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2.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-227112

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: I-gel™ and Streamlined Liner of the Pharynx Airway (SLIPA™) are the second generation supraglottic airway devices characterized by disposability and non-inflatable cuff that provide adequate sealing pressure and easy use. This study was designed to compare oro-pharyngeal leakage pressure of the I-gel™ with the SLIPA™. METHODS: Seventy-eight adult patients were randomly assigned to undergo general anesthesia with either I-gel™ or SLIPA™. Hemodynamic changes and Oro-pharyngeal leakage pressure were assessed at one minute after the insertion. The total insertion time, number of attempts, ease of insertion, and presence of blood staining and regurgitation were recorded. After surgery, postoperative sore throat and other complications (dysphonia, dysphagia or paresthesia of tongue) were evaluated. RESULTS: Oro-pharyngeal leakage pressure after device insertion was higher in the SLIPA™ group than the I-gel™ group. Insertion time was significantly shorter in the I-gel™ group than the SLIPA™ group. Blood staining was presented in 21.1% of the SLIPA™ group vs. 2.6% of the I-gel™ group. In the recovery room, postoperative sore throat measured in visual rating scale (VAS) was significantly higher in the SLIPA™ group than in the I-gel™ group. Ease of insertion, regurgitation, respiratory index and hemodynamic change after insertion showed no significant differences. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, the SLIPA™ devices provided higher oro-pharyngeal leakage pressure than I-gel™. However, the results verified ease of insertion, and safety of ventilation and hemodynamic changes, without any severe complications in both I-gel™ and SLIPA™.


Subject(s)
Adult , Anesthesia, General , Blood Stains , Deglutition Disorders , Hemodynamics , Humans , Laryngeal Masks , Paresthesia , Pharyngitis , Pharynx , Recovery Room , Ventilation
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-92345

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study was designed to find appropriate lubricant for streamed lined liner of pharyngeal airway(TM) (SLIPA(TM)). We evaluated the incidence of sore throat, nausea, vomiting, hoarseness, paresthesia and blood stain after using saline, water soluble gel and 2% lidocaine gel as a SLIPA(TM) lublicant. METHODS: One hundred twenty three patients scheduled for minor surgery to whom the SLIPA(TM) was considered suitable were randomly allocated to one of three groups which receive normal saline, water soluble gel or 2% lidocaine gel as a SLIPA(TM) lublicant. Patients were interviewed at recovery room, post operation 6-12 hour, post operation 18-24 hour about sore throat and other complications. RESULTS: There were no statistical difference in sore throat and blood stain among three groups. Also there were no statistical differences in hoarseness, nausea, vomiting. The incidence of paresthesia in 2% lidocaine gel group was significantly higher than those of the other two groups immediately after operation, but it was resolved after leaving the recovery room. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that normal saline, water soluble gel and 2% lidocaine gel are all available as a SLIPA(TM) lubricant. Size of SLIPA(TM), insertion technique and difficulty of insertion should be further investigated as the main causes of a sore throat and other complications which can occur after the insertion of SLIPA(TM).


Subject(s)
Blood Stains , Hoarseness , Humans , Incidence , Lidocaine , Nausea , Paresthesia , Pharyngitis , Recovery Room , Rivers , Minor Surgical Procedures , Vomiting
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-41287

