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1.
Acta Physiologica Sinica ; (6): 575-580, 2019.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-777154

ABSTRACT

The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of salidroside (Sal) on inflammatory activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the co-culture of rat alveolar macrophages (AM) NR 8383 and type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II) RLE-6TN. CCK-8 colorimetric method was used to detect cell proliferation percentage. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine the content of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) in the supernatant. Western blot was used to examine the expression levels of phosphorylated AKT (p-AKT) and total AKT protein. The results showed that pretreatment of RLE-6TN cells or co-culture of RLE-6TN and NR 8383 cells with 32 and 128 µg/mL Sal for 1 h, followed by continuous culture for 24 h, significantly increased the cell proliferation (P < 0.05). Compared with control group, 32 and 128 µg/mL Sal pretreatment significantly increased the ratio of p-AKT/AKT in RLE-6TN cells (P < 0.05). Pretreatment of 32 µg/mL Sal not only inhibited the secretion of TNF-α and MIP-2 by NR 8383 cells induced by LPS (P < 0.05), but also enhanced the inhibitory effect of RLE-6TN and NR 8383 cells co-culture on the secretion of TNF-α and MIP-2 by NR 8383 cells induced by LPS (P < 0.05). In addition, 32 µg/mL Sal pretreatment promoted LPS-induced IL-10 secretion by NR 8383 cells (P < 0.05), and enhanced the promoting effect of co-culture of RLE-6TN and NR 8383 cells on the IL-10 secretion by LPS-induced NR 8383 cells (P < 0.05). In conclusion, Sal may directly inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory activation of AM (NR 8383), promote the proliferation of AEC II (RLE-6TN) through PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, and enhance the regulatory effect of AEC II on LPS-induced inflammatory activation of AM.


Subject(s)
Alveolar Epithelial Cells , Metabolism , Animals , Cell Line , Chemokine CXCL2 , Metabolism , Coculture Techniques , Glucosides , Pharmacology , Interleukin-10 , Metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides , Macrophages, Alveolar , Metabolism , Phenols , Pharmacology , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases , Metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt , Metabolism , Rats , Signal Transduction , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha , Metabolism
2.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 1167-1173, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-687044

ABSTRACT

<p><b>Background</b>Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe disease with high mortality and poor prognosis. Protectin DX (PDX), a pro-resolving lipid mediator, exhibits protective effects in ALI. Our experiment aimed to explore the effects and related mechanisms of PDX in mice with ALI induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS).</p><p><b>Methods</b>BALB/c mice were randomly divided into five groups: sham, LPS, LPS plus 1 ng of PDX (LPS + PDX-1 ng), LPS plus 10 ng of PDX (LPS + PDX-10 ng), and LPS plus 100 ng of PDX (LPS + PDX-100 ng). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) were collected after 24 h, and total cells, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocyte-macrophages, and lymphocytes in BALF were enumerated. The concentration of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, and MIP-2 in BALF was determined, and histopathological changes of the lung were observed. The concentration of protein in BALF and lung wet/dry weight ratios were detected to evaluate pulmonary edema. After determining the optimal dose of PDX, neutrophil-platelet interactions in whole blood were evaluated by flow cytometry.</p><p><b>Results</b>The highest dose of PDX (100 ng/mouse) failed to provide pulmonary protective effects, whereas lower doses of PDX (1 ng/mouse and 10 ng/mouse), especially 1 ng PDX, alleviated pulmonary histopathological changes, mitigated LPS-induced ALI and pulmonary edema, inhibited neutrophil infiltration, and reduced pro-inflammatory mediator (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and MIP-1α) levels. Meanwhile, 1 ng PDX exhibited pro-resolving functions in ALI including upregulation of monocyte-macrophage numbers and anti-inflammatory mediator IL-10 levels. The flow cytometry results showed that PDX could inhibit neutrophil-platelet interactions in ALI.</p><p><b>Conclusion</b>PDX exerts protective effects in LPS-induced ALI by mitigating pulmonary inflammation and abrogating neutrophil-platelet interactions.</p>


