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2.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 115: e190396, 2020. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1101277

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Nanoparticles (NPs) are viable candidates as carriers of exogenous materials into cells via transfection and can be used in the DNA vaccination strategy against leptospirosis. OBJECTIVES We evaluated the efficiency of halloysite clay nanotubes (HNTs) and amine-functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (NH2-MWCNTs) in facilitating recombinant LemA antigen (rLemA) expression and protecting Golden Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) against Leptospira interrogans lethal infection. METHODS An indirect immunofluorescent technique was used to investigate the potency of HNTs and NH2-MWCNTs in enhancing the transfection and expression efficiency of the DNA vaccine in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Hamsters were immunised with two doses of vaccines HNT-pTARGET/lemA, NH2-MWCNTs-pTARGET/lemA, pTARGET/lemA, and empty pTARGET (control), and the efficacy was determined in terms of humoral immune response and protection against a lethal challenge. FINDINGS rLemA DNA vaccines carried by NPs were able to transfect CHO cells effectively, inducing IgG immune response in hamsters (p < 0.05), and did not exhibit cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, 83.3% of the hamsters immunised with NH2-MWCNTs-pTARGET/lemA were protected against the lethal challenge (p < 0.01), and 66.7% of hamsters immunised with HNT-pTARGET/lemA survived (p < 0.05). MAIN CONCLUSIONS NH2-MWCNTs and HNTs can act as antigen carriers for mammalian cells and are suitable for DNA nanovaccine delivery.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Bacterial Proteins/administration & dosage , Transcription Factors/administration & dosage , Bacterial Vaccines/administration & dosage , Vaccines, DNA/administration & dosage , Leptospirosis/prevention & control , Antigens, Bacterial/administration & dosage , Bacterial Proteins/immunology , Transcription Factors/immunology , Bacterial Vaccines/immunology , Cricetinae , Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Nanoparticles , Leptospira interrogans/immunology , Leptospirosis/immunology , Antibodies, Bacterial/immunology , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology
3.
Braz. j. infect. dis ; 23(4): 246-253, July-Aug. 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1039236

ABSTRACT

Abstract Accurate and rapid diagnostic tools are important aspects of managing tuberculosis (TB) cases appropriately. However, the sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic kits based on immune response such as the tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon gamma release assay (IGRA) are still debated. Thus, the exploration and assessment of specific biomarker-targeted antibodies are needed for the development of an accurate and rapid diagnostic tool. The present study was conducted in patients with a respiratory problem suspected to be TB at Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia. Among 102 patients tested by GeneXpert and AFB, 59 serum samples were from cases retrospectively determined to have active TB. A total of 102 serum of healthy controls (HC) was also collected. The PPD antigen and the recombinant CFP-10 and ESAT-6 proteins were prepared. Antibody responses against these proteins were evaluated by ELISA. All samples were also screened for the possibility of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) infection using Capilla MaC kit. The results showed that TB patients had a significantly higher concentration of IgG antibody in response to PPD than the HC. In addition, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that PPD was acceptable for diagnostic purposes with an AUC value of 0.835 (95% CI 0.770-0.900, p < 0.0001). However, ESAT-6 and CFP-10 had low AUCs, and 32 samples from both groups showed a low concentration of IgA antibody against all antigens. The MAC detection results also showed that the concentration of IgA in the HC group was the highest. The current results indicate that PPD is a better antigen for antibody-based detection of TB than ESAT-6 and CFP-10. Based on the MAC detection assay, 53 people in the HC group were probably infected with rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), although antibody response to PPD was low.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Child , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Young Adult , Bacterial Proteins/immunology , Tuberculin/immunology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/diagnosis , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/microbiology , Antibody Formation/immunology , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/immunology , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , Reference Values , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/blood , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Tuberculin Test , Case-Control Studies , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity , Statistics, Nonparametric , Indonesia
4.
Braz. j. infect. dis ; 23(3): 151-159, May-June 2019. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1019551

