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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-929132

ABSTRACT

Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is widely used for bone tissue engineering technology. Immune regulations play important roles in the process of DO like other bone regeneration mechanisms. Compared with others, the immune regulation processes of DO have their distinct features. In this review, we summarized the immune-related events including changes in and effects of immune cells, immune-related cytokines, and signaling pathways at different periods in the process of DO. We aim to elucidated our understanding and unknowns about the immunomodulatory role of DO. The goal of this is to use the known knowledge to further modify existing methods of DO, and to develop novel DO strategies in our unknown areas through more detailed studies of the work we have done.


Subject(s)
Bone Regeneration/physiology , Bone and Bones , Osteogenesis/physiology , Osteogenesis, Distraction/methods , Tissue Engineering
2.
Rev. cuba. estomatol ; 57(3): e2083, jul.-set. 2020. graf
Article in English | LILACS, CUMED | ID: biblio-1126528

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction: The placement of dental implants is based on the creation of optimal conditions in the remnant bone. In some cases, it is indispensable to perform bone regeneration procedures and use barrier membranes to create such optimal conditions capable of favorably supporting the dental implant. Objective: Describe alternatives of barrier membranes in cases of guided bone regeneration. Case report: A female 53-year-old patient presents with a gingival fistula attached to tooth 14. Root fracture is diagnosed and extraction is conducted. Next, alveolar biomodification is performed to carry out guided bone regeneration and placement of a fibrin-rich plasma membrane. When healing is complete dental implants will be placed. Conclusions: The use of barrier membrane alternatives has shown to be effective in cases of guided bone regeneration(AU)


RESUMEN Introducción: Para la colocación de implantes dentales se deben establecer condiciones óptimas de hueso remanente, por lo cual existen casos en los que se hace indispensable realizar procesos de regeneración ósea y la utilización de membranas de barrera para generar esas condiciones óptimas que puedan soportar favorablemente el implante dental. Objetivo: Describir alternativas de membranas de barrera en casos de regeneración ósea guiada. Reporte de caso: Paciente femenino de 53 años de edad que acude a consulta por presentar fístula en encía adherida de órgano dentario 14, se diagnostica como fractura radicular y se procede a la extracción, posteriormente se realiza una biomodificación del alveolo para realizar regeneración ósea guiada y colocación de membrana de plasma rica en fibrina, se espera cicatrización para la colocación de implantes dentales. Conclusiones: El uso de alternativas de membranas de barrera muestra resultados efectivos en casos de regeneración ósea guiada(AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Dental Implants/adverse effects , Osseointegration/physiology
3.
Rev. cuba. invest. bioméd ; 39(2): e515, abr.-jun. 2020. tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS, CUMED | ID: biblio-1126605

ABSTRACT

Los defectos óseos alrededor de los implantes dentales son considerados enfermedades que afectan el soporte y estabilidad del implante dental lo que limita la oseointegración. El tratamiento de estos defectos involucra procedimientos de regeneración ósea guiada que se define como la reproducción o reconstitución de una parte perdida o dañada del tejido óseo periimplantario con el fin de restaurar su arquitectura y función. El plasma rico en plaquetas y el plasma rico en fibrina son concentrados de plaquetas autólogos ampliamente usados en la regeneración periodontal y regeneración ósea guiada; sin embargo, sus resultados clínicos, histológicos y radiográficos son discutidos cuando se tratan defectos óseos alrededor de implantes dentales. En la presente revisión se realizó una búsqueda de la información mediante las bases de datos de diferentes buscadores (PubMed, SciELO, Redalyc y ScienceDirect) para encontrar artículos que traten sobre el uso de los concentrados plaquetarios (plasma rico en plaquetas y plasma rico en fibrina) en la terapia de la regeneración ósea guiada. Clínicamente, los concentrados plaquetarios otorgan resultados favorables en la reducción de la profundidad de sondaje y ganancia de nivel de inserción clínica en el tratamiento de defectos infraóseos periodontales. Histológicamente, los concentrados plaquetarios favorecen la neoformación ósea aumentando la velocidad de regeneración. Radiográficamente, los concentrados plaquetarios favorecen el aumento de densidad ósea, relleno óseo y tejido mineralizado. Con ello, se logra una reducción significativa del tamaño del defecto óseo(AU)


