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1.
Rev. Soc. Bras. Clín. Méd ; 19(2): 120-127, abr.-jun. 2021.
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: biblio-1379285

ABSTRACT

Doenças autoimunes são doenças universais, e os diagnósticos e tratamentos primários são habitualmente iniciados por clínicos em enfermarias ou ambulatórios, antes de serem encaminhados a especialistas. Além disso, pacientes em uso de biológicos internados em hospitais gerais têm sido cada vez mais frequentes na prática clínica. Conhecer o perfil de segurança, as indicações e os efeitos colaterais dessas drogas deve ser preocupação dos clínicos. Neste trabalho, foi realizada revisão de literatura sobre terapia biológica com rituximabe no tratamento das principais doenças autoimunes sistêmicas da prática clínica: artrite reumatoide, lúpus eritematoso sistêmico, vasculites relacionadas aos anticorpos anticitoplasma de neutrófilo, púrpura trombocitopênica imune e espondilite anquilosante. (AU)


AutoimmunAutoimmune diseases are universal diseases and primary diagnosis and treatment are typically initiated by internists in wards or outpatient clinics before being referred to specialists. In addition, patients on use of biologicals hospitalized in general hospitals have been increasingly common in clinical practice. Knowing the safety profile, the indications, and the side effects of these drugs should be a concern for the internists as well. In this study, the literature review was performed on biological therapy with Rituximab for treating the main systemic autoimmune diseases of clinical practice: rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, and ankylosing spondylitis. (AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , Rituximab/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Spondylitis, Ankylosing/drug therapy , Immunoglobulins/drug effects , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , Antigens, CD20/drug effects , Rituximab/pharmacology
2.
J. appl. oral sci ; 26: e20170451, 2018. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-893699

ABSTRACT

Abstract Local administration of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), agonist cytidine-phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG ODNs), and CD40 ligand (CD40L) can decrease ligature-induced periodontal inflammation and bone loss in wild type (WT) mouse. Objective: This study aimed to explore whether such effect is dependent on TLR9 signaling. Material and Methods: Purified spleen B cells isolated from WT C57BL/6J mice and TLR9 knockout (KO) mice were cultured for 48 hours under the following conditions: CD40L, CpG+CD40L, CpG at low, medium and high doses. We determined B cell numbers using a hemocytometer at 24 h and 48 h. Percentages of CD1dhiCD5+ B cells were detected by flow cytometry. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA expression and protein secretion were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and by ELISA, respectively. The silk ligature was tied around the maxillary second molars for 14 days, during which the CpG+CD40L mixture or PBS was injected into palatal gingiva on days 3, 6, and 9. Results: For both WT and TLR9 KO mice, CpG significantly induced B cell proliferation, increased IL-10 mRNA expression and protein secretion of IL-10 but reduced CD1dhiCD5+ B cells population; local injection of CpG+CD40L mixture significantly decreased alveolar bone loss and the number of TRAP-positive cells adjacent to the alveolar bone surface, and significantly increased the gingival mRNA expression of IL-10 and decreased RANKL and IFN-γ mRNA expression. Conclusions: These results indicated that CpG plus CD40L decreased periodontal inflammation and alveolar bone loss in a TLR9-independent manner in ligature-induced experimental periodontitis.


Subject(s)
Animals , Oligodeoxyribonucleotides/pharmacology , Periodontitis/drug therapy , Alveolar Bone Loss/drug therapy , CD40 Ligand/pharmacology , Cytidine/pharmacology , Toll-Like Receptor 9/drug effects , Guanine Nucleotides/pharmacology , Reference Values , Time Factors , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Adjuvants, Immunologic/pharmacology , Reproducibility of Results , Interleukin-10/analysis , Disease Models, Animal , Toll-Like Receptor 9/analysis , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Flow Cytometry , Gingiva/drug effects , Gingiva/pathology , Mice, Inbred C57BL
3.
Rev. bras. reumatol ; 57(5): 385-391, Sept.-Oct. 2017. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-899442

