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1.
International Journal of Oral Science ; (4): 6-6, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-971593

ABSTRACT

The failure rate of dental implantation in patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is higher than that in non-diabetic patients. This due, in part, to the impaired function of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) from the jawbone marrow of T2DM patients (DM-BMSCs), limiting implant osseointegration. RNA N6-methyladenine (m6A) is important for BMSC function and diabetes regulation. However, it remains unclear how to best regulate m6A modifications in DM-BMSCs to enhance function. Based on the "m6A site methylation stoichiometry" of m6A single nucleotide arrays, we identified 834 differential m6A-methylated genes in DM-BMSCs compared with normal-BMSCs (N-BMSCs), including 43 and 790 m6A hypermethylated and hypomethylated genes, respectively, and 1 gene containing hyper- and hypomethylated m6A sites. Differential m6A hypermethylated sites were primarily distributed in the coding sequence, while hypomethylated sites were mainly in the 3'-untranslated region. The largest and smallest proportions of m6A-methylated genes were on chromosome 1 and 21, respectively. MazF-PCR and real-time RT-PCR results for the validation of erythrocyte membrane protein band 4.1 like 3, activity-dependent neuroprotector homeobox (ADNP), growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11), and regulator of G protein signalling 2 agree with m6A single nucleotide array results; ADNP and GDF11 mRNA expression decreased in DM-BMSCs. Furthermore, gene ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses suggested that most of these genes were enriched in metabolic processes. This study reveals the differential m6A sites of DM-BMSCs compared with N-BMSCs and identifies candidate target genes to enhance BMSC function and improve implantation success in T2DM patients.


Subject(s)
Humans , Bone Marrow/metabolism , Bone Morphogenetic Proteins/metabolism , Dental Implants/adverse effects , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism , Growth Differentiation Factors/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , RNA/metabolism , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional
2.
Journal of Experimental Hematology ; (6): 154-161, 2023.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-971118

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To investigate the effect of adipocytes in the bone marrow microenvironment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) on the pathogenesis of MM.@*METHODS@#Bone marrow adipocytes (BMA) in bone marrow smears of health donors (HD) and newly diagnosed MM (ND-MM) patients were evaluated with oil red O staining. The mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from HD and ND-MM patients were isolated, and in vitro co-culture assay was used to explore the effects of MM cells on the adipogenic differentiation of MSC and the role of BMA in the survival and drug resistance of MM cells. The expression of adipogenic/osteogenic differentiation-related genes PPAR-γ, DLK1, DGAT1, FABP4, FASN and ALP both in MSC and MSC-derived adipocytes was determined with real-time quantitative PCR. The Western blot was employed to detect the expression levels of IL-6, IL-10, SDF-1α, TNF-α and IGF-1 in the supernatant with or without PPAR-γ inhibitor.@*RESULTS@#The results of oil red O staining of bone marrow smears showed that BMA increased significantly in patients of ND-MM compared with the normal control group, and the BMA content was related to the disease status. The content of BMA decreased in the patients with effective chemotherapy. MM cells up-regulated the expression of MSC adipogenic differentiation-related genes PPAR-γ, DLK1, DGAT1, FABP4 and FASN, but the expression of osteogenic differentiation-related gene ALP was significantly down-regulated. This means that the direct consequence of the interaction between MM cells and MSC in the bone marrow microenvironment is to promote the differentiation of MSC into adipocytes at the expense of osteoblasts, and the cytokines detected in supernatant changed. PPAR-γ inhibitor G3335 could partially reverse the release of cytokines by BMA. Those results confirmed that BMA regulated the release of cytokines via PPAR-γ signal, and PPAR-γ inhibitor G3335 could distort PPAR-γ mediated BMA maturation and cytokines release. The increased BMA and related cytokines effectively promoted the proliferation, migration and drug resistance of MM cells.@*CONCLUSION@#The BMA and its associated cytokines are the promoting factors in the survival, proliferation and migration of MM cells. BMA can protect MM cells from drug-induced apoptosis and plays an important role in MM treatment failure and disease progression.


