including hookworms, were highly prevalent until the 1970s. With mass fecal examination followed by selective mass chemotherapy with anthelmintics from 1969 to 1995, the prevalence of STH has rapidly decreased since the 1980s. Since 2004, no hookworms have been found in nationwide surveys on the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection. Therefore, we report a case of in vivo endoscopic removal of A. duodenale in a patient with abdominal pain.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Pain , Agriculture , Ambulatory Care Facilities , Ancylostoma , Ancylostomatoidea , Anthelmintics , Asians , Biopsy , Cambodia , Drug Therapy , Duodenum , Endoscopy , Gastroenterology , Global Health , Helminths , Humans , Korea , Male , Microscopy , Mucous Membrane , Nausea , Parasitic Diseases , Prevalence , Republic of Korea , Surgical Instruments , Tooth , Vomiting , Young Adult
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-203199

ABSTRACT

Hookworm infections are widely prevalent in tropical and subtropical areas, especially in low income regions. In the body, hookworms parasitize the proximal small intestine, leading to chronic intestinal hemorrhage and iron deficiency anemia. Occasionally, hookworms can cause overt gastrointestinal bleeding, but this is often ignored in heavily burdened individuals from endemic infectious areas. A total of 424 patients with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding were diagnosed by numerous blood tests or stool examinations as well as esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy, capsule endoscopy or double-balloon enteroscopy. All of the patients lived in hookworm endemic areas and were not screened for hookworm infection using sensitive tests before the final diagnosis. The patients recovered after albendazole treatment, blood transfusion, and iron replacement, and none of the patients experienced recurrent bleeding in the follow-up. All the 31 patients were diagnosed with hookworm infections without other concomitant bleeding lesions, a rate of 7.3% (31/424). Seventeen out of 227 patients were diagnosed with hookworm infections in the capsule endoscopy (CE), and 14 out of 197 patients were diagnosed with hookworm infections in the double balloon enteroscopy (DBE). Hookworm infections can cause overt gastrointestinal bleeding and should be screened in patients with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) in endemic infectious areas with sensitive methods. Specifically, the examination of stool specimens is clinically warranted for most patients, and the proper examination for stool eggs relies on staff's communication.


Subject(s)
Albendazole , Ancylostoma , Ancylostomatoidea , Anemia, Iron-Deficiency , Blood Transfusion , Capsule Endoscopy , Colonoscopy , Diagnosis , Double-Balloon Enteroscopy , Eggs , Endoscopy, Digestive System , Follow-Up Studies , Hematologic Tests , Hemorrhage , Hookworm Infections , Humans , Intestine, Small , Iron , Necator americanus , Ovum
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-203196

ABSTRACT

Hookworm infections are rare causes of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. We report a middle aged man with primary nephrotic syndrome and pulmonary embolism. During the treatment with steroids and anticoagulants, the patient presented acute massive hemorrhage of the gastrointestinal tract. The results of gastroscopy showed red worms in the duodenum. Colonoscopy and CT angiogram of abdomen were unremarkable. Capsule endoscopy revealed fresh blood and multiple hookworms in the jejunum and ileum. Hookworms caused the acute intestinal bleeding. The patient responded well to albendazole. Hematochezia was markedly ameliorated after eliminating the parasites. Hence, hookworm infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Capsule endoscopy may offer a better means of diagnosis for intestinal hookworm infections.


Subject(s)
Abdomen , Albendazole , Ancylostoma , Ancylostomatoidea , Anticoagulants , Capsule Endoscopy , Colonoscopy , Diagnosis , Diagnosis, Differential , Duodenum , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage , Gastrointestinal Tract , Gastroscopy , Hemorrhage , Hookworm Infections , Humans , Ileum , Jejunum , Middle Aged , Necator americanus , Nephrotic Syndrome , Parasites , Pulmonary Embolism , Steroids
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-180610