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Background: HIV infection harms adaptive cellular immunity mechanisms. Long-term virological control by combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) reduces the risk of mycobacterial infections. Thus, we aimed to study cellular responses to mycobacterial antigens in 20 HIV-infected adolescents with at least one year of virological control (HIV-RNA <40 copies/mL) and 20 healthy adolescents. Methods: We evaluated CD8 and γδ T-cell degranulation by measurement of CD107a membrane expression after stimulation with lysates from BCG (10 µg/mL) and H37RA Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, 10 µg/mL). Immune activation and antigen-presenting ability were also assessed by determination of HLA-DR, CD80, and CD86 markers. Results: TCR γδ T-cell CD107a expression was similar between groups in response to mycobacterial antigens, and lower in the HIV-infected group in response to mitogen. Higher baseline HLA-DR expression and lower mycobacterial-stimulated expression was found within the HIV-infected group. Conclusions: Similar degranulation in stimulated CD8+ and TCR γδ T-cells from HIV-infected adolescents, when compared to healthy controls suggests long-term immunological preservation with immune reconstitution under successful cART. However, differences in HLA-DR expression may represent ongoing inflammation and lower specific responses in HIV-infected youth. These features may be relevant in the context of the precocity and severity of vertically acquired HIV infection.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Young Adult , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, alpha-beta/immunology , AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Anti-HIV Agents/therapeutic use , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/immunology , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , Tuberculosis/immunology , Biomarkers/blood , Cross-Sectional Studies , Prospective Studies , Immunophenotyping , Antigen Presentation/immunology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Antigens, Bacterial/drug effects
5.
Braz. j. infect. dis ; 22(6): 462-471, Nov.-Dec. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-984018

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT The Region of D eletion 2 (RD2) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes reserved antigens that contribute to bacterial virulence. Among these antigens, Rv1983, Rv1986, Rv1987, and Rv1989c have been shown to be immunodominant in infected cattle; however, their diagnostic utility has not been evaluated in humans.In this study, we screened 87 overlapping synthetic peptides encoded by five RD2 proteins for diagnosing tuberculosis epitopes in 50 active tuberculosis (TB) cases, 31 non-tuberculosis patients and 36 healthy individuals. A pool of promising epitopes was then assessed for their diagnostic value in 233 suspected TB patients using a whole blood IFN-γ release assay.Only 10 peptides were recognized by more than 10% of active tuberculosis patients. The IFN-γ release responses to Rv1986-P9, P15, P16, Rv1988-P4, P11, and Rv1987-P11 were significantly higher in the active TB group than in the control groups (p < 0.05). The whole blood IFN-γ release assay based on these epitopes yielded a sensitivity of 51% and a specificity of 85% in diagnosing active tuberculosis, and the corresponding results using the T-SPOT.TB assay were 76% and 75%, respectively.In conclusion, these results suggest that the six epitopes from the RD2 of M. tuberculosis have potential diagnostic value in TB.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Young Adult , Bacterial Proteins/immunology , Tuberculosis/diagnosis , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/immunology , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , Bacterial Proteins/blood , Tuberculosis/immunology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/diagnosis , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/immunology , Case-Control Studies , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/blood , Antigens, Bacterial/blood
6.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 48(4): 774-781, Oct.-Dec. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889161

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Food-borne diseases, caused by the pathogenic bacteria, are highly prevalent in the world. Salmonella is one of the most important bacterial genera responsible for this. Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is one of the non-typhoid Salmonellae that can be transmitted to human from poultry products, water, and contaminated food. In recent years, new and rapid detection methods such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been developed. In this study, recombinant FliC (rFliC) was produced to be used as an antigen. The immunization was conducted in mice with the purified recombinant FliC (rFliC). The mice were subcutaneously immunized with rFliC and elicited significant rFliC specific serum IgG antibodies. An indirect ELISA system was established for the detection of Salmonella Enteritidis. Our results confirmed that the recombinant flagellin can be one of the excellent indicators for the detection of Salmonella Enteritidis.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Mice , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Flagellin/analysis , Salmonella enteritidis/isolation & purification , Antibodies, Bacterial/analysis , Antibodies, Bacterial/immunology , Antigens, Bacterial/analysis , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , Bacterial Proteins/analysis , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , Bacterial Proteins/immunology , Flagellin/genetics , Flagellin/immunology , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Salmonella enteritidis/genetics , Salmonella enteritidis/immunology
7.
Braz. j. infect. dis ; 21(6): 620-626, Nov.-Dec. 2017. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-888922

