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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-881035

ABSTRACT

Taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA) is one of the main effective components of bile acid, playing critical roles in apoptosis and immune responses through the TGR5 receptor. In this study, we reveal the interaction between TCDCA and TGR5 receptor in TGR5-knockdown H1299 cells and the regulation of inflammation via the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA)-cAMP response element binding (CREB) signal pathway in NR8383 macrophages. In TGR5-knockdown H1299 cells, TCDCA significantly activated cAMP level via TGR5 receptor, indicating TCDCA can bind to TGR5; in NR8383 macrophages TCDCA increased cAMP content compared to treatment with the adenylate cyclase (AC) inhibitor SQ22536. Moreover, activated cAMP can significantly enhance gene expression and protein levels of its downstream proteins PKA and CREB compared with groups of inhibitors. Additionally, TCDCA decreased tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8 and IL-12 through nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) activity. PKA and CREB are primary regulators of anti-inflammatory and immune response. Our results thus demonstrate TCDCA plays an essential anti-inflammatory role via the signaling pathway of cAMP-PKA-CREB induced by TGR5 receptor.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cell Line , Cyclic AMP/metabolism , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein/metabolism , Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation , Macrophages , Rats , Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Taurochenodeoxycholic Acid/pharmacology
2.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-828634

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To study the expression level of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in children with recurrent wheezing under three years of age and its effect on the expression of the serum orosomucoid 1-like protein 3 (ORMDL3) gene.@*METHODS@#Thirty-six children with recurrent wheezing under three years of age who visited the hospital from June 2017 to June 2019 were selected as the recurrent wheezing group. Twenty-four healthy children from physical examination were selected as the control group. The CREB expression level in peripheral blood was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were cultured, and dual-luciferase reporter assay and quantitative real-time PCR were used to investigate the effects of overexpression and siRNA interference of CREB on the promoter activity and mRNA expression of the ORMDL3 gene in the BEAS-2B cells.@*RESULTS@#The expression level of CREB in the recurrent wheezing group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.001). In BEAS-2B cells, overexpression of CREB significantly up-regulated the promoter activity and mRNA expression of the ORMDL3 gene (P<0.05), while siRNA interference of CREB significantly reduced the promoter activity and mRNA expression of the ORMDL3 gene (P<0.05).@*CONCLUSIONS@#The expression of CREB is increased in children with recurrent wheezing, and CREB may be involved in the pathogenesis of recurrent wheezing by regulating expression of the ORMDL3 gene.


Subject(s)
Child, Preschool , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Epithelial Cells , Humans , Membrane Proteins , Genetics , Promoter Regions, Genetic , Respiratory Sounds
3.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-826723

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To observe the direct intervention effects of electroacupuncture (EA) and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on pain memory, and to explore their effects on cAMP/PKA/cAMP pathway in anterior cingulate gyrus (ACC).@*METHODS@#Fifty clean healthy male SD rats were randomly divided into a control group, a model group, an indomethacin group, an EA group and a sham EA group, 10 rats in each group. Except the control group, the pain memory model was established in the remaining four groups by twice injection of carrageenan at foot; 0.1 mL of 2%λ-carrageenan was subcutaneously injected at the left foot of rats; 14 days later, when the pain threshold of rats of each group returned to the basic level, the second injection was performed with the same procedure. The rats in the EA group were treated with EA at bilateral "Zusanli" (ST 36) for 30 min; the rats in the indomethacin group was treated with indomethacin intragastric administration with the dose of 3 mg/kg; the rats in the sham EA group was treated with EA without electricity at the point 0.3 mm forward "Zusanli" (ST 36) with the depth of 2 mm for 30 min; the rats in the control group was not given any invention. All the above interventions were performed 5 h, 1 d, 2 d and 3 d after the second injection of 2% λ-carrageenan. The left-side paw withdrawal thresholds (PWT) were observed before the first injection, 4 h, 3 d, 5 d after the first injection, before the second injection and 4 h, 1 d, 2 d, 3 d after the second injection. Three days after the second injection, the number of positive cells of cAMP, p-PKA, p-CREB and the number of positive cells of protein co-expression in the right ACC brain area were detected by immunofluorescence, and the relative protein expression of p-PKA and p-CREB were detected by Western blot.@*RESULTS@#Compared with the control group, the PWTs in the model group decreased significantly 4 h, 3 d and 5 d after the first injection and 1 d, 2 d and 3 d after the second injection (<0.05); compared with the control group, the positive expression of cAMP, p-PKA and p-CREB in the right ACC brain area in the model group increased significantly (<0.05), and the number of positive cells of the co-expression of cAMP/p-PKA and p-PKA/p-CREB also increased significantly (<0.05). Compared with the model group, indomethacin group and sham EA group, the PWTs in the EA group were increased significantly 1 d, 2 d and 3 d after the second injection (<0.05); compared with the model group, indomethacin group and sham EA group, the positive expression of p-PKA and p-CREB in the right ACC brain area in the EA group decreased significantly (<0.05), and the number of positive cells of co-expression of cAMP/p-PKA and p-PKA/p-CREB was decreased significantly (<0.05). Compared with the model group and sham EA group, the positive expression of cAMP in the right ACC brain area was decreased in the EA group (<0.05).@*CONCLUSION@#EA have a direct intervention effect on pain memory, which have significant advantage over NSAIDs in the treatment of chronic pain. The advantage effect of EA on pain memory may be related to the inhibition of cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway in ACC area.