ABSTRACT

A field survey studying intestinal parasites in humans and microbial pathogen contamination at environment was performed in a Laotian rural village to identify potential risks for disease outbreaks. A parasitological investigation was conducted in Ban Lak Sip village, Luang Prabang, Lao PDR involving fecal samples from 305 inhabitants as well as water samples taken from 3 sites of the local stream. Water analysis indicated the presence of several enteric pathogens, i.e., Aeromonas spp., Vibrio spp., E. coli H7, E. coli O157: H7, verocytotoxin-producing E. coli (VTEC), Shigella spp., and enteric adenovirus. The level of microbial pathogens contamination was associated with human activity, with greater levels of contamination found at the downstream site compared to the site at the village and upstream, respectively. Regarding intestinal parasites, the prevalence of helminth and protozoan infections were 68.9% and 27.2%, respectively. Eight helminth taxa were identified in fecal samples, i.e., 2 tapeworm species (Taenia sp. and Hymenolepis diminuta), 1 trematode (Opisthorchis sp.), and 5 nematodes (Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides stercoralis, trichostrongylids, and hookworms). Six species of intestinal protists were identified, i.e., Blastocystis hominis, Cyclospora spp., Endolimax nana, Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar, Entamoeba coli, and Giardia lamblia. Questionnaires and interviews were also conducted to determine risk factors of infection. These analyses together with a prevailing infection level suggested that most of villagers were exposed to parasites in a similar degree due to limited socio-economic differences and sharing of similar practices. Limited access to effective public health facilities is also a significant contributing factor.


Subject(s)
Adenoviridae , Aeromonas , Ancylostomatoidea , Ascaris lumbricoides , Blastocystis hominis , Cestoda , Cyclospora , Disease Outbreaks , Endolimax , Entamoeba , Entamoeba histolytica , Giardia lamblia , Helminths , Human Activities , Humans , Hymenolepis , Parasites , Prevalence , Protozoan Infections , Public Health , Risk Factors , Rivers , Shigella , Strongyloides stercoralis , Trichuris , Vibrio , Water
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-180601

ABSTRACT

To investigate the prevalence of intestinal parasite infections in Yanbian Prefecture, Jilin Province, China, epidemiological surveys were conducted on a collaboration basis between the Korean Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Yanbian Center for Disease Control and Prevention. A total of 8,396 (males 3,737 and females 4,659) stool samples were collected from 8 localities and examined with the formalin-ether sedimentation technique, and additionally examined with the cellotape anal swab to detect Enterobius vermicularis eggs. The overall rate of intestinal parasites was 1.57%. The prevalence of Ascaris lumbricoides was the highest (0.80%), followed by Entamoeba spp. (0.23%), heterophyid flukes (0.15%), Clonorchis sinensis (0.08%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.07%), hookworms (0.06%), Trichostrongylus spp. (0.06%), Giardia lamblia (0.04%), Paragonimus spp. (0.02%), Diphyllobothrium spp. (0.02%), Trichuris trichiura (0.02%). The prevalence by sex was similar, 1.58% (n=59) in males and 1.57% (n=73) in females. By the present study, it is partly revealed that the prevalences of intestinal parasite infections are relatively low among the inhabitants of Yanbian Prefecture, Jilin Province, China.


Subject(s)
Ancylostomatoidea , Ascaris lumbricoides , China , Clonorchis sinensis , Cooperative Behavior , Diphyllobothrium , Eggs , Entamoeba , Enterobius , Female , Giardia lamblia , Humans , Male , Ovum , Paragonimus , Parasites , Prevalence , Trematoda , Trichostrongylus , Trichuris
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-207495

ABSTRACT

Paleopathologists have begun exploring the pathoecology of parasitic diseases in relation to diet and environment. We are summarizing the parasitological findings from a mummy in the site of Lapa do Boquete, a Brazilian cave in the state of Minas Gerais. These findings in context of the archaeology of the site provided insights into the pathoecology of disease transmission in cave and rockshelter environments. We are presenting a description of the site followed by the evidence of hookworm, intestinal fluke, and Trypanosoma infection with resulting Chagas disease in the mummy discovered in the cave. These findings are used to reconstruct the transmission ecology of the site.


