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1.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-771513

ABSTRACT

Eleven flavonoids were isolated from the twigs of Broussonetia papyrifera by column chromatography over silica gel,ODS,MCI gel,and Sephadex LH-20,as well as RP-HPLC.Their structures were identified by spectroscopic methods including NMR,MS,UV,and IR as broupapyrin A(1),5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxy-3-methoxy-8-geranylflavone(2),8-prenylquercetin-3-methyl ether(3),broussonol D(4),broussoflavonol B(5),uralenol(6),broussonol E(7),8-(1,1-dimethylallyl)-5'-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflanvonol(8),broussoflavonol E(9),4,2',4'-trihydroxychalcone(10),and butein(11).Compound 1 is a new isoprenylated flavonol.Compounds 3,6,10,and 11 were obtained from the genus Broussonetia for the first time,and 4 and 7 were firstly discovered in B.papyrifera.Compounds 1-5 and 7-9 showed significant inhibitory effects on PTP1 B with IC50 values ranging from(0.83±0.30) to(4.66±0.83) μmol·L-1.


Subject(s)
Broussonetia , Chemistry , Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid , Flavonoids , Pharmacology , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Phytochemicals , Pharmacology , Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 1
2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-169111

ABSTRACT

Broussonetia kazinoki Siebold. (B. kazinoki) has long been used in the manufacture of paper in Asian countries. Although B. kazinoki leaves (BK) have been employed in dermatological therapy, use of BK has not been tested in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). Using Nc/Nga mice, which are genetically predisposed to develop AD-like skin lesions, we confirmed the efficacy of BK in AD treatment. BK extract was applied topically to Dermatophagoides farinae-induced AD-like lesions in Nc/Nga mice, and the effects were assessed both clinically and by measuring skin thickness on the back and ears. We measured the effects of BK extract on plasma levels of IgE and IL-4. We also measured the ability of BK extract to inhibit the secretion of hTARC in HaCaT cells after stimulation by TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. We found that BK extract significantly reduced ear and dorsal skin thickness and the clinical signs of AD, as well as significantly down-regulating the plasma levels of IgE and IL-4 (p<0.01 for each comparison). Moreover, 500 mug/mL of BK extract inhibited hTARC secretion in HaCaT cells by activated TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma by about 87%. These findings suggest that topical application of BK extract has excellent potential in the treatment of AD.


Subject(s)
Animals , Asians , Broussonetia , Dermatitis, Atopic , Ear , Humans , Immunoglobulin E , Interleukin-4 , Mice , Mites , Plasma , Pyroglyphidae , Skin , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-19395

ABSTRACT

Broussonetia papyrifera and Lonicera japonica have long been used in the treatment of inflammatory disorders in Chinese medicine, especially respiratory inflammation. Previously, a new phytoformula (BL) containing B. papyrifera and L. japonica was found to exert strong anti-inflammatory activity against several animal models of inflammation, especially against an animal model of acute bronchitis. In the present investigation, the effects of BL on animal models of septic inflammation and chronic bronchitis are examined. Against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic inflammation in mice, BL (200-400 mg/kg) reduced the induction of some important proinflammatory cytokines. At 1 h after LPS treatment, BL was found to considerably inhibit TNF-alpha production when measured by cytokine array. At 3 h after LPS treatment, BL inhibited the induction of several proinflammatory cytokines, including IFN-gamma and IL-1beta, although dexamethasone, which was used as a reference, showed a higher inhibitory action on these biomarkers. Against chronic bronchitis induced by LPS/elastase instillation in rats for 4 weeks, BL (200-400 mg/kg/day) significantly inhibited cell recruitment in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, BL considerably reduced lung injury, as revealed by histological observation. Taken together, these results indicate that BL may have a potential to treat systemic septic inflammation as well as chronic bronchitis.


