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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-887733

ABSTRACT

Pathogens like bacteria and protozoa, which affect human and animal health worldwide, can be transmitted by vectors like ticks. To investigate the epidemiology and genetic diversity of bacteria and protozoans carried by ticks in Chengmai county of Hainan province, China, 285 adult hard ticks belonging to two species [


Subject(s)
Anaplasmataceae/isolation & purification , Animals , Chaperonin 60/genetics , China , Citrate (si)-Synthase/genetics , Coccidia/isolation & purification , Coxiellaceae/isolation & purification , Insect Vectors/microbiology , Islands , Ixodidae/microbiology , Phylogeny , Piroplasmia/isolation & purification , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , RNA, Ribosomal, 18S/genetics
2.
J. bras. pneumol ; 46(2): e20190184, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1134864

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a heterogeneous group of bacteria that are widely distributed in nature and associated with opportunistic infections in humans. The aims of this study were to identify NTM in patients with suspected tuberculosis who presented positive cultures and to evaluate the genetic diversity of strains identified as Mycobacterium avium. Methods: We studied pulmonary and extrapulmonary samples obtained from 1,248 patients. The samples that tested positive on culture and negative for the M. tuberculosis complex by molecular identification techniques were evaluated by detection of the hsp65 and rpoB genes and sequencing of conserved fragments of these genes. All strains identified as M. avium were genotyped using the eight-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem-repeat method. Results: We found that NTM accounted for 25 (7.5%) of the 332 mycobacteria isolated. Of those 25, 18 (72%) were M. avium, 5 (20%) were M. abscessus, 1 (4%) was M. gastri, and 1 (4%) was M. kansasii. The 18 M. avium strains showed high diversity, only two strains being genetically related. Conclusions: These results highlight the need to consider the investigation of NTM in patients with suspected active tuberculosis who present with positive cultures, as well as to evaluate the genetic diversity of M. avium strains.


RESUMO Objetivo: As micobactérias não tuberculosas (MNT) são um grupo heterogêneo de bactérias amplamente distribuídas na natureza e relacionadas com infecções oportunistas em seres humanos. Os objetivos deste estudo foram identificar MNT em pacientes com suspeita de tuberculose e culturas positivas e avaliar a diversidade genética de cepas identificadas como Mycobacterium avium. Métodos: Foram estudadas amostras pulmonares e extrapulmonares provenientes de 1.248 pacientes. As amostras que apresentaram resultado positivo em cultura e negativo para o complexo M. tuberculosis na identificação molecular foram avaliadas por meio da detecção dos genes hsp65 e rpoB e de sequenciamento de fragmentos conservados desses genes. Todas as cepas identificadas como M. avium foram genotipadas pelo método mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem-repeat com oito loci. Resultados: Das 332 micobactérias isoladas, 25 (7,5%) eram MNT. Dessas 25, 18 (72%) eram M. avium, 5 (20%) eram M. abscessus, 1 (4%) era M. gastri e 1 (4%) era M. kansasii. As 18 cepas de M. avium apresentaram alta diversidade, e apenas duas eram geneticamente relacionadas. Conclusões: Esses resultados mostram a necessidade de considerar a investigação de MNT em pacientes com suspeita de tuberculose ativa e culturas positivas e de avaliar a diversidade genética de cepas de M. avium.


Subject(s)
Humans , Nontuberculous Mycobacteria/isolation & purification , Mycobacterium avium/genetics , Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous/diagnosis , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , Genetic Variation , Brazil , DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases/genetics , Bacterial Typing Techniques , Chaperonin 60/genetics , Mycobacterium avium/isolation & purification , Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous/microbiology
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-36477