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objectives: The plague, which is an infectious disease caused by Yersinia pestis, still threatens many populations in several countries. The worldwide increase in human plague cases and the potential use of the bacteria as a biological weapon reinforce the need to study the immunity that is induced by potential vaccine candidates. To determine the immunogenicity of antigenic preparations based on the F1 protein and the total extract from Y. pestis, we assessed the role of these antigens in inducing an immune response. Methods: The immunogenicity of antigenic preparations based on the Y. pestis (YP) total extract and the Y. pestis fraction 1 capsular antigen protein (F1) was determined in Swiss-Webster mice immunized with 40 µg or 20 µg for each preparation. Immunophenotyping was performed by flow cytometry. Results: Animals immunized with the YP total extract did not elicit detectable anti-F1 antibodies (Ab) in the hemaglutination/inhibition (HA/HI) test. Animals immunized with 40 µg or 20 µg of the F1 protein produced anti-F1 Abs, with titres ranging from 1/16 to 1/8132. The average of CD3+-CD4+ and CD3+-CD8+ T cells did not differ significantly between the groups. Neither YP total extract nor F1 protein induced a significant expression of IFN-γ and IL-10 in CD4+ T lymphocytes. In addition, F1 failed to induce IFN-γ expression in CD8+ T cells, unlike the YP total extract. Conclusion: The results showed that F1 protein is not an immunogenic T cell antigen, although the YP total extract (40 µg dose) favoured CD8+ T cell-mediated cellular immunity.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Rats , Spleen/immunology , Yersinia pestis/immunology , Plague Vaccine/immunology , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , Plague/prevention & control , Spleen/cytology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Immunophenotyping , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interleukin-10/immunology , CD4-CD8 Ratio , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes , Flow Cytometry , Immunity, Cellular
8.
Braz. j. infect. dis ; 21(5): 557-561, Sept.-Oct. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1039204

ABSTRACT

Abstract Considering that the main route of Mycobacterium leprae transmission is the upper respiratory tract, detection of salivary antibodies can be a useful tool for diagnosing early infection. The study aimed to analyze salivary anti-PGL-1 IgA and IgM antibodies in 169 children aged 4-16 years old, who lived nearby or inside the house of multibacillary or paucibacillary leprosy patients in two endemic cities in Alagoas State - Brazil. Salivary anti-PGL-1 antibodies were quantified by modified ELISA method. The frequency of contact and clinical form of the index case were significantly associated with salivary antibody levels. High frequency of IgM positivity strongly suggests active transmission of M. leprae in these communities. We suggest in the present work that salivary anti-PGL IgA and IgM are important biomarkers to be used for identifying communities with probable active transmission of M. leprae.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Child, Preschool , Child , Adolescent , Glycolipids/analysis , Family , Contact Tracing , Leprosy, Multibacillary/diagnosis , Antibodies, Bacterial/administration & dosage , Antigens, Bacterial/analysis , Saliva/immunology , Saliva/chemistry , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Glycolipids/immunology , Leprosy, Paucibacillary/diagnosis , Mycobacterium leprae/immunology , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology
10.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 112(2): 123-130, Feb. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-841767