Subject(s)
Animals , Asians , Biomarkers , Bronchitis , Bronchitis, Chronic , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , Broussonetia , Cytokines , Dexamethasone , Humans , Inflammation , Lonicera , Lung Injury , Mice , Models, Animal , Rats , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-812694

ABSTRACT

AIM@#To investigate the chemical constituents from the leaves of Broussonetia papyrifera.@*METHODS@#The chemical constituents were isolated and purified by macroporous adsorptive resin D101, silica gel, and ODS column chromatography and preparative HPLC. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR analyses. In addition, their cytotoxic activity against human hepatoma carcinoma cells (HepG-2) were evaluated by the MTT method. Furthermore, RP-HPLC and colorimetric methods were used for the analysis of cosmosiin and total flavonoids.@*RESULTS@#A new lignan, together with five known compounds were obtained, and their structures were characterized as (+)-pinoresinol-4'-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-4″-O-β-D-apiofuranoside (1), cosmosiin (2), luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), liriodendrin (4), 3, 5, 4'-trihydroxy-bibenzyl-3-O-β-D-glucoside (5), and apigenin-6-C-β-D-glucopyranside (6). Furthermore, RP-HPLC and colorimetric methods were established for the analysis of cosmosiin and total flavonoids.@*CONCLUSION@#Compound 1 was a new lignan, and compounds 5 and 6 were isolated for the first time from the title plant. Compounds 1, 4 and 6 showed definite activities against HepG-2, while the other compounds didn't show inhibitory effects. The optimal harvest time of B. papyrifera (L.) Vent. is September.


Subject(s)
Broussonetia , Chemistry , Cell Proliferation , Cytotoxins , Chemistry , Toxicity , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Lignans , Chemistry , Toxicity , Molecular Structure , Plant Extracts , Chemistry , Toxicity , Plant Leaves , Chemistry
5.
PJMR-Pakistan Journal of Medical Research. 2009; 48 (4): 79-82
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-134022

ABSTRACT

Pollen allergies affect a significant proportion of Islamabad residents. Many patients with pollen allergy are hospitalised in Islamabad in spring [February to April], fall seasons [July to September], and after monsoons. To determine the type and concentration of airborne pollens causing allergic diseases in the susceptible patients in Islamabad. The study was conducted from January 2005 to December 2006 and 'Burkard Volumetric Spore Trap' provided by the World Allergy Organization was used. This spore trap was placed in the F-10 area of Islamabad and samples were collected on weekly basis during the whole study period. To obtain the sample, the spore trap drum was loaded with a strip of sticky tape every week. The sampled sticky tape was then collected each week at a specified time and replaced with a fresh strip of, sticky tape, which was then collected next week. This cycle continued for whole study period. From each sample seven permanent slides were made and mounted with gelevitol mounting media. The slides were then examined microscopically, A total of 702 individuals irrespective of age or gender were included in the study. Skin prick tests were performed for pollens using allergen extracts of Hollister-Steir, USA and the results were recorded. The two flowering seasons in Islamabad i.e., spring and fall caused maximum pollen allergies. The Broussonetia papyrifera [paper mulberry] tree in spring, and the Cannabis saliva [bhang] weed in the fall season, produced the highest seasonal pollen counts. In the spring season of 2005, Broussonetia papyrifera produced the highest pollen count, [73%] of the total pollen count, with a maximum count of 1390 pollen/cu meter of air/hour on 20th of March, while in 2006, it accounted for 75% of the total pollen count, with a maximum count of 1430 pollen/cu meter of air/hour on 10th of March. In fall season of 2005, Cannabis saliva produced maximum pollen counts of 85 pollens/cu meter of air/hr on 18th of August, while in 2006, it achieved maximum counts of only 40 pollens/cu meter of air/hr on 27th of August. Skin prick tests demonstrated that out of 702 individuals selected irrespectivc of age or gender, 338 [48%] exhibited positive results in response to Broussonetia papyrifera pollen extracts, 207 [29%] were positive to grass pollen extracts, and 137 [20%] were positive to Cannabis sativa pollen extracts. The Broussonetia papyrifera has the highest pollen count in the spring, [February to April], and is the main cause of allergic diseases like allergic rhinitis and asthma among the residents of Islamabad, while the Cannabis sativa pollen count peaks in the fall season, causing allergic symptoms from July to September. Skin prick tests confirmed the findings. Regular awareness campaigns for seasonal pollen allergy should be launched before the beginning of the seasons


Subject(s)
Pollen , Air , Dust , Broussonetia , Cannabis
6.
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica ; (12): 173-180, 2008.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-268150

