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2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-811284

ABSTRACT

We performed a revisionary open reduction and internal fixation for treating nonunion of the mid-shaft of the left clavicle with an autogenous cancellous bone graft. On postoperative day 4, the patient presented with neurologic deficits in the left upper extremity. We removed the implant and made a superior angulation to decompress the brachial plexus. At 6 months postoperatively, callus bridging and consolidation were visible and all hand and elbow functions were fully recovered. Our case suggests that brachial plexus neuropathy may be caused by stretching and compression after reduction and straightening of the nonunion site around adhesions or scar tissue. Therefore, care should be taken whether there are the risk factors that can cause brachial plexus neuropathy when revision surgery is performed for treating nonunion of a clavicle shaft fracture.


Subject(s)
Bony Callus , Brachial Plexus Neuropathies , Brachial Plexus , Cicatrix , Clavicle , Elbow , Hand , Humans , Neurologic Manifestations , Risk Factors , Transplants , Upper Extremity
4.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-766581

ABSTRACT

Physical forces agents may induce distinctive skin changes. Pressure and friction induce callus and corn. Callus and corn arise at sites of friction or pressure, particularly palms and soles, and especially the bony prominences of the joints. Pressure, shearing forces, friction, and moisture are main etiologic factors of pressure ulcer. The pressure ulcer is caused by ischemia of the underlying structures of the skin, fat, and muscles. Skin has long been known to be a very radiosensitive organ. Skin changes after radiation exposure follow a predictable course dictated by radiation dose, timing, and the biology of the human inflammatory reaction. When the skin is exposed to radiation, acute radiation dermatitis, chronic radiation dermatitis, skin cancer, and radiation recall dermatitis may be developed.


Subject(s)
Biology , Bony Callus , Dermatitis , Friction , Humans , Ischemia , Joints , Muscles , Pressure Ulcer , Radiation Exposure , Radiodermatitis , Skin , Skin Diseases , Skin Neoplasms , Zea mays
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762804

ABSTRACT

Forearm fractures are common injuries in childhood. Median nerve entrapment is a rare complication of forearm fractures, but several cases have been reported in the literature. This case report discusses the diagnosis and management of median nerve entrapment in a 13-year-old male who presented acutely with a both-bone forearm fracture and numbness in the median nerve distribution. Following the delayed diagnosis, surgical exploration revealed complete nerve entrapment and a nerve graft was performed.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Bony Callus , Delayed Diagnosis , Diagnosis , Forearm Injuries , Forearm , Fractures, Bone , Humans , Hypesthesia , Male , Median Nerve , Nerve Compression Syndromes , Transplants
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-758958

ABSTRACT

We assessed the efficacy of frozen-thawed gelatin-induced osteogenic cell sheet (FT-GCS) compared to that of fresh gelatin-induced osteogenic cell sheet (F-GCS) with adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (Ad-MSCs) used as the control. The bone differentiation capacity of GCS has already been studied. On that basis, the experiment was conducted to determine ease of use of GCS in the clinic. In vitro evaluation of F-GCS showed 3–4 layers with an abundant extracellular matrix (ECM) formation; however, cryopreservation resulted in a reduction of FT-GCS layers to 2–3 layers. Cellular viabilities of F-GCS and FT-GCS did not vary significantly. Moreover, there was no significant difference in mRNA expressions of Runx2, β-catenin, OPN, and BMP-7 between F-GCS and FT-GCS. In an in vivo experiment, both legs of six dogs with transverse radial fractures were randomly assigned to one of three groups: F-GCS, FT-GCS, or control. Fracture sites were wrapped with the respective cell sheets and fixed with 2.7 mm locking plates and six screws. At 8 weeks after the operations, bone samples were collected and subjected to micro computed tomography and histopathological examination. External volumes of callus as a portion of the total bone volume in control, F-GCS, and FT-GCS groups were 49.6%, 45.3%, and 41.9%, respectively. The histopathological assessment showed that both F-GCS and FT-GCS groups exhibited significantly (p < 0.05) well-organized, mature bone with peripheral cartilage at the fracture site compared to that of the control group. Based on our results, we infer that the cryopreservation process did not significantly affect the osteogenic ability of gelatin-induced cell sheets.