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury , Drug Therapy , Animals , Chemokine CXCL2 , Metabolism , Docosahexaenoic Acids , Therapeutic Uses , Flow Cytometry , Interleukin-10 , Metabolism , Interleukin-1beta , Metabolism , Interleukin-6 , Metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides , Toxicity , Lung , Metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha , Metabolism
3.
Acta Physiologica Sinica ; (6): 41-46, 2017.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-331595

ABSTRACT

To investigate the effect of salidroside (Sal) on the inflammatory activation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced murine macrophage cell line J774.1 and its possible mechanism, the cells were treated with PBS, LPS (0.5 µg/mL) or different doses of Sal (5, 25, 125 µg/mL) + LPS (0.5 µg/mL). CCK-8 colorimetric method was used to detect the cell activity. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect the contents of TNF-α, MCP-1 and MIP-2 in the supernatant, and the content of NO in the supernatant was determined by nitrate reductase method. The expression levels of iNOS mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. Western blot was used to detect the expression levels of iNOS protein in cytoplasm and NF-kappaB/p65 (NF-κB/p65) protein in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and DNA binding activity of NF-κB/p65 was detected by using TransAMTM NF-κB/p65 activity assay kit. The results showed that the treatment with 0.5 µg/mL LPS and different doses of Sal (5, 25, 125 µg/mL) for 12 h had no effect on cell viability. Compared with LPS stimulation group, pretreatment with Sal significantly reduced the contents of TNF-α, MCP-1, MIP-2 and NO in culture supernatant induced by LPS in a dose dependent manner (P < 0.05), downregulated the expression levels of iNOS mRNA and protein (P < 0.05), decreased the expression level of NF-κB/p65 protein in nucleus (P < 0.05) while accordingly increased that in cytoplasm (P < 0.05), and decreased DNA binding activity of NF-κB/p65 in a dose dependent manner (P < 0.05). The results suggested that Sal pretreatment can reduce macrophage inflammatory activation induced by LPS, and the mechanism may be through the LPS/TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway, thereby reducing the excessive expression and secretion of inflammatory mediators and cytokines.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cell Line , Chemokine CCL2 , Metabolism , Chemokine CXCL2 , Metabolism , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Glucosides , Pharmacology , Inflammation , Lipopolysaccharides , Macrophages , Metabolism , Mice , Nitric Oxide , Metabolism , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II , Metabolism , Phenols , Pharmacology , Signal Transduction , Transcription Factor RelA , Metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha , Metabolism
4.
Acta cir. bras ; 31(4): 278-285, Apr. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-781333

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To investigate gender differences in the evolution of the inflammatory process in rats subjected to brain death (BD). METHODS: Adult Wistar rats were divided into three groups: female; ovariectomized female; and male rats. BD was induced using intracranial balloon inflation and confirmed by maximal pupil dilatation, apnea, absence of reflex, and drop of mean arterial pressure. Six hours after BD, histological evaluation was performed in lungs, heart, liver and kidneys, and levels of inflammatory proteins, estrogen, progesterone, and corticosterone were determined in plasma. RESULTS: In the lungs, females presented more leukocyte infiltration compared to males (p<0.01). Ovariectomized female rat lungs were more hemorrhagic compared to other groups (p<0.001). In the heart, females had higher leukocyte infiltration and tissue edema compared to males (p<0.05). In the liver and kidneys, there were no differences among groups. In female group estradiol and progesterone were sharply reduced 6 hours after BD (p<0.001) to values observed in ovariectomized females and males. Corticosterone levels were similar. CONCLUSIONS: Sex hormones influence the development of inflammation and the status of organs. The increased inflammation in lungs and heart of female rats might be associated with the acute reduction in female hormones triggered by BD.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Female , Brain Death/pathology , Sex Characteristics , Kidney/pathology , Liver/pathology , Lung/pathology , Myocardium/pathology , Organ Specificity , Progesterone/blood , Reference Values , Time Factors , Ovariectomy , Sex Factors , Rats, Wistar , Edema/pathology , Estradiol/blood , Chemokine CXCL1/analysis , Chemokine CXCL2/analysis , Inflammation/pathology
5.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-359307

