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1.
Autops. Case Rep ; 10(2): e2020147, Apr.-June 2020. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1131811

ABSTRACT

In adults, B-lymphocytes comprise approximately 10% of circulating lymphocytes. The majority of peripheral B cells are B2 cells ("Mature" B-cells), which function as part of the humoral adaptive immune system. B1 cells ("Innate-like" B cells) are another sub-class of B lymphocytes, considered as innate immune cells with a characteristic phenotype (CD20+, CD27+, CD43+, CD70-, CD11b+, sIgM++, sIgD+) which can be divided into two subtypes; B1a (CD5+): spontaneously produce broadly reactive natural IgM, and B1b (CD5-): can generate T-cell independent, long-lasting IgM. There is very limited data available, indicating a correlation between allogeneic bone marrow transplantation and an increase in B1a cells. Here we present a case of a 17-year-old female with homozygous sickle cell disease (HbSS disease) who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Approximately seven months post-transplant, she was found to have 16% immature mononuclear cells on complete blood count (CBC)-differential report. A follow-up peripheral blood flow cytometry showed that these cells were polyclonal CD5+/CD20+ B-cells, and comprised 66% of lymphocytes. Further workup and follow up failed to reveal any lymphoproliferative disorders. It is important not to misdiagnose these cells as an atypical CD5+ lymphoproliferative disorder. The presence of B1a cells has not been widely reported in non-neoplastic post-stem cell transplanted patients. This case also adds to and expands our knowledge regarding the presence of increased circulating B1a cells after stem cell transplant in a patient with no history of hematological malignancy.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Adolescent , Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Blood Cell Count , Hematopoietic Stem Cells , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , B-Lymphocyte Subsets/pathology , Flow Cytometry , Anemia, Sickle Cell , Lymphoproliferative Disorders/diagnosis
3.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 109(8): 989-998, 12/2014. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-732605

ABSTRACT

Ethnic origin, genetics, gender and environmental factors have been shown to influence some immunologic indices, so that development of reference values for populations of different backgrounds may be necessary. We have determined the distribution of lymphocyte subsets in healthy Brazilian individuals from birth to adulthood. Lymphocyte subsets were determined using four-colour cytometry in a cross-sectional study of 463 human immunodeficiency virus-unexposed children and adults from birth through 49 years of age. Lymphocyte subsets varied according to age, as previously observed in other studies. However, total CD4+ T cell numbers were lower than what was described in the Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group P1009 (PACTG P1009), which assessed an American population of predominantly African and Hispanic backgrounds until the 12-18 year age range, when values were comparable. Naïve percentages and absolute values of CD8+ T cells, as assessed by CD45RA expression, were also lower than the PACTG P1009 data for all analysed age ranges. CD38 expression on both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was lower than the PACTG P1009 values, with a widening gap between the two studies at older age ranges. Different patterns of cell differentiation seem to occur in different settings and may have characteristic expression within each population.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult , /cytology , /cytology , Lymphocyte Subsets/cytology , Age Factors , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , Brazil , Clinical Trials as Topic , Cross-Sectional Studies , Flow Cytometry/methods , Healthy Volunteers , Killer Cells, Natural/cytology , Lymphocyte Count , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/cytology , Reference Values
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-144096