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives: To correlate the basal expression of complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) CD55, CD59, CD35, and CD46 in B-lymphocytes from the peripheral blood of a cohort of 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) initiating treatment with rituximab (RTX) with depletion and time repopulation of such cells. Methods: Ten patients with RA received two infusions of 1 g of RTX with an interval of 14 days. Immunophenotypic analysis for the detection of CD55, CD59, CD35, and CD46 on B-lymphocytes was carried out immediately before the first infusion. The population of B-lymphocytes was analyzed by means of basal CD19 expression and after 1, 2, and 6 months after the infusion of RTX, and then quarterly until clinical relapse. Depletion of B-lymphocytes in peripheral blood was defined as a CD19 expression <0.005 × 109/L. Results: Ten women with a median of 49 years and a baseline DAS28 = 5.6 were evaluated; 9 were seropositive for rheumatoid factor. Five patients showed a repopulation of B-lymphocytes after 2 months, and the other five after 6 months. There was a correlation between the basal expression of CD46 and the time of repopulation (correlation coefficient = −0.733, p = 0.0016). A similar trend was observed with CD35, but without statistical significance (correction coefficient = −0.522, p = 0.12). Conclusion: The increased CD46 expression was predictive of a faster repopulation of B-lymphocytes in patients treated with RTX. Studies involving a larger number of patients will be needed to confirm the utility of basal expression of CRPs as a predictor of clinical response.


Resumo Objetivos: Correlacionar a expressão basal das proteínas reguladoras do complemento (PRC) CD55, CD59, CD35 e CD46 nos linfócitos B do sangue periférico de uma coorte de 10 pacientes com artrite reumatoide (AR) iniciando tratamento com rituximabe (RTX) com a depleção e tempo de repopulação dessas células. Métodos: Dez pacientes com AR receberam duas infusões de 1 g de RTX com intervalo de 14 dias. Análises imunofenotípicas para detecção de CD55, CD59, CD35 e CD46 nos linfócitos B foram feitas imediatamente antes da primeira infusão. A população de linfócitos B foi analisada por meio da expressão de CD19 basal e após um, dois e seis meses após a infusão de RTX e então trimestralmente até a recaída clínica. Depleção de linfócitos B no sangue periférico foi definida como expressão de CD19 < 0,005 × 109/l. Resultados: Dez mulheres com mediana de 49 anos e DAS 28 basal de 5,6 foram avaliadas; nove eram soropositivas para o fator reumatoide. Cinco pacientes apresentaram repopulação de linfócitos B após dois meses e as outras cinco aos seis meses. Houve correlação entre a expressão basal de CD46 e o tempo de repopulação (coeficiente de correlação -0,733, p = 0,0016). Tendência semelhante foi observada com CD35, porém sem significância estatística (coeficiente de correção 0,522, p = 0,12). Conclusão: Expressão aumentada de CD46 foi preditora de repopulação mais rápida de linfócitos B em pacientes tratados com RTX. Estudos com um número maior de pacientes serão necessários para confirmar a utilidade da expressão basal das PRC como preditora de resposta clínica.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Adult , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , B-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , GPI-Linked Proteins/blood , Rituximab/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/immunology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/blood , Infusions, Intravenous , Drug Administration Schedule , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , Biomarkers/blood , Treatment Outcome , Antirheumatic Agents/pharmacology , Rituximab/pharmacology , Middle Aged
4.
ABCD arq. bras. cir. dig ; 28(1): 74-80, 2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-742762

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Gastric bypass is today the most frequently performed bariatric procedure,but, despite of it, several complications can occur with varied morbimortality. Probably all bariatric surgeons know these complications, but, as bariatric surgery continues to spread, general surgeon must be familiarized to it and its management. Gastric bypass complications can be divided into two groups: early and late complications, taking into account the two weeks period after the surgery. This paper will focus the early ones. METHOD: Literature review was carried out using Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Library, SciELO, and additional information on institutional sites of interest crossing the headings: gastric bypass AND complications; follow-up studies AND complications; postoperative complications AND anastomosis, Roux-en-Y; obesity AND postoperative complications. Search language was English. RESULTS: There were selected 26 studies that matched the headings. Early complications included: anastomotic or staple line leaks, gastrointestinal bleeding, intestinal obstruction and incorrect Roux limb reconstruction. CONCLUSION: Knowledge on strategies on how to reduce the risk and incidence of complications must be acquired, and every surgeon must be familiar with these complications in order to achieve an earlier recognition and perform the best intervention. .