Bone defects around dental implants are considered to be diseases affecting the support and stability of the implant, thus limiting osseointegration. Treatment of these defects involves guided bone regeneration procedures, defined as the reproduction or reconstitution of a part lost or damaged of the peri-implant bone tissue with the purpose of restoring its architecture and function. Platelet-rich plasma and fibrin-rich plasma are autologous platelet concentrates widely used in guided bone regeneration and periodontal regeneration. However, their clinical, histological and radiographic results are debated when bone defects around dental implants are dealt with. The present review included a search for information in the databases of various search engines (PubMed, SciELO, Redalyc and ScienceDirect) to find papers about the use of platelet concentrates (platelet-rich plasma and fibrin-rich plasma) in guided bone regeneration therapy. Clinically, platelet concentrates yield favorable results in reducing probing depth and raising the level of clinical insertion in the treatment of periodontal intraosseous defects. Histologically, platelet concentrates enhance bone neoformation, speeding up regeneration. Radiographically, platelet concentrates lead to an increase in bone density, bone filler and mineralized tissue. A significant reduction is thus achieved in the size of the bone defect(AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Platelet-Rich Plasma/physiology , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Bone Density/genetics , Platelet-Rich Fibrin/physiology
4.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180103, 2019. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1002400

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective This study aimed to evaluate the inflammatory effect and bone formation in sterile surgical failures after implantation of a collagen sponge with mesenchymal stem cells from human dental pulp (hDPSCs) and Aloe vera. Material and Methods Rattus norvegicus (n=75) were divided into five experimental groups according to treatment: G1) control (blood clot); G2) Hemospon®; G3) Hemospon® in a culture medium enriched with 8% Aloe vera; G4) Hemospon® in a culture medium containing hDPSCs and G5) Hemospon® in a culture medium enriched with 8% Aloe vera and hDPSCs. On days 7, 15 and 30, the animals were euthanized, and the tibia was dissected for histological, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses. The results were analyzed using nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn's post-test. Results On days 7 and 15, the groups with Aloe vera had less average acute inflammatory infiltrate compared to the control group and the group with Hemospon® (p<0.05). No statistically significant difference was found between the groups regarding bone formation at the three experimental points in time. Osteopontin expression corroborated the intensity of bone formation. Fluorescence microscopy revealed positive labeling with Q-Tracker® in hDPSCs before transplantation and tissue repair. Conclusion The results suggest that the combination of Hemospon®, Aloe vera and hDPSCs is a form of clinical treatment for the repair of non-critical bone defects that reduces the inflammatory cascade's effects.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Male , Rats , Bone Regeneration/drug effects , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Dental Pulp/cytology , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Aloe/chemistry , Osteogenesis/drug effects , Osteogenesis/physiology , Tibia/drug effects , Tibia/physiology , Tibia/pathology , Time Factors , Immunohistochemistry , Hemostatics/pharmacology , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cell Survival/physiology , Cells, Cultured , Reproducibility of Results , Collagen/pharmacology , Treatment Outcome , Osteopontin/analysis , Flow Cytometry , Microscopy, Fluorescence
5.
Acta cir. bras ; 34(2): e201900203, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-989053

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose: To analyze, histomorphologically, the influence of the geometry of nanostructured hydroxyapatite and alginate (HAn/Alg) composites in the initial phase of the bone repair. Methods: Fifteen rats were distributed to three groups: MiHA - bone defect filled with HAn/Alg microspheres; GrHA - bone defect filled with HAn/Alg granules; and DV - empty bone defect; evaluated after 15 days postoperatively. The experimental surgical model was the critical bone defect, ≅8.5 mm, in rat calvaria. After euthanasia the specimens were embedded in paraffin and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, picrosirius and Masson-Goldner's trichrome. Results: The histomorphologic analysis showed, in the MiHA, deposition of osteoid matrix within some microspheres and circumjacent to the others, near the bone edges. In GrHA, the deposition of this matrix was scarce inside and adjacent to the granules. In these two groups, chronic granulomatous inflammation was noted, more evident in GrHA. In the DV, it was observed bone neoformation restricted to the bone edges and formation of connective tissue with reduced thickness in relation to the bone edges, throughout the defect. Conclusion: The geometry of the biomaterials was determinant in the tissue response, since the microspheres showed more favorable to the bone regeneration in relation to the granules.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Biocompatible Materials/chemistry , Durapatite/chemistry , Nanostructures/chemistry , Alginates/chemistry , Spectrophotometry, Infrared , Biocompatible Materials/administration & dosage , Bone Regeneration/drug effects , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Rats, Wistar , Durapatite/administration & dosage , Nanostructures/administration & dosage , Alginates/administration & dosage
6.
Acta cir. bras ; 34(6): e201900601, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1019269