ABSTRACT

ABO discrepancy refers to an inconsistency between red cell and serum typings and has various causes, including hypogammaglobulinemia. IgM deficiency is a rare disorder that may accompany several conditions such as infection and autoimmune disorders. Here, we describe a case of IgM deficiency discovered during the evaluation of an ABO discrepancy in a 16-yr-old Korean boy. ABO blood grouping showed that while his cell type was O+, serum typing detected only anti-A (3+). Anti-B was not detectable at room temperature but was graded at 1+ at 4degrees C. ABO genotyping revealed an O/O genotype. His serum IgG, IgA, and IgM concentrations were 770 mg/dL (reference range: 800-1,700 mg/dL), 244 mg/dL (reference range: 100-490 mg/dL), and 13.5 mg/dL (reference range: 50-320 mg/dL), respectively. He was diagnosed with acute osteomyelitis on the basis of clinical presentation and imaging studies. The symptoms gradually improved within 3 weeks of treatment. However, the ABO discrepancy and IgM deficiency persisted even 6 months after recovery and lymphocyte subset analysis revealed CD19+ B cell deficiency. To the best of our knowledge, IgM deficiency detected by ABO discrepancy in a patient with acute osteomyelitis has not been reported before.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System/genetics , Acute Disease , Adolescent , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , Bone and Bones/diagnostic imaging , Genotype , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes/complications , Knee/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Osteomyelitis/complications , Radiopharmaceuticals
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-144089

ABSTRACT

ABO discrepancy refers to an inconsistency between red cell and serum typings and has various causes, including hypogammaglobulinemia. IgM deficiency is a rare disorder that may accompany several conditions such as infection and autoimmune disorders. Here, we describe a case of IgM deficiency discovered during the evaluation of an ABO discrepancy in a 16-yr-old Korean boy. ABO blood grouping showed that while his cell type was O+, serum typing detected only anti-A (3+). Anti-B was not detectable at room temperature but was graded at 1+ at 4degrees C. ABO genotyping revealed an O/O genotype. His serum IgG, IgA, and IgM concentrations were 770 mg/dL (reference range: 800-1,700 mg/dL), 244 mg/dL (reference range: 100-490 mg/dL), and 13.5 mg/dL (reference range: 50-320 mg/dL), respectively. He was diagnosed with acute osteomyelitis on the basis of clinical presentation and imaging studies. The symptoms gradually improved within 3 weeks of treatment. However, the ABO discrepancy and IgM deficiency persisted even 6 months after recovery and lymphocyte subset analysis revealed CD19+ B cell deficiency. To the best of our knowledge, IgM deficiency detected by ABO discrepancy in a patient with acute osteomyelitis has not been reported before.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System/genetics , Acute Disease , Adolescent , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , Bone and Bones/diagnostic imaging , Genotype , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes/complications , Knee/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Osteomyelitis/complications , Radiopharmaceuticals
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-39071

ABSTRACT

B-1 cells, which constitute a predominant lymphocyte subset in serosal cavities and produce most of natural antibodies, are subdivided into the CD5+ B-1a and CD5- B-1b cell subpopulations, but the differential roles of B-1a and B-1b cells are not well understood. We report that B-1a cells preferentially migrate out of the peritoneal cavity and upregulate the expression of CXCR4 with heightened sensitivity to CXCL12 and CXCL13 upon LPS treatment compared to B-1b and B-2 cells. Whereas B-1a cells were slightly more abundant than B-1b and B-2 cells in the homeostatic condition, the number of B-1a cells preferentially decreased 48 hr after LPS treatment. The decrease in the peritoneal B-1a cell number was accompanied with increased migration of B-1a cells toward CXCL-12 and CXCL-13 in in vitro transmigration assay using peritoneal B cells from LPS treated mice. The expression level of CXCR4, but not of CXCR5, was also more prominently increased in B-1a cells upon LPS stimulation. LPS-stimulated B-1a cells did not accumulate in omental milky spots in contrast to B-2 cells. These results suggest that B-1a cells actively migrate out of the peritoneal cavity through the regulation of the migratory responsiveness to chemokines and actively participate in systemic immune responses.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Immunologic/pharmacology , Animals , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , Cell Movement , Cells, Cultured , Chemokine CXCL12/metabolism , Chemokine CXCL13/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Peritoneal Cavity/cytology , Receptors, CXCR4/metabolism , Up-Regulation
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-93416