Subject(s)
Humans , Osteogenesis/genetics , Bone Marrow/metabolism , Multiple Myeloma/metabolism , Drug Resistance, Neoplasm , Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors/pharmacology , Cell Differentiation , Adipogenesis , Cytokines/metabolism , Adipocytes/metabolism , Bone Marrow Cells/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , PPAR gamma/pharmacology , Tumor Microenvironment
3.
Journal of Experimental Hematology ; (6): 377-382, 2023.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-982069

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To investigate the clinical significance of SFRP1 gene and its methylation in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) .@*METHODS@#Methylation-specific PCR (MSP) was used to detect the methylation status of SFRP1 gene in bone marrow mononuclear cells of 43 children with newly diagnosed ALL before chemotherapy (primary group) and when the bone marrow reached complete remission d 46 after induction of remission chemotherapy (remission group), the expression of SFRP1 mRNA was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), the expression of SFRP1 protein was detected by Western blot, and clinical data of children were collected, the clinical significance of SFRP1 gene methylation in children with ALL was analyze.@*RESULTS@#The positive rate of SFRP1 gene promoter methylation in the primary group (44.19%) was significantly higher than that in the remission group (11.63%) (χ2=11.328, P<0.05). The relative expression levels of SFRP1 mRNA and protein in bone marrow mononuclear cells of children in the primary group were significantly lower than those in the remission group (P<0.05). Promoter methylation of SFRP1 gene was associated with risk level (χ2=15.613, P=0.000) and survival of children (χ2=6.561, P=0.010) in the primary group, children with SFRP1 hypermethylation had significantly increased risk and shortened event-free survival time, but no significant difference in other clinical data.@*CONCLUSION@#Hypermethylation of SFRP1 gene promoter may be involved in the development of childhood ALL, and its hypermethylation may be associated with poor prognosis.


Subject(s)
Child , Humans , Clinical Relevance , DNA Methylation , Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/genetics , Bone Marrow/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism
4.
Journal of Experimental Hematology ; (6): 744-749, 2022.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-939682

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To explore the expression of cellular apoptosis susceptibility protein (CAS) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its correlation with clinical characteristics.@*METHODS@#The expression of CAS in bone marrow tissue of 54 patients with AML and 24 patients with non-hematological malignant diseases was detected by Western blot and immune-histochemical method, and compared between AML group and control group. Also the relationship of CAS expression in AML and sex, age, WBC count, Hb, platelet count, bone marrow blast cell ratio, ki-67 index, cytogenetic and molecular biological prognostic risk stratification, extramedullary infiltration and other clinical characteristics was analyzed.@*RESULTS@#Western blot showed that the expression of CAS protein in bone marrow biopsies of AML patients was significantly higher than that in control group (P<0.05). Immune-histochemical method revealed that CAS was mainly located in the cytoplasm in both AML group and control group. Among 54 AML patients, 14 patients (25.9%) showed high expression of CAS, while all the 24 patients in the control group showed low expression of CAS. The high expression rate of CAS in AML patients was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.05). There were statistically significant differences in prognostic risk stratification and the remission rate of the first chemotherapy between CAS high expression group and CAS low expression group in AML (P<0.05). The proportion of high risk patients and unremission patients after the first chemotherapy in CAS high expression group were significantly higher than those in CAS low expression group (57.1% vs 27.5%, 30.8% vs 7.9%), while the proportion of low risk patients and complete remission patients after the first chemotherapy were significantly lower than those in CAS low expression group (14.3% vs 37.5%, 53.8% vs 84.2%). In AML patients, the ki-67 index of bone marrow tissue in CAS high expression group was higher than that in CAS low expression group (60% vs 50%) (P<0.05).@*CONCLUSION@#CAS is localized in cytoplasm in both AML and non-hematological malignant diseases, and its expression increases in AML. CAS is related to the risk stratification of cytogenetics and molecular biology, the remission rate after the first chemotherapy and ki-67 index in AML, which suggests that CAS may be involved in the occurrence and development of AML.