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To observe effect of acupuncture on serum macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and MIP-2 mRNA expressions in isolated Fei and Dachang of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) induced acute lung injury (ALI) rats in the acute phase.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups, i.e., the sham-operation group, the SAP group, the acupuncture treatment group, and the acupuncture control group, 10 in each group. The SAP model was induced by retrograde infusion of 3.5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatobiliary duct. Under the guidance of "Fei and Dachang exterior-inferiorly related", points were acupunctured along Fei, Dachang, and Pi channels, as well as those points on the back of rats in the acupuncture treatment group 0.5 h after modeling. Besides, points were acupunctured along Fei and Pi channels, as well as those points on the back of rats in the acupuncture control group 0.5 h after modeling. Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and nitric oxide (NO), and MIP-2 expressions were examined 6 h after modeling. Expressions of MIP-2 mRNA in isolated lung and large intestine tissues were detected by reverse transcription PCR.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Compared with the sham-operation group, serum levels of TNF-alpha and NO, and expressions of MIP-2 and MIP-2 mRNA in isolated lung and large intestine tissues were significantly higher in the SAP group (P < 0.05). Each index was lower in the acupuncture treatment group than in the SAP group and the acupuncture control group (P < 0.05). Besides, the serum level of MIP-2 and the MIP-2 mRNA expression in isolated lung and large intestine tissues were positively correlated in all groups except the sham-operation group (P < 0.05).</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>Under the guidance of "Fei and Dachang exterior-inferiorly related", acupuncture could remarkably reduce the severity of SAP induced ALI rats in the acute phase. Its mechanism might be related to suppressing over-expressions of MIP-2 mRNA in isolated lung and large intestine tissues, and lowering the serum MIP-2 expression level.</p>


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy , Acute Lung Injury , Blood , Metabolism , Animals , Chemokine CXCL2 , Blood , Genetics , Metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Intestine, Large , Metabolism , Lung , Metabolism , Male , Pancreatitis , Blood , Metabolism , RNA, Messenger , Genetics , Rats , Rats, Wistar
6.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-359279

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To explore the mechanism of Xiaoai Jiedu Recipe (XJR) for fighting against tumors by detecting tumor gene expression profiles of H22 tumor-bearing mice.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>H22 tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into the normal control group, the low dose XJR group, the medium dose XJR group, the high dose XJR group, and the Cisplatin group. The differentially expressed genes of tumor tissues in H22 tumor-bearing mice were detected by using gene chip technique. The antitumor mechanism of XJR associated signaling pathways and gene expressions were found out by pathway analysis. The chemokine signaling pathways were analyzed.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>XJP could significantly affect multiple signaling pathways associated with tumor growth, apoptosis, and immunity. XJP also could decrease expressions of CCL3 and CXCL2 in the chemokine signaling pathway.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>XJP could inhibit the growth and invasion of tumor cells possibly by affecting expressions of some genes in the chemokine signaling pathway.</p>


Subject(s)
Animals , Cell Line, Tumor , Chemokine CCL3 , Metabolism , Chemokine CXCL2 , Metabolism , Drugs, Chinese Herbal , Pharmacology , Gene Expression Profiling , Liver Neoplasms, Experimental , Genetics , Metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Signal Transduction
7.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 491-495, 2012.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-262584

ABSTRACT

<p><b>BACKGROUND</b>Azithromycin can reduce neutrophil accumulation in neutrophilic pulmonary diseases. However, the precise mechanism behind this action remains unknown. Our experiment assessed whether azithromycin inhibits neutrophil accumulation in the airways by affecting interleukin-17 (IL-17) downstream signals.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Mice were pretreated with azithromycin before murine IL-17A (mIL-17) stimulation. After the mIL-17 stimulation, the levels of six neutrophil-mobilizing cytokines were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid; IL-6, CXC chemokine ligand-1 (CXCL-1), CXCL-5, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The number of neutrophils in BAL fluid were evaluated by cytospin preparations.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>(1) Azithromycin pretreatment significantly inhibited both the release of three neutrophil-mobilizing cytokines (MIP-2, CXCL-5 and GM-CSF) and the accumulation of neutrophils in airways caused by mIL-17 stimulation. (2) The levels of three neutrophil-mobilizing cytokines (IL-6, MIP-2 and GM-CSF) were positively correlated with the numbers of neutrophil in BAL fluid.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>Azithromycin can inhibit neutrophil accumulation in the airways by affecting IL-17 downstream signals. This finding suggests that macrolide antibiotic application might be useful in prevention of neutrophilic pulmonary diseases characterized by high levels of IL-17.</p>