ABSTRACT

Previously, we demonstrated that the p190 Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (p190RhoGEF) was induced following CD40 stimulation of B cells. In this study, we examined whether p190RhoGEF and a downstream effector molecule RhoA are required for B cell differentiation. Expression of p190RhoGEF positively correlated with the expression of surface markers and transcriptional regulators that are characteristic of mature B cells with plasma cell (PC) phenotypes. Moreover, either the overexpression of p190RhoGEF or the expression of a constitutively active RhoA drove cellular differentiation toward PC phenotypes. B cell maturation was abrogated in cells that overexpressed p190RhoGEF and a dominant-negative form of RhoA simultaneously. CD40-mediated maturation events were also abrogated in cells that overexpressed either dominant-negative p190RhoGEF or RhoA. Together, these data provide evidence that p190RhoGEF signaling through RhoA in CD40-activated B cells drives the induction of the PC differentiation.


Subject(s)
Animals , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , Cell Differentiation/genetics , Cell Line , Cells, Cultured , Female , Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors/genetics , Humans , Lymphocyte Activation/genetics , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Plasma Cells/cytology , rhoA GTP-Binding Protein/genetics
9.
An. acad. bras. ciênc ; 81(3): 489-496, Sept. 2009. ilus
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-523976

ABSTRACT

Characterization of the origin, properties, functions and fate of cells is a fundamental task for the understanding of physiological and pathological phenomena. Despite the bulk of knowledge concerning the diverse characteristics of mammalian cells, some of them, such as B-1 cells, are still poorly understood. Here we report the results obtained in our laboratory on these cells in the last 10 years. After showing that B-1 cells could be cultured and amplified in vitro, a series of experiments were performed with these cells. They showed that B1 cells reside mostly in the peritoneal and pleural cavities, migrate to distant inflammatory foci, coalesce to form giant cells and participate in granuloma formation, both in vitro and in vivo. They are also able to present antigens to immunologically responsive cells and are endowed with regulatory properties. Further, we have also shown that these cells facilitate different types of infection as well as tumor growth and spreading. These data are presently reviewed pointing to a pivotal role that these cells may play in innate and acquired immunity.


A caracterização da origem, propriedades, funções e destino das células representam objetivo fundamental para a compreensão dos fenômenos fisiológicos e patológicos. Apesar da grande quantidade de conhecimentos relativos às diversas características das células de mamíferos, muitas delas, inclusive células B-1, são pouco entendidas. Depois de mostrar que as células B-1 podem ser cultivadas e amplificadas in vitro, uma série de experimentos visando esclarecer as propriedades dessas células puderam ser feitos em nosso laboratório nos últimos 10 anos. Assim, pudemos demonstrar que células B-1 residem principalmente nas cavidades peritoneal e pleural do camundongo, migram para focos inflamatórios distantes, coalescem para formar células gigantes e participam na formação de granulomas, tanto in vitro como in vivo. São também capazes de apresentar antígenos a células responsivas e são dotadas de propriedades imuno-regulatórias. Mostramos ainda que estas células favorecem diferentes tipos de infecções bem como o crescimento e metastatização tumoral. Esses resultados sugerem que células B-1 devem exercer papel central na imunidade como um todo.


Subject(s)
Animals , Mice , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Granuloma/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , Phagocytes/immunology , Antigen-Presenting Cells/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , Immunity, Cellular
10.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-66134