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Bovine tuberculosis (TB) is a zoonotic disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis, responsible for causing major losses in livestock. A cost effective alternative to control the disease could be herd vaccination. The bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine has a limited efficacy against bovine TB, but can improved by over-expression of protective antigens. The M. bovis antigen 85B demonstrates ability to induce protective immune response against bovine TB in animal models. However, current systems for the construction of recombinant BCG expressing multiple copies of the gene result in strains of low genetic stability that rapidly lose the plasmid in vivo. Employing antibiotic resistance as selective markers, these systems also compromise vaccine safety. We previously reported the construction of a stable BCG expression system using auxotrophic complementation as a selectable marker. OBJECTIVES The fundamental aim of this study was to construct strains of M. bovis BCG Pasteur and the auxotrophic M. bovis BCG ΔleuD expressing Ag85B and determine their stability in vivo. METHODS Employing the auxotrophic system, we constructed rBCG strains that expressed M. bovis Ag85B and compared their stability with a conventional BCG strain in mice. Stability was measured in terms of bacterial growth on the selective medium and retention of antigen expression. FINDINGS The auxotrophic complementation system was highly stable after 18 weeks, even during in vivo growth, as the selective pressure and expression of antigen were maintained comparing to the conventional vector. MAIN CONCLUSION The Ag85B continuous expression within the host may generate a stronger and long-lasting immune response compared to conventional systems.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Mice , Plasmids/genetics , Plasmids/immunology , BCG Vaccine/genetics , BCG Vaccine/immunology , Genetic Vectors/immunology , Mycobacterium bovis/genetics , Mycobacterium bovis/immunology , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , Antigens, Bacterial/metabolism , Escherichia coli/genetics , Genetic Vectors , Mice, Inbred BALB C
11.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 31: e39, 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-839507

ABSTRACT

Abstract The present study compared IgA specificity against oral streptococci in colostrum and saliva samples. Sixty-two mother-and-child pairs were included; samples of colostrum (C) and saliva (MS) were collected from the mothers and saliva samples were collected from babies (BS). The specificity of IgA against Streptococcus mutans and S. mitis were analyzed by western blot. Only 30% of babies’ samples presented IgA reactivity to S. mutans, while 74 and 80% of MS and C, respectively, presented this response. IgA reactivity to S. mutans virulence antigens (Ag I/II, Gtf and GbpB) in positive samples showed differences between samples for Gtf and especially for GbpB (p < 0.05), but responses to Ag I/II were similar (p > 0.05). The positive response of Gtf-reactive IgA was different between C (90%) and MS (58%) samples (p < 0.05), but did not differ from BS (p > 0.05). GbpB was the least detected, with 48 and 26% of C and MS, and only 5% of BS samples presenting reactivity (p > 0.05). Eight percent of MS and C samples presented identical bands to SM in the same time-point. In conclusion, the differences of IgA response found between C and MS can be due to the different ways of stimulation, proliferation and transportation of IgA in those secretions. The colostrum has high levels of IgA against S. mutans virulence antigens, which could affect the installation and accumulation process of S. mutans, mainly by supplying anti-GbpB IgA to the neonate.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Infant, Newborn , Saliva/immunology , Streptococcus mutans/immunology , Immunoglobulin A, Secretory/analysis , Immunoglobulin A, Secretory/immunology , Colostrum/immunology , Streptococcus mitis/immunology , Saliva/microbiology , Bacterial Proteins/analysis , Bacterial Proteins/immunology , Virulence , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Glycoproteins/analysis , Glycoproteins/immunology , Blotting, Western , Analysis of Variance , Colostrum/microbiology , Glucosyltransferases/analysis , Glucosyltransferases/immunology , Mothers , Antibody Formation/immunology , Antigens, Bacterial/analysis , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-133739

ABSTRACT

Leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease that is caused by many serovars which are more than 200 in the world, is an emerging worldwide disease. Accurate and rapid diagnostic tests for leptospirosis are a critical step to diagnose the disease. There are some commercial kits available for diagnosis of leptospirosis, but the obscurity of a species- or genus-specific antigen of pathogenic Leptospira interrogans causes the reduced sensitivity and specificity. In this study, the polysaccharide derived from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of nonpathogenic Leptospira biflexa serovar patoc was prepared, and the antigenicity was confirmed by immunoblot and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The performance of the rapid diagnostic test (RDT) kit using the polysaccharide as a diagnostic antigen was evaluated in Korea, Bulgaria and Argentina. The sensitivity was 93.9%, 100%, and 81.0% and the specificity was 97.9%, 100%, and 95.4% in Korea (which is a rare region occurring with 2 serovars mostly), Bulgaria (epidemic region with 3 serovars chiefly) and Argentina (endemic region with 19 serovars mainly) respectively. These results indicate that this RDT is applicable for global diagnosis of leptospirosis. This rapid and effective diagnosis will be helpful for diagnosis and manage of leptospirosis to use and the polysaccharide of Leptospira may be called as genus specific antigen for diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , Argentina , Bulgaria , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Leptospira/isolation & purification , Leptospira interrogans/isolation & purification , Leptospirosis/diagnosis , Male , Polysaccharides/immunology , Reagent Kits, Diagnostic/standards , Republic of Korea , Sensitivity and Specificity
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-133738