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Both the i-gel(TM) (i-gel) and LMA Supreme(TM) (Supreme) are new single-use second generation supraglottic airway devices available in pediatric sizes. This study was designed to investigate the i-gel in comparison with the Supreme in children undergoing general anesthesia. METHODS: One hundred children with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II undergoing general anesthesia were randomly assigned to either the i-gel or the Supreme group (50 children in each group). The device size was chosen according to weight of the children. We assessed the insertion success rate, insertion time, oropharyngeal leak pressure, grade of the fiberoptic glottic view, number of airway manipulations required, and postoperative complications. RESULTS: There were no differences in the demographic data between the two groups. The success rate of insertion was same in both groups. The insertion time of the i-gel was longer than that of Supreme (P = 0.004). The oropharyngeal leak pressure in the i-gel group was higher than that in the Supreme group (P = 0.013). On fiberoptic examination, the vocal cords were visible in 90% of the children in the i-gel group and in 96% of the children in the Supreme group. The number of airway manipulations required was higher in the i-gel group (14 cases) than in the Supreme group (1 case) (P < 0.001). There were no differences in complications including blood staining of the device and sore throat between both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Both the i-gel and Supreme provided a satisfactory airway during general anesthesia in children. Compared to the Supreme, the i-gel demonstrated a higher oropharyngeal leak pressure, longer time for insertion, and a greater number of airway manipulations during anesthesia.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Anesthesia, General , Blood Stains , Child , Humans , Laryngeal Masks , Pediatrics , Pharyngitis , Postoperative Complications , Vocal Cords
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-199878

ABSTRACT

Primary vaginal cancer combined with uterine prolapse is very rare. We present a case of 80-year-old postmenopausal women complaints of something coming out per vagina for the past 20 years, along with blood stained discharge, foul odor leukorrhea, and severe pelvic pain for the last 3 months. A 4 x 5 cm ulcer was present on middle third of vaginal wall with marked edema and ulceration of surrounding tissue. The prolapse was reduced under intravenous sedation in operating room. On gynecologic examination, uterus was normal in size, no adnexal mass was examined, and both parametrium were thickened. Papanicolaou smear was normal. Biopsy of the ulcer at vaginal wall revealed invasive squamous cell carcinoma of vagina. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of abdomen and pelvis showed left hydronephrosis and liver metastasis. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) revealed metastasis to lung, liver and iliac bone. She died from progression of disease one month after diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Abdomen , Aged, 80 and over , Biopsy , Blood Stains , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell , Diagnosis , Edema , Female , Humans , Hydronephrosis , Leukorrhea , Liver , Lung , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Neoplasm Metastasis , Odorants , Operating Rooms , Papanicolaou Test , Pelvic Pain , Pelvis , Positron-Emission Tomography , Postmenopause , Prolapse , Ulcer , Uterine Prolapse , Uterus , Vagina , Vaginal Neoplasms
6.
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-143409

ABSTRACT

It is an established fact that laboratory investigations involving biological fluids play a vital role in crime investigations Blood as a source of evidence associated with crime, can provide valuable information that may solve the case. Proper collection, preservation and dispatch of this crucial evidence to the Forensic Science Laboratory is hence very essential. Improper collection and preservation can weaken or destroy a potential source of facts in a case. Many times the suspects may hide valuable blood stain evidence either on the object or the clothes in different conditions which may adversely affect the investigation. Hence, proper collection and preservation of blood stain is of paramount importance, as it may provide a strong link between an individual and a criminal act. The present study was undertaken to find out the maximum duration for which blood grouping is possible when the stains are exposed to varied environmental conditions.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System/analysis , ABO Blood-Group System/physiology , Aging , Blood Stains/chemistry , Crime , Environment , Forensic Pathology , Humans
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-145231

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to compare the streamlined liner of the pharynx airway (SLIPA), a new supraglottic airway device (SGA), with the laryngeal mask airway ProSeal(TM) (PLMA) during general anesthesia. METHODS: Sixty patients were randomly allocated to two groups; a PLMA group (n = 30) or a SLIPA group (n = 30). Ease of use, first insertion success rate, hemodynamic responses to insertion, ventilatory efficiency and positioning confirmed by fiberoptic bronchoscopy were assessed. Lung mechanics data were collected with side stream spirometry at 10 minutes after insertion. We also compared the incidence of blood stain, incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat and other complications. RESULTS: First attempt success rates were 93.3% and 73.3%, and mean insertion time was 7.3 sec and 10.5 sec in PLMA and SLIPA. There was a significant rise in all of hemodynamic response from the pre-insertion value at one minute following insertion of SLIPA. But, insertion of PLMA was no significant rise in hemodynamic response. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean maximum sealing pressure, gas leakage, lung mechanics data, gastric distension, postoperative sore throat and other complication between the two groups. Blood stain were noted on the surface of the device in 40% (n = 12) in the SLIPA vs. 6.7% (n = 2) in the PLMA. CONCLUSIONS: The SLIPA is a useful alternative to the PLMA and have comparable efficacy and complication rates. If we acquire the skill to use, SLIPA may be considered as primary SGA devices during surgery under general anesthesia.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Anesthesia, General , Blood Stains , Bronchoscopy , Hemodynamics , Humans , Incidence , Laryngeal Masks , Lung , Mechanics , Pharyngitis , Pharynx , Rivers , Spirometry
8.
J. appl. oral sci ; 17(3): 254-261, May-June 2009. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-514044