Subject(s)
Humans , Bone Marrow/metabolism , Cellular Apoptosis Susceptibility Protein/metabolism , Ki-67 Antigen/metabolism , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/drug therapy , Prognosis , Remission Induction
5.
Rev. peru. med. exp. salud publica ; 34(3): 436-444, jul.-sep. 2017. graf
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-902940

ABSTRACT

RESUMEN Objetivos Evaluar el efecto de las nanopartículas de ZnO, TiO2 y SiO2 sobre la viabilidad celular y la expresión génica de las interleuquinas 7 y 3 y del factor estimulante de colonias de granulocito - macrófago (GM-CSF) en Mus musculus. Materiales y métodos Se extrajo médula ósea roja de cinco roedores (Balb/c) para el estudio de viabilidad celular mediante la prueba de MTT. Por otro lado, grupos cinco roedores fueron inoculados vía intraperitoneal con dosis de 0,5; 1; 2,5; 5 y 10 mg/kg de nanopartículas de ZnO y SiO2 y de 5; 10; 15; 20 y 25 mg/kg de nanopartículas de TiO2, 30 h después, se obtuvo el ARN a partir de la médula ósea roja para los análisis de expresión génica empleando las técnicas de PCR y RT-PCR cuantitativa. Resultados Las nanopartículas de ZnO y SiO2 redujeron la viabilidad celular de una manera dosis-dependiente en un 37 y 26%, respectivamente, a partir de una dosis de 1 mg/kg. En cuanto al efecto sobre la expresión génica, a las dosis 5 y 10 mg/kg, las nanopartículas de TiO2 redujeron en mayor porcentaje la expresión de las interleuquinas 7 y 3 (55,3 y 70,2% respectivamente), con respecto a la expresión del GM-CSF, el mayor porcentaje de reducción lo produjo las nanopartículas de SiO2 (91%). Las nanopartículas de ZnO redujeron a partir de las dosis de 20 y 25 mg/kg. Conclusiones Las nanopartículas de ZnO, SiO2 y TiO2 alteran la viabilidad celular y la expresión génica en la médula ósea de ratón.


ABSTRACT Objectives To evaluate the effect of ZnO, TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles on cell viability and expression of the interleukin 7, interleukin 3, and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) genes in Mus musculus. Material and methods Red bone marrow was extracted from five Balb/c mice for the analysis of cell viability using the MTT test. The mice were divided into two groups of five each: one group was inoculated intraperitoneally with 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, and 10 mg/kg of ZnO and SiO2 nanoparticles, respectively, and the other group was inoculated with 5.0, 10.0, 15.0, 20.0, and 25 mg/kg of TiO2 nanoparticles, respectively. Thirty hours later, RNA was extracted from the red bone marrow of the mice in both groups for gene expression analysis using quantitative PCR and RT-PCR. Results ZnO and SiO2 nanoparticles reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner by 37% and 26%, respectively, starting at a dose of 1 mg/kg. TiO2 nanoparticles at 5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg reduced the gene expression of interleukins 7 and 3 by 55.3% and 70.2%, respectively, and SiO2 nanoparticles caused the greatest decrease (91%) in the expression of GM-CSF. ZnO nanoparticles reduced the expression of GM-CSF starting at doses of 20 mg/kg and 25 mg/kg. Conclusions ZnO, SiO2 and TiO2 nanoparticles affect cell viability and gene expression in the mouse bone marrow.