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose To evaluate PBS®MCIMMO cement in the filling of bone defects. Methods Thirty-six adult male Wistar rats were divided into three groups of twelve individuals each (group 1, group 2 and group 3). In all groups, a bone failure in the femur was induced, 2.0 mm wide and 7.0 mm deep. In group 1, the PBS®MCIMMO cement was applied to the bone defect produced and a titanium implant (CONNECTION®) 1.5 mm thick and 6 mm long was installed. In group 2, only the PBS® CIMMO cement was installed. In group 3, only bone failure was performed. Kruskal Wallis tests were performed to compare the mean area among the three groups. Results In all comparisons, significance was observed for group 2 (p = 0.0014-0.0026). Conclusion The PBS®CIMMO cement induced bone neoformation, and integration between the newly formed bone, cement, and implant was observed.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Biocompatible Materials/administration & dosage , Bone Cements , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Materials Testing , Ceramics , Bone Substitutes/administration & dosage , Femur/surgery , Prospective Studies , Longitudinal Studies , Rats, Wistar , Models, Animal
7.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 33: e079, 2019. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1019604

ABSTRACT

Abstract Cell therapy associated with guided bone regeneration (GBR) can be used to treat bone defects under challenging conditions such as osteoporosis. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in combination with a poly(vinylidene-trifluoroethylene)/barium titanate (PVDF-TrFE/BT) membrane on bone repair in osteoporotic rats. Osteoporosis was induced in female rats by bilateral removal of the ovaries (OVX) or sham surgery (SHAM), and the osteoporotic condition was characterized after 5 months by microtomographic and morphometric analyses. Calvarial defects were created in osteoporotic rats that immediately received the PVDF-TrFE/BT membrane. After 2 weeks, bone marrow-derived MSCs from healthy rats, characterized by the expression of surface markers using flow cytometry, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (Control) were injected into the defects and bone formation was evaluated 4 weeks post-injection by microtomographic, morphometric, and histological analyses. A reduction in the amount of bone tissue in the femurs of OVX compared with SHAM rats confirmed the osteoporotic condition of the experimental model. More bone formation was observed when the defects were injected with MSCs compared to that with PBS. The modification that we are proposing in this study for the classical GBR approach where cells are locally injected after a membrane implantation may be a promising therapeutic strategy to increase bone formation under osteoporotic condition.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Polyvinyls/pharmacology , Titanium/pharmacology , Barium Compounds/pharmacology , Guided Tissue Regeneration/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/physiology , Osteogenesis/drug effects , Osteoporosis/physiopathology , Osteoporosis/therapy , Polyvinyls/chemistry , Time Factors , Titanium/chemistry , Bone Regeneration/drug effects , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Ovariectomy , Random Allocation , Bone Density , Reproducibility of Results , Treatment Outcome , Rats, Wistar , Barium Compounds/chemistry , Imaging, Three-Dimensional , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/chemistry , Flow Cytometry
8.
Int. j. odontostomatol. (Print) ; 12(2): 137-141, jun. 2018. graf
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-954255

ABSTRACT

RESUMEN: El objetivo de este artículo es presentar un caso clínico con la utilización de un innovador sistema de osteosíntesis basado en la mezcla de hidroxiapatita (HA) y acido poliláctico (PLLA). La paciente fue admitida en el Hospital Abraham González Peña de Lautaro (Chile) debido a una deformidad facial que exigió realizar una cirugía ortognática monomaxilar para avance y aumento transversal del maxilar; se utilizaron placas de tipo L y tornillos de HA/PLLA de 5 mm para la fijación maxilar, realizando la cirugía sin complicaciones; el proceso técnico y alta hospitalaria se ejecutó de forma convencional. Se realizó un análisis de la literatura donde se analiza la versatilidad, la seguridad y la estabilidad de segmentos cuando se utiliza este innovador material y se concluye que este tipo de osteosíntesis es aplicable a cirugía maxilofacial, exigiendo una curva de aprendizaje por parte del cirujano, necesaria para obtener resultados adecuados.