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We investigated the characteristics of the mononuclear cells remaining in the leukoreduction system (LRS) chambers of Trima Accel(R) in comparison with those of standard buffy coat cells, and evaluated their potential for differentiation into dendritic cells. METHODS: Twenty-six LRS chambers of Trima Accel(R) were collected after platelet pheresis from healthy adults. Flow cytometric analysis for T, B, NK, and CD14+ cells was performed and the number of CD34+ cells was counted. Differentiation and maturation into dendritic cells were induced using CD14+ cells seperated via Magnetic cell sorting (MACS(R)) Seperation (Miltenyi Biotec Inc., USA). RESULTS: Total white blood cell (WBC) count in LRS chambers was 10.8x108 (range 7.7-18.0x108). The median values (range) of proportions of each cells were CD4+ T cell 29.6% (18.7-37.6), CD8+ T cell 27.7% (19.2-40.0), B cell 5.5% (2.2-12.1), NK cell 15.7% (13.7-19.9), and CD14+ cells 12.4% (8.6-32.3) respectively. Although total WBC count was significantly higher in the buffy coat (whole blood of 400 mL) than the LRS chambers, the numbers of lymphocytes and monocytes were not statistically different. The numbers of B cells and CD4+ cells were significantly higher in the buffy coat than the LRS chambers (P<0.05). The median value (range) of CD34+ cells obtained from the LRS chambers was 0.9x10(6) (0.2-2.6x10(6)). After 7 days of cytokine-supplemented culture, the CD14+ cells were successfully differentiated into dendritic cells. CONCLUSIONS: The mononuclear cells in LRS chambers of Trima Accel(R) are an excellent alternative source of viable and functional human blood cells, which can be used for research purposes.


Subject(s)
Adult , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/cytology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/cytology , Cell Differentiation , Dendritic Cells/cytology , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/cytology , Plateletpheresis/instrumentation
11.
São Paulo; s.n; 16 dez. 2008. 137[22] p. ilus, graf, tab.
Thesis in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: lil-512972

ABSTRACT

A cavidade peritoneal de camundongos abriga uma variedade de células do sistema imune. Inicialmente, devido as limitações metodológicas, acreditava-se que, aproximadamente, 90% das células peritoneais era representada por macrófagos. Em seguida, graças aos extensos estudos com células peritoneais, observou-se que, além dos macrófagos, o peritônio abrigava muitos Linfócitos B, principalmente do subtipo B-1. Utilizando metodologias contemporâneas de FACS - citometria de fluxo, este trabalho mostra que, aproximadamente, 30% das células peritoneais são macrófagos, 55% são Iinfócitos B-1, dos quais 40% pertencem ao subtipo B-1a e 15% ao subtipo B-1b. Os 15% - 20% restantes representam outros subtipos celulares, como linfócitos T, linfócitos B-2, linfócitos NK, eosinófilos, além da presença de outras populações de células que não foram possíveis de ser identificadas com os marcadores de superfície utilizados neste trabalho. Em contraste com a literatura, nossos estudos mostraram que os macrófagos da cavidade peritoneal de camundongos representam uma população heterogênea...


Subject(s)
Mice , Peritoneal Cavity/cytology , In Vitro Techniques , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Macrophages, Peritoneal/cytology , Macrophages, Peritoneal/immunology , Phenotype , Biological Assay/methods , Flow Cytometry , Microscopy, Confocal/methods , Microscopy, Electron/methods
12.
Rio de Janeiro; s.n; 2008. 100 p.
Thesis in Portuguese, Portuguese | LILACS, Inca | ID: biblio-934269

ABSTRACT

A família de fatores de transcrição NFAT (Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells) apresenta um papel central na regulação de diversos genes relacionados com a resposta imune e recentemente foram implicados na proliferação e diferenciação de diversos tipos celulares. Nossos resultados mostram que os linfócitos B deficientes para NFAT1, quando estimulados pelo BCR, proliferavam mais, apresentavam um aumento do número de células na fase G1 do ciclo celular e um aumento na expressão dos genes das ciclinas A2, E1 e E2. Além disso, o silenciamento do NFAT1 aumentou a proliferação de uma linhagem celular de células B. Análises adicionais demonstraram que a expressão ectópica de NFAT1 em células CHO inibiu a proliferação celular, a expressão das ciclinas A2, E1 e E2, a formação de colônias in vitro e o crescimento tumoral in vivo. Juntos estes resultados indicam que o NFAT1 apresenta um papel de regulador negativo do ciclo celular.