INTRODUÇÃO: O bypass gástrico é hoje o procedimento bariátrico mais realizado, mas, apesar disso, várias complicações podem ocorrer com variada morbimortalidade. Provavelmente todos os cirurgiões bariátricos conhecem essas complicações, mas como a cirurgia bariátrica continua a se espalhar, o cirurgião geral deve estar familiarizado com essas complicações e seu manuseio. As complicações do bypass gástrico podem ser divididas em dois grupos: as precoces e tardias, tendo em conta o período de duas semanas após a operação. Este artigo irá focar as precoces. MÉTODO: Foi realizada revisão da literatura utilizando as bases Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Library, SciELO, e informações adicionais sobre sites institucionais de interesse cruzando os descritores: bypass gástrico AND complicações; seguimento AND complicações; complicações pós-operatórias AND anastomose, Roux-en-Y; obesidade AND complicações pós-operatórias. A língua usada para a busca foi o inglês. RESULTADOS: Foram selecionados 26 artigos que combinavam com os descritores. As complicações imediatas foram: fístula na linha de grampeamento, sangramento gastrointestinal, obstrução intestinal e reconstrução incorreta da alça em Roux. CONCLUSÃO: O conhecimento sobre as estratégias de como reduzir o risco e incidência das complicações deve ser adquirido ao longo do tempo, e cada cirurgião deve estar familiarizado com essas complicações, a fim de reconhecê-las precocemente e realizar a melhor intervenção. .


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Mice , B-Lymphocytes/physiology , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/physiology , Antibody Formation/drug effects , Antibody Formation/genetics , Apoptosis/genetics , Apoptosis/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , B-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Cell Differentiation/drug effects , Cell Differentiation/genetics , Cell Survival/genetics , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , /pharmacology , Mice, Knockout , Multigene Family , Neoplasm Proteins/genetics , Neoplasm Proteins/metabolism , Neoplasm Proteins/physiology , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/chemistry , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/genetics , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/metabolism , Sequence Homology
5.
Biol. Res ; 47: 1-10, 2014. graf, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-950711

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Declining immune function poses an important clinical challenge worldwide and supplementation with natural products that possessing immune enhancing properties is a promising approach for preventing or delaying immune function decline. Cocoons from yellow silkworms are a significant source of lutein, and this unexplored silk extract could be a viable alternative source for dietary lutein. This study assessed immunomodulatory activities of the silk lutein extract. Female BALB/c mice orally received lutein, either as silk or marigold extracts (10 or 20 mg/kg daily), or vehicle only (1% tween 80 in PBS pH 7.4) for 4 weeks. Natural killer (NK) cell activity, specific antibody production, lymphocyte subpopulations, mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation, and cytokine production were examined. RESULTS: Silk lutein extract increased NK cell activity, and the effect was dose-related whereas marigold lutein extract was ineffective. Silk lutein extract dose-dependently enhanced antibody production in pre-immunized mice but marigold lutein extract had no effect. Feeding with silk lutein extract increased the populations of CD3+ and CD4 + CD3 + cells. Silk lutein extract also stimulated concanavalin A- and lipopolysaccharide-induced proliferations of T and B lymphocytes, respectively. Moreover, silk lutein extract increased IL-2 and IFN-γ production while the effect of marigold lutein extract was undetectable. CONCLUSIONS: Together, silk lutein extract enhanced both innate and adaptive immune functions. This preparation may prove to be an effective supplement for strengthened immunity.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Mice , Bombyx/immunology , Tissue Extracts/immunology , Lutein/immunology , Silk/immunology , Animal Shells/chemistry , Immunologic Factors/analysis , Pupa/immunology , Pupa/metabolism , Bombyx/metabolism , Tissue Extracts/pharmacology , Lutein/isolation & purification , Antibodies, Heterophile/blood , Plant Extracts/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , Killer Cells, Natural/drug effects , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , Interleukin-4/analysis , Interferon-gamma/analysis , Interleukin-2/analysis , Interleukin-10/analysis , Tagetes/immunology , Flowers/immunology , Silk/chemistry , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Flow Cytometry , Mice, Inbred BALB C
6.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 46(5): 433-439, maio 2013. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-675673