ABSTRACT

Leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease that is caused by many serovars which are more than 200 in the world, is an emerging worldwide disease. Accurate and rapid diagnostic tests for leptospirosis are a critical step to diagnose the disease. There are some commercial kits available for diagnosis of leptospirosis, but the obscurity of a species- or genus-specific antigen of pathogenic Leptospira interrogans causes the reduced sensitivity and specificity. In this study, the polysaccharide derived from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of nonpathogenic Leptospira biflexa serovar patoc was prepared, and the antigenicity was confirmed by immunoblot and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The performance of the rapid diagnostic test (RDT) kit using the polysaccharide as a diagnostic antigen was evaluated in Korea, Bulgaria and Argentina. The sensitivity was 93.9%, 100%, and 81.0% and the specificity was 97.9%, 100%, and 95.4% in Korea (which is a rare region occurring with 2 serovars mostly), Bulgaria (epidemic region with 3 serovars chiefly) and Argentina (endemic region with 19 serovars mainly) respectively. These results indicate that this RDT is applicable for global diagnosis of leptospirosis. This rapid and effective diagnosis will be helpful for diagnosis and manage of leptospirosis to use and the polysaccharide of Leptospira may be called as genus specific antigen for diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , Argentina , Bulgaria , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Leptospira/isolation & purification , Leptospira interrogans/isolation & purification , Leptospirosis/diagnosis , Male , Polysaccharides/immunology , Reagent Kits, Diagnostic/standards , Republic of Korea , Sensitivity and Specificity
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-56503

ABSTRACT

The Brucella mdh gene was successfully cloned and expressed in E. coli. The purified recombinant malate dehydrogenase protein (rMDH) was reactive to Brucella-positive bovine serum in the early stage, but not reactive in the middle or late stage, and was reactive to Brucella-positive mouse serum in the late stage, but not in the early or middle stage of infection. In addition, rMDH did not react with Brucella-negative bovine or mouse sera. These results suggest that rMDH has the potential for use as a specific antigen in serological diagnosis for early detection of bovine brucellosis.


Subject(s)
Animals , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , Brucella abortus/enzymology , Brucellosis/diagnosis , Cattle , Cattle Diseases/diagnosis , Cloning, Molecular , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Escherichia coli/genetics , Malate Dehydrogenase/genetics , Mice , Recombinant Proteins/genetics
15.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 110(8): 989-995, Dec. 2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-769835

ABSTRACT

Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease caused by pathogenic spirochetes of theLeptospira genus. Vaccination with bacterins has severe limitations. Here, we evaluated the N-terminal region of the leptospiral immunoglobulin-like B protein (LigBrep) as a vaccine candidate against leptospirosis using immunisation strategies based on DNA prime-protein boost, DNA vaccine, and subunit vaccine. Upon challenge with a virulent strain ofLeptospira interrogans, the prime-boost and DNA vaccine approaches induced significant protection in hamsters, as well as a specific IgG antibody response and sterilising immunity. Although vaccination with recombinant fragment of LigBrep also produced a strong antibody response, it was not immunoprotective. These results highlight the potential of LigBrep as a candidate antigen for an effective vaccine against leptospirosis and emphasise the use of the DNA prime-protein boost as an important strategy for vaccine development.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cricetinae , Female , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , Bacterial Proteins/immunology , Bacterial Vaccines/immunology , Leptospira/immunology , Leptospirosis/prevention & control , Vaccination/methods , Adjuvants, Immunologic , Biopsy , Chlorocebus aethiops , Conserved Sequence , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Immunoglobulin A/genetics , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulins/genetics , Immunoglobulins/immunology , Kidney/pathology , Leptospirosis/immunology , Lung/pathology , Mesocricetus , Survival Analysis , Vero Cells , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/microbiology
16.
Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop ; 48(6): 739-745, Nov.-Dec. 2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-767834