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of 16% carbamide peroxide gel (CP16%), tetrahydrate sodium perborate (SP) and mixture (CP16% + SP), in walking bleaching of non-vital discolored teeth. Materials and methods: Sixty single-rooted human premolars with intact crowns were used and initial color was assessed using Vita shade guide and standardized photos. The teeth were stained using rabbit fresh blood for 18 days and photos of discolored teeth and color evaluation were performed. The teeth were divided into 4 groups (n= 15), according to bleaching agent used: G1) CP16% gel; G2) CP16% gel + SP; G3) SP + distilled water; G4: control.The bleaching agents were replaced twice at 7-day intervals for 21 days. All teeth were evaluated by two endodontists at days 0, 7, 14 and 21 and the color changes were assessed using Vita shade guide and standardized photos. The results were analyzed byKruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s tests (p=0.05). Results: The experimental groups presented statistically similar bleaching results (p>0.05) at the end of 7, 14 and 21 days. These groups presented significantly higher bleaching efficacy than control group (G4) (p<0.05). The mixture CP16% + SP promoted return of original color in 100% of teeth at the end of 21 days. Conclusion: It was concluded that three bleaching agents were effective in bleaching of stained teeth with blood products, especially at the end of 21 days.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Rabbits , Borates/administration & dosage , Oxidants/administration & dosage , Peroxides/administration & dosage , Tooth, Nonvital , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Tooth Discoloration/therapy , Urea/analogs & derivatives , Bicuspid , Blood Stains , Drug Combinations , Urea/administration & dosage
9.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-27474

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to compare the laryngeal tube (LT) insertion conditions at 3.0 and 3.5microgram/ml effect site concentrations (ECs) during anesthesia induction using the target-controlled infusion (TCI) of propofol. METHODS: The forty patients were randomly divided into two groups. The patients received TCI of propofol with a 6.0 microgram/ml target plasma concentration (Cpt) and then an LT was inserted without the aid of a muscle relaxant when the predicted EC reached 3.0microgram/ml (group 1) or 3.5microgram/ml (group 2). The conditions of LT insertion, i.e., mouth opening, gagging, coughing, head or limb movement, laryngospasm, and overall ease, and hemodynamic responses were evaluated 3 min after midazolam injection, at loss of consciousness and eyelash reflex, and immediately before, immediately after, 1 min after, and 3 min after LT insertion. We also compared times required to insert LTs, cuff volumes, and incidences of blood staining and of postoperative sore throat. RESULTS: The conditions of LT insertion, except laryngospasm and overall ease, were not significantly different in the two groups. The incidence of laryngospasm in group 1 (25%) was significantly higher than in group 2 (0%) and group 2 was better than group 1 in terms of overall ease of insertion (P<0.05). No significant differences were observed between the two groups in terms of hemodynamic responses. Minimum cuff volume to 60 cmH2O was 64.0 +/- 8.3 ml in Group 1 and 63.9 +/- 6.5 ml in Group 2, and time required for LT insertion was 21.0 +/- 11.0 sec in Group 1 and 24.7 +/- 16.6 sec in Group 2. Postoperative sore throat and blood stain incidences were not significantly different in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: After induction with 6microgram/ml of Cpt using propofol TCI for LT insertion, LT insertion at 3.5microgram/ml of EC provided a lower incidence of laryngospasm and better overall ease than insertion at 3.0microgram/ml of EC.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Blood Stains , Cough , Extremities , Gagging , Head , Hemodynamics , Humans , Incidence , Laryngismus , Midazolam , Mouth , Pharyngitis , Plasma , Propofol , Reflex , Unconsciousness
10.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-54117