ABSTRACT

Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic and slowly progressive cholestatic liver disease of autoimmune etiology. A number of questions regarding its etiology are unclear. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in self-tolerance and, for unknown reasons, their relative number is reduced in PBC patients. B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) is a key survival factor during B-cell maturation and its concentration is increased in peripheral blood of PBC patients. It has been reported that activated B cells inhibit Treg cell proliferation and there are no BAFF receptors on Tregs. Therefore, we speculated that excessive BAFF may result in Treg reduction via B cells. To prove our hypothesis, we isolated Tregs and B cells from PBC and healthy donors. BAFF and IgM concentrations were then analyzed by ELISA and CD40, CD80, CD86, IL-10, and TGF-β expression in B cells and Tregs were measured by flow cytometry. BAFF up-regulated CD40, CD80, CD86, and IgM expression in B cells. However, BAFF had no direct effect on Treg cell apoptosis and cytokine secretion. Nonetheless, we observed that BAFF-activated B cells could induce Treg cell apoptosis and reduce IL-10 and TGF-β expression. We also showed that BAFF-activated CD4+ T cells had no effect on Treg apoptosis. Furthermore, we verified that bezafibrate, a hypolipidemic drug, can inhibit BAFF-induced Treg cell apoptosis. In conclusion, BAFF promotes Treg cell apoptosis and inhibits cytokine production by activating B cells in PBC patients. The results of this study suggest that inhibition of BAFF activation is a strategy for PBC treatment.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Apoptosis/drug effects , B-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/drug effects , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , Bezafibrate/pharmacology , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Liver Cirrhosis, Biliary/immunology , B-Cell Activating Factor , B-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/metabolism , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Flow Cytometry , Lymphocyte Activation
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-121324

ABSTRACT

B cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). High levels of B cell activating factor (BAFF) are detected in autoimmune diseases. BAFF and BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) are expressed in B and T cells of RA synovium. The study was undertaken to identify the NF-kappaB signal pathway involved in the induction of BAFF-R in human B cells. Immunohistochemical staining of NF-kappaB p65, NF-kappaB p50, BAFF, and BAFF-R was performed on sections of synovium from severe and mild RA and osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from control and RA patients and B cells were isolated from controls. BAFF-R was analyzed by flow cytometry, realtime PCR and confocal staining after treatment with NF-kappaB inhibitors. NF-kappaB p65, NF-kappaB p50, BAFF, and BAFF-R were highly expressed in severe RA synovium relative to mild RA synovium or OA synovium. BAFF-R expression was reduced by NF-kappaB inhibitors in PBMCs and B cells from normal controls. We also showed reduction in expression of BAFF-R via inhibition of the NF-kappaB pathway in PBMCs of RA patients. BAFF/BAFF-R signaling is an important mechanism of pathogenesis in RA and that BAFF-R reduction by NF-kappaB blocking therapy is another choice for controlling B cells in autoimmune diseases such as RA.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid/genetics , B-Cell Activating Factor/genetics , B-Cell Activation Factor Receptor/genetics , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , Cell Separation , Cells, Cultured , Disease Progression , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Flow Cytometry , Gene Expression Regulation/immunology , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Signal Transduction/immunology , Synovial Membrane/pathology , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , Transcriptional Activation/drug effects
9.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol ; 2004 Jun-Sep; 22(2-3): 133-42
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-37002

ABSTRACT

Interleukin (IL)-10 accelerates the IgE production of anti-CD40- and IL-4-stimulated PBMC by enhancing the IL-6 production of T lymphocytes or antigen-primed spleen cells, in addition to its role as a regulator of the inflammatory responses. To further investigate the mechanisms enhancing IgE synthesis, we determined the effect of somatropin as well as IL-10 on the secretion of Dermatophagoides farinae (Df)-specific IgE by K7 cells, which originate from an EBV-immortalized cell line. Df-pulsed autologous T cells, as well as the supernatants of these cultures, increased the synthesis of Df-specific IgE. Antigen-specific IgE was also enhanced when K7 cells were treated with anti-CD40 antibody and with both IL-4 and IL-10, or with IL-4 and IL-10 without anti-CD40 antibody. The treatment of K7 cells with anti-CD40 antibody and IL-4, or anti-CD40 antibody and IL-10 did not increase IgE production. The Df-specific IgE activity of the supernatants of K7 cells treated with somatropin alone was increased significantly although somatropin did not show any additive effect on the IgE production of anti-CD40 antibody-treated cells. The results indicate that IL-10, a Th2-type cytokine, directly affects the mature B cells that produce IgE, and that the secretion of IgE is increased by treatment with IL-10 in cells that are stimulated with anti-CD40 and IL-4 at the level of the EBV-immortalized cell line, which has already switched to IgE production. Somatropin similarly stimulates activated mature B cells to enhance their production of antigen-specific IgE without class switching, independently of IL-4 and IL-10.