The NFAT (Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells) family of transcription factors plays a central role in the regulation of several genes related to the immune response and has been recently implicated in the proliferation and differentiation of numerous cell types. Our results show that NFAT1-deficient Blymphocytes stimulated through BCR proliferate more, present an increase in the number of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and an up regulated expression of cyclins A2, E1 and E2 when compared to wild type. Also, silencing of NFAT1 increased the proliferation rate of a B cell line. Further analyses demonstrated that ectopic expression of NFAT1 in CHO cells inhibited cellular proliferation, cyclins A2, E1 and E2 expression, colony formation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Together, these results indicate NFAT1 as a negative regulator of the cell cycle.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes/cytology , Cell Cycle , Cyclins , NFATC Transcription Factors
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-15564

ABSTRACT

Flow cytometry was used to identify and characterize monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that react with rabbit leukocyte differentiation molecules (LDM). Screening sets of mAbs, developed against LDM in other species, for reactivity with rabbit LDM yielded 11 mAbs that recognize conserved epitopes on rabbit LDM orthologues and multiple mAbs that recognize epitopes expressed on the major histocompatibility class I or class II molecules. Screening of mAbs submitted to the Animal Homologues Section of the Eighth Human Leukocyte Differentiation Workshop yielded 7 additional mAbs. Screening of mAbs generated from mice immunized with leukocytes from rabbit thymus or spleen or concanavalin A activated peripheral blood and/or spleen lymphocytes has yielded 42 mAbs that recognize species restricted epitopes expressed on one or more lineages of leukocytes. Screening of the anti-rabbit mAbs against leukocytes from other species yielded one additional mAb. The studies show that screening of existing sets of mAbs for reactivity with rabbit LDM will not be productive and that a direct approach will be needed to develop mAbs for research in rabbits. The flow cytometric approach we developed to screen for mAbs of interest offers a way for individual laboratories to identify and characterize mAbs to LDM in rabbits and other species. A web-based program we developed provides a source of information that will facilitate analysis. It contains a searchable data base on known CD molecules and a data base on mAbs, known to react with LDM in one or more species of artiodactyla, equidae, carnivora, and or lagomorpha.


Subject(s)
Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antigens, Differentiation/metabolism , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , Basophils/cytology , Epitopes/genetics , Flow Cytometry , Gene Expression Regulation , Granulocytes/cytology , Leukocytes/immunology , Mice , Monocytes/cytology , Rabbits , T-Lymphocytes/cytology
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-9058

ABSTRACT

We investigated the characteristic features of cervical lymph node B cells to determine whether their behavior differs from that of B cells located elsewhere, because cervical lymph nodes may be exposed to continual antigenic stimulation from the naso- and/or oropharynx. B cells were isolated from cervical lymph nodes, spleen and peritoneal fluid of mice, cultured in medium, and exposed to various stimuli. The expression of various surface molecules characteristic of lymphoid B cells was assayed by flow cytometry, and immunoglobulin secreted into the culture supernatants was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. B220+ cells were cultured in medium alone or with lipopolysaccharide, and their entrance into S phase in response to stimuli was measured by proliferative assays. Phenotypic characteristics of cervical lymph node B cells included CD5low, CD23high, CD43low, B7.1low, B7.2low, and Syndecan-1low. Unstimulated lymphoid B cells did not secrete immunoglobulin, but, upon stimulation, secretion of IgM was increased more than secretion of IgA and IgG. B cells actively entered S phase after 48 hr stimulation. These results show that B cells in cervical lymph nodes are conventional B2 cells, like splenic B cells.