ABSTRACT: The aim of this paper is to show a clinical case, where was used an innovative osteosynthesys system based on the mixture of hidroxiapatite (HA) and polilactic acid (PLLA). The patient was admitted into Abraham González Peña Hospital (Chile), showing a facial deformity to treat with monomaxillary orthognathic surgery for advance and transversal increase of the maxilla.; were used type L plates and 5 mm screws of HA/PLLA for the internal fixation, performing the surgery without complications; the technical process and the ALTA hospital was realized in a conventional strategy. Was realized a literature review showing the versatility, safe and stability of bone segment when used this innovative material and it´s concluded that this osteosynthesis system can be used normally in maxillofacial surgery; a learning curve to learn about this material is needed by surgeons.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Osteotomy, Le Fort , Absorbable Implants , Maxilla/surgery , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Chile , Durapatite
9.
Acta cir. bras ; 33(4): 354-361, Apr. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-886281

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose: To compare bone regeneration in critical-sized defects in rat calvarium using demineralized bone matrix and calcium phosphate cement. Methods: Thirty Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 animals each. Two defects of 5-mm were made in the parietal bones of each animal. Group I had calcium phosphate cement placed in the experimental defect, Group II had filled with demineralized bone matrix and Group III had with the combination of the matrix and cement in equal parts. All animals had one defect left unfilled to serve as controls. Five animals in each group were sacrificed at 4 and 8 weeks. Histomorphometric analysis was used to quantify the amount of new bone within the defects. Results: The results showed that demineralized bone matrix-treated defects had significantly more new bone at 4 weeks compared to calcium phosphate cement-treated defects (p=0.03) and also had significantly more new bone at 8 weeks compared to unfilled defects (p=0.04). Conclusions: The demineralized bone matrix was superior to calcium phosphate cement in bone regeneration. It seems that calcium phosphate cement acted by inhibiting the osteogenesis when associated with a demineralized bone matrix and this combination should not be recommended.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Osteogenesis/drug effects , Bone Cements/pharmacology , Bone Matrix , Bone Regeneration/drug effects , Calcium Phosphates/pharmacology , Bone Substitutes/pharmacology , Osteogenesis/physiology , Skull/drug effects , Skull/physiology , Time Factors , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Materials Testing , Reproducibility of Results , Treatment Outcome , Rats, Wistar
10.
Acta cir. bras ; 33(4): 324-332, Apr. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-886287

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose: To investigate if the inorganic bovine bone matrix changes the bone formation in rats submitted to inhalation of cigarette smoke. Methods: Twenty Wistar rats were divided into two groups: Cigarette Clot Group (CCG), which in the inhalation chamber received the smoke of 10 cigarettes, 3 times a day, 10 minutes, for 30 days and had the surgical cavity filled by clot; Cigarette Biomaterial Group (CBG), submitted to the same inhalation technique but with the cavity filled by biomaterial. Results: In CCG there was a significant difference of new bone tissue in the analyzed periods (15 and 45 days), and in 15 days, there was 4.8 ± 0.42 of bone formed and 11.73 ± 0.59 (p <0.05) in 45 days. The CBG also showed a significant difference between the periods of 15 to 45 days, being respectively 6.16 ± 0.30 and 11.60 ± 0.61. However, when the groups were compared, within the same analyzed periods, a significant difference was observed only in the period of 15 days, with the new bone percentage being greater in the CBG. Conclusion: The bone matrix acted as an osteoinductive biomaterial, biocompatible and aided in the repair process, mainly in the initial period of recovery.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Bone Regeneration/drug effects , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Bone Substitutes/pharmacology , Cigarette Smoking/adverse effects , Osteogenesis/drug effects , Osteogenesis/physiology , Tibia/surgery , Tibia/drug effects , Tibia/physiology , Time Factors , Cattle , Random Allocation , Reproducibility of Results , Bone Transplantation/methods , Treatment Outcome , Rats, Wistar , Inhalation Exposure/adverse effects , Heterografts/physiology
11.
J. appl. oral sci ; 26: e20170244, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-893694