Subject(s)
Animals , Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 , Bony Callus , Cartilage , Cryopreservation , Dogs , Extracellular Matrix , Fracture Healing , In Vitro Techniques , Leg , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , RNA, Messenger
7.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-770078

ABSTRACT

Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) is a rare disease that affects the sensory and autonomic nervous system. The patients do not have the ability to sense different sensations, such as pain, which tends to lead to different injuries. In addition, the patients suffer from fluctuations in body temperature due to autonomic involvement. The present case was a five-year-old girl with a neglected distal femur fracture. X-rays taken during the follow-up showed marked callus formation and pseudarthrosis of the distal femur. She had biting injuries of the tongue, auto-amputation of the fingers, some developmental delay and a history of recurrent fever with an unknown origin. The electrodiagnostic study was normal. The quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test revealed markedly reduced postganglionic sudomotor axonal responses at all sites recorded on the left. She was diagnosed with CIPA. As the initial presentation of CIPA involves the musculoskeletal system, orthopedic surgeons should have a high index of suspicion.


Subject(s)
Autonomic Nervous System , Axons , Body Temperature , Bony Callus , Female , Femur , Fever , Fingers , Follow-Up Studies , Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies , Humans , Musculoskeletal System , Orthopedics , Pain Insensitivity, Congenital , Pseudarthrosis , Rare Diseases , Reflex , Sensation , Surgeons , Tongue
8.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-738461

ABSTRACT

The brachial plexus palsy is a rare complication of a clavicle fracture, occurring in 0.5% to 9.0% of cases. This condition is caused by excessive callus formation, which can be recovered by a spur resection and surgical fixation. In contrast, only seven cases have been reported after surgical reduction and fixation. A case of progressive brachial plexus palsy was observed after fixation of the displaced nonunion of a clavicle fracture. The symptom were improved after removing the implant.


Subject(s)
Bony Callus , Brachial Plexus Neuropathies , Brachial Plexus , Clavicle , Paralysis , Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
9.
Acta cir. bras ; 34(1): e20190010000002, 2019. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-983685

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the effects of food restriction on fracture healing in growing rats. Methods: Sixty-eight male Wistar rats were assigned to two groups: (1) Control and (2) Dietary restriction. After weaning the dietary restricted animals were fed ad libitum for 42 days with 50% of the standard chow ingested by the control group. Subsequently, the animals underwent bone fracture at the diaphysis of the right femur, followed by surgical stabilization of bone fragments. On days 14 and 28 post-fracture, the rats were euthanized, and the fractured femurs were dissected, the callus was analyzed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, micro-computed tomography, histomorphometry, mechanical tests, and gene expression. Results: Dietary restriction decreased body mass gain and resulted in several phenotypic changes at the bone callus (a delay in cell proliferation and differentiation, lower rate of newly formed bone and collagen deposition, reductions in bone callus density and size, decrease in tridimensional callus volume, deterioration in microstructure, and reduction in bone callus strength), together with the downregulated expression of osteoblast-related genes. Conclusion: Dietary restriction had detrimental effects on osseous healing, with a healing delay and a lower quality of bone callus formation.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Bony Callus/physiology , Bone Density/physiology , Fracture Healing/physiology , Malnutrition , Femoral Fractures/physiopathology , Fractures, Closed/physiopathology , Osteoporosis/prevention & control , Rats, Wistar , Femoral Fractures/diagnostic imaging , Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary , Fractures, Closed/diagnostic imaging
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-742370

ABSTRACT

Cell sheets technology is being available for fracture healing. This study was performed to clarify bone healing mechanism of undifferentiated (UCS) and osteogenic (OCS) differentiated mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) sheets in the fracture model of dogs. UCS and OCS were harvested at 10 days of culture. Transverse fractures at the radius of six beagle dogs were assigned into three groups (n = 4 in each group) i.e. UCS, OCS and control. The fractures were fixed with a 2.7 mm locking plate and six screws. Cell sheets were wrapped around the fracture site. Bones were harvested 8 weeks after operation, then scanned by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and analyzed histopathologically. The micro-CT revealed different aspects of bone regeneration among the groups. The percentages of external callus volume out of total bone volume in control, UCS, and OCS groups were 42.1, 13.0 and 4.9% (p < 0.05) respectively. However, the percentages of limbs having connectivity of gaps were 25, 12.5 and 75% respectively. In histopathological assessments, OCS group showed well organized and mature woven bone with peripheral cartilage at the fracture site, whereas control group showed cartilage formation without bone maturation or ossification at the fracture site. Meanwhile, fracture site was only filled with fibrous connective tissue without endochondral ossification and bone formation in UCS group. It was suggested that the MSC sheets reduced the quantity of external callus, and OCS induced the primary bone healing.