ABSTRACT

Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Despite multidrug therapy, leprosy remains a public health issue. The intradermal Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine, Mitsuda test (lepromin skin test), and anti-phenolic glycolipid I (PGL-I) serology are widely used in leprosy studies and have shown great epidemiological value. METHODS: This longitudinal study evaluated the relative risks and benefits of these three tools by comparing results observed in household contacts (HHCs) of leprosy patients who developed leprosy with those of HHCs who did not in a population of 2,992 individuals monitored during a 10-year period. RESULTS : Seventy-five (2.5%) new leprosy cases were diagnosed, including 28 (0.9%) co-prevalent cases. Therefore, for the risk-benefit assessment, 47 (1.6%) HHCs were considered as truly diagnosed during follow-up. The comparison between healthy and affected contacts demonstrated that not only did BCG vaccination increase protection, but boosters also increased to 95% relative risk (RR) reduction when results for having two or more scars were compared with having no scars [RR, 0.0459; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.006-0.338]. Similarly, Mitsuda reactions >7mm in induration presented 7-fold greater protection against disease development compared to reactions of 0-3mm (RR, 0.1446; 95% CI, 0.0566-0.3696). In contrast, anti-PGL-I ELISA seropositivity indicated a 5-fold RR increase for disease outcome (RR, 5.688; 95% CI, 3.2412-9.9824). The combined effect of no BCG scars, Mitsuda reaction of <7mm, and seropositivity to anti-PGL-I increased the risk for leprosy onset 8-fold (RR, 8.109; 95% CI, 5.1167-12.8511). CONCLUSIONS: The adoption of these combined assays may impose measures for leprosy control strategies.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , BCG Vaccine/immunology , Contact Tracing/statistics & numerical data , Glycolipids/immunology , Leprosy/immunology , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Longitudinal Studies , Lepromin/immunology , Leprosy/prevention & control , Leprosy/transmission , Risk Assessment
17.
Braz. j. infect. dis ; 19(6): 636-642, Nov.-Dec. 2015.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-769619

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the etiologic agent of tuberculosis, one of the world's greatest cause of morbidity and mortality due to infectious disease. Many evolutionary mechanisms have contributed to its high level of adaptation as a host pathogen. Prior to become dormant, a group of about 50 genes related to metabolic changes are transcribed by the DosR regulon, one of the most complex and important systems of host-pathogen interaction. This genetic mechanism allows the mycobacteria to persist during long time periods, establishing the so-called latent infection. Even in the presence of a competent immune response, the host cannot eliminate the pathogen, only managing to keep it surrounded by an unfavorable microenvironment for its growth. However, conditions such as immunosuppression may reestablish optimal conditions for bacterial growth, culminating in the onset of active disease. The interactions between the pathogen and its host are still not completely elucidated. Nonetheless, many studies are being carried out in order to clarify this complex relationship, thus creating new possibilities for patient approach and laboratory screening.


Subject(s)
Humans , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , Bacterial Proteins/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Latent Tuberculosis/microbiology , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/physiology , Protein Kinases/immunology , Antigens, Bacterial/genetics , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , Immune Evasion , Immunologic Tests , Latent Tuberculosis/diagnosis , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/immunology , Protein Kinases/genetics
18.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 110(7): 914-920, Nov. 2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-764594