Subject(s)
Animals , Azithromycin , Pharmacology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , Chemistry , Chemokine CXCL2 , Metabolism , Chemokines, CXC , Metabolism , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor , Metabolism , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor , Metabolism , Interleukin-17 , Pharmacology , Interleukin-6 , Metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Neutrophils , Metabolism
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-153148

ABSTRACT

Dominant inflammatory cytokines might be different depending on the underlying causes of acute lung injury (ALI). The role of kertinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), a potent chemoattractant for neutrophils, has not been clearly established in hemorrhage-induced ALI. In this study, lung injury and cytokine expressison were evaluated in LPS- or hemorrhage-induced ALI models of BALB/c mice. The myeloperoxidase activities at 4 hr after hemorrhage and LPS-injection were 47.4+/-13.0 and 56.5+/-16.4 U/g, respectively. NF-kappa B activity peaked at 4 hr after hemorrhage, which was suppressed to the control level by anti-high mobility group B1 (HMGB1) antibody. Lung expressions of TNF-alpha, MIP-2, and IL-1beta were increased by LPS injection. However, there was only a minimal increase in IL-1beta and no expressions of TNF-alpha or MIP-2 in hemorrhage-induced ALI. In contrast, lung KC increased significantly at 4 hr after hemorrhage compared to control levels (83.1+/-12.3 vs. 14.2+/-1.6 pg/mL/mg by ELISA) (P<0.05). By immunohistochemical staining, lung neutrophils stained positive for KC. Increased KC was also observed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma. KC plays an important role in hemorrhage-induced ALI.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/etiology , Animals , Antibodies/immunology , Chemokine CXCL2/analysis , Chemokines/analysis , Chickens , HMGB1 Protein/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/analysis , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Neutrophils/immunology , Peroxidase/analysis , Shock, Hemorrhagic/complications , Time Factors , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/analysis
9.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-325075

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate the changes in serum levels of chemokine MCP-1 and MIP-2 after renal transplantation in rats and the influence of Cyclosporin A (CsA) on their levels.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Three groups of rats, namely untreated group, CsA group and isograft group underwent the renal transplantation, and the serum MCP-1 and MIP-2 levels of the recipients were tested using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The serum MCP-1 level peaked 6 hours after the operation and also in critical stages of acute rejection. The first peak of MCP-1 was postponed by the application of CsA, which did not affect the peak level (P>0.05). The second peak of MCP-1 did not occur in CsA-treated group. MIP-2 concentration also peaked at 6 h after the operation in all the groups. The second peak of MIP-2, which was lower than the first one (P<0.05), occurred 9 days after the transplantation.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>MCP-1 and MIP-2 in involved not only in the ischemia-reperfusion injury but also in severe acute rejection. CsA has no significant effect on serum levels of MCP-1 and MIP-2 following renal transplantation in rats.</p>


Subject(s)
Animals , Chemokine CCL2 , Blood , Chemokine CXCL2 , Blood , Cyclosporine , Pharmacology , Graft Rejection , Blood , Drug Therapy , Kidney Transplantation , Male , Postoperative Period , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Rats, Wistar , Reperfusion Injury , Blood
10.
Egyptian Journal of Histology [The]. 2008; 31 (1): 14-21
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-101776

