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1.
Journal of Zhejiang University. Science. B ; (12): 1165-1173, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1010591

ABSTRACT

Eukaryotic organisms constantly face a wide range of internal and external factors that cause damage to their DNA. Failure to accurately and efficiently repair these DNA lesions can result in genomic instability and the development of tumors (Canela et al., 2017). Among the various forms of DNA damage, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are particularly harmful. Two major pathways, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR), are primarily responsible for repairing DSBs (Katsuki et al., 2020; Li and Yuan, 2021; Zhang and Gong, 2021; Xiang et al., 2023). NHEJ is an error-prone repair mechanism that simply joins the broken ends together (Blunt et al., 1995; Hartley et al., 1995). In contrast, HR is a precise repair process. It involves multiple proteins in eukaryotic cells, with the RAD51 recombinase being the key player, which is analogous to bacterial recombinase A (RecA) (Shinohara et al., 1992). The central event in HR is the formation of RAD51-single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) nucleoprotein filaments that facilitate homology search and DNA strand invasion, ultimately leading to the initiation of repair synthesis (Miné et al., 2007; Hilario et al., 2009; Ma et al., 2017).


Subject(s)
Recombinational DNA Repair , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , DNA Repair , DNA Damage , DNA
2.
Journal of Zhejiang University. Medical sciences ; (6): 133-138, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-982027

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES@#To investigate the prevalence of pathogenic germline mutations of mismatch repair (MMR) genes in prostate cancer patients and its relationship with clinicopathological characteristics.@*METHODS@#Germline sequencing data of 855 prostate cancer patients admitted in Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center from 2018 to 2022 were retrospectively analyzed. The pathogenicity of mutations was assessed according to the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) standard guideline, Clinvar and Intervar databases. The clinicopathological characteristics and responses to castration treatment were compared among patients with MMR gene mutation (MMR+ group), patients with DNA damage repair (DDR) gene germline pathogenic mutation without MMR gene (DDR+MMR- group) and patients without DDR gene germline pathogenic mutation (DDR- group).@*RESULTS@#Thirteen (1.52%) MMR+ patients were identified in 855 prostate cancer patients, including 1 case with MLH1 gene mutation, 6 cases with MSH2 gene mutation, 4 cases with MSH6 gene mutation and 2 cases with PMS2 gene mutation. 105 (11.9%) patients were identified as DDR gene positive (except MMR gene), and 737 (86.2%) patients were DDR gene negative. Compared with DDR- group, MMR+ group had lower age of onset (P<0.05) and initial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (P<0.01), while no significant differences were found between the two groups in Gleason score and TMN staging (both P>0.05). The median time to castration resistance was 8 months (95%CI: 6 months-not achieved), 16 months (95%CI: 12-32 months) and 24 months (95%CI: 21-27 months) for MMR+ group, DDR+MMR- group and DDR- group, respectively. The time to castration resistance in MMR+ group was significantly shorter than that in DDR+MMR- group and DDR- group (both P<0.01), while there was no significant difference between DDR+MMR- group and DDR- group (P>0.05).@*CONCLUSIONS@#MMR gene mutation testing is recommended for prostate cancer patients with early onset, low initial PSA, metastasis or early resistance to castration therapy.


Subject(s)
Male , Humans , Prostate-Specific Antigen/genetics , Germ-Line Mutation , Retrospective Studies , DNA Mismatch Repair/genetics , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , China , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology
3.
Neuroscience Bulletin ; (6): 273-291, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-971555

