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1.
Neuroscience Bulletin ; (6): 1529-1541, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-922669

ABSTRACT

The cerebellum is conceptualized as a processor of complex movements and is also endowed with roles in cognitive and emotional behaviors. Although the axons of deep cerebellar nuclei are known to project to primary thalamic nuclei, macroscopic investigation of the characteristics of these projections, such as the spatial distribution of recipient zones, is lacking. Here, we studied the output of the cerebellar interposed nucleus (IpN) to the ventrolateral (VL) and centrolateral (CL) thalamic nuclei using electrophysiological recording in vivo and trans-synaptic viral tracing. We found that IpN stimulation induced mono-synaptic evoked potentials (EPs) in the VL but not the CL region. Furthermore, both the EPs induced by the IpN and the innervation of IpN projections displayed substantial heterogeneity across the VL region in three-dimensional space. These findings indicate that the recipient zones of IpN inputs vary between and within thalamic nuclei and may differentially control thalamo-cortical networks.


Subject(s)
Axons , Cerebellar Nuclei , Cerebellum , Thalamic Nuclei
2.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-921772

ABSTRACT

When ischemia or hemorrhagic stroke occurs, astrocytes are activated by a variety of endogenous regulatory factors to become reactive astrocytes. Subsequently, reactive astrocytes proliferate, differentiate, and migrate around the lesion to form glial scar with the participation of microglia, neuron-glial antigen 2(NG2) glial cells, and extracellular matrix. The role of glial scars at different stages of stroke injury is different. At the middle and late stages of the injury, the secreted chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and chondroitin sulfate are the main blockers of axon regeneration and nerve function recovery. Targeted regulation of glial scars is an important pathway for neurological rehabilitation after stroke. Chinese medicine has been verified to be effective in stroke rehabilitation in clinical practice, possibly because it has the functions of promoting blood resupply, anti-inflammation, anti-oxidative stress, inhibiting cell proliferation and differentiation, and benign intervention in glial scars. This study reviewed the pathological process and signaling mechanisms of glial scarring after stroke, as well as the intervention of traditional Chinese medicine upon glial scar, aiming to provide theoretical reference and research evidence for developing Chinese medicine against stroke in view of targeting glial scarring.


Subject(s)
Astrocytes , Axons/pathology , Cicatrix/pathology , Gliosis/pathology , Humans , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , Nerve Regeneration , Stroke/drug therapy
3.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 2710-2720, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-921234

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND@#Histological and functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is of significant clinical value as delayed surgical repair and longer distances to innervate terminal organs may account for poor outcomes. Low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy (LiESWT) has already been proven to be beneficial for injured tissue recovery on various pathological conditions. The objective of this study was to explore the potential effect and mechanism of LiESWT on PNI recovery.@*METHODS@#In this project, we explored LiESWT's role using an animal model of sciatic nerve injury (SNI). Shockwave was delivered to the region of the SNI site with a special probe at 3 Hz, 500 shocks each time, and 3 times a week for 3 weeks. Rat Schwann cells (SCs) and rat perineurial fibroblasts (PNFs) cells, the two main compositional cell types in peripheral nerve tissue, were cultured in vitro, and LiESWT was applied through the cultured dish to the adherent cells. Tissues and cell cultures were harvested at corresponding time points for a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence staining. Multiple groups were compared by using one-way analysis of variance followed by the Tukey-Kramer test for post hoc comparisons.@*RESULTS@#LiESWT treatment promoted the functional recovery of lower extremities with SNI. More nerve fibers and myelin sheath were found after LiESWT treatment associated with local upregulation of mechanical sensitive yes-associated protein (YAP)/transcriptional co-activator with a PDZ-binding domain (TAZ) signaling pathway. In vitro results showed that SCs were more sensitive to LiESWT than PNFs. LiESWT promoted SCs activation with more expression of p75 (a SCs dedifferentiation marker) and Ki67 (a SCs proliferation marker). The SCs activation process was dependent on the intact YAP/TAZ signaling pathway as knockdown of TAZ by TAZ small interfering RNA significantly attenuated this process.@*CONCLUSION@#The LiESWT mechanical signal perception and YAP/TAZ upregulation in SCs might be one of the underlying mechanisms for SCs activation and injured nerve axon regeneration.