Subject(s)
Animals , Bone Regeneration , Bony Callus , Cartilage , Connective Tissue , Dogs , Extremities , Fracture Healing , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Osteogenesis , Radius
11.
Acta cir. bras ; 32(11): 924-934, Nov. 2017. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-886184

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the influence of nandrolone decanoate on fracture healing and bone quality in normal rats. Methods: Male rats were assigned to four groups (n=28/group): Control group consisting of animals without any intervention, Nandrolone decanoate (DN) group consisting of animals that received intramuscular injection of nandrolone decanoate, Fracture group consisting of animals with a fracture at the mid-diaphysis of the femur, and Fracture and nandrolone decanoate group consisting of animals with a femur fracture and treatment with nandrolone decanoate. Fractures were created at the mid-diaphysis of the right femur by a blunt trauma and internally fixed using an intramedullary steel wire. The DN was injected intramuscularly twice per week (10 mg/kg of body mass). The femurs were measured and evaluated by densitometry and mechanical resistance after animal euthanasia. The newly formed bone and collagen type I levels were quantified in the callus. Results: The treated animals had longer femurs after 28 days. The quality of the intact bone was not significantly different between groups. The bone callus did show a larger mass in the treated rats. Conclusion: The administration of nandrolone decanoate did not affect the quality of the intact bone, but might have enhanced the bone callus formation.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Bony Callus/physiology , Fracture Healing/drug effects , Femoral Fractures/drug therapy , Anabolic Agents/pharmacology , Nandrolone/analogs & derivatives , Bone Density/physiology , Rats, Wistar , Fracture Healing/physiology , Nandrolone/pharmacology
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-25543

ABSTRACT

Previous studies report positive effects of pentoxifylline (PTX) alone or in combination with other drugs on some pathologic bone diseases as well as an ability to accelerate osteogensis and fracture healing in both animal models and human patients. The aim of this present study was to evaluate the effects of PTX administration on Hounsfield unit and bone strength at catabolic response (bone resorbing) of a fracture in an experimental rat model of ovariectomy induced osteoporosis (OVX-D). Thirty adult female rats were divided into groups as follows: 1 (OVX, control, no treatment); 2 (OVX, sham: daily distilled water); 3 (OVX, daily alendronate: 3 mg/kg); 4 (OVX, twice daily 100 mg/kg PTX) and 5 (OVX, PTX+alenderonate). OVX was induced by bilateral ovariectomy in all rats. A complete standardized osteotomy of the right femur was made after 3.5 months. PTX and alendronate treatments were performed for eight weeks. Then, rats were euthanized and had its right femur subjected to computerized tomography scanning for measuring Hounsfield unit; eventually, the samples were sent for a three point bending test for evaluation of the bone strength. Administration of PTX with 200 mg/kg and alendronate alone and in combination showed no significant alteration in Hounsfield unit and biomechanical properties of repairing callus of the complete osteotomy compared with the control group. Results showed increased bending stiffness and stress high load mean values of repairing complete osteotomy in PTX-treated rats compared to the control OVX-D.


Subject(s)
Adult , Alendronate , Animals , Bone Diseases , Bony Callus , Female , Femur , Fracture Healing , Humans , Models, Animal , Osteoporosis , Osteotomy , Ovariectomy , Pentoxifylline , Rats
13.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 49(3): e5076, Mar. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-771937

ABSTRACT

Osteoporosis has become a serious global public health issue. Hence, osteoporotic fracture healing has been investigated in several previous studies because there is still controversy over the effect osteoporosis has on the healing process. The current study aimed to analyze two different periods of bone healing in normal and osteopenic rats. Sixty, 7-week-old female Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: unrestricted and immobilized for 2 weeks after osteotomy (OU2), suspended and immobilized for 2 weeks after osteotomy (OS2), unrestricted and immobilized for 6 weeks after osteotomy (OU6), and suspended and immobilized for 6 weeks after osteotomy (OS6). Osteotomy was performed in the middle third of the right tibia 21 days after tail suspension, when the osteopenic condition was already set. The fractured limb was then immobilized by orthosis. Tibias were collected 2 and 6 weeks after osteotomy, and were analyzed by bone densitometry, mechanical testing, and histomorphometry. Bone mineral density values from bony calluses were significantly lower in the 2-week post-osteotomy groups compared with the 6-week post-osteotomy groups (multivariate general linear model analysis, P<0.000). Similarly, the mechanical properties showed that animals had stronger bones 6 weeks after osteotomy compared with 2 weeks after osteotomy (multivariate general linear model analysis, P<0.000). Histomorphometry indicated gradual bone healing. Results showed that osteopenia did not influence the bone healing process, and that time was an independent determinant factor regardless of whether the fracture was osteopenic. This suggests that the body is able to compensate for the negative effects of suspension.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Bone Diseases, Metabolic/physiopathology , Fracture Healing/physiology , Tibial Fractures/physiopathology , Bone Density/physiology , Bony Callus/physiopathology , Collagen/analysis , Hindlimb Suspension/adverse effects , Hindlimb Suspension/physiology , Models, Animal , Osteotomy/adverse effects , Random Allocation , Rats, Wistar , Time Factors , Torsion, Mechanical
14.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-654004