ABSTRACT

Abstract The repair of bone defects raises the interest of investigators in several health specialties. Grafting techniques with bone substitutes and laser therapies have been investigated to replace autogenous bone and accelerate the bone healing process. Objective To evaluate the effect of photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) associated with guided bone regeneration (GBR) in critical size defects. Material and Methods The study was conducted on 80 male rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus, Wistar) submitted to surgical creation of a critical size defect on the calvaria, divided into eight study groups: group C (control - only blood clot); group M (collagen membrane); group PBMT (photobiomodulation therapy); group AB (autogenous bone); group AB+PBMT; group AB+M; group PBMT+M; group AB+PBMT+M. The animals were killed 30 days postoperatively. After tissue processing, bone regeneration was evaluated by histomorphometric analysis and statistical analyses were performed (Tukey test, p<0.05). Results All groups had greater area of newly formed bone compared to group C (9.96±4.49%). The group PBMT+M (achieved the greater quantity of new bone (64.09±7.62%), followed by groups PBMT (47.67±8.66%), M (47.43±15.73%), AB+PBMT (39.15±16.72%) and AB+PBMT+M (35.82±7.68%). After group C, the groups AB (25.10±16.59%) and AB+M (22.72±13.83%) had the smallest quantities of newly formed bone. The area of remaining particles did not have statistically significant difference between groups AB+M (14.93±8.92%) and AB+PBMT+M (14.76±6.58%). Conclusion The PBMT utilization may be effective for bone repair, when associated with bone regeneration techniques.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Bone Regeneration/radiation effects , Low-Level Light Therapy/methods , Guided Tissue Regeneration/methods , Osteogenesis/drug effects , Osteogenesis/physiology , Reference Values , Skull/surgery , Skull/radiation effects , Skull/physiology , Wound Healing/radiation effects , Wound Healing/physiology , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Random Allocation , Reproducibility of Results , Collagen/analysis , Treatment Outcome , Rats, Wistar , Autografts
12.
J. appl. oral sci ; 26: e20170296, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-954528

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective The aim of this study was to compare the bone resorption rate, histomorphometry and immunohistochemical findings of bioactive glass (Biogran; Biomet, Warsaw, IN, USA) mixed with autogenous bone grafts (1:1) and autogenous bone graft isolate in maxillary sinus elevation surgery. Material and Methods A total of 9 maxillary sinuses were grafted with Biogran with autogenous bone graft (group 1) and 12 were mixed with autogenous bone graft (group 2). Postoperative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to measure the initial graft volume after 15 days (T1), and 6 months later, another CBCT scan was performed to evaluate the final graft volume (T2) and determine the graft resorption rate. The resorption outcomes were 37.9%±18.9% in group 1 and 45.7%±18.5% in group 2 (P=0.82). After 6 months, biopsies were obtained concurrent with the placement of dental implants; these implants were subjected to histomorphometric analysis and immunohistochemical analysis for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). Results The average bone formation in group 1 was 36.6%±12.9 in the pristine bone region, 33.2%±13.3 in the intermediate region, and 45.8%±13.8 in the apical region; in group 2, the values were 34.4%±14.4, 35.0%±13.9, and 42.0%±16.6 of new bone formation in the pristine bone, intermediate, and apical regions, respectively. Immunostaining for TRAP showed poor clastic activity in both groups, which can indicate that those were in the remodeling phase. Conclusions The similarity between the groups in the formation and maintenance of the graft volume after 6 months suggests that the bioactive glass mixed with autogenous bone (1:1) can be used safely as a bone substitute for the maxillary sinus lift.


Subject(s)
Humans , Alveolar Bone Loss/pathology , Bone Transplantation , Bone Substitutes/therapeutic use , Bone Substitutes/chemistry , Sinus Floor Augmentation/methods , Glass/chemistry , Maxillary Sinus/surgery , Osteogenesis/physiology , Time Factors , Transplantation, Autologous/methods , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Immunohistochemistry , Prospective Studies , Reproducibility of Results , Treatment Outcome , Statistics, Nonparametric , Cone-Beam Computed Tomography , Maxillary Sinus/pathology
13.
J. appl. oral sci ; 26: e20180083, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-954498

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective To evaluate whether hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment has a favorable effect on implant osseointegration in diabetic rabbits. Material and Methods An experimental diabetes model was induced in 32 New Zealand rabbits through IV injection of alloxan. After the state of diabetes had been confirmed, one dental implant was placed in the metaphysical region of each animal's tibia. After the implants' placements, the animals were divided into two groups. Half of the animals underwent HBO treatment, while the other group did not receive HBO treatment and served as the control group. The animals were euthanized at the 4th and 8th weeks. The osseointegration of the implants were compared by histomorphometry and resonance frequency analysis (RFA). Results The Bone Implant Contact (BIC) values were significantly higher in the HBO group than in the control group at the 4th week. There was no difference in the BIC values between the groups at the 8th week. There was no significant difference in the RFA scores between the groups both at the 4th and 8th weeks after the operation. Conclusion Histomorphometry findings suggest that HBO has positive effect on implant osseointegration in the early healing period in diabetic rabbits. However, implant stability is not affected by HBO treatment.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Osseointegration/physiology , Dental Implantation, Endosseous/methods , Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/physiopathology , Hyperbaric Oxygenation/methods , Rabbits , Tibia/surgery , Time Factors , Wound Healing , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Reproducibility of Results , Treatment Outcome , Alloxan , Bone-Implant Interface/physiology
14.
J. appl. oral sci ; 26: e20160531, 2018. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-893737