Subject(s)
Animals , Axons , Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy , Nerve Regeneration , Peripheral Nerve Injuries/therapy , Rats , Schwann Cells , Sciatic Nerve , Signal Transduction
4.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-879412

ABSTRACT

Perineuronal nets (PNNs) is a complex network composed of highly condensed extracellular matrix molecules surrounding neurons. It plays an important role in maintaining the performance of neurons and protecting them from harmful substances. However, after spinal cord injury, PNNs forms a physical barrier that surrounds the neuron and limits neuroplasticity, impedes axonal regeneration and myelin formation, and promotes local neuroinflammatory uptake. This paper mainly describes the composition and function of PNNs of neurons and its regulatory effects on axonal regeneration, myelin formation and neuroinflammation after spinal cord injury.


Subject(s)
Axons , Extracellular Matrix , Humans , Nerve Regeneration , Neuronal Plasticity , Neurons , Spinal Cord , Spinal Cord Injuries
5.
Int. j. morphol ; 38(2): 505-512, abr. 2020. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1056469

ABSTRACT

Sexual dimorphism exists at all levels of the nervous system. These sex differences could underlie genderrelated differences in behavior and neuropsychological function, as well as the gender differences in the prevalence of various mental disorders such as autism, attention deficit disorders, and schizophrenia. Myelination, on the other hand, is a unique cellular process that can have a dramatic impact on the structure and physiology of an axon and its surrounding tissue. The corpus callosum (CC) is the largest of the brain commissures, which connects the cerebral cortices of the two hemispheres, and provides interhemispheric connectivity for information transfer and processing between cortical regions. Variation in the axonal properties of CC will alter the interhemispheric connectivity. The CC consists of myelinated and unmyelinated axons, glial cells and blood vessels. Several functional studies have reported that the function of CC is associated with its axons density and myelination properties. The sexual dimorphism in the axonal content of the CC has always been controversial; hence, the aim of this study was to analyze the differences in axons' diameter and myelin sheath thickness of the CC between male and female rats. For this purpose, five pairs of adult male and female rats were perfused and the CC were removed and sectioned. Four sections from different subregions of the corpus callosum that represent the genu, anterior body, posterior body, and splenium of the CC were stained and electron microscopic images were captured using stereological guidelines. Later, the axons diameter and myelin sheath thickness for each subregion were calculated and compared between males and females. Our preliminary findings of the present study indicated region specific differences in the myelinated axon thickness and diameter in the CC between male and female rats.


El dimorfismo sexual existe en todos los niveles del sistema nervioso. Estas diferencias de sexo podrían ser la base de las diferencias de comportamiento y función neuropsicológica relacionadas con el sexo, así como las diferencias en la prevalencia de diversos trastornos mentales, como el autismo, los trastornos por déficit de atención y la esquizofrenia. La mielinización, por otro lado, es un proceso celular único que puede tener un impacto dramático en la estructura y fisiología de un axón y su tejido circundante. El cuerpo calloso (CC) es la mayor comisura cerebral, que conecta las cortezas cerebrales de ambos hemisferios, y proporciona la conectividad interhemisférica para la transferencia y el procesamiento de información entre regiones corticales. La variación en las propiedades axonales de CC alterará la conectividad interhemisférica. El CC consiste en axones mielinizados y no mielinizados, células gliales y vasos sanguíneos. Varios estudios funcionales han informado que la función de CC está asociada con la densidad de axones y las propiedades de mielinización. El dimorfismo sexual en el contenido axonal del CC siempre ha sido controvertido; por lo tanto, el objetivo de este estudio fue analizar las diferencias en el diámetro de los axones y el grosor de la vaina de mielina del CC entre ratas macho y hembra. Para este propósito, se perfundieron cinco pares de ratas macho y hembra adultas y se extrajeron y seccionaron las CC. Se tiñeron cuatro secciones de diferentes subregiones del cuerpo calloso que representan el genu, el cuerpo anterior, el cuerpo posterior y el esplenio y se capturaron imágenes de microscopía electrónicas utilizando referencias estereológicas. Posteriormente se calculó el diámetro de los axones y el grosor de la vaina de mielina para cada subregión y se compararon entre machos y hembras. Nuestros hallazgos preliminares del presente estudio indicaron diferencias específicas en el grosor y diámetro del axón mielinizado en el CC entre ratas macho y hembra.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Female , Rats , Axons/ultrastructure , Sex Characteristics , Corpus Callosum/ultrastructure , Myelin Sheath/ultrastructure , Microscopy, Electron , Corpus Callosum/cytology
6.
Rev. chil. neuro-psiquiatr ; 58(1): 50-60, mar. 2020.
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-1115470