Subject(s)
Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal , Therapeutic Uses , Cyclic AMP , Metabolism , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Metabolism , Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases , Metabolism , Electroacupuncture , Gyrus Cinguli , Metabolism , Male , Pain Threshold , Random Allocation , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Signal Transduction
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-786072

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Inflammation is crucial to limiting vascular disease. Previously we reported that acrolein, a known toxin in tobacco smoke, might play an important role in the progression of atherosclerosis via an inflammatory response involving cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Curcumin has been known to improve vascular function and have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated whether curcumin prevents the induction of inflammatory response caused by acrolein.METHODS: Anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin were examined in acrolein-stimulated HUVECs. Induction of proteins, mRNA, prostaglandin and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using immunoblot analysis, real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and flow cytometry, respectively.RESULTS: Curcumin attenuates inflammatory response via inhibition of COX-2 expression and prostaglandin production in acrolein-induced human endothelial cells. This inhibition by curcumin results in the abolition of phosphorylation of protein kinase C, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and cAMP response element-binding protein. Furthermore, curcumin suppresses the production of ROS and endoplasmic reticulum stress via phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor-2α caused by acrolein.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that curcumin might be a useful agent against endothelial dysfunction caused by acrolein-induced inflammatory response.


Subject(s)
Acrolein , Atherosclerosis , Curcumin , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Cyclooxygenase 2 , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , Endothelial Cells , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Flow Cytometry , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells , Humans , Inflammation , Phosphorylation , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Protein Kinase C , Protein Kinases , Reactive Oxygen Species , RNA, Messenger , Smoke , Tobacco , Vascular Diseases
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-760609

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Myocardial infarction (MI) is caused by extensive myocardial damage attributed to the occlusion of coronary arteries. Our previous study in a rat model of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) demonstrated that administration of arabinoxylan (AX), comprising arabinose and xylose, protects against myocardial injury. In this study, we undertook to investigate whether psyllium seed husk (PSH), a safe dietary fiber containing a high level of AX (> 50%), also imparts protection against myocardial injury in the same rat model. MATERIALS/METHODS: Rats were fed diets supplemented with PSH (1, 10, or 100 mg/kg/d) for 3 d. The rats were then subjected to 30 min ischemia through ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery, followed by 3 h reperfusion through release of the ligation. The hearts were harvested and cut into four slices. To assess infarct size (IS), an index representing heart damage, the slices were stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC). To elucidate underlying mechanisms, Western blotting was performed for the slices. RESULTS: Supplementation with 10 or 100 mg/kg/d of PSH significantly reduces the IS. PSH supplementation (100 mg/kg/d) tends to reduce caspase-3 generation and increase BCL-2/BAX ratio. PSH supplementation also upregulates the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), and its target genes including antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase mu 2 (GSTM2) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2). PSH supplementation upregulates some sirtuins (NAD+-dependent deacetylases) including SIRT5 (a mitochondrial sirtuin) and SIRT6 and SIRT7 (nuclear sirtuins). Finally, PSH supplementation upregulates the expression of protein kinase A (PKA), and increases phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) (pCREB), a target protein of PKA. CONCLUSIONS: The results from this study indicate that PSH consumption reduces myocardial I/R injury in rats by inhibiting the apoptotic cascades through modulation of gene expression of several genes located upstream of apoptosis. Therefore, we believe that PSH can be developed as a functional food that would be beneficial in the prevention of MI.