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the osteoconductive potential of BoneCeramic™ on bone healing in rat calvaria 5-mm defects. Material and Methods: A 5-mm calvaria bone defect was induced in three groups and the defect was not filled with biomaterial [Clot Group (CG)], autogenous bone (AG), or Bone Ceramic Group (BCG). Animals were euthanized after 14 or 28 days and the bone tissue within the central area of the bone defect was evaluated. Results were compared using ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). Immunohistochemistry was performed using primary antibodies against osteocalcin, RUNX-2, TRAP, VEGF proteins, and 3-dimensional images of the defects in μCT were obtained to calculate bone mineral density (BMD). Results: In BCG, the defect was completely filled with biomaterial and new bone formation, which was statistically superior to that in the GC group, at both time-points (p<0.001 for 14 days; p=0.002 for 28 days). TRAP protein showed weak, RUNX-2 showed a greater immunolabeling when compared with other groups, VEGF showed moderate immunostaining, while osteocalcin was present at all time-points analyzed. The μCT images showed filling defect by BCG (BMD= 1337 HU at 28 days). Conclusion: Therefore, the biomaterial tested was found to be favorable to fill bone defects for the reporting period analyzed.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Skull/drug effects , Wound Healing/drug effects , Bone Regeneration/drug effects , Bone Substitutes/pharmacology , Hydroxyapatites/pharmacology , Skull , Skull/pathology , Time Factors , Wound Healing/physiology , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Immunohistochemistry , Bone Density , Osteocalcin/analysis , Treatment Outcome , Rats, Wistar , Bone Substitutes/therapeutic use , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/analysis , Core Binding Factor Alpha 1 Subunit/analysis , Tartrate-Resistant Acid Phosphatase/analysis , Hydroxyapatites/therapeutic use
15.
J. appl. oral sci ; 26: e20170084, 2018. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-893718

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: This study aimed to evaluate bone repair in rat dental sockets after implanting nanostructured carbonated hydroxyapatite/sodium alginate (CHA) and nanostructured carbonated hydroxyapatite/sodium alginate containing 5% strontium microspheres (SrCHA) as bone substitute materials. Methods: Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two experimental groups: CHA and SrCHA (n=5/period/group). After one and 6 weeks of extraction of the right maxillary central incisor and biomaterial implantation, 5 μm bone blocks were obtained for histomorphometric evaluation. The parameters evaluated were remaining biomaterial, loose connective tissue and newly formed bone in a standard area. Statistical analysis was performed by Mann-Withney and and Wilcoxon tests at 95% level of significance. Results: The histomorphometric results showed that the microspheres showed similar fragmentation and bio-absorbation (p>0.05). We observed the formation of new bones in both groups during the same experimental periods; however, the new bone formation differed significantly between the weeks 1 and 6 (p=0.0039) in both groups. Conclusion: The CHA and SrCHA biomaterials were biocompatible, osteoconductive and bioabsorbable, indicating their great potential for clinical use as bone substitutes.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Strontium/pharmacology , Bone Regeneration/drug effects , Carbonates/pharmacology , Durapatite/pharmacology , Bone Substitutes/pharmacology , Tooth Socket/drug effects , Nanostructures/therapeutic use , Alginates/pharmacology , Osteogenesis/drug effects , Osteogenesis/physiology , Strontium/chemistry , Time Factors , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Carbonates/chemistry , Random Allocation , Reproducibility of Results , Bone Transplantation/methods , Treatment Outcome , Rats, Wistar , Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared , Durapatite/chemistry , Bone Substitutes/chemistry , Tooth Socket/physiology , Glucuronic Acid/pharmacology , Glucuronic Acid/chemistry , Nanostructures/chemistry , Alginates/chemistry , Hexuronic Acids/pharmacology , Hexuronic Acids/chemistry
16.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 32: e21, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889464