ABSTRACT

Resumen Introducción: Este artículo presenta avances de la medicina regenerativa y la ingeniería de tejidos orientados a la regeneración de neuronas, de axones y nervios. Revisamos las técnicas que existen actualmente, las más utilizas o prometedoras, en la búsqueda de avances para regenerar este tipo de tejidos. Objetivo: Con esta revisión queremos describir el conocimiento actual sobre la medicina regenerativa y la ingeniería de tejidos orientados a la reparación de tejidos nerviosos. Metodología: Para desarrollar esta revisión se realizó una búsqueda de artículos entre los años 2007 y el 2018, la búsqueda se restringió a los artículos que incluyeran dentro de sus palabras clave; Ingeniería tisular, Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, Medicina regenerativa, Regeneración axonal, Regeneración neuronal, Regeneración tisular. Con el fin de seleccionar los artículos más adecuados, se realizó una búsqueda exhaustiva en bases de datos como Springer, Medline Ebsco y Science direct. Conclusiones: Se mencionan técnicas como implantación de injertos, terapia celular y terapia molecular e implantación de andamios 3D para regeneración de neuronas, axones y nervios; a partir de esta revisión pudimos observar que estas técnicas en su mayoría funcionan mejor cuando se combinan, aprovechando las ventajas de cada una para promover la regeneración de los diferentes tejidos nerviosos.


Introduction: This article presents advances in regenerative medicine aimed at the regeneration of nervous and neuronal tissue, focusing on regeneration of neurons, axons and nerve regeneration. We will review the techniques that currently exist, the most used or promising, in the search of advances to regenerate this type of tissues. Objective: With this review we want to describe the current knowledge about regenerative medicine and tissue engineering oriented to nerve tissue repair. Methodology: To carry out this review, a search of articles was carried out between 2007 and 2018, the search was restricted to the articles that they included within their keywords; Tissue Engineering, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Regenerative Medicine, Axonal Regeneration, Neuronal Regeneration, Tissue Regeneration. We will mention about techniques such as implantation. Conclusions: with this review we could observe that most of the mentioned techniques work better when combined, taking advantage of each one to promote a greater regeneration of the different tissues.


Subject(s)
Axons , Neurodegenerative Diseases , Tissue Engineering , Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy , Nerve Tissue , Neurons
7.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-828540

ABSTRACT

The intrinsic regrowth ability of injured neurons is essential for axon regeneration and functional recovery. Recently, numerous intrinsic pathways that regulate axon regeneration have been discovered, among which the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) pathway are arguably the best characterized examples. MAPK signaling pathway is involved in multiple processes including sensing injury signals, initiating and promoting axonal regrowth through regulating cytoskeleton dynamics and protein synthesis. The PI3K/Akt signaling pathway regulates axon regeneration mainly through gene transcription and translation. Combinatory manipulation of multiple regeneration-promoting signals can further improve the extend of axonal regrowth. This paper summarizes current progresses on axon regeneration studies in various organisms and discuss their potentials in promoting functional recovery .


Subject(s)
Axons , Physiology , Nerve Regeneration , Neurons , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases , Regeneration , Signal Transduction
8.
Rev. chil. neuro-psiquiatr ; 57(1): 64-69, mar. 2019. ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-1003679

ABSTRACT

Resumen Antecedentes: El virus linfotrópico T tipo I (HTLV-I) origina la paraparesia espástica tropical (PET) en el 3% de los infectados, afectando predominante mujeres. Excepcionalmente la PET puede asociar un síndrome vestibular central y atrofia cerebelosa. Propósito: Presentar un nuevo y excepcional caso de paraparesia espástica y atrofia cerebelosa. Sugerir una interpretación patogénica del predominio femenino en esta patología Paciente: Mujer de 20 años de talla baja y menuda, infectada con HTLV-I durante la lactancia. Aproximadamente a los 15 años inició un síndrome ataxo-espástico progresivo, con grave alteración de la marcha, posteriormente agregó daño cognitivo y atrofia cerebelosa en la RM. Se constató a su ingreso una elevada carga viral y altos niveles de proteína Tax. Fue tratada con 4 mg betametasona diarios durante 10 días, que mejoraron la marcha. Conclusión: La PET es una axonopatía de la vía motora central, originada por la crónica perturbación del transporte axoplásmico, atribuible a la presencia de elevados niveles de la proteína Tax del virus. Circunstancialmente este aumento de Tax logra dañar axones del centro oval (deterioro cognitivo) o del vermis cerebeloso (síndrome vestibular central). La PET afecta mayoritariamente a mujeres 3:1, prevalencia que hace aparecer a las mujeres con una mayor vulnerabilidad en su SNC. Sin embargo, esta aparente minusvalía, sería debida a un aumento en la concentración de Tax en el SNC de ellas, causado por la adversa relación entre peso corporal y cantidad absoluta de Tax, que fue evidente en nuestra paciente, quien dio la clave para esta hipótesis.


