Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 21
Filter
1.
J. med. virol ; 92(10): 1-6, Aug. 2, 2020. tab
Article in English | LILACS, ColecionaSUS, CONASS, SES-RS | ID: biblio-1120884

ABSTRACT

Respiratory viral infection can cause severe disease and hospitalization, especially among children, the elderly, and patients with comorbidities. In Brazil, the official surveillance system of severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) investigates influenza A (IAV) and B (IBV) viruses, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus (HAdV), and parainfluenza viruses (hPIV 1­3). In Rio Grande do Sul (RS), Brazil, many fatalities associated with SARI between 2013 and 2017 occurred among patients without underlying diseases and for whom the causative agent had not been identified using official protocols. This cross­sectional study analyzed the presence of coronaviruses (HCoV), bocavirus (HBoV), metapneumovirus (hMPV), and rhinovirus in patients who died of SARI despite not having comorbidities, and that were negative for IAV, IBV, RSV, HAdV, and hPIV. Nasopharyngeal aspirates/swabs from patients were used for nucleic acid extraction. The presence of HCoVs OC43, HKU1, NL63, and 229E; HBoV; hMPV; and rhinovirus was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription­polymerase chain reaction. Clinical data were also analyzed. Between 2013 and 2017, 16 225 cases of SARI were reported in RS; 9.8% of the patients died; 20% of all fatal cases were patients without comorbidities and for whom no pathogen was detected using standard protocols. Analysis of 271 of these cases identified HCoV in nine cases; HBoV, hMPV, and rhinovirus were detected in 3, 3, and 10 cases, respectively. Of note, patients infected with HCoV were adults. Results reinforce the importance of including coronaviruses in diagnostic panels used by official surveillance systems because besides their pandemic potential, endemic HCoVs are associated to severe disease in healthy adults.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Child , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Young Adult , Respiratory System , Coronavirus , Epidemiological Monitoring , Infections , Patients , Rhinovirus , Viruses , Virus Diseases , Adenoviridae , Disease , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , Influenza, Human , Bocavirus
2.
São Paulo; s.n; 2017. 82 p. graf, tab.
Thesis in Portuguese | LILACS, SES-SP, SESSP-ACVSES | ID: biblio-1086337

ABSTRACT

O bocavírus humano (HBoV), gênero Bocavírus, família Parvoviridae está relacionado a doenças respiratórias, predominantemente na infância. Recebeu esta nomenclatura, devido a estrutura genômica apresentar similaridade aos gêneros parvovírus bovino e canino. Foram detectados 4 grupos: HBoV-1, HBoV-2, HBoV-3 e HBoV-4. Foi realizado um estudo retrospectivo, no ano de 2010, utilizando-se 300 amostras de secreção nasofaringe, coletadas de crianças de 0 a 5 anos de idade, com sintomas respiratórios agudo. As amostras foram registradas e processadas no Núcleo de Doenças Respiratórias do Instituto Adolfo Lutz...


Subject(s)
Bocavirus , Respiratory Tract Infections , Virology
3.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-279900

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To detect human bocavirus (HBoV) and investigate its genetic and evolutionary characteristics in children with acute respiratory infection in Tianjin, China.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>A total of 1,259 samples of nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children with a confirmed diagnosis of acute respiratory infection between January and December, 2012. Viral nucleic acid was extracted, HBoV was detected by real-time quantitative PCR, and the gene segments of nucleocapsid protein of HBoV in positive samples were amplified by PCR. Several products were randomly selected and sequenced.The sequence obtained was compared with the known sequence of HBoV, and a phylogenetic analysis was performed. All the samples were examined to detect for other common respiratory tract viruses.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Among the 1,259 samples, the positive rate of HBoV was 4.53% (57/1,259), and among the 57 samples with positive HBoV, 75% (43/57) were positive in children with an age of 6-36 months. The positive rate of HBoV in children peaked in summer (from June to August), and there was a mixed infection with other viruses. Sequence analysis was performed for the PCR products from 36 positive samples, and the presence of HBoV was confirmed, with a higher homology to the known sequence of HBoV.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>In Tianjin, acute respiratory infection in some children may be associated with HBoV infection, which is commonly seen in infants with an age of 6-36 months. The peak of HBoV infection occurs in summer. The phylogenetic analysis shows a high homology to the known sequence of HBoV, with few gene sequence variations.</p>