ABSTRACT

Deer serve as reservoirs of tick-borne pathogens that impact on medical and veterinary health worldwide. In the Republic of Korea, the population of Korean water deer (KWD, Hydropotes inermis argyropus) has greatly increased from 1982 to 2011, in part, as a result of reforestation programs established following the Korean War when much of the land was barren of trees. Eighty seven Haemaphysalis flava, 228 Haemaphysalis longicornis, 8 Ixodes nipponensis, and 40 Ixodes persulcatus (21 larvae, 114 nymphs, and 228 adults) were collected from 27 out of 70 KWD. A total of 89/363 ticks (266 pools, 24.5% minimum infection rate) and 5 (1.4%) fed ticks were positive for Anaplasma phagocytophilum using nested PCR targeting the 16S rRNA and groEL genes, respectively. The 16S rRNA gene fragment sequences of 88/89 (98.9%) of positive samples for A. phagocytophilum corresponded to previously described gene sequences from KWD spleen tissues. The 16S rRNA gene fragment sequences of 20/363 (5.5%) of the ticks were positive for A. bovis and were identical to previously reported sequences. Using the ITS specific nested PCR, 11/363 (3.0%) of the ticks were positive for Bartonella spp. This is the first report of Anaplasma and Bartonella spp. detected in ticks collected from KWD, suggesting that ticks are vectors of Anaplasma and Bartonella spp. between reservoir hosts in natural surroundings.


Subject(s)
Anaplasma/genetics , Animals , Arachnid Vectors/microbiology , Bartonella/genetics , Chaperonin 60/genetics , Deer/parasitology , Disease Reservoirs/veterinary , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Ticks/microbiology
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-178343

ABSTRACT

Mycobacterium longobardum is a slow-growing, nontuberculous mycobacterium that was first characterized from the M. terrae complex in 2012. We report a case of M. longobardum induced chronic osteomyelitis. A 71-yr-old man presented with inflammation in the left elbow and he underwent a surgery under the suspicion of tuberculous osteomyelitis. The pathologic tissue culture grew M. longobardum which was identified by analysis of the 65-kDa heat shock protein and full-length 16S rRNA genes. The patient was cured with the medication of clarithromycin and ethambutol without further complications. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a M. longobardum infection worldwide.


Subject(s)
Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , Chaperonin 60/genetics , Clarithromycin/therapeutic use , Elbow/pathology , Ethambutol/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous/microbiology , Nontuberculous Mycobacteria/classification , Osteomyelitis/diagnosis , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Treatment Outcome
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-43980

ABSTRACT

We herein report a case in which the recently characterized species Mycobacterium monacense was isolated from the sputum of an Iranian patient. This case represents the first isolation of M. monacense from Iran. The isolate was identified by conventional and molecular techniques. Our findings show that M. monacense infection is not restricted to developed countries.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Proteins/genetics , Chaperonin 60/genetics , Chronic Disease , Female , Humans , Iran , Lung Diseases/diagnosis , Middle Aged , Mycobacterium/classification , Mycobacterium Infections/microbiology , Polymerase Chain Reaction , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Sputum/microbiology
6.
J Genet ; 2005 Dec; 84(3): 265-81
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-114289

ABSTRACT

Earlier studies have shown that of the four genes (Hsp60A, Hsp60B, Hsp60C, Hsp60D genes) predicted to encode the conserved Hsp60 family chaperones in Drosophila melanogaster, the Hsp60A gene (at the 10A polytene region) is expressed in all cell types of the organism and is essential from early embryonic stages, while the Hsp60B gene (at 21D region) is expressed only in testis, being essential for sperm individualization. In the present study, we characterized the Hsp60C gene (at 25F region), which shows high sequence homology with the other three Hsp60 genes of D. melanogaster. In situ hybridization of Hsp60C-specific riboprobe shows that expression of this gene begins in late embryonic stages (stage 14 onwards), particularly in the developing tracheal system and salivary glands; during larval and adult stages, it is widely expressed in many cell types but much more strongly in tracheae and in developing and differentiating germ cells. A P-insertion mutant (Hsp60C(1)) allele with the P transposon inserted at -251 position of the Hsp60C gene promoter was generated. This early larval recessive lethal mutation significantly reduces levels of Hsp60C transcripts in developing tracheae and this is associated with a variety of defects in the tracheal system, including lack of liquid clearance. About 10% of the homozygotes survive as weak, shortlived and completely sterile adults. Testes of the surviving mutant males are significantly smaller, with fewer spermatocytes, most of which do not develop beyond the round spermatid stage. In situ and Northern hybridizations show significantly reduced levels of the Hsp60C transcripts in Hsp60C(1) homozygous adult males. The absence of early meiotic stages in the Hsp60C(1) homozygous testes contrasts with the effect of testis-specific Hsp60B (21D) gene, whose mutation affects individualization of sperm bundles later in spermiogenesis. In view of the specific effects in tracheal development and in early stages of spermatogenesis, it is likely that, besides its functions as a chaperone, Hsp60C may have signalling functions and may also be involved in cation transport across the developing tracheal epithelial cells.