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of teriparatide administration on fracture healing after intramedullary nailing in atypical femoral fractures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 26 patients (26 cases) with atypical femoral fracture who were treated using intramedullary nailing between January 2009 and December 2013. Teriparatide was not administered to 15 patients (non-injection group) and was administered to 11 patients after surgery (injection group). Clinical results were assessed using the Nakajima score and the visual analogue scale (VAS). Radiographic results were compared for the time of callus formation, callus bridge formation, and bone union between the groups. RESULTS: Time to recover walking ability and to decrease pain in the surgery region (VAS≤2) were significantly shorter in the injection group than in the non-injection group. The time of callus formation, callus bridge formation, and bone union was significantly shorter in the injection group than in the non-injection group. There were 5 cases of delayed bone union (33.3%) and 1 case of none union (6.7%) in the non-injection group and all cases obtained bone union in injection group. CONCLUSION: The injection group showed better clinical and radiographic results than the non-injection group after intramedullary nailing in atypical femoral fracture. Therefore, we think that teriparatide administration after intramedullary nailing could be a useful treatment option to promote bone union.


Subject(s)
Bony Callus , Femoral Fractures , Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary , Fracture Healing , Humans , Parathyroid Hormone , Retrospective Studies , Teriparatide , Walking
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-81515

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To assess the functional and radiological outcomes of minimally invasive anterior bridge plating (ABP) for mid-shaft humerus fractures in patients predominantly involved in overhead activities (athletes and manual laborers). METHODS: Forty-eight patients fulfilling inclusion criteria were treated with ABP at a level-I trauma center using a 4.5-mm dynamic/locking compression plate and followed for a period of 1 year. Functional outcome was assessed using the Constant, Mayo elbow, and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) scores. Range of motion (ROM), subjective strength, and radiographic union were assessed. A general satisfaction questionnaire was also administered. RESULTS: Most patients achieved excellent functional and radiological outcomes. ROM and strength of the shoulder girdle exhibited clinically nonsignificant loss as compared to the opposite side. The mean time for return to the original activities was 64 days (range, 36 to 182 days) and the mean time for confirmed radiographic union was 45 days (range, 34 to 180 days). The mean Constant, Mayo elbow, DASH scores were 95.73 ± 5.76 (range, 79 to 100), 95.94 ± 6.74 (range, 85 to 100), and 1.56 ± 3.15 (range, 0.0 to 14.0), respectively. The majority of patients (43 patients, 89.6%) who fell in the excellent or very good category according to our questionnaire were extremely satisfied. There were 2 cases (4.17%) of nonunion and 3 patients (6.25%) had to change/modify their original occupation. CONCLUSIONS: ABP is fundamentally different from traditional open posterior plating or conventional intramedullary nailing. It gives relative stability with union taking place by callus formation, and a longer plate on the tensile surface ensures that the humerus can withstand greater amount of rotational and bending stresses. The minimally invasive nature causes minimal soft tissue damage and, if done correctly, causes no damage to the vital structures in proximity. ABP for mid-shaft humerus fractures in patients predominantly engaged in overhead activities is a safe and effective treatment modality yielding high rates of union, excellent functional recovery, minimal biological disruption, better cosmesis, and superior satisfaction rates.