Subject(s)
CD40 Antigens/immunology , Antigens, Dermatophagoides/immunology , Asthma/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , Cell Line , Child , Dermatophagoides farinae/immunology , Flow Cytometry , Growth Hormone , Humans , Immunoglobulin E/biosynthesis , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-4/immunology , Polymerase Chain Reaction , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects
10.
Indian J Exp Biol ; 2002 Mar; 40(3): 282-7
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-55613

ABSTRACT

Immunomodulatory activity of an Ayurvedic polyherbal formulation, Immu-21 containing extracts of Ocimum sanctum, Withania somnifera, Emblica officinalis and Tinospora cordifolia was studied on proliferative response of splenic leukocytes to T cell mitogens, concanavalin (Con)-A and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and B cell mitogen, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vitro by [3H]-thymidine uptake assay in mice. The cytotoxic activity of Immu-21 was tested by measuring the splenic leukocyte natural killer (NK) cell activity against K 562 cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment with Immu-21 (30 mg/kg) once a day for 14 and 21 days did not cause change in body weight and spleen weight, where as splenocytes/spleen count was increased. Treatment of Immu-21 (30 mg/kg, i.p.) for 14 days and 1 mg/kg for 21 days significantly increased LPS induced leukocyte proliferation. NK cell activity was significantly increased when mice were pretreated with Immu-21 (10 and 30 mg/kg, i.p.) once a day for 7 days. The results indicate that pretreatment with Immu-21 selectively increased the proliferation of splenic leukocyte to B cell mitogen, LPS and cytotoxic activity against K 562 cells in mice.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Immunologic/pharmacology , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , Cytotoxicity, Immunologic/drug effects , Humans , K562 Cells , Killer Cells, Natural/drug effects , Lymphocyte Activation/drug effects , Medicine, Ayurvedic , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Plants, Medicinal , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-16701

ABSTRACT

Glucose prevents the development of diabetes induced by alloxan. In the present study, the protective mechanism of glucose against alloxan-induced beta-cell damage was investigated using HIT-T 15 cell, a Syrian hamster transformed beta-cell line. Alloxan caused beta-cell damages with DNA fragmentation, inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin release, and decrease of cellular ATP level, but all of these beta-cell damages by alloxan were prevented by the presence of 20 mM glucose. Oligomycin, a specific inhibitor of ATP synthase, completely abolished the protective effects of glucose against alloxan-induced cell damage. Furthermore, treatment of nuclei isolated from HIT-T15 cells with ATP significantly prevented the DNA fragmentation induced by Ca2+. The results indicate that ATP produced during glucose metabolism plays a pivotal role in the protection of glucose against alloxan-induced beta-cell damage.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Triphosphate/pharmacology , Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Alloxan/pharmacology , Animals , B-Lymphocytes/metabolism , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , Calcium/pharmacology , Cell Line , Cell Nucleus/genetics , Cell Nucleus/drug effects , Cell Survival , DNA/metabolism , DNA/genetics , DNA/drug effects , DNA Fragmentation , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Egtazic Acid/pharmacology , Glucose/pharmacology , Insulin/metabolism , Oligomycins/pharmacology
13.
Rev. méd. Chile ; 127(3): 341-8, mar. 1999.
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-243801

ABSTRACT

The immune response is partly regulated by the nervous system, that involves endogenous opioids, stimulating or depressing immune responses. Opioids modulate immune response by indirect and direct mechanisms. Indirect modulation occurs when the activation of opioid receptors within the nervous system modifies the activity of neuroendocrine axes or neurotransmission pathways. Direct modulation results from the effects of opioids on immune system cells. This requires the expression of membrane opioid receptors in these cells. Immunomodulating effects of morphine would be a result of the integration of indirect and direct effects. In animal models, morphine transiently depresses cellular and humoral immunity. In humans, morphine has similar effects; however, the real impact of morphine administration on the immune response in clinical situations in not yet known


Subject(s)
Humans , Immune System/drug effects , Narcotics/pharmacology , Adjuvants, Immunologic/pharmacology , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Immune Tolerance , Morphine/pharmacology , Narcotics/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
14.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-215286

ABSTRACT

Previous studies on the effect of the oral administration of bacterial immunomodulators (IM-104 and RN-301) during the protein free diet period, have shown an increase on B and T cell gut repopulation, accompanied by IgA antibody production. The usefulness of oral administration of the immunomodulator thymomodulin (TmB) during the protein refeeding period was investigated. TmB allowed the recovery of a normal repopulation of gut lamina propria with IgA B and CD5 T cells and decreases to control values the number of activated intraepithelial lymphocytes (CD25+T cell subset). Therefore, the oral administration of TmB may be useful as a therapeutic agent as it seems to improve the repopulation of intestinal villi with immunocompetent cells. Also, it seems to regulate the immunosurveillance at the epithelium level as it increases the CD5+T cells but decreases the activated ones.