Subject(s)
Animals , Apoptosis , Arabinose , Blotting, Western , Caspase 3 , Coronary Vessels , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases , Diet , Dietary Fiber , Functional Food , Gene Expression , Glutathione Transferase , Heart , Infarction , Ischemia , Ligation , Models, Animal , Myocardial Infarction , Psyllium , Rats , Reperfusion , Sirtuins , Superoxide Dismutase , Xylose
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-759498

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pain-relief properties of tricyclic antidepressants can be attributed to several actions. Recent observations suggest that adenosine is involved in the antinociceptive effect of amitriptyline. The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) is the only adenosine subtype overexpressed in inflammatory and cancer cells. This study was performed to investigate the role of A3AR in the anti-nociceptive effect of amitriptyline. METHODS: Spinal nerve-ligated neuropathic pain was induced by ligating the L5 and L6 spinal nerves of male Sprague-Dawley rats. The neuropathic rats were randomly assigned to one of the following three groups (8 per group): a neuropathic pain with normal saline group, a neuropathic pain with amitriptyline group, and a neuropathic pain with amitriptyline and 3-ethyl-5-benzyl- 2-methyl-4-phenylethynyl-6-phenyl-1,4-(±)-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate (MRS) group. Amitriptyline or saline was administered intraperitoneally and 3-ethyl-5-benzyl-2-methyl-4-phenylethynyl-6-phenyl-1,4-(±)-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate (MRS-1191), an A3AR antagonist, was injected subcutaneously immediately before amitriptyline administration. The level of extracellular signal-regulated kinase P44/42 (ERK1/2), cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and proinflammatory cytokines were assessed using immunoblotting or reverse-transciption polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Amitriptyline increased the mechanical withdrawal threshold of the neuropathic rats. The level of phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-CREB proteins, and proinflammatory cytokines produced by spinal nerve ligation were significantly reduced by amitriptyline administration. However, the use of MRS-1191 before amitriptyline administration not only reduced the threshold of mechanical allodynia, but also increased the signaling protein and proinflammatory cytokine levels, which were reduced by amitriptyline. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that the anti-nociceptive effect of amitriptyline involves the suppression of ERK1/2 and CREB signaling proteins, and A3AR activation also affects the alleviation of the inflammatory response.


Subject(s)
Adenosine , Amitriptyline , Animals , Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Cytokines , Humans , Hyperalgesia , Immunoblotting , Ligation , Male , Neuralgia , Phosphotransferases , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Receptors, Purinergic P1 , Spinal Nerves
7.
Annals of Dermatology ; : 631-639, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762394

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is a fundamental regulatory system involved in various biological events. ICG-001 selectively blocks the interaction of β-catenin with its transcriptional co-activator cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CBP). Recent studies have provided convincing evidence of the inhibitory effects of ICG-001 on Wnt-driven disease models, such as organ fibrosis, cancer, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and asthma. However, the effects of ICG-001 in atopic dermatitis (AD) have not been investigated. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether β-catenin/CBP-dependent signaling was contributed in the pathogenesis of AD and ICG-001 could be a therapeutic agent for AD. METHODS: We examined the effects of ICG-001 in an AD-like murine model generated by repeated topical application of the hapten, oxazolone (Ox). ICG-001 or vehicle alone was injected intraperitoneally every day during the development of AD-like dermatitis arising from once-daily Ox treatment. RESULTS: Ox-induced AD-like dermatitis characterized by increases in transepidermal water loss, epidermal thickness, dermal thickness accompanied by increased myofibroblast and mast cell counts, and serum levels of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine, and decreases in stratum corneum hydration, were virtually normalized by the treatment with ICG-001. Elevated serum levels of periostin tended to be downregulated, without statistical significance. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that β-catenin/CBP-dependent signaling might be involved in the pathogenesis of AD and could be a therapeutic target.