Subject(s)
Animals , Mice , Titanium/pharmacology , Zinc Oxide/pharmacology , Bone Marrow/drug effects , Bone Marrow/metabolism , Gene Expression/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/biosynthesis , Interleukin-7/biosynthesis , Interleukin-3/biosynthesis , Silicon Dioxide/pharmacology , Nanoparticles , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/genetics , Interleukin-7/genetics , Interleukin-3/genetics , Mice, Inbred BALB C
6.
Clinics ; 71(8): 464-469, Aug. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-794629

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Bone marrow adipose tissue has been associated with low bone mineral density. However, no data exist regarding marrow adipose tissue in primary hyperparathyroidism, a disorder associated with bone loss in conditions of high bone turnover. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between marrow adipose tissue, bone mass and parathyroid hormone. The influence of osteocalcin on the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was also evaluated. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at a university hospital, involving 18 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and 21 controls (CG). Bone mass was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and marrow adipose tissue was assessed by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biochemical evaluation included the determination of parathyroid hormone, osteocalcin, glucose and insulin levels. RESULTS: A negative association was found between the bone mass at the 1/3 radius and parathyroid hormone levels (r = -0.69; p<0.01). Marrow adipose tissue was not significantly increased in patients (CG = 32.8±11.2% vs PHPT = 38.6±12%). The serum levels of osteocalcin were higher in patients (CG = 8.6±3.6 ng/mL vs PHPT = 36.5±38.4 ng/mL; p<0.005), but no associations were observed between osteocalcin and insulin or between insulin and both marrow adipose tissue and bone mass. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the increment of adipogenesis in the bone marrow microenvironment under conditions of high bone turnover due to primary hyperparathyroidism is limited. Despite the increased serum levels of osteocalcin due to primary hyperparathyroidism, these patients tend to have impaired insulin sensitivity.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Bone Marrow/metabolism , Insulin Resistance/physiology , Osteocalcin/blood , Adipose Tissue/metabolism , Hyperparathyroidism, Primary/metabolism , Parathyroid Hormone/blood , Reference Values , Blood Glucose/analysis , Bone Marrow/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Absorptiometry, Photon , Bone Density/physiology , Case-Control Studies , Adipose Tissue/diagnostic imaging , Calcium/blood , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hyperparathyroidism, Primary/etiology , Hyperparathyroidism, Primary/diagnostic imaging , Adipogenesis/physiology , Homeostasis
7.
Annals of Laboratory Medicine ; : 170-173, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-151579

ABSTRACT

We report the first Far Eastern case of a Korean child with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) caused by a novel syntaxin 11 (STX11) mutation. A 33-month-old boy born to non-consanguineous Korean parents was admitted for intermittent fever lasting one week, pancytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, and HLH in the bone marrow. Under the impression of HLH, genetic study revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation of STX11: c.650T>C, p.Leu217Pro. Although no large deletion or allele drop was identified, genotype analysis demonstrated that the homozygous c.650T>C may have resulted from the duplication of a maternal (unimaternal) chromosomal region and concurrent loss of the other paternal allele, likely caused by meiotic errors such as two crossover events. A cumulative study of such novel mutations and their effects on specific protein interactions may deepen the understanding of how abnormal STX1 expression results in deficient cytotoxic function.


Subject(s)
Child, Preschool , Humans , Male , Alleles , Amino Acid Sequence , Asian People/genetics , Base Sequence , Bone Marrow/metabolism , Comparative Genomic Hybridization , DNA Mutational Analysis , Genotype , Haplotypes , Homozygote , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/genetics , Molecular Sequence Data , Mutation, Missense , Pedigree , Qa-SNARE Proteins/genetics , Republic of Korea , Sequence Alignment
10.
Annals of Laboratory Medicine ; : 399-404, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-59857