Subject(s)
Rats , Female , Animals , Adjuvants, Immunologic/therapeutic use , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , Immunoglobulin A/drug effects , Intestines/drug effects , Protein Deficiency/drug therapy , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , Thymus Extracts/therapeutic use , Adjuvants, Immunologic , Analysis of Variance , B-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Caseins , Immunoglobulin A/metabolism , Intestines/cytology , Protein Deficiency/metabolism , Rats, Wistar , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Thymus Extracts
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-159769

ABSTRACT

Mouse spleen cells activated in a mixed lymphocyte reaction release a soluble factor, which induces a significant proliferative response in fresh mouse spleen cells. This proliferation inducing factor (PIF) was found to be heat stable (90 degrees C for 45 min) and also resistant to trypsin or chymotrypsin treatment. By using a sizing HPLC column, the molecular weight of PIF appears to be 25 kDa. Mouse spleen cells treated with anti-thy-1 + complement lost Con-A induced proliferative responses but responded well to PIF. B cell depleted spleen cells obtained by negative selection panning, did not respond to PIF. These results indicate that B cells proliferated in response to PIF. Polymixin-B, which blocks the B cell proliferative response to LPS, did not inhibit PIF induced proliferation.


Subject(s)
Animals , B-Lymphocytes/physiology , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , Bone Marrow/metabolism , Cell Division/physiology , Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid , Chymotrypsin/pharmacology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Growth Substances/pharmacology , Growth Substances/chemistry , Hot Temperature , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Molecular Weight , Polymyxin B/pharmacology , Protein Denaturation , Spleen/metabolism , Thymus Gland/metabolism , Trypsin/pharmacology
17.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 29(3): 359-62, Mar. 1996. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-163844

ABSTRACT

In the present study, seven adult male mice were inoculated with Ehrlich tumor into the footpad after local substance P release was blocked by neurectomy of the sciatic and saphenous nerves. The contralateral footpad was also inoculated but sham-operated, and used as control. This procedure did not modify the percent of CD4+ (about 1-2 per cent), CD8+ (about 1-3 per cent), macrophages (about 21-22 per cent), lymphocyte B (about 0-1 per cent) and NK (about 1-2 per cent) mononuclear cells present among tumor cells. These data suggest that chemotactic activity of substance P may not be relevant in this situation because the lack of this neurotransmitter (checked by immunohistochemistry) secondary to neurectomy did not change the cell migration profile into tumor mass.


Subject(s)
Male , Mice , Animals , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Carcinoma, Ehrlich Tumor/pathology , Macrophages/immunology , Substance P/pharmacology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , Mice, Inbred Strains , Macrophages , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects
18.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 28(5): 575-84, May 1995. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-154879

ABSTRACT

Bacterial products have served as important immunological tools to study ly,phocyte activation. The lipopolysaccharides of the Gram-negative bacteria are well known to be potent activators of B lymphocytes. Several Gram-positive bacteria produce exotoxins that are superantigens for T cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that the Gram-positive bacteria Clostridium botulinum C and D produce a high molecular weight mitogen (Cb mitogen) that is a potent activator of murine B lymphocytes. The Cb mitogen was discovered as a consequence of our attempt to investigate a possible superantigen activity present in the botulinum exotoxins. We observed initially that mouse spleen cells were strongly stimulated to proliferate by culture supernatants of C. botulinum C and D. However, the characterization of the responding cell ruled out superantigen because only the B lymphocytes were stimulated to proliferate and to secrete immunoglobulins, and they did so independent of T cell help. In addition, the molecular characterization of the Cb mitogen demonstrated that the purified botulinum toxin was devoid of mitogenic activity. In contrast, the fractionation of the culture supernatant of C. botulinum C in an FPLC Superose 12 column indicated that the Cb mitogen was present in the void volume of the column (MW ò 300 kDa) which had no toxigenic activity. However, the fractions containing molecules of 150 KDa were highly toxic for mice and had no mitogenic activity...