ABSTRACT

Polymorphonuclear leucocyte neutrophils [PMN] migrate to infected mucosal sites to protect the injured tissue from invading pathogens. Their interaction with the epithelial barrier is controlled by chemokines. Also, chemokines are involved in the pathogenesis of renal disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE]. Therefore, the present study examined the immunocytochemical localization of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-2 [CINC-2] and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 [MIP-2] in PMN of patients with urinary tract disease; SLE, urinary tract infection [UTI], renal transplanted recipients and bladder cancer patients in comparison with normal and patients without renal disease; hepatitis C virus [HCV] and diabetes mellitus [DM]. The obtained results showed that CINC-2 and MIP-2 immunoreactivity was weak in PMN from normal and patients without urinary tract disease. However, patients with SLE, UTI and bladder cancer exhibited an upregulation in CINC-2 or MIP-2 as reflected by strong immunoreactivity and significant increase in number of positive PMN. In contrast, CINC-2 and MIP-2 immunoreactivity and number of positive PMN was slightly increased after kidney transplantation especially in case of normal graft function. However during episodes of rejection, the immunoreactivity of CINC-2 and MIP-2 as well as number of positive PMN was augmented. Additionally, there was a positive correlation between the CINC-2 and MIP-2 immunoreactivity of PMN in all groups. Taken together, the upregulation of CINC-2 and MIP-2 in patients with urinary tract disease suggest that the defect in urinary tract function leads to accumulation of CINC-2 and MIP-2 as a defect in their clearance. Thus, CINC-2 and MIP-2 can be used as an additional marker for renal rejection


Subject(s)
Humans , Chemokine CXCL2/blood , Neutrophils , Biomarkers , Graft Rejection , Fluorescent Antibody Technique
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-173551

ABSTRACT

Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has immuno-stimulatory effects. We hypothesized that GM-CSF plays an important role both in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and hemorrhage-induced acute lung injury (ALI). We also postulated that GM-CSF augments LPS-induced inflammation by priming neutrophils. ALI was induced in GM-CSF-/- or control C57BL mice either by LPS injection or by hemorrhage. Lung inflammation (by lung expression for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin- 6 (IL-6), and keratinocyte-derived chemokine) and lung injury (by myeloperoxidase and evans blue dye assay) were evaluated after ALI. Incremental doses of LPS (0, 1, 10, and 100 ng/mL) and GM-CSF (0, 1, 10, and 100 ng/mL) were added to bone marrow neutrophils. The expression of TNF-alpha, MIP-2, and IL-1beta was evaluated with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The mRNA expression of three cytokines, and the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF kappa-B) were evaluated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and electropnoretic mobility shift assay, respectively. GM-CSF -/- mice showed decreased neutrophil infiltration, less leakage, and lower expression of cytokines in the lung after LPS or hemorrhage. GM-CSF augmented LPS-induced protein and mRNA expression of TNF-alpha, MIP-2 and IL-1beta, which was mediated by increased intra-nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B. GM-CSF plays an important role in high-dose LPS and hemorrhage-induced ALI, which appears to be mediated by its priming effect on neutrophils.


Subject(s)
Animals , Bone Marrow Cells/cytology , Chemokine CXCL2/metabolism , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/metabolism , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Lung Injury , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Transgenic , Neutrophils/cytology , Peroxidase/metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism
12.
Chinese Journal of Hepatology ; (12): 215-219, 2008.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-332280

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To explore the role of early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1) signal pathway in acute intrahepatic cholestatic liver injury in rats.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>A single dose (50 mg/kg) of alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) was administered by gavage to each experimental rat to induce intrahepatic cholestasis. Liver tissue and serum specimens were collected from rats at 24, 48 and 72 h after the intoxication. The values of Egr-1, cytokine induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1(CINC-1), macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) mRNA, the protein expression of inducible nitricoxide synthase (iNOS) and the values of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were assayed by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and ELISA, respectively. The levels of MDA, SOD, NO and MPO were assayed by thiobarbituric acid method, xanthine oxidase method, nitric acid deoxidizing assay, and colorimetric method, respectively.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>In the model group at 24, 48, 72 h after intoxication, the values of CINC-1 and MIP-2 mRNA were higher than those of the controls (P < 0.05). In the model group at 24, 48 h after intoxication, the value of Egr-1 mRNA was higher than that of the controls (P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference at 72 h (P < 0.05). Of the model group, the absorbance value of iNOS was lower than that of the controls at 24, 48 and 72 h (P < 0.05). Of the model group at 24, 48, 72 h after intoxication, the values of TNF alpha, IL-6, MPO and MDA were higher than those of the controls (P < 0.05), but the values of NO and SOD were lower than those of the controls (P < 0.05).</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>Egr-1 signal pathway is involved in acute intrahepatic cholestatic liver injury induced by ANIT. After Egr-1 was activated, CINC-1 and MIP-2 are activated consequently and attract neutrophils into the liver. TNF alpha and IL-6 are activated at the same time, so neutrophils are activated and the resulting lipid peroxidation and MDA increased, injuring the liver. iNOS and NO may play a protective role in acute intrahepatic cholestatic liver injury induced by ANIT.</p>