Subject(s)
Bocavirus , Classification , Child, Hospitalized , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Phylogeny , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Respiratory Tract Infections , Virology , Seasons
4.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-185155

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed at determining the detection rate of respiratory viruses and at investigating the risk factors associated with respiratory virus detection in young infants. METHODS: From September 2011 to August 2012, nasopharyngeal swabs were obtained from 227 infants aged < or =90 days with suspected infectious diseases, including sepsis. We performed a retrospective analysis of their clinical characteristics. The prevalence of respiratory viruses in their nasopharyngeal swabs was assayed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR). RESULTS: In total, 157 (69.2%) infants had more than one of the following respiratory viruses: respiratory syncytial virus (n=75), rhinovirus (n=42), influenza virus (n=18), parainfluenza virus (n=15), human metapneumovirus (n=9), coronavirus (n=9), adenovirus (n=4), and bocavirus (n=3). During the same period, bacterial infections were confirmed in 24 infants (10.6%). The detection of respiratory viruses was significantly associated with the presence of cough, a family history of respiratory illness, and a seasonal preference (fall/winter). Using logistic regression analysis, these 3 variables were also identified as significant risk factors. During fall and winter, detection of respiratory viruses was significantly higher in infants who did not have a bacterial infection. CONCLUSION: Respiratory virus is an important pathogen in young infants admitted to a hospital, who are suspected with infectious diseases. Detection of respiratory viruses in young infants was associated with seasonality (fall/winter), presence of respiratory symptoms and a family history of respiratory illness.


Subject(s)
Adenoviridae , Bacterial Infections , Bocavirus , Communicable Diseases , Coronavirus , Cough , Humans , Infant , Logistic Models , Metapneumovirus , Nasopharynx , Orthomyxoviridae , Paramyxoviridae Infections , Prevalence , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses , Respiratory Tract Infections , Retrospective Studies , Rhinovirus , Risk Factors , Seasons , Sepsis , Virus Diseases
5.
Chinese Journal of Virology ; (6): 190-193, 2012.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-354749

ABSTRACT

Porcine bocavirus (PBoV) was considered as a new member of the genus Bocavirus of the subfamily Parvovirinae of the family Parvoviridae, which was discovered in Swedish swine herds with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) in 2009. At present, as an emerging pathogen, it was paid great attention by researchers at home and abroad. This paper referred to some published literatures and reviewed several aspects of PBoV including its finding, classification, genome structure and replication, epidemiology, associativity with diseases, cultural and diagnostic methods.


Subject(s)
Animals , Biomedical Research , Bocavirus , Classification , Genetics , Physiology , Parvoviridae Infections , Diagnosis , Virology , Swine , Swine Diseases , Diagnosis , Virology
6.
Chinese Journal of Virology ; (6): 418-423, 2012.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-354714

ABSTRACT

To verify that the circular forms of bocavirus genome exist in their host, bocavirus episomes were detected in fecal samples of healthy piglets using a semi-nested PCR method. Two species of porcine bocaviruses (PBoVG2-episome and PBoVG3-episome) were identified for the first time. The relevant terminal sequences of the noncoding region (405 and 511 nt, respectively) were also obtained. Sequence analyses and secondary structure prediction indicated that the PBoVG2-episome was more similar to that of human bocavirus 3 (HBoV3) but the PBoVG3-episome was quite different from that of other members of the genus Bocavirus. Discovery of episomal forms of porcine bocaviruses (PBoV) suggested that PBoV, like HBoV, used a different replication mechanism from other parvoviruses. The sequencing of episome Inverted Terminal Repeats (ITRs) also contributes to a possible alternative strategy for constructing infectious molecular clones of bocavirus in a future study.