Subject(s)
Spleen/cytology , Phenotype , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice , Male , Lymph Nodes/cytology , Immunoglobulin M/chemistry , Flow Cytometry , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Culture Media/pharmacology , Cell Proliferation , Cell Culture Techniques/methods , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , Antigens/metabolism , Animals
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-191494

ABSTRACT

CD40 ligand (CD40L) expressed by activated CD4+ T cells is a family member of membrane bound TNF family ligand and its interaction with CD40 expressed in APC has been shown to contribute in enhancing immune response. Exogenous stimulation through CD40 has been performed using soluble trimeric CD40L, anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody and cells expressing CD40L. Schneider 2 (S2) cells, a cell line derived from Drosophila melanogaster, was transfected with a plasmid vector, pAc5.1/V5-HisA, for the constitutive expression of CD40L (S2-CD40L). Upon incubation of S2-CD40L with B-lymphocytes for 6 days, activated B cells were examined by counting B cell numbers and for activation markers including CD86 and HLA Class II molecules. The activated B cells were tested for its efficient APC function by mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) and enzyme-linked Immunospot (ELISPOT) assay. S2-CD40L was cultured for a year and maintained CD40L expression (>90%). S2-CD40L induced B cell activation as demonstrated by increment of total B cells and up-regulation of CD86 and MHC Class II molecules. Activated B cells pulsed with peptide from human cytomegalovirus pp65 antigen efficiently induced both proliferation and IFN-gamma secretion of T cells. Our result suggests that S2-CD40L can efficiently and conveniently generate B cells as a functional APC and represents a potential role for B-cell mediated cancer immunotherapy.


Subject(s)
Animals , Antigen Presentation/immunology , B7-2 Antigen/metabolism , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD40 Ligand/genetics , Cell Line , Cell Proliferation , Coculture Techniques , Drosophila melanogaster , Gene Expression , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/metabolism , Humans , Lymphocyte Activation , Transfection
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-171362

ABSTRACT

Host immune response has been considered as an important disease-modifying factor of periodontitis, however, which immune cell(s) or factor(s) are involved in the destruction of periodontium remains unclear. Previously, we reported that osteoclastogenesis is enhanced by activated B cells but suppressed by activated CD8(+)T cells. We present new data that B cells activated in the presence of Th1 cytokines inhibit osteoclastogenesis. Purified murine B cells were activated with anti-IgD mAb, IL-4, and anti-CD40 mAb, in the absence (B(Th2)) or presence of Th1 cytokines, either IL-2 (B(IL-2)) or IFN-gamma (B(IFN-gamma)). Each activated B cell population was co-cultured with RAW264.7 cells in the presence of soluble receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (sRANKL), and the effect on osteoclastic differentiation was evaluated. While B(Th2)increased osteoclastogenesis, B(IL-2)and B(IFN-gamma)suppressed it profoundly. To verify the mediating molecule(s), we analyzed cytokine profiles of the activated B cells. Compared to B(Th2), B(IL-2)expressed increased amount of IFN-gamma and B(IFN-gamma)expressed decreased amounts of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10. IFN-gamma was a key negative regulator of osteoclastic differentiation, and mediated the inhibition by B(IL-2). These results suggest that Th1 cytokines may have new important roles in resistance to periodontitis, acting directly on osteoclasts or indirectly through B cells.


Subject(s)
Animals , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , Base Sequence , Cell Differentiation/drug effects , Cytokines/pharmacology , Female , Giant Cells/cytology , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation/drug effects , Mice , Molecular Sequence Data , Osteoclasts/cytology , Phenotype , Th1 Cells/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/pharmacology
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-83849

ABSTRACT

Treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (t-AML) are now well established as complications of cytotoxic chemotherapy. We experienced a 28-yr-old female patient who developed t-MDS/t-AML with characteristic chromosomal abnormalities including 11q23 chromosomal rearrangement following high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The patient was admitted with bulky abdominal masses of B cell lineage non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. After 2 cycles of systemic chemotherapy of the Vanderbilt regimen, the patient underwent ASCT with high dose chemotherapy of the BEAC regimen. She also received radiation of 48 Gy for the residual periportal lymphadenopathy. The initial cytogenetic analysis of the infused mononuclear cells revealed a normal karyotype. Twenty two months after the ASCT, pancytopenia was noted and her bone marrow aspirate showed dysplastic hemopoiesis with myeloblasts up to 12% of nonerythroid nucleated cells. The patient was diagnosed as t-MDS (refractory anemia with an excess of blasts). Cytogenetic analysis showed complex chromosomal abnormalities including 11q23 rearrangement, which is frequently found in topoisomerase II inhibitor-related hematologic malignancies. Four months later, it was noted that the t-MDS had evolved into an overt t-AML. Cytogenetic analysis showed an evolving pattern with more complex abnormalities. The patient was treated with combination che-motherapy, but her leukemic cells were resistant to the therapy.