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nucleophosmin gene (NPM1) mutation may be a good molecular marker for assessing the clinical status and predicting the outcomes in AML patients. We evaluated the applicability of NPM1 type A mutation (NPM1-mutA) quantitation for this purpose. METHODS: Twenty-seven AML patients with normal karyotype but bearing the mutated NPM1 were enrolled in the study, and real-time quantitative PCR of NPM1-mutA was performed on 93 bone marrow (BM) samples (27 samples at diagnosis and 56 at follow-up). The NPM1-mutA allele burdens (represented as the NPM1-mutA/Abelson gene (ABL) ratio) at diagnosis and at follow-up were compared. RESULTS: The median NPM1-mutA/ABL ratio was 1.3287 at diagnosis and 0.092 at 28 days after chemotherapy, corresponding to a median log10 reduction of 1.7061. Significant correlations were observed between BM blast counts and NPM1-mutA quantitation results measured at diagnosis (γ=0.5885, P=0.0012) and after chemotherapy (γ=0.5106, P=0.0065). Total 16 patients achieved morphologic complete remission at 28 days after chemotherapy, and 14 (87.5%) patients showed a >3 log10 reduction of the NPM1-mutA/ABL ratio. The NPM1-mutA allele was detected in each of five patients who had relapsed, giving a median increase of 0.91-fold of the NPM1-mutA/ABL ratio at relapse over that at diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: The NPM1-mutA quantitation results corresponded to BM assessment results with high stability at relapse, and could predict patient outcomes. Quantitation of the NPM1-mutA burden at follow-up would be useful in the management of AML patients harboring this gene mutation.


Subject(s)
Humans , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Bone Marrow/metabolism , Cytarabine/therapeutic use , Daunorubicin , Karyotype , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/drug therapy , Mutation , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Recurrence , Remission Induction , Retrospective Studies , Sequence Analysis, DNA , fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3/genetics
12.
Annals of Laboratory Medicine ; : 291-299, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-48343

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mutations in calreticulin (CALR) have been reported to be key markers in the molecular diagnosis of myeloid proliferative neoplasms. In most previous reports, CALR mutations were analyzed by using Sanger sequencing. Here, we report a new, rapid, and convenient system for screening CALR mutations without sequencing. METHODS: Eighty-three bone marrow samples were obtained from 81 patients with thrombocytosis. PCR primers were designed to detect wild-type CALR (product: 357 bp) and CALR with type 1 (product: 302 bp) and type 2 mutations (product: 272 bp) in one reaction. The results were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and compared with results from fragment analysis. RESULTS: The minimum detection limit of the screening PCR was 10 ng for type 1, 1 ng for type 2, and 0.1 ng for cases with both mutations. CALR type 1 and type 2 mutants were detected with screening PCR with a maximal analytical sensitivity of 3.2% and <0.8%, respectively. The screening PCR detected 94.1% (16/17) of mutation cases and showed concordant results with sequencing in the cases of type 1 and type 2 mutations. Sanger sequencing identified one novel mutation (c.1123_1132delinsTGC). Compared with sequencing, the screening PCR showed 94.1% sensitivity, 100.0% specificity, 100.0% positive predictive value, and 98.5% negative predictive value. Compared with fragment analysis, the screening PCR presented 88.9% sensitivity and 100.0% specificity. CONCLUSIONS: This screening PCR is a rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective method for the detection of major CALR mutations.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Base Sequence , Bone Marrow/metabolism , Calreticulin/chemistry , DNA Mutational Analysis , Follow-Up Studies , Genotype , Janus Kinase 2/chemistry , Mutation , Myeloproliferative Disorders/complications , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Thrombocytosis/complications
14.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 154-159, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-212758

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Bilateral oophorectomy leads to reduced bone mineral density (BMD), and reduced BMD is associated with increased marrow fat and reduced marrow perfusion. Purpose of this study was to investigate how soon these changes occur following surgical oophorectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six patients who underwent hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were studied. At baseline, mean patient age was 49.5 years (range: 45-54 years). Third lumbar vertebral body BMD measurement using quantitative CT, marrow fat fraction (FF) using MR spectroscopy and marrow perfusion using dynamic contrast enhanced MRI were conducted immediately prior to surgery and at 3, 9, and 21 months after surgery. RESULTS: Reduced BMD, increased marrow FF, and reduced marrow perfusion occurred synchronously post-oophorectomy. There was a sharp decrease of 12.5 +/- 7.2% in BMD (n = 6), a sharp increase of 92.2 +/- 46.3% (n = 6) in FF, a sharp decrease of 23.6 +/- 3.9% in maximum contrast enhancement (n = 5), and of 45.4 +/- 7.7% for enhancement slope (n = 5) during the initial 3 months post surgery. BMD and marrow perfusion continued to decrease, and marrow FF continued to increase at a slower rate during the following 18 months. Friedman test showed a significant trend for these changes (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Bilateral oophorectomy leads to a rapid decrease in lumbar BMD, an increase in marrow fat content, and a decrease in marrow blood perfusion.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Body Mass Index , Bone Density , Bone Marrow/metabolism , Contrast Media , Hysterectomy , Lipids/analysis , Longitudinal Studies , Lumbar Vertebrae/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Ovariectomy , Prospective Studies
15.
Annals of Laboratory Medicine ; : 563-569, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-76939