Background: Lymphotropic Virus Type I (HTLV-I) causes Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (PET) in 3% of infected patients; in whom have been described exceptionally associated a central vestibular syndrome and cerebellar atrophy. Those alterations of CNS are predominating in women. Purpose: To present a new case of the exceptional form of spastic paraparesis and cerebellar atrophy. To suggest a pathogenic interpretation of female predominance in this pathology Patient: A 20-year-old woman of small size, infected with HTLV-I during lactation. Approximately at 15 years of age he started a progressive ataxo-spastic syndrome, later cognitive damage and cerebellar atrophy were added. Upon admission, high viral load and high levels of Tax protein, leukemoid lymphocytes and Sicca syndrome were observed. Conclusion: PET is an axonopathy of the central motor pathway, originated by a chronic disturbance of axoplasmic transport, attributable to the action of elevated levels of Tax protein in the CNS. In addition axons of the oval center (cognitive impairment) or the cerebellar vermis (central vestibular syndrome) are occasionally damaged. Although PET mainly affects 3: 1 women, this prevalence increases in accordance with the increase of neurological damage. The apparent greater vulnerability of the CNS in women would be due to the higher concentration of Tax in the CNS of them, originated in the adverse relationship between body weight and absolute amount of Tax, which was evident in our patient, who gave the key to this hypothesis.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Adult , Atrophy , Axons , Syndrome , Human T-lymphotropic virus 1 , Paraparesis, Tropical Spastic
9.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 311-319, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-763773

ABSTRACT

Axon guidance molecules (AGMs), such as Netrins, Semaphorins, and Ephrins, have long been known to regulate axonal growth in the developing nervous system. Interestingly, the chemotactic properties of AGMs are also important in the postnatal period, such as in the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses. In particular, AGMs play pivotal roles in inflammation of the nervous system, by either stimulating or inhibiting inflammatory responses, depending on specific ligand-receptor combinations. Understanding such regulatory functions of AGMs in neuroinflammation may allow finding new molecular targets to treat neurodegenerative diseases, in which neuroinflammation underlies aetiology and progression.


Subject(s)
Axons , Ephrins , Inflammation , Nervous System , Neurodegenerative Diseases , Neuroglia , Semaphorins
10.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 362-375, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-763768

ABSTRACT

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a distinct neurodegenerative disease that associated with repetitive head trauma. CTE is neuropathologically defined by the perivascular accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in the depths of the sulci in the cerebral cortices. In advanced CTE, hyperphosphorylated tau protein deposits are found in widespread regions of brain, however the mechanisms of the progressive neurodegeneration in CTE are not fully understood. In order to identify which proteomic signatures are associated with CTE, we prepared RIPA-soluble fractions and performed quantitative proteomic analysis of postmortem brain tissue from individuals neuropathologically diagnosed with CTE. We found that axonal guidance signaling pathwayrelated proteins were most significantly decreased in CTE. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis showed that axonal signaling pathway-related proteins were down regulated in neurons and oligodendrocytes and neuron-specific cytoskeletal proteins such as TUBB3 and CFL1 were reduced in the neuropils and cell body in CTE. Moreover, oligodendrocyte-specific proteins such as MAG and TUBB4 were decreased in the neuropils in both gray matter and white matter in CTE, which correlated with the degree of axonal injury and degeneration. Our findings indicate that deregulation of axonal guidance proteins in neurons and oligodendrocytes is associated with the neuropathology in CTE. Together, altered axonal guidance proteins may be potential pathological markers for CTE.