Subject(s)
Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Chaperonin 60/genetics , Drosophila Proteins/genetics , Female , Fertility/genetics , Genes, Recessive , Homozygote , In Situ Hybridization , Larva/genetics , Male , Molecular Sequence Data , Mutation , Sequence Homology , Spermatocytes/metabolism , Spermatogonia/metabolism
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-71818

ABSTRACT

We investigated the prevalence of Bartonella infections in ticks, mites and small mammals (rodents, insectivores and weasels) collected during 2001 through 2004, from various military installations and training sites in Korea, using PCR and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA and groEL heat shock protein genes. The prevalence of Bartonella spp. was 5.2% (n = 1, 305 sample pools) in ticks, 19.1% (n = 21) in mesostigmatid mites and 13.7% (n = 424 individuals) in small mammals. The prevalence within the family Ixodidae was, 4.4% (n = 1, 173) in Haemaphysalis longicornis (scrub tick), 2.7% (n = 74) in H. flava, 5.0% (n = 20) in Ixodes nipponensis, 11.1% (n = 9) in I. turdus, 33.3% (n = 3) in I. persulcatus and 42.3% (n = 26) in Ixodes spp. ticks. In rodents, the prevalence rate was, 6.7% (n = 373) in Apodemus agrarius (striped field mouse) and 11.1% (n = 9) in Eothenomys regulus (Korean red-backed vole) and in an insectivore, Crocidura lasiura, 12.1% (n = 33). Neither of the two weasels were positive for Bartonella spp. Phylogenetic analysis based on amino acid sequence of a portion of the groEL gene amplified from one A. agrarius spleen was identical to B. elizabethae species. We demonstrated the presence of Bartonella DNA in H. longicornis, H. flava and I. nipponensis ticks, indicating that these ticks should be added to the growing list of potential tick vectors and warrants further detailed investigations to disclose their possible roles in Bartonella infection cycles.


Subject(s)
Animals , Bartonella/classification , DNA, Bacterial , Disease Vectors , Chaperonin 60/genetics , Mammals/microbiology , Mites/microbiology , Polymerase Chain Reaction , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , RNA, Ribosomal, 23S/genetics , Ticks/microbiology
8.
Biol. Res ; 26(1/2): 313-4, 1993.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-228614

ABSTRACT

To identify the members of the HSP70 and HSP60 families of Trypanosoma cruzi, we analysed 35S methionine epimastigote cells by two dimensional Western blot. At 29 degrees C, an HSP70 monoclonal antibody (anti-D. melanogaster) recognized eight isotypes. At least five of these were heat-induced. Polyclonal antibody against the 65 KDa antigen (anti-M. tuberculosis) recognized three isotypes with identical molecular weights, but different microliters. Only one isoform was heat induced. The cellular distribution of HSP70 and HSP60 was studied by immunoelectron microscopy. Anti-HSP70 reactive protein was localized in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and nucleus, while anti-HSP60 protein was found in the mitochondrion and in close association with the kinetoplast. To characterize the HSP60 gene and its proteins, we isolated a genomic T. cruzi clone encoding the HSP60 gene. T. cruzi HSP60 genes could be shown to be organized in 2100 nt tandem arrays. RELP in the HSP60 genes revealed that at least three different types of HSP60 genes were encoded in the T cruzi genome. The predicted open reading frame measured exhibits about 50 percent identity to other HSP60 described. Expression of these HSP60 genes could not be induced by 2 hours heat shock at 37 degrees C. Post-transcriptional mechanisms may be responsible for HSP60 induction in T. cruzi


Subject(s)
Animals , Chaperonin 60/isolation & purification , Genes, Protozoan/genetics , HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins/isolation & purification , Protozoan Proteins/isolation & purification , Trypanosoma cruzi/genetics , Chaperonin 60/genetics , Chaperonin 60/ultrastructure , Genome, Protozoan , HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics , HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins/ultrastructure , Protozoan Proteins/genetics , Protozoan Proteins/ultrastructure
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