Subject(s)
Animals , Mice , Clostridium botulinum/physiology , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Lymphocyte Activation , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , Spleen/cytology , Chromatography , Immunoglobulins/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/biosynthesis , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Molecular Weight
19.
EJMM-Egyptian Journal of Medical Microbiology [The]. 1993; 2 (2): 239-242
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-27799

ABSTRACT

The genus Nigella includes many species [N. sativa L., N. arensis L., N. assyriace Boiss., N. deserti Boiss., N. hispanica L., and N. damascena L., amongst which only N. sativa L. is known to be indogenous and grows well in different localities of Egypt. This species is known to have considerable therapeutic values. The immunological effect of this seed on the immune system was studied by testing the B cell function of BALB/C mice after their feeding on the seed for two weeks. The test was performed by the method of plaque assay using Cunningham and Szenberg slides. The results was so encouraging because it revealed a four fold increase in the mean number of plaques in mice fed on the seeds [80 plaques per 10 lymphocytes] while those not fed on the seeds [i.e.] control group showed only 20 plaques per 10 lymphocytes


Subject(s)
Animals, Laboratory , Plants/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , Mice , Plants, Medicinal
20.
Acta bioquím. clín. latinoam ; 25(4): 403-10, dic.1991. ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-105857

ABSTRACT

Los estudios realizados en el campo de la citogenética del cáncer han permitido determinar que las alteraciones cariotípicas de las células neoplásicas se encuentran distribuidas en el genoma en forma específica, encontrándose cromosomas particularmente asociados a diferentes tipos de neoplasias (1)(2). En lo que respecta a las neoplasias hematológicas, el análisis citogenético ha demostrado ser de gran importancia para la evaluación del diagnóstico, pronóstico y tratamiento de las mismas (3)(4). Los avances logrados en la citogenética de neoplasias han sido posibles debido al desarrollo y mejoramiento de distintas técnicas, que permiten la obtención de extendidos cromosómicos de alta calidad, donde es posible detectar alteraciones muy pequeñas del material genético. Sin embargo, las técnicas tradicionales de citogenética llevan a la destrucción de la membrana plasmática y del contenido citoplasmático. Si bien esto permite una mejor extensión y dispersión de los cromosomas, impide, por otro lado, la identificación de las células cuyos cariotipos son analizados. Esto último es de particular importancia en el caso de la médula ósea, donde existen numerosas progenies celulares capaces de originar mitosis para el análisis cromosómico. siendo imposible a través de las técnicas convencionales de citogenética, poder determinar si las anomalías cromosómicas observadas se encuentran o no restringidas a aquellas que muestran clonalidad. Actualmente es posible estudiar poblaciones celulares presentes en sangre periférica y médula ósea, a través de diferentes técnicas de inmunohistoquímica que, en los últimos años se han perfeccionado notablemente con el desarrollo de los anticuerpos monoclonales y los métodos enzimáticos de inmunomarcación. Los estudios previos realizados para determinar el origen de las células hematopoyéticas cariotípicamente anormales, se basaron en análisis morfológicos y citogenéticos separados de la misma muestra, o en la creación de poblaciones hemogéneas, a partir de células aisladas o cultivos de células progenitoras. Los primeros intentos de identificación directa de células mitóticas fueron hechos por Rastrick et al (5), usando el cromosoma Philadelphia (PH1) como un marcador de células leucémicas y la incorporación de hierro radiactivo como un indicador de precursores eritroides, en un paciente con leucemia mieloide crónica (LMC)> Blocstock y Garson (6) usaron la misma técnica en células de médula ósea, de pacientes con leucemia mieloide


Subject(s)
Cells, Cultured/analysis , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Cytogenetics , Hodgkin Disease/diagnosis , Leukemia/diagnosis , Lymphoma/diagnosis , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , Cell Line , Neoplastic Cells, Circulating/isolation & purification , Chromosome Aberrations/diagnosis , Chromosome Banding , Colchicine , Culture Techniques , Glutamine , Hybridization, Genetic/drug effects , Metaphase/drug effects , Mutagens , Philadelphia Chromosome , Phytohemagglutinins , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects
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