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Angiogenesis is important for the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Bone marrow (BM) microvessel density (MVD) is a useful marker of angiogenesis and is determined by immunohistochemical staining with anti-CD34 antibody. This study investigated the prognostic impact of MVD and demonstrated the relationship between MVD and previously mentioned prognostic factors in patients with MM. METHODS: The study included 107 patients with MM. MVD was assessed at initial diagnosis in a blinded manner by two hematopathologists who examined three CD34-positive hot spots per patient and counted the number of vessels in BM samples. Patients were divided into three groups according to MVD tertiles. Cumulative progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) curves, calculated by using Kaplan-Meier method, were compared among the three groups. Prognostic impact of MVD was assessed by calculating Cox proportional hazard ratio (HR). RESULTS: Median MVDs in the three groups were 16.8, 33.9, and 54.7. MVDs were correlated with other prognostic factors, including beta2-microglobulin concentration, plasma cell percentage in the BM, and cancer stage according to the International Staging System. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that high MVD was an independent predictor of PFS (HR=2.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-5.42; P=0.013). PFS was significantly lower in the high MVD group than in the low MVD group (P=0.025). However, no difference was observed in the OS (P=0.428). CONCLUSIONS: Increased BM MVD is a marker of poor prognosis in patients newly diagnosed with MM. BM MVD should be assessed at the initial diagnosis of MM.


Subject(s)
Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Antigens, CD34/metabolism , Bone Marrow/metabolism , Disease-Free Survival , Immunohistochemistry , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Microvessels/physiopathology , Multiple Myeloma/diagnosis , Neoplasm Staging , Neovascularization, Pathologic , Plasma Cells/cytology , Prognosis , Proportional Hazards Models , Regression Analysis , Risk Factors
19.
Annals of Laboratory Medicine ; : 426-432, 2014.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-178239

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The presence of significant dysplasia in bone marrow (BM) aspirates helps to distinguish between hypocellular myelodysplastic syndrome (hMDS) and aplastic anemia (AA). Occasionally, diluted BM aspirates make it difficult to recognize dysplastic changes and can also negatively affect the detection of cytogenetic abnormalities in hMDS. We evaluated the usefulness of CD34 and p53 immunoreactivity for discriminating between hMDS and AA and for estimating survival outcomes in hMDS patients. METHODS: BM clot section (BMC) or BM biopsy (BMB) specimens were obtained from 64 hMDS/AA patients (33 with hMDS and 31 with AA) and seven controls. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for CD34 and p53 was performed by using the EnVision detection system (Dako, Denmark). We compared the results of IHC staining, BM findings, and chromosomal analyses, and determined overall survival outcomes. RESULTS: The number of CD34- and p53-positive BM cells was higher among the patients with hMDS than among the patients with AA (P<0.001 and P=0.001, respectively). hMDS patients with increased CD34-positive cells had significantly poorer survival outcomes compared with those with normal number of CD34-positive cells (P=0.013). CONCLUSIONS: CD34 and p53 IHC stains of BMC or BMB provide useful information for differentiating between hMDS and AA. CD34 IHC staining of BMC or BMB also provides useful information for estimating survival outcomes in hMDS patients.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Anemia, Aplastic/diagnosis , Antigens, CD34/metabolism , Bone Marrow/metabolism , Chromosome Aberrations , Diagnosis, Differential , Immunohistochemistry , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/diagnosis , ROC Curve , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/metabolism
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