Subject(s)
1-Naphthylisothiocyanate , Acute Disease , Animals , Chemokine CXCL1 , Metabolism , Chemokine CXCL2 , Metabolism , Cholestasis, Intrahepatic , Metabolism , Pathology , Early Growth Response Protein 1 , Metabolism , Interleukin-6 , Metabolism , Liver , Chemistry , Pathology , Male , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Signal Transduction , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha , Metabolism
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-263276

ABSTRACT

Recent studies revealed that apoptotic cells are actively involved in immunosuppression and anti-inflammation. After being phagocytosed by macrophages, apoptotic cells can actively regulate cytokines secretion from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages, in which the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines such as interleukin-10 (IL-10) is increased while the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFa), interleukin-1beta (IL-1b) and leukin-8 (IL-8) are suppressed. In this paper, we first present evidence that phagocytosed apoptotic cells regulate cytokine secretion of LPS-stimulated macrophages, but also inhibit the activation of T lymphocytes stimulated by ConA. These data suggest that apoptotic cells can alter the biological behavior of macrophages which gain immunosuppressive property.


Subject(s)
Animals , Antigens, CD , Metabolism , Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte , Metabolism , Apoptosis , Allergy and Immunology , Chemokine CXCL2 , Chemokines , Genetics , Concanavalin A , Pharmacology , Cytokines , Female , Humans , Immune Tolerance , In Vitro Techniques , Jurkat Cells , Lectins, C-Type , Lipopolysaccharides , Pharmacology , Lymphocyte Activation , Macrophages , Allergy and Immunology , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Phagocytosis , Receptors, Interleukin-2 , Metabolism , Signal Transduction , Allergy and Immunology , T-Lymphocytes , Allergy and Immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha , Genetics
14.
Chinese Journal of Hematology ; (12): 666-670, 2004.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-229930

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To study the expression of hHSF in E. coli and its effect on the mobilization of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>The hHSF gene was obtained by overlapping PCR and cloned into the vector pET30a to yield pET30a-hHSF, which was transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3) and expressed with IPTG induction. Subsequently, rhHSF was purified by gel filtration and cation exchange chromatography and subjected to refolding. Molecular weight of hHSF was measured by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectroscopy. The N terminal amino acid sequence rhHSF was determined by protein sequencing. rhHSF was profiled in rhesus monkey for mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells. Eight rhesus monkeys were equally divided into two groups. The first group was administered single subcutaneous injection of 500 microg/kg hHSF, while the other one was administered 10 microg.kg(-1).d(-1) G-CSF for 4 days followed by a single subcutaneous injection of 500 microg/kg rhHSF.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The sequence coding hHSF was confirmed by sequencing and the induced-expression level was about 30% of total cell proteins. The purity of target protein was over 95%. The sequence of N terminal 10 amino acids and the amino acid composition were consistent with the theoretical parameters; molecular weight of rhHSF was 7540. The peripheral CD34(+) cells, CFU-GM yields, and neutrophils peaked at 3 h (16.3-folds increase compared with baseline), 1 h (1.9-folds increase) and 45 min (4.4-folds increase) respectively after the single injection of rhHSF. The addition of rhHSF after the last dose of G-CSF boosted these levels to 25.8-folds, 8.7-folds and 8.3-folds respectively.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>hHSF is highly expressed in E. coli and rapidly mobilizes the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and neutrophils in rhesus monkeys. hHSF shows distinct synergistic effect with G-CSF.</p>


Subject(s)
Animals , Chemokine CXCL2 , Chemistry , Genetics , Pharmacology , Escherichia coli , Genetics , Female , Genetic Vectors , Genetics , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor , Pharmacology , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization , Methods , Hematopoietic Stem Cells , Cell Biology , Humans , Macaca mulatta , Male , Protein Folding , Recombinant Proteins , Chemistry , Pharmacology , Sequence Analysis, Protein , Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
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