ABSTRACT

Leprosy inflammatory episodes [type 1 (T1R) and type 2 (T2R) reactions] represent the major cause of irreversible nerve damage. Leprosy serology is known to be influenced by the patient’s bacterial index (BI) with higher positivity in multibacillary patients (MB) and specific multidrug therapy (MDT) reduces antibody production. This study evaluated by ELISA antibody responses to leprosy Infectious Disease Research Institute diagnostic-1 (LID-1) fusion protein and phenolic glycolipid I (PGL-I) in 100 paired serum samples of 50 MB patients collected in the presence/absence of reactions and in nonreactional patients before/after MDT. Patients who presented T2R had a median BI of 3+, while MB patients with T1R and nonreactional patients had median BI of 2.5+ (p > 0.05). Anti-LID-1 and anti-PGL-I antibodies declined in patients diagnosed during T1R (p < 0.05). Anti-LID-1 levels waned in MB with T2R at diagnosis and nonreactional MB patients (p < 0.05). Higher anti-LID-1 levels were seen in patients with T2R at diagnosis (vs. patients with T1R at diagnosis, p = 0.008; vs. nonreactional patients, p = 0.020) and in patients with T2R during MDT (vs. nonreactional MB, p = 0.020). In MB patients, high and persistent anti-LID-1 antibody levels might be a useful tool for clinicians to predict which patients are more susceptible to develop leprosy T2R.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Antibodies, Bacterial/blood , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , Glycolipids/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Leprosy, Multibacillary/diagnosis , Antibodies, Bacterial/immunology , Disease Susceptibility , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Mycobacterium leprae/immunology
19.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 110(5): 655-661, Aug. 2015. ilus
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-755889

ABSTRACT

Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the connection of innate and adaptive immunity of hosts to mycobacterial infection. Studies on the interaction of monocyte-derived DCs (MO-DCs) using Mycobacterium leprae in leprosy patients are rare. The present study demonstrated that the differentiation of MOs to DCs was similar in all forms of leprosy compared to normal healthy individuals. In vitro stimulation of immature MO-DCs with sonicated M. leprae induced variable degrees of DC maturation as determined by the increased expression of HLA-DR, CD40, CD80 and CD86, but not CD83, in all studied groups. The production of different cytokines by the MO-DCs appeared similar in all of the studied groups under similar conditions. However, the production of interleukin (IL)-12p70 by MO-DCs from lepromatous (LL) leprosy patients after in vitro stimulation with M. lepraewas lower than tuberculoid leprosy patients and healthy individuals, even after CD40 ligation with CD40 ligand-transfected cells. The present cumulative findings suggest that the MO-DCs of LL patients are generally a weak producer of IL-12p70 despite the moderate activating properties ofM. leprae. These results may explain the poor M. leprae-specific cell-mediated immunity in the LL type of leprosy.

.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Male , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Leprosy, Lepromatous/immunology , Monocytes/immunology , Mycobacterium leprae/immunology , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , Case-Control Studies , In Vitro Techniques , /immunology , Retrospective Studies
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-44468

ABSTRACT

Fucoidan is a sulfated polysaccharide derived from brown seaweed, including Fucus vesiculosus. This compound is known to have immunostimulatory effects on various types of immune cells including macrophages and dendritic cells. A recent study described the application of fucoidan as a vaccine adjuvant. Vaccination is regarded as the most efficient prophylactic method for preventing harmful or epidemic diseases. To increase vaccine efficacy, effective adjuvants are needed. In the present study, we determined whether fucoidan can function as an adjuvant using vaccine antigens. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that fucoidan increases the expression of the activation markers major histocompatibility complex class II, cluster of differentiation (CD)25, and CD69 in spleen cells. In combination with Bordetella bronchiseptica antigen, fucoidan increased the viability and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production of spleen cells. Furthermore, fucoidan increased the in vivo production of antigen-specific antibodies in mice inoculated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigen. Overall, this study has provided valuable information about the use of fucoidan as a vaccine adjuvant.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Immunologic/pharmacology , Animals , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , Bacterial Vaccines/administration & dosage , Biomarkers/metabolism , Bordetella bronchiseptica/immunology , Cells, Cultured , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Flow Cytometry , Fucus/chemistry , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae/immunology , Polysaccharides/pharmacology , Spleen/metabolism
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