Subject(s)
Arm , Athletes , Bony Callus , Elbow , Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary , Hand , Humans , Humeral Fractures , Humerus , Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures , Occupations , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Range of Motion, Articular , Shoulder , Trauma Centers
16.
Hip & Pelvis ; : 148-156, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-126676

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Atypical femoral fracture (AFF), periprosthetic femoral fracture (PPFF) and femoral nonunion (FNU) are recalcitrant challenges for orthopedic surgeons. Teriparatide (TPTD) had been demonstrated to have anabolic effects on bone in various studies. We postulated that adjuvant TPTD after operation would enhance biologic stimulation for bone formation. We investigated (1) whether the adjuvant TPTD could achieve satisfactory union rate of surgically challenging cases such as displaced AFF, PPFF and FNU; (2) whether the adjuvant TPTD could promote development of abundant callus after surgical fixation; (3) whether the adjuvant TPTD had medically serious adverse effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirteen patients who agreed to off label use of TPTD in combination of operation were included in this retrospective case series. Median patients' age was 68.7 years, and there were three male and ten female patients. Their diagnoses were nonunion in six patients and acute fracture in seven. Medical records and radiographic images were reviewed. RESULTS: Twelve of thirteen fractures were united both clinically and radiologically within a year after adjuvant TPTD. Union completed radiologically median 5.4 months and clinically 5.7 months after the medication, respectively. Callus appeared abundantly showing median 1.4 of fracture healing response postoperatively. There was no serious adverse reaction of medication other than itching, muscle cramp, or nausea. CONCLUSION: Even appropriate surgical treatment is a mainstay of treatment for AFF, PPFF, and FNU, the current report suggested that adjuvant TPTD combined with stable fixation results in satisfactory outcome for the challenging fractures of femur.


Subject(s)
Anabolic Agents , Bony Callus , Diagnosis , Female , Femoral Fractures , Femur , Fracture Healing , Humans , Male , Medical Records , Muscle Cramp , Nausea , Off-Label Use , Orthopedics , Osteogenesis , Periprosthetic Fractures , Pruritus , Retrospective Studies , Surgeons , Teriparatide
17.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 49(1): e4736, 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-951645

ABSTRACT

Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) are important regulators of bone repair and regeneration. In this study, we examined whether TGF-β1 and BMP-2 expressions were delayed during bone healing in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Tibial fractures were created in 95 diabetic and 95 control adult male Wistar rats of 10 weeks of age. At 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 weeks after fracture induction, five rats were sacrificed from each group. The expressions of TGF-β1 and BMP2 in the fractured tibias were measured by immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, weekly for the first 5 weeks post-fracture. Mechanical parameters (bending rigidity, torsional rigidity, destruction torque) of the healing bones were also assessed at 3, 4, and 5 weeks post-fracture, after the rats were sacrificed. The bending rigidity, torsional rigidity and destruction torque of the two groups increased continuously during the healing process. The diabetes group had lower mean values for bending rigidity, torsional rigidity and destruction torque compared with the control group (P<0.05). TGF-β1 and BMP-2 expression were significantly lower (P<0.05) in the control group than in the diabetes group at postoperative weeks 1, 2, and 3. Peak levels of TGF-β1 and BMP-2 expression were delayed by 1 week in the diabetes group compared with the control group. Our results demonstrate that there was a delayed recovery in the biomechanical function of the fractured bones in diabetic rats. This delay may be associated with a delayed expression of the growth factors TGF-β1 and BMP-2.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Tibial Fractures/physiopathology , Bony Callus/physiopathology , Fracture Healing/physiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/physiopathology , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/metabolism , Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2/metabolism , Tibial Fractures/metabolism , Time Factors , Biomechanical Phenomena , Immunohistochemistry , Rats, Wistar , Torque , Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/physiopathology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/metabolism , Fractures, Bone/physiopathology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
18.
Acta cir. bras ; 30(11): 727-735, Nov. 2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-767596