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The laryngeal tube is a variant of the esophageal obturator airway. We compared laryngeal tube (LT), laryngeal mask airway classicTM (LMA) and laryngeal mask airway ProsealTM (PLMA) as a airway management device during general anesthesia. METHODS: Forty-five fasted healthy adult patients were enrolled in this study into one of three groups in a randomized, single-blinded protocol. Group 1 was to receive LT for airway management, LMA for Group 2, and PLMA for Group 3. General anesthesia was induced identically in three groups with thiopental sodium 5 mg/kg followed rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg. 90 seconds later, LT, LMA or PLMA was placed for airway management. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured immediately pre-induction control value, post-insertion of device 0 min, 1 min, 3 min and 5 min. We also compared times of insertion, the amounts of secretion, blood stain, and postoperative sore throat. RESULTS: There was no significant change of SBP, DBP and HR within three groups. All the groups showed stable hemodynamic results. The success rate on the first attempt was 93.6% (14/15, Group 1), 93.6% (14/15, Group 2) and 86.6% (13/15, Group 3). Minimum cuff volume to prevent gas leakage was 69.9+/-0.5 ml (Group 1), 11.1+/-4.3 ml (Group 2) and 11.9+/-3.2 ml (Group 3). The corresponding cuff pressure was 61.6+/-22.0 cmH2O (Group 1), 4.8+/-0.9 cmH2O (Group 2) and 4.6+/-1.5 cmH2O (Group 3). Moderate, severe sore throat was 20% (3/15, Group 1), 6.6% (1/15, Group 2) and 6.6% (1/15, Group 3). Moderate, profuse secretion was 40% (6/15, Group 1), 20% (3/15, Group 2) and 13.3% (2/15, Group 3). There was a 20% (3/15, Group 1) and 13.3% (2/15, Group 3) blood stain. But there was no blood stain for the Group 2. There was a 20% (3/15) gas leakage in Group 1, so we had to insert gas intermittently, but there were no gastric distension, regurgitation, aspiration, hypoxia, airway obstruction and laryngospasm in all three groups. CONCLUSIONS: All the groups revealed stable hemodynamics, no serious complications such as regurgitation, aspiration, hypoxia and airway obstruction during general anesthesia. But we did not find any evidence that LMA and PLMA have the remarkable advantages than laryngeal tube. So we suggested that laryngeal tube could be an alternative airway management device, even though further study will be needed.


Subject(s)
Adult , Airway Management , Airway Obstruction , Anesthesia, General , Hypoxia , Blood Pressure , Blood Stains , Heart Rate , Hemodynamics , Humans , Laryngeal Masks , Laryngismus , Pharyngitis , Thiopental
11.
MJFCT-Mansoura Journal of Forensic Medicine and Clinical Toxicology. 2002; 10 (2): 57-77
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-60212

ABSTRACT

This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between the age of the dried human bloodstains and the degree of detectability of morphine and phenobarbitone present in bloodstains. Detection of the drugs was studied in bloodstains at different time intervals [1, 14 days 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 months] by using thin layer chromatography [TLC] and enzyme multiplied immunoassay [EMIT]. Furthermore, the effect of storage temperature [25C and 20C] on detectability of these drugs was investigated. The results showed that both phenobarbitone and morphine could be detected by TLC from recent and old blood stains up to 5 months at both 25C by using EMIT, the percentages of both phenobarbitone and morphine concentrations were 48.39% and 82.59%, respectively, after 5 months of storage at room temperature [25C]. Thus, the decrease in morphine concentrations was less marked than that of phenobarbitone indicating that morphine was more stable in bloodstains. On the other hand, storage of blood stain samples at-20C showed slight insignificant variation in the concentrations of both phenobarbitone and morphine at all the time intervals up to 5 months. It became 98.98% and 98.80%, respectively, after 5 months. Thus, storage of bloodstains at 20C had a stability effect on the tested drugs. Statistical regression equation was used to predict the concentrations and percentages of both phenobarbitone and morphine in the dried bloodstains provided that the age of bloodstain is known at the time of assay