Subject(s)
Animals , Base Sequence , Bocavirus , Genetics , Physiology , DNA, Circular , Genetics , DNA, Viral , Genetics , Genome, Viral , Genetics , Molecular Sequence Data , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Swine , Virology
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-155873

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this prospective case-control study was to survey the detection rate of respiratory viruses in children with Kawasaki disease (KD) by using multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and to investigate the clinical implications of the prevalence of respiratory viruses during the acute phase of KD. METHODS: RT-PCR assays were carried out to screen for the presence of respiratory syncytial virus A and B, adenovirus, rhinovirus, parainfluenza viruses 1 to 4, influenza virus A and B, metapneumovirus, bocavirus, coronavirus OC43/229E and NL63, and enterovirus in nasopharyngeal secretions of 55 KD patients and 78 control subjects. RESULTS: Virus detection rates in KD patients and control subjects were 32.7% and 30.8%, respectively (P=0.811). However, there was no significant association between the presence of any of the 15 viruses and the incidence of KD. Comparisons between the 18 patients with positive RT-PCR results and the other 37 KD patients revealed no significant differences in terms of clinical findings (including the prevalence of incomplete presentation of the disease) and coronary artery diameter. CONCLUSION: A positive RT-PCR for currently epidemic respiratory viruses should not be used as an evidence against the diagnosis of KD. These viruses were not associated with the incomplete presentation of KD and coronary artery dilatation.


Subject(s)
Adenoviridae , Bocavirus , Case-Control Studies , Child , Coronary Aneurysm , Coronary Vessels , Coronavirus , Dilatation , Enterovirus , Humans , Incidence , Metapneumovirus , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome , Orthomyxoviridae , Paramyxoviridae Infections , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses , Respiratory Tract Infections , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Rhinovirus , Viruses
8.
Rev. otorrinolaringol. cir. cabeza cuello ; 71(3): 215-222, dic. 2011. tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-612123

ABSTRACT

Introducción: La hipoacusia sensorioneural súbita (HSNS), es una causa poco frecuente de hipoacusia. La mayoría son consideradas idiopáticas y sólo en el 10 por ciento-15 por ciento puede descubrirse un factor etiológico. Se han propuesto 4 teorías fisiopatológicas: viral, vascular, inmunológica y por ruptura de membranas. La etiología viral es controversial. Objetivo: Investigar la etiología viral como posible causa de HSNS y evaluar su presencia en relación con el pronóstico de recuperación auditiva. Material y método: Estudio descriptivo observacional de 24 meses, de pacientes con cuadro clínico de HSNS y exámenes compatibles. Previo al tratamiento se tomó hisopado y aspirado nasofaríngeo analizados mediante Microarray. Resultados: Se reclutaron 15 pacientes. En 9 se detectó virus respiratorio sincicial (VRS) y simultáneamente cuatro de ellos además otros virus (bocavirus, herpes VI y VII). No se detectaron casos de virus herpes I y II. No se han evidenciado diferencias en la evolución auditiva en el grupo con muestras positivas para virus. Conclusiones: La etiología viral de HSNS permanece en controversia. El 60 por ciento de los pacientes evaluados resultaron positivos, sin embargo, no hubo ningún virus herpes I ó II en las muestras. El VRS aparece como nuevo agente involucrado, aun cuando se encuentra fuera de temporada habitual.


Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is a rare cause of hearing loss. Most are considered idiopathic and only 10-15 percent can discover an etiologic factor. Four pathophysiological theories have been proposed: viral, vascular, immunological and rupture of membranes. The viral etiology is controversial and there are reports with varying results. Aim: To investigate the viral etiology as a cause of HSNS and evaluate their presence in relation to the prognosis of hearing recovery. Material and method: descriptive, observational study of 24 months, patients with symptoms and exams compatible SSHL. Before treatment, nasopharyngeal aspirate was taken and then analyzed using Microarray. Results: Were enrolled 15 patients. In 9 was detected a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and four of them simultaneously also other viruses (Bocavirus, Herpes VI and VII). There were no cases of Herpes Virus I and II. There were no evidence differences in auditory development in the group with samples positive for virus. Conclusions: The viral etiology of SSHL remains controversial. 60 percent of patients tested were positive, however, there was no Herpes virus I or II in the samples. RSV appears as a new agent involved, even when was out of regular season.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Adolescent , Adult , Female , Middle Aged , Hearing Loss, Sensorineural/virology , Hearing Loss, Sudden/virology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Bocavirus/isolation & purification , /isolation & purification , /isolation & purification , Prognosis , Hearing Loss, Sensorineural/etiology , Hearing Loss, Sensorineural/drug therapy , Hearing Loss, Sudden/drug therapy , Severity of Illness Index , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/isolation & purification
9.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-164302