Subject(s)
Axons , Blotting, Western , Brain Injury, Chronic , Brain , Cell Body , Cerebral Cortex , Craniocerebral Trauma , Cytoskeletal Proteins , Gray Matter , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Neurodegenerative Diseases , Neurons , Neuropathology , Neuropil , Oligodendroglia , tau Proteins , White Matter
11.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 390-403, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-763766

ABSTRACT

Memantine is a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist clinically approved for moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease (AD) to improve cognitive functions. There is no report about the proteomic alterations induced by memantine in AD mouse model yet. In this study, we investigated the protein profiles in the hippocampus and the cerebral cortex of AD-related transgenic mouse model (3×Tg-AD) treated with memantine. Mice (8-month) were treated with memantine (5 mg/kg/bid) for 4 months followed by behavioral and molecular evaluation. Using step-down passive avoidance (SDA) test, novel object recognition (NOR) test and Morris water maze (MWM) test, it was observed that memantine significantly improved learning and memory retention in 3xTg-AD mice. By using quantitative proteomic analysis, 3301 and 3140 proteins in the hippocampus and the cerebral cortex respectively were identified to be associated with AD abnormalities. In the hippocampus, memantine significantly altered the expression levels of 233 proteins, among which PCNT, ATAXIN2, TNIK, and NOL3 were up-regulated, and FLNA, MARK 2 and BRAF were down-regulated. In the cerebral cortex, memantine significantly altered the expression levels of 342 proteins, among which PCNT, PMPCB, CRK, and MBP were up-regulated, and DNM2, BRAF, TAGLN 2 and FRY1 were down-regulated. Further analysis with bioinformatics showed that memantine modulated biological pathways associated with cytoskeleton and ErbB signaling in the hippocampus, and modulated biological pathways associated with axon guidance, ribosome, cytoskeleton, calcium and MAPK signaling in the cerebral cortex. Our data indicate that memantine induces higher levels of proteomic alterations in the cerebral cortex than in the hippocampus, suggesting memantine affects various brain regions in different manners. Our study provides a novel view on the complexity of protein responses induced by memantine in the brain of AD.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease , Animals , Axons , Brain , Calcium , Cerebral Cortex , Cognition , Computational Biology , Cytoskeleton , Hippocampus , Learning , Memantine , Memory , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , N-Methylaspartate , Proteome , Ribosomes , Water
12.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 172-182, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-739545

ABSTRACT

Rheb (Ras homolog enriched in the brain) is a small GTPase protein that plays an important role in cell signaling for development of the neocortex through modulation of mTORC1 (mammalian-target-of-rapamycin-complex-1) activity. mTORC1 is known to control various biological processes including axonal growth in forming complexes at the lysosomal membrane compartment. As such, anchoring of Rheb on the lysosomal membrane via the farnesylation of Rheb at its cysteine residue (C180) is required for its promotion of mTOR activity. To test the significance of Rheb farnesylation, we overexpressed a farnesylation mutant form of Rheb, Rheb C180S, in primary rat hippocampal neurons and also in mouse embryonic neurons using in utero electroporation. Interestingly, we found that Rheb C180S maintained promotional effect of axonal elongation similar to the wild-type Rheb in both test systems. On the other hand, Rheb C180S failed to exhibit the multiple axon-promoting effect which is found in wild-type Rheb. The levels of phospho-4EBP1, a downstream target of mTORC1, were surprisingly increased in Rheb C180S transfected neurons, despite the levels of phosphorylated mTOR being significantly decreased compared to control vector transfectants. A specific mTORC1 inhibitor, rapamycin, also could not completely abolish axon elongation characteristics of Rheb C180S in transfected cells. Our data suggests that Rheb in a non-membrane compartment can promote the axonal elongation via phosphorylation of 4EBP1 and through an mTORC1-independent pathway.


Subject(s)
Animals , Axons , Biological Phenomena , Cysteine , Electroporation , GTP Phosphohydrolases , Hand , Membranes , Mice , Neocortex , Neurons , Phosphorylation , Prenylation , Protein Prenylation , Rats , Sirolimus , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases
13.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 119-129, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-739526