ABSTRACT

To separate and identify the chemical constituents from the leaves of Broussonetia papyrifera (Linn.) Vent, various columns including Diaion HP-20, Toyopearl HW-40C, Sephadex LH-20, silica gel were employed for the isolation and purification of compounds from the leaves of B. papyrifera. The structures of the compounds were elucidated by their physiochemical characteristics and spectral data. Nineteen compounds were isolated from the leaves of B. papyrifera and their structures were identified as apigenin (1), apigenin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2), chrysoerid-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), apigenin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranuronide (4), vitexin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (5), luteolin (6), 5,7,4'-trihydroxyl-6-C-[a-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->2)]-beta-D-glucopyranosyl flavone (7), 5,7,4'-trihydroxyl-8-C-[a-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->2)]-beta-D-glucopyranosyl flavone (8), saponaretin (9), vitexin (10), benzyl benzoate-2, 6-di-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (11), (2R, 3R, 5R, 6S, 9R)-3-hydroxy-5,6-epoxy-beta-ionol-2-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (12), (2R, 3R, 5R, 6S, 9R)-3-hydroxyl-5,6-epoxy-acetyl-beta-ionol-2-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (13), ficustriol (14), (6S, 9S)-roseoside (15), 3beta-hydroxy-5alpha,6alpha-epoxy-beta-ionone-2alpha-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (16), icariside B1 (17), sammangaoside A (18), 3-hydroxy-5alpha,6alpha-epoxy-beta-ionone (19). Compounds 11, 12 and 13 are new compounds, the others are isolated from this genus Broussonetia for the first time.


Subject(s)
Apigenin , Chemistry , Broussonetia , Chemistry , Glucosides , Chemistry , Luteolin , Chemistry , Molecular Structure , Plant Leaves , Chemistry , Plants, Medicinal , Chemistry
7.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-351842

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate the chemical constituents from the branch of Broussonetia papyrifera.</p><p><b>METHOD</b>Column chromatographic methods were used to isolate the chemical constituents. ESI-MS and NMR methods were employed for their structural elucidation.</p><p><b>RESULT</b>Six compounds were isolated and identified as (2S)-7, 3'-dihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavan (1), ergosterol peroxide (2), D-galacitol (3), sulfuretin (4), liriodendrin (5), graveolone (6), respectively.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>Compounds 1-6 were isolated from the plant for the first time.</p>


Subject(s)
Benzofurans , Chemistry , Broussonetia , Chemistry , Ergosterol , Chemistry , Flavonoids , Chemistry , Furans , Chemistry , Glucosides , Chemistry , Plant Stems , Chemistry , Plants, Medicinal , Chemistry
8.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-285849

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate the oxidative damage of ultraviolet A (UVA) to human immortalized keratinocytes line HaCaT and the protective effects of total flavonoids of Broussonetia papyrifera (TFBP) gotten from the leaves of broussonetia papyifera.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Based on the culture of the human keratinocytes, the experiment group added with different dosages of TFBP before exposure to the radiation, received the UVA radiation together with the treatment group. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were determined in cultured HaCaT cells as well as the cell activity with MTT reduction assay. Human immortalized keratinocytes HaCaT cells received ultraviolet A with the different dosages between 0.46 and 2.76 J/cm(2) respectively. The protective effects of TFBP at different concentrations were also evaluated.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The cell activity decreased gradually from 96.3% to 37.5% with the increase of UVA dosage from 0.46 J/cm(2) to 2.76 J/cm(2). After 10 mg/L up to 200 mg/L of TFBP were added the cell activity increased, the levels of MDA decreased from (5.14 +/- 0.58) nmol/mg pro to (2.98 +/- 0.14) nmol/mg pro, the levels of SOD increased from (23.09 +/- 3.91) U/mg pro to (34.50 +/- 1.59) U/mg pro and the activity of GSH-Px increased somewhat.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>Ultraviolet A causes significant oxidative injury to HaCaT cells under the conditions of this study. TFBP gotten from the leaves of broussonetia papyrifera has certain protective effect on HaCaT epithelial cells.</p>


Subject(s)
Antioxidants , Pharmacology , Broussonetia , Chemistry , Cells, Cultured , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation , Flavonoids , Pharmacology , Glutathione Peroxidase , Metabolism , Humans , Keratinocytes , Radiation Effects , Lipid Peroxidation , Radiation Effects , Malondialdehyde , Metabolism , Plant Leaves , Chemistry , Superoxide Dismutase , Metabolism , Ultraviolet Rays
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