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to compare clinical manifestations of human bocavirus (hBoV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and human rhinovirus (hRV) in children with acute wheezing. METHODS: We retrospectively investigated 549 virus-positive throat swabs obtained between January 2006 and December 2008 from pediatric inpatients with acute respiratory tract disease at Kwangju Christian Hospital. Among them, 109 patients, who had lower respiratory tract infections with wheezing, were enrolled in this study. The medical records of patients with positive results were reviewed for clinical data. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients with RSV was 7.15 months, 15.66 months in those with hRV, and 15.04 months in those with hBoV. The mean fever duration and frequency of patients with fever was 2.43 days and 47.9% for RSV, 2.86 days and 51.7% for hRV, and 3.75 days and 69.6% for hBoV. The frequency of patients with acute otitis media was 20.8% in the RSV, 20.7% in the hRV, and 13.0% in the hBoV groups. The frequency of lung infiltration on chest X-ray was 12.5% in the RSV, 20.7% in the hRV, and 47.8% in the hBoV groups. CONCLUSION: We compared the clinical manifestations of respiratory viral infections in infants and children with wheezing. However, further surveillance will be necessary to clarify the clinical manifestations of the viruses.


Subject(s)
Bocavirus , Child , Fever , Human bocavirus , Humans , Infant , Inpatients , Korea , Lung , Medical Records , Otitis Media , Pharynx , Respiratory Sounds , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses , Respiratory Tract Diseases , Respiratory Tract Infections , Retrospective Studies , Rhinovirus , Thorax
10.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-219044

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to identify the viral etiology of acute respiratory illnesses and to determine epidemiology in outpatients in Busan, Korea. METHODS: We collected nasal wash samples from 990 patients who visited the hospital for acute respiratory illnesses between January 2007 and December 2008. Extracted DNA or RNA from specimens was used for viral detection by an RT-PCR method. RESULTS: Of a total of 990 samples, viruses were detected in 351 cases (35.5%). The ratio of male to female was 1.6:1 and 93.7% were less than 5 years old. Rhinovirus was detected year-round in 202 cases (57.5%), respiratory syncytial virus from October to March in 57 cases (16.2%), adenovirus year-round in 37 cases (10.5%), influenza virus from December to April in 21 cases (6%), bocavirus from January to August in 15 cases (4.3%), parainfluenza virus from April to July in 9 cases (2.6%), coronavirus from January to July in 7 cases (2%), and enterovirus from June to September in 3 cases (0.9%). CONCLUSION: We identified the etiology and epidemiology of viruses that caused the acute respiratory diseases that were prevalent in Busan, 2007-2008. Further surveillance will be necessary.


Subject(s)
Adenoviridae , Bocavirus , Coronavirus , DNA , Enterovirus , Female , Humans , Male , Orthomyxoviridae , Outpatients , Paramyxoviridae Infections , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses , Rhinovirus , RNA , Viruses
11.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-316980

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To sequence the complete sequence of bocavirus I with sequence independent single primer amplification (SISPA-PCR).</p><p><b>METHODS</b>To exclude the co-effection samples, all clinical samples of diarrhea cases were screened with special primers of rotavirus, astrovirus, adenovirus, calicivirus and bocavirus I. The virus were enriched through ultracentrifugation. Other nucleic acids, such as human and bacteria genomes, were degradated by DNase I and RNase. DNA of bocavirus was Amplificated with SISPA-PCR, then purificated, cloned and sequenced. The sequences were alighmented in nr with blastn and assembled with DNAstar.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>A 4834bp sequence of bocavirus I were assembled.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>SISPA-PCR is an economical and efficient technique for sequence a virus complete genome.</p>