ABSTRACT

Adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) is a progressive degenerative white matter disorder caused by mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of the CSF1R gene. ALSP is often misdiagnosed as other diseases due to its rarity and various clinical presentations such as Parkinsonism, pyramidal signs, cognitive impairment and/or psychiatric symptoms. We describe an autopsy case of ALSP with a CSF1R mutation. A 61-year-old woman presented insidious-onset gait difficulty for 12 years since her age of 49, and premature ovarian failure since her age of 35. At initial hospital visit, brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed hydrocephalus. Initially, Parkinson's syndrome was diagnosed, and she was prescribed L-dopa/carbidopa because of spasticity and rigidity of extremities, which had worsened. Subsequently, severe neuropsychiatric symptoms and cognitive impairment developed and radiologically, features of leukoencephalopathy or leukodystrophy were detected. She showed a down-hill course and died, 12 years after initial diagnosis. At autopsy, the brain showed severe symmetric atrophy of bilateral white matter, paper-thin corpus callosum, thin internal capsule, and marked hydrocephalus. Microscopically, diffuse loss of white matter, relatively preserved subcortical U-fibers, and many eosinophilic bulbous neuroaxonal spheroids were noted, but there was no calcification. Pigmented glia with brown cytoplasmic pigmentation were readily found in the white matter, which were positive for Periodic acid-Schiff, p62, and CD163 stains, but almost negative for CD68. Whole-exome and Sanger sequencing revealed a CSF1R mutation (c.2539G>A, p.Glu847Lys) which was reported in prior one ALSP case. This example demonstrates that ALSP could be associated with premature ovarian failure.


Subject(s)
Atrophy , Autopsy , Axons , Brain , Cognition Disorders , Coloring Agents , Corpus Callosum , Cytoplasm , Diagnosis , Eosinophils , Extremities , Female , Gait , Humans , Hydrocephalus , Internal Capsule , Leukoencephalopathies , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Middle Aged , Muscle Spasticity , Neuroglia , Parkinsonian Disorders , Pigmentation , Primary Ovarian Insufficiency , Protein-Tyrosine Kinases , White Matter
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-739331

ABSTRACT

Recovery from central nervous system (CNS) injury, such as stroke or spinal cord injury (SCI), largely depends on axonal regeneration, and the neuronal and glial cells plasticity in the lesioned tissue. The lesioned tissue following CNS injury forms a scar that is composed of astrocytes and mixed with connective tissues. At the glial scar, the regenerating axon forms dystrophic endbulbs which do not regenerate and grow beyond the glial scar without a suitable environment. Along with the astrocytes, microglia are also suspected of being involved in necrotic and apoptotic neuronal cell death and the early response to axonal damage in CNS injury. The inflammatory response, a major component of secondary injury and controlled by the microglia, plays a pivotal role in nerve injury and control the regenerative response. As a result, it is very important to control the glial cell function in order to assure the recovery of the CNS injury. Studies have suggested that agmatine, a L-arginine derived primary amine, is a potential modulator of glial cell function after CNS injuries. Agmatine was found to possess anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective characteristics that benefited the rehabilitation process following CNS injury. In this review, we will discuss the effect of agmatine on glial cells in the process of recovery after CNS injury.


Subject(s)
Agmatine , Arginine , Astrocytes , Axons , Cell Death , Central Nervous System , Cicatrix , Connective Tissue , Microglia , Neuroglia , Neurons , Plastics , Regeneration , Rehabilitation , Spinal Cord Injuries , Stroke
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-739233

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Hearing loss disrupts the balance of auditory-somatosensory inputs in the cochlear nucleus (CN) of the brainstem, which has been suggested to be a mechanism of tinnitus. This disruption results from maladaptive auditory-somatosensory plasticity, which is a form of axonal sprouting. Axonal sprouting is promoted by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling, which can be inhibited by losartan. We investigated whether losartan prevents maladaptive auditory-somatosensory plasticity after hearing loss. METHODS: The study consisted of two stages: determining the time course of auditory-somatosensory plasticity following hearing loss and preventing auditory-somatosensory plasticity using losartan. In the first stage, rats were randomly divided into two groups: a control group that underwent a sham operation and a deaf group that underwent cochlea ablation on the left side. CNs were harvested 1 and 2 weeks after surgery. In the second stage, rats were randomly divided into either a saline group that underwent cochlear ablation on the left side and received normal saline or a losartan group that underwent cochlear ablation on the left side and received losartan. CNs were harvested 2 weeks after surgery. Hearing was estimated with auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). Western blotting was performed for vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), reflecting auditory input; vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2), reflecting somatosensory input; growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43), reflecting axonal sprouting; and p-Smad2/3. RESULTS: Baseline ABR thresholds before surgery ranged from 20 to 35 dB sound pressure level. After cochlear ablation, ABR thresholds were higher than 80 dB. In the first experiment, VGLUT2/VGLUT1 ratios did not differ significantly between the control and deaf groups 1 week after surgery. At 2 weeks after surgery, the deaf group had a significantly higher VGLUT2/VGLUT1 ratio compared to the control group. In the second experiment, the losartan group had a significantly lower VGLUT2/VGLUT1 ratio along with significantly lower p-Smad3 and GAP-43 levels compared to the saline group. CONCLUSION: Losartan might prevent axonal sprouting after hearing loss by blocking TGF-β signaling thereby preventing maladaptive auditory-somatosensory plasticity.