ABSTRACT

Abstract: The lack of guidelines for bone augmentation procedures might compromise decision making in implantology. The objective of this study was to perform a retrospective study to verify the outcomes of horizontal bone reconstruction in implant dentistry with different types of materials and amounts of native bone in the recipient bed to allow for a new guideline for horizontal bone reconstruction. One hundred preoperative CT scans were retrospectively evaluated and categorized in accordance to horizontal bone defects as presence (Group P) or absence (Group A) of cancellous bone in the recipient bed. Different approaches were used to treat the edentulous ridge and the outcomes were defined either as satisfactory or unsatisfactory regarding the possibility of implant placement. The percentage distribution of the patients according to the presence or absence of cancellous bone was 92% for Group P and 8% for Group A. In Group P, 98% of the patients had satisfactory outcomes, and the use of autografts had 100% of satisfactory outcomes in this group. In Group A, 37.5% of the patients had satisfactory outcomes, and the use of autografts also yielded 100% of satisfactory outcomes. The use of allografts and xenografts in Group A had 0% and 33.3% of satisfactory outcomes, respectively. Therefore, it seems reasonable to speculate that the presence of cancellous bone might be predictive and predictable when the decision includes bone substitutes. In cases of absence of cancellous bone in the recipient bed, the use of a vitalized graft seems to be mandatory.


Subject(s)
Humans , Alveolar Ridge Augmentation/methods , Bone Substitutes/therapeutic use , Bone Transplantation/methods , Mandible/transplantation , Maxilla/transplantation , Alveolar Bone Grafting/methods , Alveolar Bone Loss/surgery , Autografts/transplantation , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Cancellous Bone/surgery , Cone-Beam Computed Tomography , Jaw, Edentulous, Partially/surgery , Patient Satisfaction , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
17.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 32: e29, 2018. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889503

ABSTRACT

Abstract Concentrated growth factor (CGF) is an autogenuous product that contains highly concentrated number of platelets and can be derived from venous blood by selective centrifugation. It has been speculated that local growth factors in human platelets (insulinlike growth factor, IGF; transforming growth factor, TGF-b; platelet derived growth factor, PDGF) would enhance healing of grafts and also counteract resorption. The osteogensis effect of CGF and acellular dermal matrix (ADM) for alveolar cleft defects was evaluated in this study. Twenty alveolar cleft patients were divided randomly into two groups. One group underwent guided bone regeneration (GBR) using acellular dermal matrix film combined with alveolar bone grafting using iliac crest bone grafts (GBR group), while the other group underwent alveolar bone grafting combined with CGF (CGF group). Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained at 1 week and 6 months following the procedure. Using Mimics 17.0 software, the bone resorption rate and bone density improvement rate were calculated and compared between the two groups. Although not significant between ADM and CGF in bone resorption rate, the bone density improvement in cases with CGF(61.62 ± 4.728%) was much better than in cases with ADM (27.05 ± 5.607%) (p = 0.0002). Thus, CGF could be recommended to patients with alveolar cleft as a better choice.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Child , Adolescent , Adult , Young Adult , Acellular Dermis , Alveolar Bone Grafting/methods , Cleft Lip/therapy , Cleft Palate/therapy , Guided Tissue Regeneration/methods , Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/pharmacology , Osteogenesis/drug effects , Alveolar Bone Loss/diagnostic imaging , Alveolar Bone Loss/physiopathology , Bone Density/physiology , Bone Regeneration/drug effects , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Cleft Lip/diagnostic imaging , Cleft Lip/physiopathology , Cleft Palate/diagnostic imaging , Cleft Palate/physiopathology , Cone-Beam Computed Tomography , Osteogenesis/physiology , Reproducibility of Results , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Wound Healing/drug effects , Wound Healing/physiology
18.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 32: e83, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-974444