Subject(s)
Base Sequence , Bocavirus , Genetics , DNA Primers , Genetics , Diarrhea , Virology , Genome, Viral , Humans , Parvoviridae Infections , Virology , Polymerase Chain Reaction
12.
Rev. chil. infectol ; 26(6): 504-510, dic. 2009. ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-536829

ABSTRACT

The human bocavirus (HBoV), virus of the Parvoviridae family, discovered by molecular methods in 2005,has been reported in respiratory samples, stool, urine and blood, both in children and adults. Prevalence ratesrange from 0.8% in fecal samples of individuals with acute diarrhea, up to 19% in respiratory samples and blood.HBoV has been detected in up to 43% of nasopharyngeal samples in asymptomatic children. In Chile, HBoV wasdetected in 24.2% of nasopharyngeal swabs in children under 5 years of age with respiratory symptoms of which74% had coinfection with other viruses. In asymptomatic children under 5 years of age, 37.5% of NP sampleswere positive for HBoV. We discuss the role of HBoV as a causal agent of respiratory and/or enteric disease inlight of the high rates of coinfection and asymptomatic infections.


Subject(s)
Adult , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Bocavirus/isolation & purification , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Parvoviridae Infections/virology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Chile , Seasons
13.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 1289-1292, 2009.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-292723

ABSTRACT

<p><b>BACKGROUND</b>Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a newly identified human parvovirus that was originally detected in the respiratory secretions of children with respiratory infections. This study aimed to learn about the importance of HBoV infections by revealing the prevalence of serum antibodies against HBoV in Beijing population.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Two batches of serum specimens collected in different periods were tested by Western blotting for specific IgG against HBoV using recombinant VP2 as antigen.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Out of 677 serum specimens collected during April 1996 to March 1997, 400 (59.1%) were positive and antibody positive rate for another batch of 141 serum specimens collected in August, 2005 from adults aged from 20 years to over 60 years was 78.7% (111/141). Comparison of the sero-prevalence profiles for serum specimens collected during 1996 - 1997 to those collected in 2005 indicated that the antibody positive rate for specimens collected in 2005 was higher than that of the corresponding age groups collected during 1996 - 1997.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>The data suggest that HBoV has been circulating in Beijing population for at least over 10 years, and most of children had been exposed to HBoV by age of 7 years. Higher HBoV antibody positive rate shown in the serum specimens collected in 2005 suggested that infections by HBoV have been increased in Beijing population in recent years.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Antibodies, Viral , Blood , Blotting, Western , Bocavirus , Virulence , China , Epidemiology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Allergy and Immunology , Middle Aged , Parvoviridae Infections , Blood , Epidemiology , Allergy and Immunology , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Viral Proteins , Allergy and Immunology , Young Adult
14.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-325522

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To clone and express VP, gene from HBoV, and the expressed VP, protein was as the antigen in order to detect serum from children in Wenling area with lower respiratory tract infections.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>The VP, gene was recombined with the genome of Baculovirus, which infected the insect cell. The fusion protein with HA tag was applied to confirm the specificity of expressed protein. Furthermore, the recombinant protein was observed using electron microscopy. The 176 serum from children in Wenling area with lower respiratory tract infections was screened using Western blot.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The expressed VP2 protein was more than 60% in total proteins from insect cell, and MWt about 60 x 10(3). The virus-like particle (VLP) was observed using electron microscopy, and size about 20 nm. The 176 serum from children in wenling area with lower respiratory tract infections was screened using Western blot. The HBoV positive rate was 2.28% (4/176).</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>The VP2 protein from human bocavirus was expressed in insect cell successfully. Through HA tag the VP2 protein was specific, and then the assay using SDS-PAGE with Western blot could detect and screen the antibody in serum from children with lower respiratory tract infections rapidly and accurately.</p>