Subject(s)
Animals , Axons , Blotting, Western , Brain Stem , Cochlea , Cochlear Nucleus , Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem , GAP-43 Protein , Hearing Loss , Hearing , Losartan , Plastics , Rats , Tinnitus , Transforming Growth Factors , Vesicular Glutamate Transport Protein 1 , Vesicular Glutamate Transport Protein 2
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-739201

ABSTRACT

Schwannoma is a benign tumor rarely found in the head and neck and much less commonly found in the intraparotid facial nerve. It is a slow-growing encapsulated tumor originating from the Schwann cells or axonal nerve sheath. It can occur anywhere along the course of the facial nerve. Patients may present with symptoms of facial palsy, but the most common presenting symptom is an asymptomatic swelling. Diagnosis is usually difficult before surgical removal and histopathological examination. We report a rare case of intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma in a 57-year-old female who had sustained a mass of the right preauricular area for 3 years. She reported no pain or facial muscle weakness. Enhanced computed tomography findings revealed the impression of pleomorphic adenoma. However, intraoperative gross findings were not characteristic of pleomorphic adenoma, and a frozen biopsy was performed resulting in the impression of a nerve sheath tumor. We performed an extracapsular surgical excision without parotidectomy. Permanent histopathology and immunohistochemistry reports diagnosed the mass as schwannoma. There were no complications including facial palsy after surgery. No recurrence was found at 6 months after surgery


Subject(s)
Adenoma, Pleomorphic , Axons , Biopsy , Diagnosis , Facial Muscles , Facial Nerve , Facial Paralysis , Female , Head , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Middle Aged , Neck , Neurilemmoma , Parotid Gland , Recurrence , Schwann Cells
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-785833

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Recombinant amelogenin protein (RAP) was reported to induce soft-tissue regeneration in canine infected endodontically treated permanent teeth with open apices. To characterize identities of the cells found in the RAP regenerated tissues compared to authentic pulp by identifying: 1) stem cells by their expression of Sox2; 2) nerve fibers by distribution of the axonal marker peripherin; 3) axons by their expression of calcitonin gene–related peptide (CGRP); 4) the presence of astrocytes expressing glial fibrillary acidic proteins (GFAP).METHODS: A total of 240 open-apex root canals in dogs were used. After establishment of oral contamination to the pulp, the canals were cleaned, irrigated, and 120 canals filled with RAP, and the other 120 with calcium hydroxide.RESULTS: After 1, 3, and 6 months, teeth were recovered for immune-detection of protein markers associated with native pulp tissues. Regenerated pulp and apical papilla of RAP group revealed an abundance of stem cells showing intense immunoreactivity to Sox2 antibody, immunoreactivity of peripherin mainly in the A-fibers of the odontoblast layer and immunoreactivity to CGRP fibers in the central pulp region indicative of C-fibres. GFAP immunoreactivity was observed near the odontoblastic, cell-rich regions and throughout the regenerated pulp.CONCLUSIONS: RAP induces pulp regeneration following regenerative endodontic procedures with cells identity by gene expression demonstrating a distribution pattern similar to the authentic pulp innervation. A- and C-fibers, as well as GFAP specific to astrocytic differentiation, are recognized. The origin of the regenerated neural networks may be derived from the Sox2 identified stem cells within the apical papilla.


Subject(s)
Amelogenin , Animals , Astrocytes , Axons , Calcitonin , Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide , Calcium Hydroxide , Dental Pulp Cavity , Dental Pulp Necrosis , Dogs , Gene Expression , Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein , Nerve Fibers , Odontoblasts , Periapical Periodontitis , Regeneration , Stem Cells , Tooth
18.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 679-696, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-785789