Subject(s)
Adult , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , Bone Marrow Cells/pathology , Carmustine/adverse effects , Chromosome Aberrations , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11 , Combined Modality Therapy/adverse effects , Cyclophosphamide/adverse effects , Cytarabine/adverse effects , Etoposide/adverse effects , Female , Gene Rearrangement , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Humans , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/etiology , Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/therapy , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/etiology , Neoplasms, Second Primary/etiology , Pelvis , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic/therapy , Transplantation, Autologous
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-16701

ABSTRACT

Glucose prevents the development of diabetes induced by alloxan. In the present study, the protective mechanism of glucose against alloxan-induced beta-cell damage was investigated using HIT-T 15 cell, a Syrian hamster transformed beta-cell line. Alloxan caused beta-cell damages with DNA fragmentation, inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin release, and decrease of cellular ATP level, but all of these beta-cell damages by alloxan were prevented by the presence of 20 mM glucose. Oligomycin, a specific inhibitor of ATP synthase, completely abolished the protective effects of glucose against alloxan-induced cell damage. Furthermore, treatment of nuclei isolated from HIT-T15 cells with ATP significantly prevented the DNA fragmentation induced by Ca2+. The results indicate that ATP produced during glucose metabolism plays a pivotal role in the protection of glucose against alloxan-induced beta-cell damage.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Triphosphate/pharmacology , Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Alloxan/pharmacology , Animals , B-Lymphocytes/metabolism , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , Calcium/pharmacology , Cell Line , Cell Nucleus/genetics , Cell Nucleus/drug effects , Cell Survival , DNA/metabolism , DNA/genetics , DNA/drug effects , DNA Fragmentation , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Egtazic Acid/pharmacology , Glucose/pharmacology , Insulin/metabolism , Oligomycins/pharmacology
19.
Medicina (B.Aires) ; 59(5,pt.1): 491-5, 1999. ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-247917

ABSTRACT

Los cambios citomorfológicos y la expresión de determinados marcadores en los distintos estadios de la diferenciación linfocitaria son bien conocidos. Los estudios sobre patrones de expresión de genes específicos de las células linfoides y los mecanismos de su regulación, han llevado últimamente a clarificar los mecanismos fundamentales del desarrollo y activación de estas células. Se han aprofundizado los conocimientos sobre los "enhancers" y promotores, elementos regulatorios de esos genes, y de los factores de transcripción que se unen a esos elementos. En el trabajo que se presenta se hace un análisis de estos componentes y de la participación de algunos de ellos, como los PU.1, Ikaros, Aiolos, GATA-3, Egf-1, E2A, EBF-1, PAX-5 (BSAP), TFE-3, Oct-1, Oct-2 y NF-kB en la regulación de los estadios de diferenciación de las series linfoides B y T.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Mice , Cell Differentiation , Gene Expression Regulation , Lymphocytes/cytology , Transcription Factors , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , T-Lymphocytes/cytology
20.
In. Palomo González, Iván; Ferreira Vigoroux, Arturo; Sepúlveda Carvajal, Cecilia; Rosemblatt Silber, Mario; Vergara Castillo, Ulises. Fundamentos de inmunología. Talca, Universidad de Talca, 1998. p.271-85, ilus.
Monography in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-284811
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