ABSTRACT

MAGED4B belongs to the melanoma-associated antigen family; originally found in melanoma, it is expressed in various types of cancer, and is especially enriched in glioblastoma. However, the functional role and molecular mechanisms of MAGED4B in glioma are still unclear. In this study, we found that the MAGED4B level was higher in glioma tissue than that in non-cancer tissue, and the level was positively correlated with glioma grade, tumor diameter, Ki-67 level, and patient age. The patients with higher levels had a worse prognosis than those with lower MAGED4B levels. In glioma cells, MAGED4B overexpression promoted proliferation, invasion, and migration, as well as decreasing apoptosis and the chemosensitivity to cisplatin and temozolomide. On the contrary, MAGED4B knockdown in glioma cells inhibited proliferation, invasion, and migration, as well as increasing apoptosis and the chemosensitivity to cisplatin and temozolomide. MAGED4B knockdown also inhibited the growth of gliomas implanted into the rat brain. The interaction between MAGED4B and tripartite motif-containing 27 (TRIM27) in glioma cells was detected by co-immunoprecipitation assay, which showed that MAGED4B was co-localized with TRIM27. In addition, MAGED4B overexpression down-regulated the TRIM27 protein level, and this was blocked by carbobenzoxyl-L-leucyl-L-leucyl-L-leucine (MG132), an inhibitor of the proteasome. On the contrary, MAGED4B knockdown up-regulated the TRIM27 level. Furthermore, MAGED4B overexpression increased TRIM27 ubiquitination in the presence of MG132. Accordingly, MAGED4B down-regulated the protein levels of genes downstream of ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7) involved in the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced apoptotic pathway. These findings indicate that MAGED4B promotes glioma growth via a TRIM27/USP7/receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (RIP1)-dependent TNF-α-induced apoptotic pathway, which suggests that MAGED4B is a potential target for glioma diagnosis and treatment.


Subject(s)
Humans , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Ubiquitin-Specific Peptidase 7 , Cisplatin , Temozolomide , Transcription Factors , Glioma , Cell Proliferation , Melanoma , Cell Line, Tumor , Apoptosis , Nuclear Proteins/genetics
4.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 152-157, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-971026

ABSTRACT

Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding protein 1 (CHD1) deletion is among the most common mutations in prostate cancer (PCa), but its role remains unclear. In this study, RNA sequencing was conducted in PCa cells after clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-based CHD1 knockout. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) indicated upregulation of hypoxia-related pathways. A subsequent study confirmed that CHD1 deletion significantly upregulated hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) expression. Mechanistic investigation revealed that CHD1 deletion upregulated HIF1α by transcriptionally downregulating prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2), a prolyl hydroxylase catalyzing the hydroxylation of HIF1α and thus promoting its degradation by the E3 ligase von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor (VHL). Functional analysis showed that CHD1 deletion promoted angiogenesis and glycolysis, possibly through HIF1α target genes. Taken together, these findings indicate that CHD1 deletion enhances HIF1α expression through PHD2 downregulation and therefore promotes angiogenesis and metabolic reprogramming in PCa.


Subject(s)
Male , Humans , Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein/metabolism , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Prolyl Hydroxylases/metabolism , Hypoxia , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Glycolysis , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/metabolism , Cell Line, Tumor , DNA Helicases/metabolism
5.
Chinese Journal of Lung Cancer ; (12): 701-708, 2023.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1010077

ABSTRACT

The genomic instability may lead to an initiation of cancer in many organisms. Homologous recombination repair (HRR) is vital in maintaining cellular genomic stability. RAD51 associated protein 1 (RAD51AP1), which plays a crucial role in HRR and primarily participates in forming D-loop, was reported as an essential protein for maintaining cellular genomic stability. However, recent studies showed that RAD51AP1 was significantly overexpressed in various cancer types and correlated with poor prognosis. These results suggested that RAD51AP1 may play a significant pro-cancer effect in multiple cancers. The underlying mechanism is still unclear. Cancer stemness-maintaining effects of RAD51AP1 might be considered as the most reliable mechanism. Meanwhile, RAD51AP1 also promoted resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy in many cancers. Thus, researches focused on RAD51AP1, and its regulatory molecules may provide new targets for overcoming cancer progression and treatment resistance. Here, we reviewed the latest research on RAD51AP1 in cancers and summarized its differential expression and prognostic implications. In this review, we also outlined the potential mechanisms of its pro-cancer and drug resistance-promoting effects to provide several potential directions for further research.
.


Subject(s)
Humans , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Lung Neoplasms , DNA Repair , Genomic Instability , Rad51 Recombinase/metabolism
6.
Journal of Zhejiang University. Medical sciences ; (6): 594-604, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1009928

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES@#To explore the mechanism of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) induce renal fibrosis.@*METHODS@#Renal fibroblast NRK-49F cells treated with and without TGF-β1 were subjected to RNA-seq analysis. DESeq2 was used for analysis. Differentially expressed genes were screened with the criteria of false discovery rate<0.05 and l o g 2 F C >1. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analyses were performed for differentially expressed genes. Genes encoding transcription factors were further screened for differential expression genes. Then, the expression of these genes during renal fibrosis was verified using unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced mouse renal fibrosis model and a public gene expression dataset (GSE104954).@*RESULTS@#After TGF-β1 treatment for 6, 12 and 24 h, 552, 1209 and 1028 differentially expressed genes were identified, respectively. GO analysis indicated that these genes were significantly enriched in development, cell death, and cell migration. KEGG pathway analysis showed that in the early stage of TGF-β1 induction (TGF-β1 treatment for 6 h), the changes in Hippo, TGF-β and Wnt signaling pathways were observed, while in the late stage of TGF-β1 induction (TGF-β1 treatment for 24 h), the changes of extracellular matrix-receptor interaction, focal adhesion and adherens junction were mainly enriched. Among the 291 up-regulated differentially expressed genes treated with TGF-β1 for 6 h, 13 genes (Snai1, Irf8, Bhlhe40, Junb, Arid5a, Vdr, Lef1, Ahr, Foxo1, Myc, Tcf7, Foxc2, Glis1) encoded transcription factors. Validation in a cell model showed that TGF-β1 induced expression of 9 transcription factors (encoded by Snai1, Irf8, Bhlhe40, Junb, Arid5a, Vdr, Lef1, Myc, Tcf7), while the expression levels of the other 4 genes did not significantly change after TGF-β1 treatment. Validation results in UUO-induced mouse renal fibrosis model showed that Snai1, Irf8, Bhlhe40, Junb, Arid5a, Myc and Tcf7 were up-regulated after UUO, Vdr was down-regulated and there was no significant change in Lef1. Validation based on the GSE104954 dataset showed that IRF8 was significantly overexpressed in the renal tubulointerstitium of patients with diabetic nephropathy or IgA nephropathy, MYC was highly expressed in diabetic nephropathy, and the expressions of the other 7 genes were not significantly different compared with the control group.@*CONCLUSIONS@#TGF-β1 induces differentially expressed genes in renal fibroblasts, among which Irf8 and Myc were identified as potential targets of chronic kidney disease and renal fibrosis.


Subject(s)
Mice , Animals , Humans , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/metabolism , Diabetic Nephropathies/pathology , Transcriptome , Signal Transduction , Kidney , Ureteral Obstruction/pathology , Fibrosis , Interferon Regulatory Factors , Transforming Growth Factor beta/metabolism , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Transcription Factors/metabolism
7.
Braz. j. biol ; 83: e243910, 2023. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, VETINDEX | ID: biblio-1278525

ABSTRACT

Abstract Nucleotide excision repair (NER) acts repairing damages in DNA, such as lesions caused by cisplatin. Xeroderma Pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) protein is involved in recognition of global genome DNA damages during NER (GG-NER) and it has been studied in different organisms due to its importance in other cellular processes. In this work, we studied NER proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma evansi, parasites of humans and animals respectively. We performed three-dimensional models of XPC proteins from T. cruzi and T. evansi and observed few structural differences between these proteins. In our tests, insertion of XPC gene from T. evansi (TevXPC) in T. cruzi resulted in slower cell growth under normal conditions. After cisplatin treatment, T. cruzi overexpressing its own XPC gene (TcXPC) was able to recover cell division rates faster than T. cruzi expressing TevXPC gene. Based on these tests, it is suggested that TevXPC (being an exogenous protein in T. cruzi) interferes negatively in cellular processes where TcXPC (the endogenous protein) is involved. This probably occurred due interaction of TevXPC with some endogenous molecules or proteins from T.cruzi but incapacity of interaction with others. This reinforces the importance of correctly XPC functioning within the cell.


Resumo O reparo por excisão de nucleotídeos (NER) atua reparando danos no DNA, como lesões causadas por cisplatina. A proteína Xeroderma Pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) está envolvida no reconhecimento de danos pela via de reparação global do genoma pelo NER (GG-NER) e tem sido estudada em diferentes organismos devido à sua importância em outros processos celulares. Neste trabalho, estudamos proteínas do NER em Trypanosoma cruzi e Trypanosoma evansi, parasitos de humanos e animais, respectivamente. Modelos tridimensionais das proteínas XPC de T. cruzi e T. evansi foram feitos e observou-se poucas diferenças estruturais entre estas proteínas. Durante testes, a inserção do gene XPC de T. evansi (TevXPC) em T. cruzi resultou em crescimento celular mais lento em condições normais. Após o tratamento com cisplatina, T. cruzi superexpressando seu próprio gene XPC (TcXPC) foi capaz de recuperar as taxas de divisão celular mais rapidamente do que T. cruzi expressando o gene TevXPC. Com base nesses testes, sugere-se que TevXPC (sendo uma proteína exógena em T. cruzi) interfere negativamente nos processos celulares em que TcXPC (a proteína endógena) está envolvida. Isso provavelmente ocorreu pois TevXPC é capaz de interagir com algumas moléculas ou proteínas endógenas de T.cruzi, mas é incapaz de interagir com outras. Isso reforça a importância do correto funcionamento de XPC dentro da célula.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Trypanosoma cruzi/genetics , Xeroderma Pigmentosum , DNA Damage/genetics , Computational Biology , DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , DNA Repair/genetics
8.
Chinese Journal of Preventive Medicine ; (12): 171-177, 2022.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-935240

ABSTRACT

Objective: To express DNA-binding protein (DBP) of human adenovirus (HAdV) type 7 using the prokaryotic expression system, and product anti-HAdV-7 DBP rabbit polyclonal antibody. Methods: The HAdV-7 DBP gene was synthesized and cloned into prokaryotic expressing vector pET30a, and the recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) competent cell. The recombinant protein DBP was expressed by induced Isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) and purified with Ni-NTA affinity column. The titer of anti-DBP polyclonal antibody produced in immunized rabbit was measured by indirect ELISA, and the specificity of the antibody was identified by Western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). In addition, purified rDBP was used as coating antigen for indirect ELISA assay to detect specific IgM and IgG antibodies against DBP in the serum of children infected with HAdV. Results: The HAdV-7 DBP plasmid was constructed successfully. The purified recombinant DBP was more than 95% after purification. The titer of polyclonal antibody was 1∶1 024 000. The polyclonal antibody showed high specificity in vitro using Western blotting and IFA. The positive rate of specific anti-DBP IgM and IgG antibody in acute-phase serum samples collected from children infected with HAdV were 50.0% (19/38) and 63.2% (24/38), respectively, using indirect ELISA. Conclusion: In summary, the HAdV-7 rDBP is expressed using prokaryotic expression system, and the recombinant HAdV-7 DBP protein and the anti-DBP rabbit polyclonal antibody with high titer are prepared.


Subject(s)
Animals , Rabbits , Adenoviruses, Human/genetics , Antibody Specificity , Blotting, Western , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Escherichia coli/genetics , Immunoglobulin G
9.
Chinese Journal of Biotechnology ; (12): 34-49, 2022.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-927691

ABSTRACT

Plant adaptation to adverse environment depends on transmitting the external stress signals into internal signaling pathways, and thus forming a variety of stress response mechanisms during evolution. Brassinosteroids (BRs) is a steroid hormone and widely involved in plant growth, development and stress response. BR is perceived by cell surface receptors, including the receptor brassinosteroid-insensitive 1 (BRI1) and the co-receptor BRI1-associated-kinase 1 (BAK1), which in turn trigger a signaling cascade that leads to the inhibition of BIN2 and activation of BES1/BZR1 transcription factors. BES1/BZR1 can directly regulate the expression of thousands of downstream responsive genes. Studies in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that members of BR biosynthesis and signal transduction pathways, particularly protein kinase BIN2 and its downstream transcription factors BES1/BZR1, can be extensively regulated by a variety of environmental factors. In this paper, we summarize recent progresses on how BR biosynthesis and signal transduction are regulated by complex environmental factors, as well as how BR and environmental factors co-regulate crop agronomic traits, cold and salt stress responses.


Subject(s)
Arabidopsis/metabolism , Brassinosteroids/pharmacology , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation, Plant , Stress, Physiological
10.
Rev. Assoc. Med. Bras. (1992, Impr.) ; 67(1): 64-70, Jan. 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1287776

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY OBJECTIVE: Bladder cancer under the age of 40 is extremely rare. Bladder cancer development involves complex and multi-stage processes, one of which is the DNA damage repair mechanism. In this retrospective study, we aimed to evaluate the histopathological features of bladder urothelial carcinoma seen in patients under 40 years of age and tumor microsatellite instability status using immunohistochemistry. METHODS: A total of 50 patients under the age of 40 with urothelial bladder carcinoma from two different centers in the same country were included. Expression of the mismatch repair proteins MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Age at the time of diagnosis ranged from 17 to 40 years old. Most tumors were non-invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma. Two cases had nuclear loss of MSH-6 and PMS-2. We observed that tumor grade, tumor stage, presence of tumor differentiation, and infiltrative growth pattern of the tumor have significant impact on prognosis, but microsatellite instability does not have an effective role in bladder carcinogenesis in young patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that the presence of microsatellite instability is not related to the low tumor grade and stage in urothelial neoplasms in young patients, suggesting that urothelial carcinoma of the bladder in young patients may represent a genetically stable form of neoplasia.


Subject(s)
Humans , Adolescent , Adult , Young Adult , Carcinoma, Transitional Cell/genetics , Microsatellite Instability , Urinary Bladder/metabolism , Retrospective Studies , DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , DNA Mismatch Repair
11.
Chinese Journal of Biotechnology ; (12): 4293-4302, 2021.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-921506

ABSTRACT

Acetic acid is a common inhibitor present in lignocellulosic hydrolysate. Development of acetic acid tolerant strains may improve the production of biofuels and bio-based chemicals using lignocellulosic biomass as raw materials. Current studies on stress tolerance of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have mainly focused on transcription control, but the role of transfer RNA (tRNA) was rarely investigated. We found that some tRNA genes showed elevated transcription levels in a stress tolerant yeast strain. In this study, we further investigated the effects of overexpressing an arginine transfer RNA gene tR(ACG)D and a leucine transfer RNA gene tL(CAA)K on cell growth and ethanol production of S. cerevisiae BY4741 under acetic acid stress. The tL(CAA)K overexpression strain showed a better growth and a 29.41% higher ethanol productivity than that of the control strain. However, overexpression of tR(ACG)D showed negative influence on cell growth and ethanol production. Further studies revealed that the transcriptional levels of HAA1, MSN2, and MSN4, which encode transcription regulators related to stress tolerance, were up-regulated in tL(CAA)K overexpressed strain. This study provides an alternative strategy to develop robust yeast strains for cellulosic biorefinery, and also provides a basis for investigating how yeast stress tolerance is regulated by tRNA genes.


Subject(s)
Acetic Acid , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Fermentation , Leucine , RNA, Transfer/genetics , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolism , Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/metabolism , Transcription Factors
12.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 115: e190405, 2020. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BNUY, UY-BNMED | ID: biblio-1091247

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) are the etiological agents of cervical cancer. Among them, types 16 and 18 are the most prevalent worldwide. The HPV genome encodes three oncoproteins (E5, E6, and E7) that possess a high transformation potential in culture cells when transduced simultaneously. In the present study, we analysed how these oncoproteins cooperate to boost key cancer cell features such as uncontrolled cell proliferation, invasion potential, and cellular redox state imbalance. Oxidative stress is known to contribute to the carcinogenic process, as reactive oxygen species (ROS) constitute a potentially harmful by-product of many cellular reactions, and an efficient clearance mechanism is therefore required. Cells infected with HR-HPVs can adapt to oxidative stress conditions by upregulating the formation of endogenous antioxidants such as catalase, glutathione (GSH), and peroxiredoxin (PRX). OBJECTIVES The primary aim of this work was to study how these oncoproteins cooperate to promote the development of certain cancer cell features such as uncontrolled cell proliferation, invasion potential, and oxidative stress that are known to aid in the carcinogenic process. METHODS To perform this study, we generated three different HaCaT cell lines using retroviral transduction that stably expressed combinations of HPV-18 oncogenes that included HaCaT E5-18, HaCaT E6/E7-18, and HaCaT E5/E6/E7-18. FINDINGS Our results revealed a statistically significant increment in cell viability as measured by MTT assay, cell proliferation, and invasion assays in the cell line containing the three viral oncogenes. Additionally, we observed that cells expressing HPV-18 E5/E6/E7 exhibited a decrease in catalase activity and a significant augmentation of GSH and PRX1 levels relative to those of E5, E6/E7, and HaCaT cells. MAIN CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates for the first time that HPV-18 E5, E6, and E7 oncoproteins can cooperate to enhance malignant transformation.


Subject(s)
Humans , Cell Transformation, Viral/genetics , Oncogene Proteins, Viral/metabolism , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Human papillomavirus 18/metabolism , Oxidation-Reduction , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Cell Survival , Cell Line, Tumor/virology , Cell Proliferation
13.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 52(7): e8381, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1011592

ABSTRACT

Experiments were conducted to determine if the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor binding inhibitor (FRBI) impacts the expression levels of AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1A (ARID1A) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in ovaries and blood, as well as expressions of follicle-stimulating hormone cognate receptor (FSHR) gene and proteins. Mice in FRBI-10, FRBI-20, FRBI-30, and FRBI-40 groups were intramuscularly injected with 10, 20, 30, and 40 mg FRBI/kg, respectively, for five consecutive days. Western blotting and qRT-PCR were utilized to determine expression levels of ARID1A and PTEN proteins and mRNAs. Serum ARID1A and PTEN concentrations of the FRBI-40 group were higher than the control group (CG) and FSH group (P<0.05). FSHR mRNA levels of FRBI-20, FRBI-30, and FRBI-40 groups were lower than that of CG and FSH groups on day 15 (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Expression levels of FSHR proteins of FRBI-30 and FRBI-40 groups were lower than those of CG and FSH groups (P<0.05). Levels of ARID1A and PTEN proteins of the FRBI-30 group were greater than CG on days 20 and 30 (P<0.05). FRBI doses had significant positive correlations to levels of ARID1A and PTEN proteins. Additionally, ARID1A and PTEN had negative correlations to FSHR mRNAs and proteins. A high dose of FRBI could promote the expression levels of ARID1A and PTEN proteins in ovarian tissues. FRBI increased serum concentrations of ARID1A and PTEN. However, FRBI depressed expression levels of FSHR mRNAs and proteins in mouse ovaries.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Rabbits , Ovarian Neoplasms/metabolism , Receptors, FSH/antagonists & inhibitors , Nuclear Proteins/blood , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , PTEN Phosphohydrolase/blood , Follicle Stimulating Hormone/metabolism , Phosphorylation , Transcription Factors , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Transcriptional Activation/genetics , Up-Regulation , Blotting, Western , DNA-Binding Proteins/blood , PTEN Phosphohydrolase/metabolism , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
14.
Electron. j. biotechnol ; 32: 1-5, Mar. 2018. ilus
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1022489

ABSTRACT

Background: TRF2 (telomeric repeat binding factor 2) is an essential component of the telomere-binding protein complex shelterin. TRF2 induces the formation of a special structure of telomeric DNA and counteracts activation of DNA damage-response pathways telomeres. TRF2 has a poorly characterized linker region (udTRF2) between its homodimerization and DNA-binding domains. Some lines of evidence have shown that this region could be involved in TRF2 interaction with nuclear lamina. Results: In this study, the fragment of the TERF2 gene encoding udTRF2 domain of telomere-binding protein TRF2 was produced by PCR and cloned into the pET32a vector. The resulting plasmid pET32a-udTRF2 was used for the expression of the recombinant udTRF2 in E. coli RosettaBlue (DE3). The protein was isolated and purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by ion-exchange chromatography. The purified recombinant protein udTRF2 was injected into guinea pigs to generate polyclonal antibodies. The ability of anti-udTRF2 antibodies to bind endogenous TRF2 in human skin fibroblasts was tested by western blotting and immunofluorescent staining. Conclusions: In this study, the recombinant protein udTRF2 and antibodies to it were generated. Both protein and antibodies will provide a useful tool for investigation of the functions of the udTRF2 domain and its role in the interaction between TRF2 and nuclear lamina.


Subject(s)
Animals , Guinea Pigs , Telomeric Repeat Binding Protein 2/metabolism , Antibodies/metabolism , Plasmids , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , Immunohistochemistry , Blotting, Western , Chromosomes , Cloning, Molecular , Nuclear Lamina , Telomeric Repeat Binding Protein 2/genetics , Immunoprecipitation , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Escherichia coli/metabolism , Antibodies/isolation & purification , Antibody Formation , Nucleoproteins
15.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 51(9): e7588, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-951758

ABSTRACT

Previous studies suggested that chromodomain helicase DNA-binding proteins (CHDs), including CHD 1-8, were associated with several human diseases and cancers including lymphoma, liver cancer, colorectal cancer, stomach cancer, etc. To date, little research on CHD 9 in human cancers has been reported. In this study, we assessed the prognostic value of CHD 9 in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). We screened for CHD 9 expression using immunohistochemical analysis in 87 surgical CRC specimens and found that the expression was upregulated in 81.5% of the cases, while 7.4% were decreased; in the remaining 11.1% of the cases, levels were not altered. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with high CHD 9 expression had better prognosis than those with low CHD 9 expression (54.5 vs 32.1%, P=0.034). Subsequently, Cox multi-factor survival regression analysis revealed that expression of CHD 9 protein was an independent predictor for CRC, with a hazard ratio of 0.503 (P=0.028). In addition, we found that CHD 9 expression was positively correlated with MSH2 (rs=0.232, P=0.036). We speculated that CHD9 might be a putative tumor suppressor gene, and could inhibit the development of CRC by participating in DNA repair processes. Our findings suggest that CHD 9 could be a novel prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target for CRC. Further studies are needed to detect the effect of CHD 9 on cellular function and the expression of mismatch repair genes.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Young Adult , Transcription Factors/metabolism , Colorectal Neoplasms/metabolism , Biomarkers, Tumor/metabolism , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Prognosis , Transcription Factors/genetics , Immunohistochemistry , Colorectal Neoplasms/genetics , Colorectal Neoplasms/pathology , Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Trans-Activators , DNA Helicases , DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Neoplasm Staging
16.
Biol. Res ; 51: 13, 2018. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-950899

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neuroblastoma (NB) represents the most common extracranial solid tumor in children. Accumulating evidence shows that microRNAs (miRs) play an important role in the carcinogenesis of NB. Here, we investigated the biological function of miR-1247 in NB in vitro. METHODS/RESULTS: We found miR-1247 was downregulated in NB tissues and cells using quantitative PCR analysis. Gain- and loss-of-function studies demonstrated that miR-1247 significantly suppressed cell proliferation and induced cell cycle G0/G1 phase arrest and cell apoptosis of NB cells in vitro by using MTT, colony formation assay and Flow cytometry analysis. Luciferase assay suggested ZNF346 was the target of miR-1247 and its expression could be down-regulated by miR-1247 overexpression using Western blotting. Furthermore, downregulation of ZNF346 by siRNA performed similar effects with overexpression of miR-1247 in NB cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggested miR-1247 directly targeted to repress ZNF346 expression, thus suppressing the progression of NB, which might be a novel therapeutic target against NB.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , MicroRNAs/metabolism , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Neuroblastoma/metabolism , Phenotype , Time Factors , Tumor Cells, Cultured , Down-Regulation , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Child, Preschool , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , Colony-Forming Units Assay , MicroRNAs/genetics , Cell Proliferation/genetics , DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Flow Cytometry , Neuroblastoma/genetics , Neuroblastoma/pathology
17.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 43(6): 1060-1067, Nov.-Dec. 2017. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-892928

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: miR-483-5p has been identified as a miRNA oncogene in certain cancers. However, its role in prostate cancer has not been sufficiently investigated. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-483-5p in prostate cancer and examined RBM5 regulation by miR-483-5p. Material and methods: Expression levels of miR-483-5p were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. The effect of miR-483-5p on proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay, cell invasion was evaluated by trans-well invasion assays, and target protein expression was determined by western blotting in LNCaP, DU-145, and PC-3 cells. Luciferase reporter plasmids were constructed to confirm the action of miR-483-5p on downstream target gene RBM5 in HEK-293T cells. Results: we observed that miR-483-5p was upregulated in prostate cancer cell lines and tissues. A miR-483-5p inhibitor inhibited prostate cancer cell growth and invasion in DU-145 and PC-3 cells. miR-483-5p directly bound to the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of RBM5 in HEK-293T cells. RBM5 overexpression inhibited prostate cancer cell growth and invasion in LNCaP cells. Enforced RBM5 expression alleviated miR-483-5p promotion of prostate cancer cell growth and invasion in LNCaP cells. Conclusion: The present study describes a potential mechanism underlying a miR-483-5p/RBM5 link that contributes to prostate cancer development.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatic Neoplasms/genetics , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Untranslated Regions/genetics , Tumor Suppressor Proteins/metabolism , MicroRNAs/physiology , Cell Proliferation/genetics , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Prostatic Neoplasms/mortality , Down-Regulation , Up-Regulation , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , MicroRNAs/antagonists & inhibitors , Cell Line, Tumor , Neoplasm Invasiveness
18.
Journal of Forensic Medicine ; (6): 289-292, 2017.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-984895

ABSTRACT

TAR DNA-binding domain protein 43 (TDP-43) is a highly conserved and widely expressed nuclear protein. Nowadays, the expression of TDP-43 can be found in most neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, which makes it become a neurodegenerative disease associated marker protein. From the current research status at homeland and abroad, and around the relationship between the expression of TDP-43 and brain injury, this article emphatically probes into the specific expression and function of TDP-43 in acute and chronic brain injury based on the knowledge of its biological characteristics, which aims to explore the feasibility for determining the cause of death and the injury and disability situations by TDP-43 in forensic pathology.


Subject(s)
Humans , Brain Injuries/pathology , DNA , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism
19.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 50(11): e6389, 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-888946

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to observe the infection of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and its effect on the expression of single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSBP1) and on lipid metabolism in endothelial cells. We screened the differential expression of mRNAs after HCMV infection by suppression subtractive hybridization and the expression levels of SSBP1 mRNA and protein after HCMV infection by real-time PCR and western blot. After verification of successful infection by indirect immunofluorescent staining and RT-PCR, we found a differential expression of lipid metabolism-related genes including LDLR, SCARB, CETP, HMGCR, ApoB and LPL induced by HCMV infection. The expression levels of SSBP1 mRNA and protein after HCMV infection were significantly down-regulated. Furthermore, we found that upregulation of SSBP1 inhibited the expression of atherosclerosis-associated LDLR, SCARB, HMGCR, CETP as well as the accumulation of lipids in the cells. The results showed that the inhibition of SSBP1 by HCMV infection promotes lipid accumulation in the cells.


Subject(s)
Humans , Cytomegalovirus Infections/metabolism , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/virology , Lipid Metabolism/physiology , Mitochondrial Proteins/metabolism , Atherosclerosis/metabolism , Atherosclerosis/virology , Cholesterol Ester Transfer Proteins/metabolism , Cholesterol/analysis , DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , Down-Regulation , Hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA Reductases/metabolism , Lipid Metabolism/genetics , Mitochondrial Proteins/genetics , Receptors, LDL/metabolism , Scavenger Receptors, Class B/metabolism , Time Factors
20.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 647-651, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-21850

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In the gastric mucosa of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-infected patients with gastritis or adenocarcinoma, proliferation of gastric epithelial cells is increased. Hyperproliferation is related to induction of oncogenes, such as β-catenin and c-myc. Even though transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1 are activated in H. pylori-infected cells, whether NF-κB or AP-1 regulates the expression of β-catenein or c-myc in H. pylori-infected cells has not been clarified. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1 mediates the expression of oncogenes and hyperproliferation of gastric epithelial cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Gastric epithelial AGS cells were transiently transfected with mutant genes for IκBα (MAD3) and c-Jun (TAM67) or treated with a specific NF-κB inhibitor caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) or a selective AP-1 inhibitor SR-11302 to suppress activation of NF-κB or AP-1, respecively. As reference cells, the control vector pcDNA was transfected to the cells. Wild-type cells or transfected cells were cultured with or without H. pylori. RESULTS: H. pylori induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1, cell proliferation, and expression of oncogenes (β-catenein, c-myc) in AGS cells, which was inhibited by transfection of MAD3 and TAM67. Wild-type cells and the cells transfected with pcDNA showed similar activities of NF-κB and AP-1, proliferation, and oncogene expression regardless of treatment with H. pylori. Both CAPE and SR-11302 inhibited cell proliferation and expression of oncogenes in H. pylori-infected cells. CONCLUSION: H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1 regulates transcription of oncogenes and mediates hyperproliferation in gastric epithelial cells.


Subject(s)
Humans , Blotting, Western , Caffeic Acids , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation , DNA, Bacterial/analysis , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Gastric Mucosa/metabolism , Gastritis/pathology , Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial , Helicobacter Infections/metabolism , Helicobacter pylori/pathogenicity , NF-kappa B/antagonists & inhibitors , Peptide Fragments , Phenylethyl Alcohol/analogs & derivatives , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-jun , Repressor Proteins , Transcription Factor AP-1/biosynthesis , Transcription Factors/metabolism , beta Catenin/metabolism
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