ABSTRACT

Abstract Distraction osteogenesis (DO) relies on the recruitment and proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to the target site, where they differentiate into osteoblasts to promote bone formation. Nevertheless, MSC recruitment appears to be slow and limits bone formation in DO defects. Thus, this systematic review aims to evaluate the ability of locally applied MSC to enhance bone formation in DO preclinical models. Databases were searched for quantitative pre-clinical controlled studies that evaluated the effect of local administration of MSC on DO bone formation. Eligible studies were identified and data regarding study characteristics, outcome measures and quality were extracted. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Autogenous and xenogenous MSC were used to promote DO bone formation. These included bone marrow-derived MSC, adipose tissue-derived MSC and MSC derived from human exfoliated deciduous teeth. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneities in study designs. Local MSC implantation was not associated with adverse effects. In 4 out of the 5 studies, locally delivered undifferentiated bone-marrow MSC had a positive effect on DO bone formation. Few studies evaluated the therapeutic effects of MSC from other sources. The adjunct use of biologically active molecules or forced expression of key genes involved in osteogenesis further boosted the ability of bone-marrow MSC to promote DO bone formation. While risk of bias and heterogeneity limited the strength of this systematic review, our results suggest that the use of MSC is safe and may provide beneficial effects on DO bone formation.


Subject(s)
Animals , Osteogenesis/physiology , Osteogenesis, Distraction/methods , Models, Animal , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/physiology , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Bias , Reproducibility of Results , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
19.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 32: e85, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-952161

ABSTRACT

Abstract This study aimed to investigate the effects of different doses of systemic melatonin application on new bone formation during mandibular distraction osteogenesis (DO) in rats. Mandibular DO was performed on 30 adult female Sprague-Dawley rats, which were randomly divided into three groups: control group (CNT), melatonin dose 1 (MLT-D1), and melatonin dose 2 (MLT-D2). A five-day latent waiting period and a ten-day distraction phase followed the surgery. After the surgery, rats from the MLT-D1 and MLT-D2 groups received 25 and 50 mg/kg melatonin, respectively, at 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days. The animals were euthanised 28 days after distraction, i.e. at 43 days after surgery. Histological and histomorphometric analyses revealed that the distracted bone area was completely filled with new bone formation in all three groups. The MLT-D2 group exhibited the most new bone formation, followed by MLT-D1 and CNT. The melatonin groups had more osteoclasts than the CNT (p < 0.05). The number of osteoblasts was higher in the melatonin groups than in the CNT group, and the MLT-D2 had more osteoclasts than the MLT-D1 group (p < 0.05). Finally, the osteopontin (OPN) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were higher in the melatonin groups than in the CNT group, and the MLT-D2 had higher OPN and VEGF levels than the MLT-D1 (p < 0.05). This study suggests that systemic melatonin application could increase new bone formation in DO.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Osteogenesis/drug effects , Bone Regeneration/drug effects , Osteogenesis, Distraction/methods , Melatonin/administration & dosage , Antioxidants/administration & dosage , Osteoblasts/physiology , Osteoclasts/physiology , Osteogenesis/physiology , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Immunohistochemistry , Random Allocation , Reproducibility of Results , Treatment Outcome , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/analysis , Osteopontin/analysis , Mandible/surgery , Mandible/drug effects , Mandible/physiology , Mandible/pathology
20.
Rev. cient. odontol ; 5(2): 744-751, jul.-dic. 2017. ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-999142

ABSTRACT

Las perforaciones corticales, penetraciones intramedulares o decorticaciones se realizan a menudo como parte del procedimiento de regeneración ósea guiada (ROG). Su sustento biológico se basa en que mejorarían la angiogénesis y proporcionarían una vía hacia el hueso esponjoso rico en vasos sanguíneos. También se consideran como un "noxious stimuli" (estímulo nocivo) que iniciaría el fenómeno regional acelerado con una respuesta local exuberante facilitando la cicatrización ósea normal. Además, mejorarían la unión o enlace físico entre el injerto óseo y el lecho receptor asegurando estabilidad y fusión de los bloques óseos. Sin embargo, se nos presentan algunas interrogantes relacionadas a su fundamento, a los términos que las describen, a los tamaños, a su cantidad y disposición, al instrumental adecuado para realizarlas y al confort del paciente. (AU)


Cortical perforations, intramedullary penetrations or decortications are often performed as part of the guided bone regeneration (GBR) procedure. Their biological basis is that they would improve angiogenesis, providing a pathway to the medullar bone rich of blood vessels. In addition, cortical perforations would be consider as a "noxious stimuli" that initiate the accelerated regional phenomenon with an exuberant local response facilitating normal bone healing. Moreover, they would improve the physical bonding between the bone graft and the recipient bed ensuring stability and fusion of the bone blocks. However, there are some questions related to its foundation, terms to describe them, their sizes, quantity and disposition, the appropriate instruments to perform them and the comfort of the patient. (AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Wound Healing/physiology , Bone Regeneration/physiology , Neovascularization, Pathologic
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