ABSTRACT

Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes axonal damage and demyelination, neural cell death, and comprehensive tissue loss, resulting in devastating neurological dysfunction. Neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPCs) transplantation provides therapeutic benefits for neural repair in SCI, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been uncovered to have capability of stimulating axonal regeneration and remyelination after SCI. In this study, to evaluate whether GDNF would augment therapeutic effects of NSPCs for SCI, GDNF-encoding or mock adenoviral vector-transduced human NSPCs (GDNF-or Mock-hNSPCs) were transplanted into the injured thoracic spinal cords of rats at 7 days after SCI. Grafted GDNF-hNSPCs showed robust engraftment, long-term survival, an extensive distribution, and increased differentiation into neurons and oligodendroglial cells. Compared with Mock-hNSPC- and vehicle-injected groups, transplantation of GDNF-hNSPCs significantly reduced lesion volume and glial scar formation, promoted neurite outgrowth, axonal regeneration and myelination, increased Schwann cell migration that contributed to the myelin repair, and improved locomotor recovery. In addition, tract tracing demonstrated that transplantation of GDNF-hNSPCs reduced significantly axonal dieback of the dorsal corticospinal tract (dCST), and increased the levels of dCST collaterals, propriospinal neurons (PSNs), and contacts between dCST collaterals and PSNs in the cervical enlargement over that of the controls. Finally grafted GDNF-hNSPCs substantially reversed the increased expression of voltage-gated sodium channels and neuropeptide Y, and elevated expression of GABA in the injured spinal cord, which are involved in the attenuation of neuropathic pain after SCI. These findings suggest that implantation of GDNF-hNSPCs enhances therapeutic efficiency of hNSPCs-based cell therapy for SCI.


Subject(s)
Animals , Axons , Cell Death , Cell Movement , Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy , Cicatrix , Demyelinating Diseases , gamma-Aminobutyric Acid , Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor , Humans , Hyperalgesia , Myelin Sheath , Neuralgia , Neurites , Neuroglia , Neurons , Neuropeptide Y , Paraplegia , Pyramidal Tracts , Rats , Regeneration , Spinal Cord Injuries , Spinal Cord , Therapeutic Uses , Transplants , Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels
19.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-774223

ABSTRACT

Deep brain stimulation (DBS), which usually utilizes high frequency stimulation (HFS) of electrical pulses, is effective for treating many brain disorders in clinic. Studying the dynamic response of downstream neurons to HFS and its time relationship with stimulus pulses can reveal important mechanisms of DBS and advance the development of new stimulation modes (e.g., closed-loop DBS). To exhibit the dynamic neuronal firing and its relationship with stimuli, we designed a two-dimensional raster plot to visualize neuronal activity during HFS (especially in the initial stage of HFS). Additionally, the influence of plot resolution on the visualization effect was investigated. The method was then validated by investigating the neuronal responses to the axonal HFS in the hippocampal CA1 region of rats. Results show that the new design of raster plot is able to illustrate the dynamics of indexes (such as phase-locked relationship and latency) of single unit activity (i.e., spikes) during periodic pulse stimulations. Furthermore, the plots can intuitively show changes of neuronal firing from the baseline before stimulation to the onset dynamics during stimulation, as well as other information including the silent period of spikes immediately following the end of HFS. In addition, by adjusting resolution, the raster plot can be adapted to a large range of firing rates for clear illustration of neuronal activity. The new raster plot can illustrate more information with a clearer image than a regular raster plot, and thereby provides a useful tool for studying neuronal behaviors during high-frequency stimulations in brain.


Subject(s)
Action Potentials , Animals , Axons , Physiology , CA1 Region, Hippocampal , Physiology , Deep Brain Stimulation , Neurons , Physiology , Rats
20.
Chinese Journal of Biotechnology ; (12): 1361-1373, 2019.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-771793

ABSTRACT

After a long-term co-evolution, alphaherpesviruses have established mutual adaptability with their hosts. Some alphaherpesviruses have typical neurotropic characteristics, which have received extensive attention and in-depth research. Neurotropic alphaherpesviruses can break through the host barrier to infect neurons and multiply in large numbers in the neuron cell body to complete further proliferation or establish latent infection in the cell body. Either in the process of infecting neurons or further spreading, alphaherpesviruses will undergo transmission along axons or dendrites, so this process is an integral part of the life cycle of the viruses, and is also a key factor for the viruses to spread in nervous system. Therefore, studies on transportation of alphaherpesviruses in neurons will provide new insights of the viruses and promote the development of corresponding vaccines or targeted therapeutic pharmaceuticals. In addition, the neurotropism of alphaherpesviruses is conducive to the analysis of nerve circuits. Herein, the mechanisms of alphaherpesvirus transport in axons were reviewed, and the research direction and application of the transport of alphaherpesviruses in axons were put forward, which can provide reference for the prevention and control of alphaherpesviral infections.


Subject(s)
Alphaherpesvirinae , Axons , Neurons
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