Subject(s)
Animals , Asthma , Chemokine CCL17 , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Cyclic AMP , Dermatitis , Dermatitis, Atopic , Fibrosis , Mast Cells , Mice , Myofibroblasts , Oxazolone , Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma , Water
8.
Laboratory Animal Research ; : 154-164, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-786408

ABSTRACT

In the present study, we investigated the effects of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) on novel object recognition, cell proliferation, and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampus. To facilitate penetration into the blood–brain barrier and neuronal plasma membrane, we created a Tat-HSP70 fusion protein. Eight-week-old mice received intraperitoneal injections of vehicle (10% glycerol), control-HSP70, or Tat-HSP70 protein once a day for 21 days. To elucidate the delivery efficiency of HSP70 into the hippocampus, western blot analysis for polyhistidine was conducted. Polyhistidine protein levels were significantly increased in control-HSP70- and Tat-HSP70-treated groups compared to the control or vehicle-treated group. However, polyhistidine protein levels were significantly higher in the Tat-HSP70-treated group compared to that in the control-HSP70-treated group. In addition, immunohistochemical study for HSP70 showed direct evidences for induction of HSP70 immunoreactivity in the control-HSP70- and Tat-HSP70-treated groups. Administration of Tat-HSP70 increased the novel object recognition memory compared to untreated mice or mice treated with the vehicle. In addition, the administration of Tat-HSP70 significantly increased the populations of proliferating cells and differentiated neuroblasts in the dentate gyrus compared to those in the control or vehicle-treated group based on the Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX) immunostaining. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) was significantly enhanced in the dentate gyrus of the Tat-HSP70-treated group compared to that in the control or vehicle-treated group. Western blot study also demonstrated the increases of DCX and pCREB protein levels in the Tat-HSP70-treated group compared to that in the control or vehicle-treated group. In contrast, administration of control-HSP70 moderately increased the novel object recognition memory, cell proliferation, and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus compared to that in the control or vehicle-treated group. These results suggest that Tat-HSP70 promoted hippocampal functions by increasing the pCREB in the hippocampus.


Subject(s)
Animals , Blotting, Western , Cell Membrane , Cell Proliferation , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Dentate Gyrus , Heat-Shock Proteins , Hippocampus , Hot Temperature , HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins , Injections, Intraperitoneal , Memory , Mice , Neurons , Phosphorylation
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-773418

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To estimate the detrimental effects of shortwave exposure on rat hippocampal structure and function and explore the underlying mechanisms.@*METHODS@#One hundred Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (25 rats per group) and exposed to 27 MHz continuous shortwave at a power density of 5, 10, or 30 mW/cm2 for 6 min once only or underwent sham exposure for the control. The spatial learning and memory, electroencephalogram (EEG), hippocampal structure and Nissl bodies were analysed. Furthermore, the expressions of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunits (NR1, NR2A, and NR2B), cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) and phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB) in hippocampal tissue were analysed on 1, 7, and 14 days after exposure.@*RESULTS@#The rats in the 10 and 30 mW/cm2 groups had poor learning and memory, disrupted EEG oscillations, and injured hippocampal structures, including hippocampal neurons degeneration, mitochondria cavitation and blood capillaries swelling. The Nissl body content was also reduced in the exposure groups. Moreover, the hippocampal tissue in the 30 mW/cm2 group had increased expressions of NR2A and NR2B and decreased levels of CREB and p-CREB.@*CONCLUSION@#Shortwave exposure (27 MHz, with an average power density of 10 and 30 mW/cm2) impaired rats' spatial learning and memory and caused a series of dose-dependent pathophysiological changes. Moreover, NMDAR-related CREB pathway suppression might be involved in shortwave-induced structural and functional impairments in the rat hippocampus.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Genetics , Metabolism , Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation , Electroencephalography , Radiation Effects , Hippocampus , Radiation Effects , Male , Memory , Radiation Effects , Nissl Bodies , Physiology , Radiation Effects , Radio Waves , Random Allocation , Rats , Rats, Wistar , Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate , Genetics , Metabolism , Spatial Learning , Radiation Effects
10.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-776518

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To study the effect of exendin-4(Ex-4) on the differentiation of neural stem cells(NSCs) in adult mouse subventricular zone(SVZ)and its mechanism .@*METHODS@#NSCs in the SVZ were derived from 5-week C57BL/6J mice and the expression of nestin was detected by immunofluorescence. The cell morphology was observed after the cells treatmed with 100 nmol/L Ex-4 for 14 days.The expressions of nestin and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) were detected by immunofluorescence. GLP-1R was knocked down by using shRNA and the study was divided into four groups: control group, Ex-4 group, GLP-1R knockdown group, GLP-1R knockdown + Ex-4 group. After treatment with 100 nmol/L Ex-4 for 14 d, β-tublin III and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were labeled by immunofluorescence and then the proportion of β-tublin III positive cells were counted. Western blot was used to detect the activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) in NSCs. In order to further study the effects of Ex-4 on mitogen-activated protein kinase(MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-hydroxy kinase (PI3K) pathways, the cells were pretreated with MAPK inhibitor U0126 at a concentration of 0.07 μmol/L for 30 min or PI3K inhibitor LY294002 at 50 μmol for 2 h, respectively. The study was divided into six groups: control group, Ex-4 group, U0126 group, U0126 + Ex-4 group, LY294002 group, LY294002 + Ex-4 group. The activation of CREB in each group was detected by Western blot. The experiment was repeated three times independently.@*RESULTS@#NSCs were successfully extracted from SVZ of C57BL/6J mice. Immunofluorescence showed that nestin and GLP-1R were positive in NSCs. Compared with the control group, the proportion of neurons differentiated from Ex-4 group was higher. The percentage of neurons in GLP-1R knockdown + Ex-4 group was basically the same as that in control group (P<0.01). The positive cells of beta-tublin III showed positive activation of GLP-1R and CREB. Western blot showed that CREB was significantly activated in the Ex-4 group, and knockdown of GLP-1R abolished its activation (P<0.01). U0126 did not affect Ex-4-mediated CERB activation, and LY294002 significantly reduced Ex-4-mediated CREB activation (P<0.01).@*CONCLUSION@#Ex-4 promotes the differentiation of NSCs into neurons in SVZ of adult mice through GLP-1R receptor, which may be achieved through PI3K/CREB pathway.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cell Differentiation , Cells, Cultured , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Metabolism , Exenatide , Pharmacology , Gene Knockdown Techniques , Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor , Genetics , Metabolism , Lateral Ventricles , Cell Biology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Neural Stem Cells , Cell Biology , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases
11.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-776495

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To investigate the effects of Acorus tatarinowii Schott and its active component 5- hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) on learning and memory and ERK/CREB signal in hippocampus of rats with exercise-induced fatigue.@*METHODS@#SD rats were randomly divided into normal group (A), exercise group (B), exercise + HMF low, middle and high dose treatment group (C, D, E), exercise + acorus tatarinowii Schott low, middle and high dose treatment group (F, G, H), with ten rats in each group. The rats in group C, D and E were treated with HMF at the doses of 0.10, 1.00 and 3.00 mg. kg by ig. The rats in group F, G and H were treated with the extracts of Acorus tatarinowii Schott at the doses of 0.12, 1.20 and 4.80 g. kg by ig. Learning and memory of rats were tested by the method of water maze experiment, and the expression levels of p-ERK1/2 and p-CREB protein in hippocampus of rats were tested by the method of Western blot in the end of the experiment.@*RESULTS@#The escape latencies of E and H groups were lower than those of groups B, C, D, F and G; and the numbers of plateau crossing were more than those of groups B, C, D, F and G and the expression levels of p-ERK1/2, p-CREB protein were higher than those of groups B, C, D, F and G , respectively(P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in the above indexes among groups A, E and H(P>0.05) except that the expression levels of p-ERK2 protein in group E were lower than those in group A and H (P<0.05).@*CONCLUSION@#Acorus tatarinowii and its active component- HMF can improve the learning and memory of rats with exercise-induced fatigue, and the mechanism is related to the up-regulation of ERK / CREB signal in hippocampus of rats with exercise-induced fatigue.


Subject(s)
Acorus , Chemistry , Animals , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Metabolism , Fatigue , Drug Therapy , Furaldehyde , Pharmacology , Hippocampus , Metabolism , MAP Kinase Signaling System , Maze Learning , Memory , Physical Conditioning, Animal , Phytochemicals , Pharmacology , Random Allocation , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley
12.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-775853

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To explore the effect of electrical stimulation at auricular points (EAS) combined with sound masking on the expression of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) in the auditory cortex of tinnitus rats.@*METHODS@#A total of 27 adult male SD rats were randomly divided into a control group, a model group and an EAS group. The rats in the model group and the EAS group were intervened with intraperitoneal injection of sodium salicylate to induce tinnitus model, while the rats in the control group were intervened with injection of 0.9% NaCl solution. After the model was successfully established, the rats in the EAS group were treated with electrical stimulation at "Shenmen" (TF) and "Yidan" (CO), combined with sound masking; the treatment was given once a day for 15 days. The gap prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle (GPIAS) and prepulse inhibition (PPI) testing were performed using the acoustic startle reflex starter package for rats. The expression of BDNF, TrkB, CREB and p-CREB in the auditory cortex of each group were measured with Western Blot analysis.@*RESULTS@#① Compared with the control group, the GPIAS values in 12 kHz, 16 kHz, 20 kHz and 28 kHz were significantly decreased in the model group (all 0.05).@*CONCLUSION@#EAS could improve the GPIAS values of high-frequency background sound in tinnitus rats, which may be related with the upregulation of the BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling pathway in the auditory cortex, leading to the reversion of the maladaptive plasticity.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Points , Animals , Auditory Cortex , Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor , Metabolism , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Metabolism , Electric Stimulation , Male , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Receptor, trkB , Metabolism , Tinnitus , Metabolism , Therapeutics
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-715247

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Fermented Laminaria japonica (FL), a type sea tangle used as a functional food ingredient, has been reported to possess cognitive improving properties that may aid in the treatment of common neurodegenerative disorders, such as dementia. MATERIALS/METHODS: We examined the effects of FL on scopolamine (Sco)- and ethanol (EtOH)-induced hippocampus-dependent memory impairment, using the Passive avoidance (PA) and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. To examine the underlying mechanisms associated with neuroprotective effects, we analyzed acetylcholine (ACh) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, brain tissue expression of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), and immunohistochemical analysis, in the hippocampus of mice, compared to current drug therapy intervention. Biochemical blood analysis was carried out to determine the effects of FL on alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) levels. 7 groups (n = 10) consisted of a control (CON), 3 Sco-induced dementia and 3 EtOH-induced dementia groups, with both dementia group types containing an untreated group (Sco and EtOH); a positive control, orally administered donepezil (Dpz) (4mg/kg) (Sco + Dpz and EtOH + Dpz); and an FL (50 mg/kg) treatment group (Sco + FL50 and EtOH + FL50), orally administered over the 4-week experimental period. RESULTS: FL50 significantly reduced EtOH-induced increase in AST and ALT levels. FL50 treatment reduced EtOH-impaired step-through latency time in the PA test, and Sco- and EtOH-induced dementia escape latency times in the MWM test. Moreover, anticholinergic effects of Sco and EtOH on the brain were reversed by FL50, through the attenuation of AChE activity and elevation of ACh concentration. FL50 elevated ERK1/2 protein expression and increased p-CREB (ser133) in hippocampus brain tissue, according to Western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis, respectively. CONCLUSION: Overall, these results suggest that FL may be considered an efficacious intervention for Sco- and EtOH-induced dementia, in terms of reversing cognitive impairment and neuroplastic dysfunction.


Subject(s)
Acetylcholine , Acetylcholinesterase , Alanine Transaminase , Animals , Aspartate Aminotransferases , Blotting, Western , Brain , Cholesterol , Cognition Disorders , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Dementia , Drug Therapy , Ethanol , Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases , Functional Food , Hippocampus , Immunohistochemistry , Laminaria , Memory , Mice , Neurodegenerative Diseases , Neuronal Plasticity , Neuroprotective Agents , Receptors, Muscarinic , Scopolamine , Triglycerides , United Nations , Water
14.
Laboratory Animal Research ; : 239-247, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-718843

ABSTRACT

Bacopa monnieri is a medicinal plant with a long history of use in Ayurveda, especially in the treatment of poor memory and cognitive deficits. In the present study, we hypothesized that Bacopa monnieri extract (BME) can improve memory via increased cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus. BME was administered to 7-week-old mice once a day for 4 weeks and a novel object recognition memory test was performed. Thereafter, the mice were euthanized followed by immunohistochemistry analysis for Ki67, doublecortin (DCX), and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and western blot analysis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BME-treated mice showed moderate increases in the exploration of new objects when compared with that of familiar objects, leading to a significant higher discrimination index compared with vehicle-treated mice. Ki67 and DCX immunohistochemistry showed a facilitation of cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation following the administration of BME in the dentate gyrus. In addition, administration of BME significantly elevated the BDNF protein expression in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, and increased CREB phosphorylation in the dentate gyrus. These data suggest that BME improves novel object recognition by increasing the cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus, and this may be closely related to elevated levels of BDNF and CREB phosphorylation in the dentate gyrus.


Subject(s)
Animals , Bacopa , Blotting, Western , Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor , Cell Proliferation , Cognition Disorders , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Dentate Gyrus , Discrimination, Psychological , Immunohistochemistry , Memory , Mice , Neurogenesis , Phosphorylation , Plants, Medicinal
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-691375

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To research Angelica tenuissima Nakai (ATN) for use in novel Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapeutics.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>The effect of a 30% ethanol extract of ATN (KH032) on AD-like cognitive impairment and neuropathological and neuroinflammatory changes induced by bilateral intracerebroventricular injections of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide (Aβ) was investigated. Male C57Bl/6 mice were randomly divided into 4 groups, 10 in each group. KH032-treated groups were administrated with a low or high dose of KH032 (50 and 200 mg/kg, respectively), intragastrically for 16 days; distilled water was applied in the sham and negative groups. Open fifield test, Y maze and Morris water maze test were used for behavior test and cognitive ability. In addition, the neuroprotective effects of KH032 in Aβ-infused mice on the histopathological markers [neuronspecific nuclear protein (NeuN), Aβ] of neurodegeneration were examined. The levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), NeuN, phosphorylation extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/ERK, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), phosphorylation cAMP response element-binding (CREB)/CREB protein expression were measured by Western blot.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>KH032 treatment ameliorated cognitive impairments, reduced the overexpression of Aβ, and inhibited neuronal loss and neuroinflammatory response in the Aβ-infused mice. Moreover, KH032 treatment enhanced BDNF expression levels in the hippocampus. Finally, KH032 treatment increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB, vital for ERK-CREB signaling.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>KH032 attenuated cognitive defificits in the Aβ-infused mice by increasing BDNF expression and ERK1/2 and CREB phosphorylation and inhibiting neuronal loss and neuroinflflammatory response, suggesting that KH032 has therapeutic potential in neurodegenerative disorders such as AD.</p>


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease , Drug Therapy , Pathology , Amyloid beta-Peptides , Angelica , Chemistry , Animals , Brain , Pathology , Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor , Metabolism , Cognitive Dysfunction , Drug Therapy , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Male , Maze Learning , Memory, Short-Term , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Neurogenesis , Neuroglia , Metabolism , Pathology , Neurons , Metabolism , Pathology , Neuroprotective Agents , Pharmacology , Therapeutic Uses , Phosphorylation , Phytotherapy , Plant Extracts , Pharmacology , Therapeutic Uses , Plaque, Amyloid , Drug Therapy , Pathology , Signal Transduction
17.
Neuroscience Bulletin ; (6): 736-746, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-775492

ABSTRACT

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among the elderly, characterized by amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuroinflammation in the brain, as well as impaired cognitive behaviors. A sex difference in the prevalence of AD has been noted, while sex differences in the cerebral pathology and relevant molecular mechanisms are not well clarified. In the present study, we systematically investigated the sex differences in pathological characteristics and cognitive behavior in 12-month-old male and female APP/PS1/tau triple-transgenic AD mice (3×Tg-AD mice) and examined the molecular mechanisms. We found that female 3×Tg-AD mice displayed more prominent amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, neuroinflammation, and spatial cognitive deficits than male 3×Tg-AD mice. Furthermore, the expression levels of hippocampal protein kinase A-cAMP response element-binding protein (PKA-CREB) and p38-mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) also showed sex difference in the AD mice, with a significant increase in the levels of p-PKA/p-CREB and a decrease in the p-p38 in female, but not male, 3×Tg-AD mice. We suggest that an estrogen deficiency-induced PKA-CREB-MAPK signaling disorder in 12-month-old female 3×Tg-AD mice might be involved in the serious pathological and cognitive damage in these mice. Therefore, sex differences should be taken into account in investigating AD biomarkers and related target molecules, and estrogen supplementation or PKA-CREB-MAPK stabilization could be beneficial in relieving the pathological damage in AD and improving the cognitive behavior of reproductively-senescent females.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease , Metabolism , Pathology , Psychology , Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor , Genetics , Metabolism , Animals , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Metabolism , Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases , Metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Hippocampus , Metabolism , Pathology , Humans , Inflammation , Metabolism , Pathology , Psychology , Male , Maze Learning , Physiology , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Transgenic , Neurofibrillary Tangles , Metabolism , Pathology , Plaque, Amyloid , Metabolism , Pathology , Psychology , Presenilin-1 , Genetics , Metabolism , Sex Characteristics , Spatial Memory , Physiology , p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases , Metabolism , tau Proteins , Genetics , Metabolism
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-727937

ABSTRACT

Cilostazol is a selective inhibitor of type 3 phosphodiesterase (PDE3) and has been widely used as an antiplatelet agent. Cilostazol mediates this activity through effects on the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling cascade. Recently, it has attracted attention as a neuroprotective agent. However, little is known about cilostazol's effect on excitotoxicity induced neuronal cell death. Therefore, this study evaluated the neuroprotective effect of cilostazol treatment against hippocampal neuronal damage in a mouse model of kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal loss. Cilostazol pretreatment reduced KA-induced seizure scores and hippocampal neuron death. In addition, cilostazol pretreatment increased cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and decreased neuroinflammation. These observations suggest that cilostazol may have beneficial therapeutic effects on seizure activity and other neurological diseases associated with excitotoxicity.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate , Animals , Cell Death , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Hippocampus , Kainic Acid , Mice , Neurons , Neuroprotective Agents , Phosphorylation , Seizures , Therapeutic Uses
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-728754

ABSTRACT

Anesthetics are used extensively in surgeries and related procedures to prevent pain. However, there is some concern regarding neuronal degeneration and cognitive deficits arising from regular anesthetic exposure. Recent studies have indicated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) are involved in learning and memory processes. Genistein, a plant-derived isoflavone, has been shown to exhibit neuroprotective effects. The present study was performed to examine the protective effect of genistein against isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Neonatal rats were exposed to isoflurane (0.75%, 6 hours) on postnatal day 7 (P7). Separate groups of rat pups were orally administered genistein at doses of 20, 40, or 80 mg/kg body weight from P3 to P15 and then exposed to isoflurane anesthesia on P7. Neuronal apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay and FluoroJade B staining following isoflurane exposure. Genistein significantly reduced apoptosis in the hippocampus, reduced the expression of proapoptotic factors (Bad, Bax, and cleaved caspase-3), and increased the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. RT-PCR analysis revealed enhanced BDNF and TrkB mRNA levels. Genistein effectively upregulated cAMP levels and phosphorylation of CREB and TrkB, leading to activation of cAMP/CREB-BDNF-TrkB signaling. PI3K/Akt signaling was also significantly activated. Genistein administration improved general behavior and enhanced learning and memory in the rats. These observations suggest that genistein exerts neuroprotective effects by suppressing isoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis and by activating cAMP/CREB-BDNF-TrkB-PI3/Akt signaling.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Anesthetics , Animals , Apoptosis , Body Weight , Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor , Cognition Disorders , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Genistein , Hippocampus , In Situ Nick-End Labeling , Isoflurane , Learning , Memory , Neurons , Neuroprotective Agents , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase , Phosphorylation , Rats , RNA, Messenger , Spatial Learning
20.
Acta Physiologica Sinica ; (6): 252-260, 2017.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-348277

ABSTRACT

To study the correlation between the spatial cognitive impairment and different subtypes of estrogen receptor α (ERα) of hippocampus in diabetic mice, we used alloxan (intraperitoneal injection) to induce type 1 diabetes in male Kunming mice and compared the spatial cognitive ability of the model mice with that of control mice through Morris water maze test. Meanwhile, using Western blot, we detected the protein expressions of ER-α36, ER-α66, caveolin-1, PKCα, cAMP-response element binding protein 2 (CREB2), and synaptophysin (Syn) in the hippocampus of the mice. The results showed that on the 3rd and 5th days of training, the ability of spatial learning and memory in the diabetic mice was significantly inferior to that of the control mice (P < 0.05). In the diabetic mice, the protein expressions of caveolin-1 and PKCα were decreased (P < 0.05), but ER-α66 expression was unaffected, while ER-α36 and CREB2 expressions were significantly increased (P < 0.05) compared with those of the control mice. The results suggest that abnormal expression of ER-α36 and related signal molecules may be important factors for diabetes-induced spatial cognitive impairment.


Subject(s)
Animals , Caveolin 1 , Metabolism , Cognitive Dysfunction , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental , Estrogen Receptor alpha , Metabolism , Hippocampus , Metabolism , Male , Maze Learning , Memory , Mice , Protein Kinase C-alpha , Metabolism , Synaptophysin , Metabolism
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