Subject(s)
Blood Stains , Phenobarbital/blood , Chromatography, Thin Layer , Enzyme Multiplied Immunoassay Technique , Age Factors
12.
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-45271

ABSTRACT

Forensic samples that are often degraded and limited in quality cause DNA typing analysis by conventional methods unsuitable. We performed a single tube-multiplex PCR on 9 STR loci (D3S1358, vWA, FGA, TH01, TPOX, CSF1PO, D5S818, D13S317, and D7S820) and the X-Y homologous gene amelogenin of DNA extracted from six week postmortem blood stain and decomposed muscle by using QIAGEN QIAamp blood or tissue procedure. An automated genetic analyzer based on fluorescent dye technology was used to detect STR allele patterns. The DNA profile of blood stain sample obtained a complete and unambiguous pattern, whereas, that of muscle DNA extracted from QIAamp tissue and Chelex plus QIAamp blood protocols showed detected STR alleles for 70 per cent and 50 per cent of all tested alleles, respectively. The degraded muscle DNA could not yield amplified products of large size STR alleles; CSF1PO, D13S317 and D7S820. However, the analysis which relied upon the PCR-based STR polymorphism analysis and automated genetic analyzer system offers an ideal strategy for forensic identification.


Subject(s)
Autopsy , Blood Stains , DNA/analysis , DNA Fingerprinting , Humans , Muscle, Skeletal/chemistry , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Polymorphism, Genetic/genetics , Sensitivity and Specificity , Tandem Repeat Sequences
13.
MJFCT-Mansoura Journal of Forensic Medicine and Clinical Toxicology. 2000; 8 (1): 137-147
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-54708

ABSTRACT

In this study, peptidase A [pep A] was successfully typed in hair root sheaths obtained from 320 unrelated Egyptian population sample of both sexes using electrophoresis technique. In each case, hair sample was typed first for pep A and confirmed by typing blood from the same donor. Peptidase A activity was found in 300 of the samples and the other 20 samples showed no activity as they had no outer root sheath indicating that enzyme activity was present only in sheath material. Three phenotypes of peptidase A were controlled by two alleles. The most frequent phenotype was pep A1-1, while the least frequent one was pep A2-2. The most frequent allele was pep A*1 with a frequency of 0.806. The phenotypic distribution of peptidase A in the Egyptian population sample was in a close agreement with that predicted by Hardy-Weinberg equation


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Isoenzymes , Peptide Hydrolases , Electrophoresis , Individuality , Phenotype , Blood Stains
14.
Egyptian Journal of Anatomy [The]. 1999; 22 (1): 81-94
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-50531

ABSTRACT

The drumstick is a particular chromatin structure in the neutrophils of various mammalian females. In the present study comparison was done between drumsticks of normal 50 human females and 70 animal females of seven different groups, including cats, dogs, rabbits, albino rats, cows, buffaloes and sheeps, each group consisted of ten animals. Fresh and dried blood films were done and stained for all females. In fresh blood the drumsticks were clearly detected in neutrophils with 3-5 lobes in human and 3-7 lobes in animals. They were formed of a basophilic dense homogeneous chromatin drum, often with central sapce, and attached to one nuclear lobe by a thread-like chromatin stick. There were Only oval and round shapes in all females, and highly significant low drumstick frequency was found in human than in animals but no significant differences were present between human and animal drum diameter and stick length. In dried blood, drumsticks were present after one and two months in some neutrophils with normal nuclei, but without cell membranes. They were identical in structure and shape to those of fresh blood, its frequency could not be estimated, and slight changes occurred in their dimensions. After three months, neutrophils with normal nuclei were completely absent. Lastly it was concluded that drumstick frequency could be successfully used for identification of only fresh human female blood, while its presence is useful for sex identification


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Female , Neutrophils , Female , Animals , Sex Characteristics , Individuality , Blood Stains , Comparative Study , Forensic Medicine
15.
New Egyptian Journal of Medicine [The]. 1998; 18 (2): 91-95
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-49043

ABSTRACT

Blood specimens of 10 healthy males and 10 healthy females were collected and prepared as fresh blood stain, one month old blood stain and 2 month old blood stain, then assayed for testosterone and progesterone hormone contents by radioimmunoassay. A forensic application was reported for the sex determination of these subjects whose blood strains were analyzed by radioimmunoassay to establish the sex origin of the fresh and dried old blood stain


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Radioimmunoassay , Blood Stains , Testosterone/analysis
17.
In. Castro Bobadilla, Dennis A; Dickerman Kraunick, Arema R. Compendio de medicina forense. Tegucigalpa, Alin Editora, oct. 1995. p.365-74, ilus.
Monography in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-166103

Subject(s)
Blood Stains
18.
Indian Pediatr ; 1992 Sep; 29(9): 1101-6
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-15399

ABSTRACT

The present study aims at analyzing the suitability of transcutaneous approach and filter paper technique using Minolta Jaundicemeter in the management of neonatal bilirubinemia. I compared serially measured values of Serum Bilirubin Index (SBI) by using filter paper technique and transcutaneous bilirubin index (TcBI) with serum bilirubin level determined by Diazo Method in 100 clinically jaundiced newborns and in 25 neonates at birth. The estimation of TcBI is simple, quick, reliable and non-traumatic to the newborn with no workload on the laboratory and technician. However, different nomograms are to be prepared for different laboratories, as also for the newborns with difference in skin pigmentation, gestational age and after phototherapy. SBI determined by filter paper technique eliminates these limitations. Moreover, the linear correlation was stronger between SBI and Diazo values (r = 0.9343, p < 0.001) in comparison to TcBI with Diazo values (r = 0.9090, p < 0.001). Further SBI readings almost correspond with actual serum bilirubin levels while corresponding TcBI values were much higher especially at higher diazo values. Thus TcBI can be used routinely for the surveillance of neonatal jaundice till it reaches a level corresponding to critical serum bilirubin level at which active management is required. At this point, serum bilirubin level may be confirmed by SBI.


Subject(s)
Bilirubin/blood , Blood Chemical Analysis/instrumentation , Blood Stains , Female , Fetal Blood/metabolism , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Jaundice, Neonatal/blood , Male , Neonatal Screening/instrumentation , Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted , Software
20.
Journal of the Egyptian Society of Parasitology. 1991; 21 (1): 151-161
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-20319

ABSTRACT

The biologist in forensic work is confronted with many problems on grouping of dry blood stains; these problems are due to many factors and environmental changes, which may mislead the analysis. The present work deals with the factors affecting ABO grouping of dry blood stains in Riyadh, including exposure to extremes of temperature, from refrigeration at -4C up to heating at 150C, effect of time till six months, occurrence of the stains on different fabrics, and effect of putrefaction. The results showed that, ABO grouping of dry blood stains was not affected by different substrata or cloth fabrics. 30% of the samples gave irronious results when exposed to temperature at 150C for 2 hours. Storage for six months at room temperature ranged from 29C-44C, representing the ambient temperature met with in Riyadh, gave no effects. Putrefaction showed that the antigraphic were deteriorated in 80% of cases after 90 days. Chromatographic separation was a suitable procedure before grouping the samples which were buried in sand or mud


Subject(s)
Blood Stains , Biological Factors
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