Subject(s)
Ancylostomatoidea , Archaeology , Brazil , Chagas Disease , Diet , Echinostoma , Ecology , Mummies , Parasites , Parasitic Diseases , Trematoda , Trypanosoma
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-166325

ABSTRACT

Hookworm infections as well as other intestinal nematodiases are endemic in China. In this case, a 70-year-old male showed symptoms of chest tightness, shortness of breath, and both lower extremities edema. The diagnostic result was chronic renal insufficiency, chronic kidney disease (5th stage), and renal anemia at first. Then, he received treatment with traditional drugs. However, this treatment did not help to alleviate the symptoms of the patient significantly. The results of gastroendoscopy showed hookworms in the duodenum, also confirmed by pathology examination. Anemia was markedly ameliorated after eliminating the parasites. The results mentioned above suggested that ancylostomiasis was the leading causes of anemia in this patient, and the etiology of anemia in uremic patients should be systematically considered. Especially when anemia could not be cured by regular treatments, rare diseases should be investigated.


Subject(s)
Aged , Ancylostomatoidea , Ancylostomiasis , Anemia , China , Duodenum , Dyspnea , Edema , Hookworm Infections , Humans , Lower Extremity , Male , Parasites , Pathology , Peritoneal Dialysis , Rare Diseases , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Thorax
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-99319

ABSTRACT

To know the infection status of helminths in primary schoolchildren of southern parts of Vietnam, we performed an epidemiological study in Krong Pac district, Dak Lak Province, Vietnam. A total of 1,206 stool specimens were collected from ethnic Ede schoolchildren in 4 primary schools in 2015 and examined by the Kato-Katz technique. In addition, stool cultures were done by the Harada-Mori method to obtain hookworm larvae and then to clarify the species of hookworms infected. The results showed that the helminth infection rate was 25.0%, including 2.0% Ascaris lumbricoides, 0.33% Trichuris trichiura, and 22.8% hookworm infections. The average intensity of infection was 102.0 eggs per gram of feces (EPG) for Ascaris, 36.0 EPG for Trichuris, and 218.0 EPG for hookworms. ITS1 gene sequences of the hookworm larvae were identical with those of Necator americanus (100% homology) reported in GenBank. It has been confirmed in this study that the hookworm, N. americanus, is a dominant helminth species infected in primary schoolchildren of a southern part of Vietnam. Public health attention is needed for control of hookworm infections among schoolchildren in surveyed areas of Vietnam.


Subject(s)
Ancylostomatoidea , Ascaris , Ascaris lumbricoides , Databases, Nucleic Acid , Eggs , Epidemiologic Studies , Feces , Helminths , Hookworm Infections , Humans , Larva , Methods , Necator americanus , Ovum , Prevalence , Public Health , Trichuris , Vietnam
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-99311

ABSTRACT

A 26-year-old male member of the Australian Defense Force presented with a history of central abdominal pain of 4 weeks duration and peripheral eosinophilia consistent with eosinophilic enteritis. Acute hookworm disease was diagnosed as the cause. Adult worms recovered from feces after therapy with albendazole were morphologically consistent with Ancylostoma ceylanicum. As the patient had been deployed with the Regional Assistance Mission to Solomon Islands for 6 months prior to this presentation, it is very likely that the A. ceylanicum was acquired in Solomon Islands. Until now, it has been assumed that any Ancylostoma spp. recovered from humans in Solomon Islands is A. duodenale. However, this case demonstrates that human hookworm infection acquired in the Solomon Islands could be caused by A. ceylanicum.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Pain , Adult , Albendazole , Ancylostoma , Ancylostomatoidea , Enteritis , Eosinophilia , Eosinophils , Feces , Hookworm Infections , Humans , Male , Melanesia , Military Personnel
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-72759

ABSTRACT

Mus musculus (Rodentia: Muridae) has generally been infected with a rodent hookworm Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. In this report, we present morphological and molecular identification of N. brasiliensis by light and scanning electron microscopy and PCR amplification of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene and the protein sequences encoded by cox1 gene, respectively. Despite the use of N. brasiliensis in many biochemistry studies from India, their taxonomic identification was not fully understood, especially at the species level, and no molecular data is available in GenBank from India. Sequence analysis of cox1 gene in this study revealed that the present specimen showed close identity with the same species available in GenBank, confirming that the species is N. brasiliensis. This study represents the first record of molecular identification of N. brasiliensis from India and the protein structure to better understand the comparative phylogenetic characteristics.


Subject(s)
Ancylostomatoidea , Animals , Biochemistry , Databases, Nucleic Acid , Electron Transport Complex IV , India , Mice , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Nippostrongylus , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Rodentia , Sequence Analysis
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL