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1.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(2): 248-257, Apr.-June 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889237

ABSTRACT

Abstract In this study for the first-time microbial communities in the caves located in the mountain range of Hindu Kush were evaluated. The samples were analyzed using culture-independent (16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing) and culture-dependent methods. The amplicon sequencing results revealed a broad taxonomic diversity, including 21 phyla and 20 candidate phyla. Proteobacteria were dominant in both caves, followed by Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Planctomycetes, and the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. Representative operational taxonomic units from Koat Maqbari Ghaar and Smasse-Rawo Ghaar were grouped into 235 and 445 different genera, respectively. Comparative analysis of the cultured bacterial isolates revealed distinct bacterial taxonomic profiles in the studied caves dominated by Proteobacteria in Koat Maqbari Ghaar and Firmicutes in Smasse-Rawo Ghaar. Majority of those isolates were associated with the genera Pseudomonas and Bacillus. Thirty strains among the identified isolates from both caves showed antimicrobial activity. Overall, the present study gave insight into the great bacterial taxonomic diversity and antimicrobial potential of the isolates from the previously uncharacterized caves located in the world's highest mountains range in the Indian sub-continent.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacteria/classification , Environmental Microbiology , Biota , Antibiosis , Pakistan , Phylogeny , Bacteria/growth & development , Bacteria/genetics , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , DNA, Ribosomal/genetics , DNA, Ribosomal/chemistry , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Cluster Analysis , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Euryarchaeota/isolation & purification , Euryarchaeota/classification , Euryarchaeota/growth & development , Euryarchaeota/genetics , DNA, Archaeal/genetics , DNA, Archaeal/chemistry , Metagenomics
2.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(1): 128-137, Jan.-Mar. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889212

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for the detection of Y. pestis by targeting the 3a sequence on chromosome. All 11 species of the genus Yersinia were used to evaluate the specificity of LAMP and PCR, demonstrating that the primers had a high level of specificity. The sensitivity of LAMP or PCR was 2.3 or 23 CFU for pure culture, whereas 2.3 × 104 or 2.3 × 106 CFU for simulated spleen and lung samples. For simulated liver samples, the sensitivity of LAMP was 2.3 × 106 CFU, but PCR was negative at the level of 2.3 × 107 CFU. After simulated spleen and lung samples were treated with magnetic beads, the sensitivity of LAMP or PCR was 2.3 × 103 or 2.3 × 106 CFU, whereas 2.3 × 105 or 2.3 × 107 CFU for magnetic bead-treated liver samples. These results indicated that some components in the tissues could inhibit LAMP and PCR, and liver tissue samples had a stronger inhibition to LAMP and PCR than spleen and lung tissue samples. LAMP has a higher sensitivity than PCR, and magnetic bead capture of DNAs could remarkably increase the sensitivity of LAMP. LAMP is a simple, rapid and sensitive assay suitable for application in the field or poverty areas.


Subject(s)
Humans , Plague/microbiology , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/methods , Magnetics/methods , Yersinia pestis/isolation & purification , Yersinia pestis/classification , Yersinia pestis/genetics , DNA, Bacterial/isolation & purification , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Sensitivity and Specificity , Immunomagnetic Separation , DNA Primers/genetics , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/instrumentation , Magnetics/instrumentation
3.
Rev. méd. Maule ; 33(1): 8-13, jun. 2017. tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-1283791

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The clinical outcome of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been related to the presence of CagA protein. This protein is highly polymorphic and its oncogenic ability depends on the number and type of tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the EPIYAs repeat sequences (A, B, C and D). AIM: To determine the EPIYA patterns of the CagA gene in H. pylori strains and its relationship with gastrointestinal pathology in infected patients of the Regional Hospital of Talca. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The strains were isolated from gastric biopsies and characterized by bacteriological and molecular methods. Gastrointestinal pathology was characterized by histopathological analysis. For the determination of the presence of the cagA gene and the EPIYAs standards, the conventional PCR technique was used. RESULTS: 138 DNA samples from H. pylori strains were analyzed. 92.0% (127/138) of the isolates carried the cagA gene, of which 66 (52.0%) corresponded to the EPIYA-ABC pattern, 43 (33.8%) to the EPIYA-ABCC pattern and 21 16.5%) to the EPIYA-ABCCC phosphorylation pattern. 50.4% (64/127) of cagA positive strains isolated from dyspeptic patients in the Maule region have more than two C sites of phosphorylation. The number of EPIYAs C motifs was associated with the presence of more severe histopathological damage in the gastric mucosa.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Stomach Neoplasms/microbiology , Stomach Neoplasms/pathology , Helicobacter pylori/genetics , Helicobacter Infections/microbiology , Helicobacter Infections/pathology , Amino Acid Motifs , Stomach Neoplasms/epidemiology , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , Biopsy , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , Chile/epidemiology , Epidemiology, Descriptive , Endoscopy, Digestive System , Helicobacter Infections/epidemiology , Ethics Committees , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Antigens, Bacterial/genetics
4.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 48(2): 193-195, April.-June 2017. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-839391

ABSTRACT

Abstract Ralstonia solanacearum is a heterogeneous species complex causing bacterial wilts in more than 450 plant species distributed in 54 families. The complexity of the genome and the wide diversity existing within the species has led to the concept of R. solanacearum species complex (RsSC). Here we report the genome sequence of the four strains (RS2, RS25, RS48 and RS75) belonging to three of the four phylotypes of R. solanacearum that cause potato bacterial wilt in India. The genome sequence data would be a valuable resource for the evolutionary, epidemiological studies and quarantine of this phytopathogen.


Subject(s)
Plant Diseases/microbiology , Solanum tuberosum/microbiology , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , Genome, Bacterial , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Ralstonia solanacearum/genetics , Genotype , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , Ralstonia solanacearum/isolation & purification , Ralstonia solanacearum/classification , India
5.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 48(2): 187-188, April.-June 2017.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-839392

ABSTRACT

Abstract Pseudomonas taiwanensis strain SJ9 is a caprolactam degrader, isolated from industrial wastewater in South Korea and considered to have the potential for caprolactam bioremediation. The genome of this strain is approximately 6.2 Mb (G + C content, 61.75%) with 6,010 protein-coding sequences (CDS), of which 46% are assigned to recognized functional genes. This draft genome of strain SJ9 will provide insights into the genetic basis of its caprolactam-degradation ability.


Subject(s)
Pseudomonas/genetics , Pseudomonas/metabolism , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , Caprolactam/metabolism , Genome, Bacterial , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Pseudomonas/isolation & purification , Base Composition , Water Microbiology , Biotransformation , Open Reading Frames , Molecular Sequence Annotation , Industrial Waste , Korea
6.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 48(2): 196-197, April.-June 2017.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-839366

ABSTRACT

Abstract Worldwide increasing emergence of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. has rendered the limited availability of effective antimicrobial agents and has become a major public health concern. In this study, we report the draft genome sequence of A. pittii TCM156, a multidrug-resistant isolate that harbored the blaOXA-357 gene. The genome sequence was further analyzed by various bioinformatics methods. The genome size was estimated to be 3,807,313 bp with 3508 predicted coding regions and G + C content is 38.7%. These findings have raised awareness of the possible emergence of OXA-type enzyme-producing A. pittii isolate in China.


Subject(s)
Acinetobacter/genetics , beta-Lactamases/metabolism , Acinetobacter Infections/microbiology , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , Genome, Bacterial , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial , Base Composition , Acinetobacter/isolation & purification , Acinetobacter/drug effects , Acinetobacter/enzymology , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , China
7.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 48(2): 191-192, April.-June 2017.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-839376

ABSTRACT

Abstract Serratia marcescens is a Gram-negative rod intrinsically resistant to polymyxins and usually associated with wound, respiratory and urinary tract infections. The whole genome of the first GES-5-producing S. marcescens isolated from a Brazilian patient was sequenced using Ion Torrent PGM System. Besides blaGES-5, we were able to identify genes encoding for other β-lactamases, for aminoglycoside modifying enzymes and for an efflux pump to tetracyclines.


Subject(s)
Humans , Serratia marcescens/enzymology , Serratia marcescens/genetics , beta-Lactamases/metabolism , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , Genome, Bacterial , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Membrane Transport Proteins/genetics , Serratia marcescens/isolation & purification , Transferases/metabolism , beta-Lactamases/genetics , Brazil
8.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 48(2): 305-313, April.-June 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-839385

ABSTRACT

Abstract The aerobic degradation of aromatic compounds by bacteria is performed by dioxygenases. To show some characteristic patterns of the dioxygenase genotype and its degradation specificities, twenty-nine gram-negative bacterial cultures were obtained from sediment contaminated with phenolic compounds in Wuhan, China. The isolates were phylogenetically diverse and belonged to 10 genera. All 29 gram-negative bacteria were able to utilize phenol, m-dihydroxybenzene and 2-hydroxybenzoic acid as the sole carbon sources, and members of the three primary genera Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and Alcaligenes were able to grow in the presence of multiple monoaromatic compounds. PCR and DNA sequence analysis were used to detect dioxygenase genes coding for catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase and protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase. The results showed that there are 4 genotypes; most strains are either PNP (catechol 1,2-dioxygenase gene is positive, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene is negative, protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase gene is positive) or PNN (catechol 1,2-dioxygenase gene is positive, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene is negative, protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase gene is negative). The strains with two dioxygenase genes can usually grow on many more aromatic compounds than strains with one dioxygenase gene. Degradation experiments using a mixed culture representing four bacterial genotypes resulted in the rapid degradation of phenol. Determinations of substrate utilization and phenol degradation revealed their affiliations through dioxygenase genotype data.


Subject(s)
Phenol/metabolism , Dioxygenases/genetics , Dioxygenases/metabolism , Gram-Negative Bacteria/enzymology , Gram-Negative Bacteria/metabolism , Phylogeny , Pseudomonas , Soil Pollutants/metabolism , Acinetobacter , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , DNA, Ribosomal/genetics , DNA, Ribosomal/chemistry , Carbon/metabolism , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Biotransformation , Cluster Analysis , China , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Geologic Sediments/microbiology , Alcaligenes , Environmental Pollution , Gram-Negative Bacteria/classification , Gram-Negative Bacteria/genetics
9.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 48(2): 189-190, April.-June 2017. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-839388

ABSTRACT

Abstract We report here the draft genome sequence of Acinetobacter sp. Strain V2 isolated from the oil contaminated soil collected from ENGEN, Amanzimtoti, South Africa. Degradation of phenolic compounds such as phenol, toluene, aniline etc. at 400 ppm in 24 h and oil degrading capability makes this organism an efficient multifunctional bioremediator. Genome sequencing of Acinetobacter spp. V2 was carried out on Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform (performed by the Beijing Genomics Institute [BGI], Shenzhen, China). The data obtained revealed 643 contigs with genome size of 4.0 Mb and G + C content of 38.59%.


Subject(s)
Acinetobacter/genetics , Acinetobacter/metabolism , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , Oils/metabolism , Genome, Bacterial , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Phenols/metabolism , Soil Microbiology , Soil Pollutants/metabolism , South Africa , Base Composition , Acinetobacter/isolation & purification , Biotransformation
10.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 47(1): 1-9, Jan.-Mar. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-775132

ABSTRACT

Abstract This study was conducted to isolate an acid-producing, alkaliphilic bacterium to reduce the alkalinity of cement industry waste (cement kiln dust). Gram-positive isolate KG1 grew well at pH values of 6–12, temperatures of 28–50 °C, and NaCl concentrations of 0–16% and thus was further screened for its potential to reduce the pH of an alkaline medium. Phenotypic characteristics of the KG1 isolate were consistent with those of the genus Bacillus, and the highest level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity was found with Bacillus halodurans strain DSM 497 (94.7%). On the basis of its phenotypic characteristics and genotypic distinctiveness from other phylogenetic neighbors belonging to alkaliphilic Bacillus species, the isolated strain was designated B. halodurans strain KG1, with GenBank accession number JQ307184 (= NCIM 5439). Isolate KG1 reduced the alkalinity (by 83.64%) and the chloride content (by 86.96%) of cement kiln dust and showed a potential to be used in the cement industry for a variety of applications.


Subject(s)
Bacillus/growth & development , Bacillus/metabolism , Biotechnology/methods , Industrial Waste , Waste Management/methods , Bacterial Typing Techniques , Bacillus/classification , Bacillus/isolation & purification , Cluster Analysis , Construction Materials , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , DNA, Ribosomal/chemistry , DNA, Ribosomal/genetics , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Molecular Sequence Data , Phylogeny , /genetics , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Sodium Chloride/metabolism , Temperature
11.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 47(1): 177-180, Jan.-Mar. 2016. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-775102

ABSTRACT

Abstract We report the first description of a rare catalase-negative strain of Staphylococcus aureus in Chile. This new variant was isolated from blood and synovial tissue samples of a pediatric patient. Sequencing analysis revealed that this catalase-negative strain is related to ST10 strain, which has earlier been described in relation to S. aureus carriers. Interestingly, sequence analysis of the catalase gene katA revealed presence of a novel nonsense mutation that causes premature translational truncation of the C-terminus of the enzyme leading to a loss of 222 amino acids. Our study suggests that loss of catalase activity in this rare catalase-negative Chilean strain is due to this novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene, which truncates the enzyme to just 283 amino acids.


Subject(s)
Child, Preschool , Humans , Codon, Nonsense , Catalase/genetics , Catalase/metabolism , Staphylococcal Infections/microbiology , Staphylococcus aureus/enzymology , Staphylococcus aureus/genetics , Arthritis/microbiology , Bacteremia/microbiology , Chile , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , Genotype , Sequence Analysis, DNA
12.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 47(1): 85-95, Jan.-Mar. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-775117

ABSTRACT

Abstract The main objective of the present study was to isolate and characterize actinomycetes for their plant growth-promotion in chickpea. A total of 89 actinomycetes were screened for their antagonism against fungal pathogens of chickpea by dual culture and metabolite production assays. Four most promising actinomycetes were evaluated for their physiological and plant growth-promotion properties under in vitro and in vivo conditions. All the isolates exhibited good growth at temperatures from 20 °C to 40 °C, pH range of 7–11 and NaCl concentrations up to 8%. These were also found highly tolerant to Bavistin, slightly tolerant to Thiram and Captan (except VAI-7 and VAI-40) but susceptible to Benlate and Ridomil at field application levels and were found to produce siderophore, cellulase, lipase, protease, chitinase (except VAI-40), hydrocyanic acid (except VAI-7 and VAI-40), indole acetic acid and β-1,3-glucanase. When the four actinomycetes were evaluated for their plant growth-promotion properties under field conditions on chickpea, all exhibited increase in nodule number, shoot weight and yield. The actinomycetes treated plots enhanced total N, available P and organic C over the un-inoculated control. The scanning electron microscope studies exhibited extensive colonization by actinomycetes on the root surface of chickpea. The expression profiles for indole acetic acid, siderophore and β-1,3-glucanase genes exhibited up-regulation for all three traits and in all four isolates. The actinomycetes were identified as Streptomyces but different species in the 16S rDNA analysis. It was concluded that the selected actinomycetes have good plant growth-promotion and biocontrol potentials on chickpea.


Subject(s)
Actinobacteria/growth & development , Cicer/growth & development , Soil Microbiology , Actinobacteria/metabolism , Cluster Analysis , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , DNA, Ribosomal/chemistry , DNA, Ribosomal/genetics , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Molecular Sequence Data , Phylogeny , Plant Growth Regulators/metabolism , Rhizosphere , /genetics , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Soil , Sodium Chloride/metabolism , Temperature
15.
Annals of Laboratory Medicine ; : 320-324, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-48339

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We investigated the whole genome sequence (WGS) of a carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolate belonging to the global clone 2 (GC2) and predicted resistance islands using a software tool. METHODS: A. baumannii strain YU-R612 was isolated from the sputum of a 61-yr-old man with sepsis. The WGS of the YU-R612 strain was obtained by using the PacBio RS II Sequencing System (Pacific Biosciences Inc., USA). Antimicrobial resistance genes and resistance islands were analyzed by using ResFinder and Genomic Island Prediction software (GIPSy), respectively. RESULTS: The YU-R612 genome consisted of a circular chromosome (ca. 4,075 kb) and two plasmids (ca. 74 kb and 5 kb). Its sequence type (ST) under the Oxford scheme was ST191, consistent with assignment to GC2. ResFinder analysis showed that YU-R612 possessed the following resistance genes: four β-lactamase genes bla(ADC-30), bla(OXA-66), bla(OXA-23), and bla(TEM-1); armA, aadA1, and aacA4 as aminoglycoside resistance-encoding genes; aac(6')Ib-cr for fluoroquinolone resistance; msr(E) for macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B resistance; catB8 for phenicol resistance; and sul1 for sulfonamide resistance. By GIPSy analysis, six putative resistant islands (PRIs) were determined on the YU-R612 chromosome. Among them, PRI1 possessed two copies of Tn2009 carrying bla(OXA-23), and PRI5 carried two copies of a class I integron carrying sul1 and armA genes. CONCLUSIONS: By prediction of resistance islands in the carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii YU-R612 GC2 strain isolated in Korea, PRIs were detected on the chromosome that possessed Tn2009 and class I integrons. The prediction of resistance islands using software tools was useful for analysis of the WGS.