Subject(s)
Animals , Antibodies, Viral , Blood , Bocavirus , Genetics , Allergy and Immunology , Capsid Proteins , Genetics , Allergy and Immunology , Child, Preschool , Female , Gene Expression , Humans , Infant , Male , Parvoviridae Infections , Blood , Diagnosis , Allergy and Immunology , Virology , Recombinant Proteins , Genetics , Allergy and Immunology , Spodoptera
15.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-254129

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>In this study, human bronchial epithelial cells were inoculated with positive sputum specimens of HBoV. After four days' infection, cytopathic effects (CPE) were observed by inverted microscopy. These viruses all cause typical cell damages such as rounded and shrivelled, fusion and fallout. These damages got quick following increased future degenerations. The other assay result of CPE within the infected cells were observed by inverted microscopy, have typical "owl's eye" plaque and above 90 percent hemadsorption within the infected cells by erythrocytes for hemadsorption technique. The typical fluorescence lump of nucleus within the infected cells was found by indirect immunofluorescence technique.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>Isolation and identification of HBoV could be done in the human bronchial epithelial cell, and we found some characterizing CPE in the human bronchial epithelial cell after HBoV infection. The above studies pave a way for studying pathogenicity of human bocavirus.</p>


Subject(s)
Bocavirus , Physiology , Bronchi , Cell Biology , Cell Death , Physiology , Cell Survival , Physiology , Cells, Cultured , Epithelial Cells , Cell Biology , Virology , Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Microscopy, Fluorescence
16.
Chinese Journal of Pediatrics ; (12): 111-114, 2008.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-249445

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To find out the importance of human bocavirus (HBoV) as an infectious agent for population in Beijing, China, seroprevalence study was conducted by using expressed recombinant major capsid VP2 protein as an antigen.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Serum specimens collected from infants and children who visited the Children's Hospital Affiliated to the Capital Institute of Pediatrics for health check up and adults visited the Xuanwu Hospital, Beijing for diseases other than respiratory infections from April 1996 to March 1997 were used for investigation. The major capsid protein VP2 from HBoV was expressed in E. coli strain BL21 (DE3) with the transformed PET30b vector inserted with full-length VP2 gene of HBoV and the specific antigenicity of this expressed protein was validated by previous study. Western blot was used to detect specific IgG antibody against HBoV in collected serum specimens diluted to 1:200. Mock expressed protein was E. coli cells strain BL21 (DE3) with the transformed PET30b vector without insert. Anti-His monoclonal antibody and rabbit anti-HBoV VP2 polypeptides hyper-immune serum were used as positive control for antibody detection.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Out of 677 serum specimens tested, 400 (59.1%) were positive by Western blot. About 45.3% (34/75) of the newborns under 1 month of age had anti-HBoV antibodies, and antibody positive rates were lower in the age groups of 1 and 2 months (41.4% and 31.3%, respectively) and were higher in the following ages from 6 months to 7 years (from 45.6% to 69.7%). The antibody positive rates were at a relatively constant level (about 70%) in the age groups from 7 years to 40 years and became lower (61.8% - 62.8%) in groups of age over 50 years.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>The high seroprevalence against recombinant HBoV VP2 protein and early age antibody acquisition indicate that HBoV has been circulating in Beijing, China as early as in 1996 and most of children had been exposed to HBoV by the age of 7 years. Infants under the age of 6 months were susceptible to infection with this virus.</p>


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Viral , Blood , Blotting, Western , Bocavirus , Allergy and Immunology , Capsid Proteins , Allergy and Immunology , Child , Child, Preschool , China , Epidemiology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Blood , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Parvoviridae Infections , Epidemiology , Allergy and Immunology , Prevalence , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Young Adult
17.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 1607-1610, 2008.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-293950