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of vibration therapy on the bone callus of fractured femurs and the bone quality of intact femurs in ovariectomized rats. METHODS: Fifty-six rats aged seven weeks were divided into four groups: control with femoral fracture (CON, n=14), ovariectomized with femoral fracture (OVX, n=14), control with femoral fracture plus vibration therapy (CON+VT, n=14), and ovariectomized with femoral fracture plus vibration therapy (OVX+VT, n=14). Three months after ovariectomy or sham surgery, a complete fracture was produced at the femoral mid-diaphysis and stabilized with a 1-mm-diameter intramedullary Kirschner wire. X-rays confirmed the fracture alignment and fixation. Three days later, the VT groups underwent vibration therapy (1 mm, 60 Hz for 20 minutes, three times per week for 14 or 28 days). The bone and callus quality were assessed by densitometry, three-dimensional microstructure, and mechanical test. RESULTS : Ovariectomized rats exhibited a substantial loss of bone mass and severe impairment in bone microarchitecture, both in the non-fractured femur and the bone callus. Whole-body vibration therapy exerted an important role in ameliorating the bone and fracture callus parameters in the osteoporotic bone. CONCLUSION: Vibration therapy improved bone quality and the quality of the fracture bone callus in ovariectomized rats.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Bony Callus/physiology , Femoral Fractures/therapy , Fracture Healing/physiology , Osteoporosis/physiopathology , Ovariectomy/adverse effects , Vibration/therapeutic use , Absorptiometry, Photon , Bone Density/physiology , Femoral Fractures/etiology , Femoral Fractures/physiopathology , Osteoporotic Fractures/etiology , Osteoporotic Fractures/physiopathology , Osteoporotic Fractures/therapy , Random Allocation , Rats, Wistar , Reproducibility of Results , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
19.
Professional Medical Journal-Quarterly [The]. 2015; 22 (4): 476-482
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-162234

ABSTRACT

The femur fractures usually happen with oomph forces like motor vehicle accidents. To assess the mode of injury and complications of the management, in diaphyseal femoral fractures, in comparison of close versus open intramedullary interlocking nail [IMN]. Experimental and comparative study. April 2013 to March 2014. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Peoples University of Medical and Health sciences, Nawabshah. The cases were divided into two groups A and B. Group A was treated by open nailing [n = 20] and group B by close nailing [n = 20], all the cases were operated within 48 hours of admission. All the data were recorded on well structured proforma. Serial radiographies were performed at 3, 6, 12 weeks, and 6 months; additional radiographies were performed as needed postoperatively. Knee, ankle, and hip motions were begun and protected weight bearing was started on the second day postoperatively and increased gradually to full WB depending on x-ray findings of callus formation. The patients were followed for two years. Results of open and closed I.M.N were assessed and the complications if any were observed over a mean follow-up period of two years. The mean age in group A was 29.40 years and the mean age in group B was 30.45 years. Out of 40 cases, 32[80.0%] were males with male to female ratio 1:4. Mean +/- SD hospital stay was 19.80 +/- 14.60 days in group A, and 17.90 +/- 5.95 days in group B [p value 0.55]. Average time between injury and admission was 1.53 days [n = 40], in the group A it was 1.05 days, and in the group B it was 2.0 days [p value 0.03]. The average of time between injury and operation in the group A was 8.75 days, and in the group B, it was 8.20 days, [p value 0.71]. The average of time between admission and discharge in the group A was 11.0 days, and in the group B was 9.15 days, [p value 0.55]. Mean +/- SD union time was 11.70 +/- 6.45 weeks, in group A and 11.90 +/- 5.77 weeks, in group B. [p value 0.91]. All the patients had full ranged of hip motion and 2 [10.0%] patients of group A had mild limitation of knee motion with a flexion ranges between 80 and 110 degrees. Final functional results based on Thoresen BO criteria16. Excellent results were observed in 19 [47.5%] cases, out of them 5[25.0%] were in group A and 14[70.0%] were in group B. Good results were found in 13[32.5%] patients, out of these 7[35.0%] were in group A and 6[30.0%] were in group. Fair and poor results were detected in 4[10.0%] cases of group A. Road traffic accidents by motorcycle was found the commonest [47.5%] cause of femur fracture, a few complications were observed in open interlocking nailing as compared to closed interlocking nails


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Male , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary , Motor Vehicles , Accidents, Traffic , Bone Nails , Femoral Fractures/etiology , Bony Callus/physiology , Treatment Outcome
20.
Acta Medica Philippina ; : 74-79, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-632830

ABSTRACT

Osteogenesis imperfecta (Ol) type V is distinct Ol phenotype that has recently been described. Patients with this phenotype present characteristically with interosseous membrane calcification and hyperplastic callus formation. We present the clinical and radiographic characteristics of two Filipino families diagnosed to have Ol type V. Through this review of cases, we aim to educate healthcare providers by highlighting salient clinical and radiographic features to aid in the recognition of this specific Ol phenotype, difficulties in diagnosis, current practices in management and fracture prevention, and issues in genetic counseling.


Subject(s)
Humans , Osteogenesis Imperfecta , Patients , Bony Callus , Phenotype , Diagnosis , Genetic Counseling
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