Subject(s)
Humans , Acinetobacter Infections/drug therapy , Acinetobacter baumannii/drug effects , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , Carbapenems/therapeutic use , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Genomic Islands/genetics , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Multilocus Sequence Typing , Plasmids/genetics , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Sequence Analysis, DNA
16.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 46(4): 1147-1154, Oct.-Dec. 2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-769668

ABSTRACT

Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in spite of being a ubiquitous organism (as it is found in soil, water, and humans), is also an opportunistic pathogen. In order to maintain its diversity in the community, it produces various toxic proteins, known as, bacteriocins. In the present study, pyocin SA189, which is a bacteriocin produced by P. aeruginosa SA189 (isolated from a clinical sample) was characterized. P. aeruginosa SA189, as identified by the conventional and 16S rRNA gene amplification, produced pyocin SA189 of molecular weight of 66 k Da. The pyocin showed antimicrobial activity against several clinically relevant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and was substantially stable for wide ranges of temperature and pH. Furthermore, the pyocin also retained its biological activity upon treatment with metal ions, organic solvents, and various proteolytic and lipolytic enzymes. The data from the growth kinetics indicated that the maximum bacteriocin production occurred in the late log phase. Overall, our results signify the potential of pyocin SA189 as a bio-control agent.


Subject(s)
Pseudomonas aeruginosa/metabolism , Pyocins/isolation & purification , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , DNA, Ribosomal/chemistry , DNA, Ribosomal/genetics , Host Specificity , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Molecular Weight , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/genetics , Pyocins/chemistry , /genetics , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Temperature
17.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 46(2): 443-453, Apr-Jun/2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-749707

ABSTRACT

The diversity of thermophilic bacteria was investigated in four hot springs, three salt marshes and 12 desert sites in Morocco. Two hundred and forty (240) thermophilic bacteria were recovered, identified and characterized. All isolates were Gram positive, rod-shaped, spore forming and halotolerant. Based on BOXA1R-PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the recovered isolates were dominated by the genus Bacillus (97.5%) represented by B. licheniformis (119), B. aerius (44), B. sonorensis (33), B. subtilis (subsp. spizizenii (2) and subsp. inaquosurum (6)), B. amyloliquefaciens (subsp. amyloliquefaciens (4) and subsp. plantarum (4)), B. tequilensis (3), B. pumilus (3) and Bacillus sp. (19). Only six isolates (2.5%) belonged to the genus Aeribacillus represented by A. pallidus (4) and Aeribacillus sp. (2). In this study, B. aerius and B. tequilensis are described for the first time as thermophilic bacteria. Moreover, 71.25%, 50.41% and 5.41% of total strains exhibited high amylolytic, proteolytic or cellulolytic activity respectively.


Subject(s)
Bacillaceae/classification , Bacillaceae/isolation & purification , Gram-Positive Rods/classification , Gram-Positive Rods/isolation & purification , Hot Springs/microbiology , Soil Microbiology , Water Microbiology , Biodiversity , Bacillaceae/genetics , Bacillaceae/radiation effects , Cluster Analysis , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , DNA, Ribosomal/chemistry , DNA, Ribosomal/genetics , Gram-Positive Rods/genetics , Gram-Positive Rods/radiation effects , Molecular Sequence Data , Morocco , Phylogeny , /genetics , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Spores, Bacterial/cytology
18.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 46(2): 631-637, Apr-Jun/2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-749708

ABSTRACT

This work addresses the production of prodigiosin from ram horn peptone (RHP) using MO-1, a local isolate in submerged culture. First, a novel gram-negative and rod-shaped bacterial strain, MO-1, was isolated from the body of the grasshopper (Poecilemon tauricola Ramme 1951), which was collected from pesticide-contaminated fields. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA classified the microbe as Serratia marcescens. The substrate utilization potential (BIOLOG) and fatty acid methyl ester profile (FAME) of S. marcescens were also determined. The effect of RHP on the production of prodigiosin by S. marcescens MO-1 was investigated, and the results showed that RHP supplementation promoted the growth of MO-1 and increased the production of prodigiosin. A concentration of 0.4% (w/v) RHP resulted in the greatest yield of prodigiosin (277.74 mg/L) after 48 h when mannitol was used as the sole source of carbon. The pigment yield was also influenced by the types of carbon sources and peptones. As a result, RHP was demonstrated to be a suitable substrate for prodigiosin production. These results revealed that prodigiosin could be produced efficiently by S. marcescens using RHP.


Subject(s)
Animals , Culture Media/chemistry , Peptones/metabolism , Prodigiosin/metabolism , Serratia marcescens/growth & development , Serratia marcescens/metabolism , Bacterial Typing Techniques , Cluster Analysis , Cytosol/chemistry , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , DNA, Ribosomal/chemistry , DNA, Ribosomal/genetics , Fatty Acids/analysis , Grasshoppers/microbiology , Molecular Sequence Data , Phylogeny , Pigments, Biological/metabolism , /genetics , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Serratia marcescens/classification , Serratia marcescens/isolation & purification
19.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 46(2): 425-432, Apr-Jun/2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-749712

ABSTRACT

The strain JPL-2, capable of degrading fenoxaprop-P-ethyl (FE), was isolated from the soil of a wheat field and identified as Rhodococcus ruber. This strain could utilize FE as its sole carbon source and degrade 94.6% of 100 mg L−1 FE in 54 h. Strain JPL-2 could also degrade other aryloxyphenoxy propanoate (AOPP) herbicides. The initial step of the degradation pathway is to hydrolyze the carboxylic acid ester bond. A novel esterase gene feh, encoding the FE-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase (FeH) responsible for this initial step, was cloned from strain JPL-2. Its molecular mass was approximately 39 kDa, and the catalytic efficiency of FeH followed the order of FE > quizalofop-P-ethyl > clodinafop-propargyl > cyhalofop-butyl > fluazifop-P-butyl > haloxyfop-P-methyl > diclofop-methy, which indicated that the chain length of the alcohol moiety strongly affected the hydrolysis activity of the FeH toward AOPP herbicides.


Subject(s)
Carboxylesterase/genetics , Carboxylesterase/metabolism , Herbicides/metabolism , Oxazoles/metabolism , Propionates/metabolism , Rhodococcus/isolation & purification , Rhodococcus/metabolism , Biotransformation , Cloning, Molecular , Cluster Analysis , Carboxylesterase/chemistry , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , DNA, Ribosomal/chemistry , DNA, Ribosomal/genetics , Molecular Sequence Data , Molecular Weight , Phylogeny , /genetics , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , Rhodococcus/enzymology , Rhodococcus/genetics , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Soil Microbiology , Substrate Specificity , Triticum/growth & development
20.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 46(2): 433-441, Apr-Jun/2015. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-749723

ABSTRACT

An indigenous bacterial strain capable of utilizing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid as the sole carbon and energy source was isolated from a soil used for grown wheat with a long-term history of herbicide use in Beijing, China. The strain BJ71 was identified as Cupriavidus campinensis based on its 16S rRNA sequence analysis and morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics. The degradation characteristics of strain BJ71 were evaluated. The optimal conditions for 2,4-D degradation were as follows: pH 7.0, 30 °C, 3% (v/v) inoculum size, and an initial 2,4-D concentration of 350 mg L−1. Up to 99.57% of the 2,4-D was degraded under optimal conditions after 6 days of incubation. Strain BJ71 was also able to degrade quizalofop and fluroxypyr. This is the first report of a 2,4-D-degrader containing tfdA gene that can utilize these two herbicides. In a biodegradation experiment, 87.13% and 42.53% of 2,4-D (initial concentration, 350 mg kg−1) was degraded in non-sterile and sterilized soil inoculated with BJ71, respectively, after 14 days. The 2,4-D degradation was more rapid in a soil microcosm including BJ71 than in a soil microcosm without BJ71. These results indicate that strain BJ71 is a potential candidate for the bioremediation of soil contaminated with the herbicide 2,4-D.


Subject(s)
Cupriavidus/isolation & purification , Cupriavidus/metabolism , Herbicides/metabolism , /metabolism , Acetates/metabolism , Bacteriological Techniques , Biotransformation , China , Cluster Analysis , Cupriavidus/genetics , Cupriavidus/physiology , DNA, Bacterial/chemistry , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , DNA, Ribosomal/chemistry , DNA, Ribosomal/genetics , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Molecular Sequence Data , Phylogeny , Propionates/metabolism , Pyridines/metabolism , Quinoxalines/metabolism , /genetics , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Temperature , Time Factors , Triticum
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