ABSTRACT

<p><b>BACKGROUND</b>Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a parvovirus recently found to possibly cause respiratory tract disease in children and adults. This study investigated HBoV infection and its clinical characteristics in children younger than five years of age suffering from acute lower respiratory tract infection in Beijing Children's Hospital.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children suffering from acute lower respiratory tract infection during the winters of 2004 to 2006 (from November through the following February). HBoV was detected by polymerase chain reaction amplification and virus isolation and the amplification products were sequenced for identification.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>HBoV infection was detected in 16 of 333 study subjects. Coinfections with respiratory syncytial virus were detected in 3 of 16 HBoV positive patients with acute lower respiratory tract infection. The median age for HBoV positive children was 8 months (mean age, 17 months; range, 3 to 57 months). Among the HBoV positive children, 14 were younger than 3 years old, 9 were younger than 1 year old and 7 were younger than 6 months. These 16 positive HBoV children exhibited coughing and abnormal chest radiography findings and more than 60% of these children had wheezing and fever. Ten children were clinically diagnosed with pneumonia, 2 bronchiolitis, 2 acute bronchitis and 2 asthma. One child died.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>HBoV was detected in about 5% of children with acute lower respiratory infection seen in Beijing Children's Hospital. Further investigations regarding clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of HBoV infection are needed.</p>


Subject(s)
Bocavirus , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Parvoviridae Infections , Diagnosis , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Respiratory Tract Infections , Diagnosis
18.
Chinese Journal of Virology ; (6): 57-59, 2007.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-334909

ABSTRACT

Human bocavirus, which was firstly discovered in 2005, is a new human parvovirus associated with lower respiratory tract infection in children. In this study, a human bocavirus, named WLL-1 isolate, was identified in Wenlin County, Zhejiang Province. The genome of bocavirus WLL-1 has been sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic analyses showed that WLL-1 shares 99% homology with other bocaviruses recently reported, but also has some special variations.


Subject(s)
Bocavirus , Classification , Genetics , China , DNA, Viral , Chemistry , Genetics , Genome, Viral , Humans , Molecular Sequence Data , Phylogeny , Sequence Analysis, DNA
19.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-248822

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To study the clinical characteristics of human bocavirus (HBoV) among children and to understand the association of HBoV with human diseases.</p><p><b>METHOD</b>Totally 148 nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) samples were collect from hospitalized children with acute respiratory infection during Oct. 2005 to Feb. 2006. Two serum samples were obtained from HBoV positive patients. PCR was used to assay all these samples and PCR products were sequenced.</p><p><b>RESULT</b>HBoV was positive in 11 of 148 NPA samples. The positive rate was 7.4 percent. The serum samples of HBoV infected patients showed that serum contained HBoV by PCR assay. All these HBoV positive patients had the clinical symptoms of bronchitis, bronchopneumonia and pneumonia. Some patients had diarrhea.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>All patients infected with HBoV had upper and lower respiratory tract infections. HBoV is a probable important pathogen of upper and lower respiratory tract infection. The HBoV could cause viremia. In addition, some HBoV patients had diarrhea. HBoV infection probably could also result in intestinal disease and other related symptoms.</p>


Subject(s)
Bocavirus , Genetics , Child , Child, Preschool , DNA, Viral , Blood , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Parvoviridae Infections , Virology , Respiratory Tract Infections , Virology
20.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-248763

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate maternal-fetal transmission at human bocavirus (HBoV).</p><p><b>METHODS</b>IgG antibody to HBoV in serum samples of 316 mothers were determined with ELISA and HBoV DNA was determined with real time PCR in the sera of the mothers and their infants.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>HBoV-IgG was positive in 40.20 percent (127/316) of the mothers, while it was positive in 29.43 percent (93/316) of the cord blood specimens of the infants. The difference between the two groups was significant (X2=8.12, P less than 0.005); 93 samples of both the mothers and the infants were positive for HBoV-IgG.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>HBoV-IgG can cross the placenta to the fetuses through placenta. Further study is needed to answer the question whether vertical maternal-fetal transmission occurs.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Antibodies, Viral , Blood , Bocavirus , DNA, Viral , Blood , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Blood , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Parvoviridae Infections , Pregnancy , Prospective Studies
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL