Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 64
Filter
1.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 114: e190210, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1101271

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The influence of Plasmodium spp. infection in the health of Southern brown howler monkey, Alouatta guariba clamitans, the main reservoir of malaria in the Atlantic Forest, is still unknown. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to investigate the positivity rate of Plasmodium infection in free-living howler monkeys in an Atlantic Forest fragment in Joinville/SC and to associate the infection with clinical, morphometrical, haematological and biochemical alterations. METHODS Molecular diagnosis of Plasmodium infection in the captured monkeys was performed by Nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (18S rRNA and coxI). Haematological and biochemical parameters were compared among infected and uninfected monkeys; clinical and morphometrical parameters were also compared. FINDINGS The positivity rate of Plasmodium infection was 70% among forty captured animals, the highest reported for neotropical primates. None statistical differences were detected in the clinical parameters, and morphometric measures comparing infected and uninfected groups. The main significant alteration was the higher alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels in infected compared to uninfected monkeys. MAIN CONCLUSIONS Therefore, Plasmodium infection in howler monkeys may causes haematological/biochemical alterations which might suggest hepatic impairment. Moreover, infection must be monitored for the eco-epidemiological surveillance of malaria in the Atlantic Forest and during primate conservation program that involves the animal movement, such as translocations.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Female , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Alouatta/parasitology , Malaria/veterinary , Monkey Diseases/parasitology , Brazil/epidemiology , Alouatta/blood , Malaria/blood , Malaria/epidemiology , Animals, Wild , Monkey Diseases/blood , Monkey Diseases/epidemiology
2.
Braz. j. biol ; 78(4): 609-614, Nov. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-951605

ABSTRACT

Abstract Zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL), caused by protozoans of the genus Leishmania, it is a worldwide of great importance disease. In the northeast region of Brazil, the state of Alagoas has an endemic status for ZVL. Thus, this work aimed to analyze the epidemiological situation of human and canine visceral leishmaniasis in Alagoas, Northeast, Brazil, from 2007 to 2013. We conducted a descriptive, observational, retrospective study using secondary data from the Notifiable Diseases Information System, the Center of Zoonosis Control of Maceió, and the Central Laboratory of Public Health of Alagoas. During the studied period, it was observed that the highest incidence of human visceral leishmaniasis was in 2011 and the lowest in 2013. On the other hand, canine visceral leishmaniasis had its highest incidence in 2007 and its lowest in 2012. Of the 55 municipalities in the State of Alagoas that showed human visceral leishmaniasis (HVL), São José da Tapera presented an average of 4.4 cases over the past five years, being classified as of intense transmission. Regarding canine visceral leishmaniasis, in the same studied period, 45,112 dogs were examined in the State, of which 4,466 were positive. It resulted, thus, in a 9.9% positivity rate. Conclusions: Our data are important because canine infection is an important risk factor for the human disease.


Resumo Leishmaniose visceral zoonótica, causada por protozoários do gênero Leishmania, é uma doença importante no mundo. Na região nordeste do Brasil, do estado de Alagoas é endêmico para LVZ. Neste sentido, este trabalho teve como objetivo analisar a situação epidemiológica da leishmaniose visceral humana e canina em Alagoas, Nordeste, Brasil, no período de 2007 a 2013. Foi realizado um estudo descritivo, observacional, retrospectivo, usando-se secundário do Sistema de Informação de Agravos de Notificação (SINAN), Centro de Controle de Zoonoses de Maceió (CCZ) e Laboratório Central de Saúde Pública de Alagoas (LACEN/AL). Durante o período de estudo, observou-se que o ano de maior incidência de Leishmaniose visceral humana (LVH) foi o de 2011 e o de menor foi no ano de 2013. Já a LVC teve maior incidência em 2007 e menor em 2012. Dos 55 municípios do Estado de Alagoas que apresentaram LVH, São José da Tapera apresentou uma média de casos de 4,4 nos últimos cinco anos classificado como de transmissão intensa; No que diz respeito à leishmaniose visceral canina (LVC), no mesmo período de estudo, foram examinados 45.112 cães no Estado, dos quais 4.466 foram positivos. Resultou assim, em uma taxa de 9,9% de positividade. Nossos dados são importantes porque a infecção canina é um importante fator de risco para a doença humana.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Male , Female , Infant , Child , Adult , Middle Aged , Dogs , Endemic Diseases/veterinary , Endemic Diseases/statistics & numerical data , Dog Diseases/epidemiology , Neglected Diseases/epidemiology , Leishmaniasis, Visceral/veterinary , Leishmaniasis, Visceral/epidemiology , Brazil/epidemiology , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Risk Factors , Cities , Disease Progression , Dog Diseases/parasitology , Dog Diseases/transmission , Leishmaniasis, Visceral/transmission
3.
Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop ; 51(4): 445-451, July-Aug. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-957436

ABSTRACT

Abstract INTRODUCTION The National Park of Serra das Confusões (NPSC) is a protected area of natural landscape located in Southern Piauí, Brazil, and it is considered as one of the largest and most important protected areas in the Caatinga biome. METHODS The natural occurrences of trypanosomatids from hemocultures on small mammals and cultures from intestinal contents triatomines were detected through molecular diagnoses of blood samples, and phylogenetic relationship analysis of the isolates parasites using the trypanosome barcode (V7V8 SSUrDNA) were realized. RESULTS Only two Galea spixii (8.1%) and six Triatoma brasiliensis (17.6%) were positive by hemoculture, and the isolates parasites were cryopreserved. All the isolates obtained were positioned on the Trypanosoma cruzi DTU TcI branch. CONCLUSIONS Research focused on studying the wild animal fauna in preserved and underexplored environments has made it possible to elucidate indispensable components of different epidemiological chains of diseases with zoonotic potential.


Subject(s)
Animals , Rodentia/parasitology , Trypanosoma cruzi/genetics , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Triatominae/parasitology , Animals, Wild/parasitology , Marsupialia/parasitology , Phylogeny , Rodentia/classification , Trypanosoma cruzi/isolation & purification , Brazil , Biodiversity , Parks, Recreational , Genotype , Marsupialia/classification
4.
Rev. bras. parasitol. vet ; 26(1): 17-27, Jan.-Mar. 2017. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-844132

ABSTRACT

Abstract This study aimed to detect parasites from Leishmania genus, to determine the prevalence of anti-Leishmania spp. antibodies, to identify circulating species of the parasite, and to determine epidemiological variables associated with infection in rats caught in urban area of Londrina, Paraná, Brazil. Animal capture was carried out from May to December 2006, serological and molecular methods were performed. DNA was extracted from total blood, and nested-PCR, targeting SSu rRNA from Leishmania genus, was performed in triplicate. The positive samples were sequenced twice by Sanger method to species determination. In total, 181 rodents were captured, all were identified as Rattus rattus and none showed clinical alterations. Forty-one of the 176 (23.3%) animals were positive for Leishmania by ELISA and 6/181 (3.3%) were positive by IFAT. Nine of 127 tested animals (7.1%) were positive by PCR; seven were identified as L. (L.) amazonensis, one as L. (L.) infantum. Four rats were positive using more than one test. This was the first description of synanthropic rodents naturally infected by L. (L.) amazonensis (in the world) and by L. (L.) infantum (in South Brazil). Regarding L. (L.) amazonensis, this finding provides new evidence of the urbanization of this etiological agent.


Resumo Esse estudo objetivou detectar parasitos do gênero Leishmania, determinar a prevalência de anticorpos anti-Leishmania spp., identificar as espécies circulantes do parasito e determinar variáveis epidemiológicas associadas com a infecção em ratos capturados em área urbana de Londrina, Paraná, Brazil. A captura dos animais ocorreu de maio a dezembro de 2006, métodos sorológicos e moleculares foram realizados. O DNA foi extraído do sangue total, uma nested-PCR cujo alvo foi o gene SSu rRNA do gênero Leishmania, foi realizado em triplicata. As amostras positivas foram sequenciadas duas vezes pelo método de Sanger para a determinação da espécie. No total, 181 roedores foram capturados, todos foram identificados como Rattus rattus e nenhum apresentou alterações clínicas. Quarenta e um dos 176 (23,3%) animais foram positivos no ELISA para Leishmania e 6/181 (3,3%) foram positivos na RIFI. Nove dos 127 animais testados (7,1%) foram positivos na PCR; sete foram identificadas como L. (L.) amazonensis, um como L. (L.) infantum. Quatro ratos foram positivos em mais de um teste. Essa é a primeira descrição de roedores sinantrópicos naturalmente infectados por L. (L.) amazonensis (no mundo) e por L. (L.) infantum (no Sul do Brasil). Com relação a L. (L.) amazonensis, esse resultado é uma nova evidência da urbanização desse agente etiológico.


Subject(s)
Animals , Rats/parasitology , Disease Reservoirs/veterinary , Antibodies, Protozoan/blood , Leishmania/isolation & purification , Urbanization , Brazil , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Leishmania infantum/isolation & purification , Leishmania infantum/immunology , Leishmania/immunology
5.
Belo Horizonte; s.n; 2017. 86 p.
Thesis in Portuguese | ColecionaSUS, LILACS, ColecionaSUS | ID: biblio-943122

ABSTRACT

As leishmanioses são doenças parasitárias de origem zoonótica, sendo transmitidas por flebotomíneos vetores em ambiente silvestres, rurais e urbano. Sua distribuição está condicionada não somente ao vetor, mas também aos mamíferos reservatórios. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo realizar estudos eco-epidemiológicos em relação aos hospedeiros vertebrados e invertebrados de Leishmania spp. no Santuário do Caraça. Do período de Junho de 2013 a Junho de 2014 foram realizadas coletas bimestrais intercaladas de flebotomíneos e de pequenos mamíferos em pontos selecionados ao acaso em locais de atração turística na RPPN Santuário do Caraça. Foram utilizadas 25 armadilhas luminosas do tipo CDC para coletas de flebotomíneos distribuídas em sete trilhas pelo parque. Para coleta dos pequenos mamíferos foram utilizadas 60 armadilhas do tipo Tomahalk distribuídas em seis trilhas (dez armadilhas por trilha). Um total de 376 flebotomíneos foi coletado (300 fêmeas e 76 machos) representando 18 espécies.


As espécies mais abundantes foram Psychodopygus lloydi(72,79%), Brumptomyia troglodytes (5,25%), Nyssomyia whitmani (4,01%) e Pintomyia monticola (4,30%). Duas amostras de Ps. lloydi foram detectadas com DNA de Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, utilizando a técnica ITS1 PCR-RFLP, e sete espécimes desta espécie foram identificados com sangue de porco doméstico (Sus scrofa) através de sequenciamento do gene ctyb. Um total de 55 pequenos mamíferos foi coletado tendo como espécies mais abundantes Akodon cursor (56,4%), Cerradomys subflavus (10,9%) e Oligoryzomys nigripes(10,9%). Foram obtidos seis isolados de Le. (V.) braziliensis de fígado e pele de cauda dos mamíferos das espécies A. cursor (3), C. subflavus (1) e Oxymicterus dasytrichus (1). Estes mesmos espécimes foram detectados positivos na técnica de kDNA PCR. Os resultados encontrados inferem que há circulação de Le. (V.) braziliensis neste ambiente silvestre e que Ps. lloydi possa desempenhar papel importante na manutenção do ciclo neste local e que, ainda, A. cursor, C. subflavus e O. dasytrichus atuam como hospedeiros de leishmaniose tegumentar na área de estudo


Subject(s)
Animals , Dogs , Rats , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Leishmania/isolation & purification , Leishmaniasis/transmission
6.
Rev. bras. epidemiol ; 19(4): 803-811, Out.-Dez. 2016. tab, graf
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: biblio-843730

ABSTRACT

RESUMO: Objetivo: Avaliar a influência do consumo de carne de caça na transmissão da doença de Chagas (DC), assim como as condições em que ela ocorre e a frequência de relatos na literatura. Métodos: Mediante revisão sistemática, foram consultadas as bases PubMed, LILACS, MEDLINE e SciELO, sendo incluídos artigos escritos em português, inglês e espanhol, sem limitação do ano de publicação. Os descritores utilizados foram: oral, transmission, meat, wild animals, hunt, carnivory e Chagas disease, sendo inseridos na análise os artigos que mencionavam o consumo de carne de animais como forma de transmissão humana da DC. Foram utilizados critérios de evidência epidemiológico, clínico e laboratorial. Resultados: Entre os 298 artigos identificados, apenas seis preencheram os critérios de elegibilidade. Foram identificados somente cinco episódios de transmissão oral por consumo de carne ou sangue de animais silvestres, porém em dois deles não foi possível afastar a possibilidade de transmissão vetorial. A maior parte dos relatos preencheu os critérios de evidência epidemiológico, clínico e laboratorial, estabelecidos para sustentar a transmissão. Conclusão: Apesar da transmissão de DC ser incomum, a caça e o consumo de mamíferos silvestres reservatórios devem ser desestimulados nos países endêmicos em função dos riscos inerentes a essas práticas.


ABSTRACT: Objective: To evaluate the influence of game meat consumption in Chagas disease (CD) transmission, the conditions under which it occurs and the frequency of reports in the literature. Methods: Through systematic review, databases PubMed, LILACS, MEDLINE, and SciELO were consulted, and articles written in Portuguese, English, and Spanish were included, with no limitation over publication date. We used the following descriptors: oral, transmission, meat, wild animals, hunt, carnivory, and Chagas disease. Articles that mentioned consumption of animal meat as a form of human transmission of CD were included. We used epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory evidence criteria to confirm cases. Results: Among the 298 articles identified, only six met the eligibility criteria. Only five episodes of oral transmission through wild animal meat or blood consumption were identified. However, in two of them, the possibility of vectorial transmission could not be ruled out. Most reports met the epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory evidence criteria established to support the transmission. Conclusion: Though CD transmission is uncommon, hunting and consumption of wild mammals that serve as Trypanosoma cruzi reservoirs should be discouraged in endemic countries in light of the risks inherent to these practices.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Animals, Wild , Chagas Disease/transmission , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Meat/parasitology , Trypanosoma cruzi
7.
Rev. bras. parasitol. vet ; 25(4): 504-510, Sept.-Dec. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-830046

ABSTRACT

Abstract Neighborhood dogs may act as reservoirs for several zoonotic protozoan infections, particularly in urban areas, thus constituting a potential public health threat. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the exposure of neighborhood dogs to four protozoan pathogens in public areas with high levels of human movement in Curitiba, southern Brazil. Blood samples from 26 neighborhood dogs were screened by means of the indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT) for Leishmania spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Trypanosoma cruzi and Neospora caninum, and a questionnaire was answered by the respective keeper. A total of 8/26 dogs (30.7%) seroreactive to T. gondii, 3/26 (11.5%) to N. caninum and 2/26 (7.7%) to both were identified. All the samples were seronegative for T. cruzi and Leishmania spp. Pathogen seroreactivity was not associated with the daily human movements or other epidemiological variables investigated (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the low seroprevalence for T. gondii and N. caninum indicated low environmental and food risk for animal infection and the seronegativity for Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi may reflect the absence of these pathogens in urban areas of Curitiba. Moreover, neighborhood dogs may be used as environmental sentinels for the presence of protozoan pathogens and their vectors.


Resumo Cães comunitários podem atuar como reservatórios para algumas zoonoses causadas por protozoários, principalmente em áreas urbanas, constituindo potencial ameaça à saúde pública. Portanto, o objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar a exposição de cães comunitários a quatro protozoários em áreas públicas com alta circulação de pessoas, em Curitiba, Sul do Brasil. Amostras de sangue de 26 cães comunitários foram testadas pela reação de imunofluorescência indireta (RIFI) para Leishmania spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Trypanosoma cruzi e Neospora caninum, e um questionário foi respondido pelo respectivo mantenedor. Um total de 8/26 (30,7%) foram sororreagentes para T. gondii, 3/26 (11,5%) para N. caninum e 2/26 (7,7%) para ambos. Todas as amostras foram soronegativas para T. cruzi e Leishmania spp. Não houve associação entre sororreatividade para os patógenos pesquisados e o tráfego diário de pessoas e outras variáveis epidemiológicas analisadas (p > 0.05). Conclui-se a baixa soroprevalência para T. gondii e T. cruzi indica baixo risco ambiental e alimentar para a infecção dos animais, e a soronegatividade para Leishmania spp. e T. cruzi pode refletir a ausência desses patógenos em áreas urbanas de Curitiba. Além disso, os cães comunitários podem atuar como sentinelas ambientais quanto à presença de protozoários e seus vetores.


Subject(s)
Animals , Toxoplasma/isolation & purification , Trypanosoma cruzi/isolation & purification , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Neospora/isolation & purification , Dogs/parasitology , Leishmania/isolation & purification , Toxoplasma/immunology , Trypanosoma cruzi/immunology , Brazil , Antibodies, Protozoan/blood , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Toxoplasmosis, Animal/immunology , Toxoplasmosis, Animal/parasitology , Neospora/immunology , Dogs/blood , Leishmania/immunology
8.
Braz. j. biol ; 76(3): 638-644, tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-785034

ABSTRACT

Abstract This study analyzed the presence of Biomphalaria in Melo creek basin, Minas Gerais state, and its relationship to irrigation canals. Seventeen of these canals were used to determine a limnological, morphological and hydrological characterization during an annual seasonal cycle. Biomphalaria samples were sent to René Rachou Research Center/FIOCRUZ for identification and parasitological examination. Six canals were identified as breeding areas for mollusks and in one of them it was registered the coexistence of B. tenagophila (first report to this basin) and B. glabrata species. Results indicated that the low flow rate and speed of water flow were the main characteristics that contributed to this specific growth of the mollusks in the area. These hydraulic characteristics were created due to anthropogenic action through the canalization of lotic areas in Melo creek, which allowed ideal ecological conditions to Biomphalaria outbreak. The results emphasize the need of adequate handling and constant monitoring of the hydrographic basin, subject to inadequate phytosanitary conditions, aiming to prevent the occurrence and propagation of schistosomiasis.


Resumo Neste estudo avaliou-se a presença de espécies de Biomphalaria na bacia do Ribeirão do Melo, municípios de Rio Espera e Capela Nova, sudeste do estado de Minas Gerais, e sua relação com os canais de irrigação presentes na região. Em 17 desses canais foi realizada uma caracterização limnológica, morfológica e hidrológica durante um ciclo sazonal anual. Espécimes de Biomphalaria foram coletados e encaminhados ao Centro de Pesquisas René Rachou/FIOCRUZ (Belo Horizonte, MG) para identificação e exame parasitológico. Dos 17 canais estudados, foram identificados seis como criadouros do caramujo, sendo que em um dos canais coexistiam as espécies B. tenagophila (primeiro registro para a bacia) e B. glabrata. Os resultados indicaram que a baixa vazão e a velocidade do fluxo foram os fatores que contribuíram para a ocorrência pontual dos caramujos na bacia. Estas características hidrológicas foram modificadas por ação antropogênica, através da canalização de trechos lóticos do ribeirão do Melo. Os resultados destacam a necessidade do manejo adequado e monitoramento constante da bacia hidrográfica, sujeita a condições sanitárias inadequadas, como forma de prevenção da ocorrência e propagação da esquistossomose.


Subject(s)
Animals , Schistosomiasis/prevention & control , Biomphalaria/parasitology , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Ecosystem , Agricultural Irrigation , Brazil , Cities , Disease Vectors
9.
Braz. j. infect. dis ; 20(2): 119-126, Mar.-Apr. 2016. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-780799

ABSTRACT

Abstract A population survey was conducted to explore the prevalence and factors associated with Leishmania infection in the Fercal region of the Federal District. The Fercal region is a group of neighborhoods in Brasília in which the first cases of visceral leishmaniasis were described. Leishmania infection was established by a positive leishmanin test. Although other tests were performed in the study (an immunochromatographic assay (Kalazar detect®) and a molecular assay), only the leishmanin skin test provided sufficient results for the measurement of the disease prevalence. Data on the epidemiological, clinical and environmental characteristics of individuals were collected along with the diagnostic tests. After sampling and enrollment, seven hundred people from 2 to 14 years of age were included in the study. The prevalence of Leishmania infection was 33.28% (95% CI 29.87–36.84). The factors associated with Leishmania infection according to the multivariate analysis were age of more than seven years and the presence of opossums near the home. Age is a known factor associated with Leishmania infection; however, the presence of wild animals, as described, is an understudied factor. The presence of opossums, which are known reservoirs of Leishmania, in peri-urban areas could be the link between the rural and urban occurrence of visceral leishmaniasis in the outskirts of largest Brazilian cities, as suggested by previous studies.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Male , Female , Child, Preschool , Child , Adolescent , Opossums/parasitology , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Asymptomatic Infections , Leishmaniasis, Visceral/epidemiology , Brazil/epidemiology , Prevalence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Risk Factors , Leishmaniasis, Visceral/diagnosis , Leishmaniasis, Visceral/transmission
10.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 110(8): 945-955, Dec. 2015. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-769829

ABSTRACT

Asymptomatic Plasmodium infection carriers represent a major threat to malaria control worldwide as they are silent natural reservoirs and do not seek medical care. There are no standard criteria for asymptomaticPlasmodium infection; therefore, its diagnosis relies on the presence of the parasite during a specific period of symptomless infection. The antiparasitic immune response can result in reducedPlasmodium sp. load with control of disease manifestations, which leads to asymptomatic infection. Both the innate and adaptive immune responses seem to play major roles in asymptomatic Plasmodiuminfection; T regulatory cell activity (through the production of interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β) and B-cells (with a broad antibody response) both play prominent roles. Furthermore, molecules involved in the haem detoxification pathway (such as haptoglobin and haeme oxygenase-1) and iron metabolism (ferritin and activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase) have emerged in recent years as potential biomarkers and thus are helping to unravel the immune response underlying asymptomatic Plasmodium infection. The acquisition of large data sets and the use of robust statistical tools, including network analysis, associated with well-designed malaria studies will likely help elucidate the immune mechanisms responsible for asymptomatic infection.


Subject(s)
Humans , Asymptomatic Infections , Antigens, Protozoan/immunology , Carrier State/immunology , Malaria, Falciparum/immunology , Malaria, Vivax/immunology , Plasmodium/immunology , Adaptive Immunity/physiology , Biomarkers , Carrier State/parasitology , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Ferritins/immunology , Haptoglobins/immunology , Heme Oxygenase-1/immunology , Immunity, Innate/physiology , /immunology , JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/immunology , Malaria, Falciparum/prevention & control , Malaria, Vivax/prevention & control , Parasitemia/immunology , Plasmodium/isolation & purification , Transforming Growth Factor beta/immunology
11.
Rev. bras. parasitol. vet ; 24(4): 402-409, Oct.-Dec. 2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-770319

ABSTRACT

Abstract One of the measures to control visceral leishmaniosis (VL) in Brazil is the identification and culling of the canine reservoir. There is much controversy concerning this strategy, including the proper identification of positive dogs and the fact that the host-parasite relationship changes over time make it more challenging. A dynamic cohort of 62 dogs was followed every three months using serological and parasitological examinations and PCR. Positivity by PCR was higher than by serology and by parasitological examinations and showed a tendency to decrease over time, while serology tended to increase after six months. Concomitant positivity in all tests was observed in 10.4% of the samples, and negativity in 29.1%. Overall sensitivity ranged from 43.6 to 64.1%, and was not uniform over time. The proportion of dogs with or without clinical signs was not different by cytology or PCR but PCR was able to identify a larger number of asymptomatic dogs compared to ELISA and immunochromatography. PCR can be useful for surveillance of areas where cases of canine VL have not yet been detected and in which control strategies can be implemented to limit the spread of the disease. Despite the advance in diagnostic tools CVL diagnosis remains a challenge.


Resumo Uma das medidas de controle da leishmaniose visceral (LV) no Brasil se baseia na identificação e eliminação do reservatório canino. Existe considerável controvérsia relativa a esta estratégia incluindo a correta identificação dos cães positivos e a variação temporal da relação hospedeiro-parasita, o que torna esta medida ainda mais desafiadora. Uma coorte dinâmica de 62 cães foi acompanhada trimestralmente utilizando-se métodos sorológicos, parasitológicos e a PCR. A taxa de positividade por PCR foi maior em comparação à dos métodos sorológicos e parasitológicos, e mostrou tendência à diminuição com o passar do tempo, enquanto que a positividade sorológica apresentou tendência a aumento, após seis meses. Observou-se positividade concomitante em todos os testes em 10,4% das amostras e, negatividade concomitante, em 29,1%. A sensibilidade geral variou de 43,6% a 64,1%, não sendo uniforme ao longo do estudo. A proporção de cães com e sem sinais clínicos que foram positivos ao exame parasitológico ou à PCR não foi estatisticamente diferente. Contudo, foi possível identificar como positivos um maior número de animais assintomáticos por meio da técnica de PCR, em comparação aos testes ELISA e imunocromatográfico. A PCR pode ser bastante útil para a vigilância epidemiológica de áreas onde casos de LV canina ainda não tenham sido descritos e onde estratégias de controle podem ser implantadas para limitar a disseminação da doença. Não obstante o avanço nas ferramentas diagnósticas, diagnosticar a LVC continua um desafio.


Subject(s)
Animals , Disease Reservoirs/veterinary , Dog Diseases/diagnosis , Leishmaniasis, Visceral/veterinary , Brazil , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/veterinary , Longitudinal Studies , Dog Diseases/parasitology , Dog Diseases/blood , Leishmaniasis, Visceral/diagnosis
12.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 110(3): 387-393, 05/2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-745974

ABSTRACT

Trypanosoma cruzi is the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, which affects approximately eight million people in the Americas. This parasite exhibits genetic variability, with at least six discrete typing units broadly distributed in the American continent. T. cruzi I (TcI) shows remarkable genetic diversity; a genotype linked to human infections and a domestic cycle of transmission have recently been identified, hence, this strain was named TcIDom. The aim of this work was to describe the spatiotemporal distribution of TcI subpopulations across humans, insect vectors and mammalian reservoirs in Colombia by means of molecular typing targeting the spliced leader intergenic region of mini-exon gene. We analysed 101 TcI isolates and observed a distribution of sylvatic TcI in 70% and TcIDom in 30%. In humans, the ratio was sylvatic TcI in 60% and TcIDom in 40%. In mammal reservoirs, the distribution corresponded to sylvatic TcI in 96% and TcIDom in 4%. Among insect vectors, sylvatic TcI was observed in 48% and TcIDom in 52%. In conclusion, the circulation of TcIDom is emerging in Colombia and this genotype is still adapting to the domestic cycle of transmission. The epidemiological and clinical implications of these findings are discussed herein.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Insect Vectors/parasitology , Mammals/parasitology , Triatominae/parasitology , Trypanosoma cruzi/genetics , Colombia , Chagas Disease/parasitology , Genotype , Insect Vectors/classification , Mammals/classification , Retrospective Studies , Spatio-Temporal Analysis , Triatominae/classification
13.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 110(3): 277-282, 05/2015. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-745975

ABSTRACT

This review deals with transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi by the most important domestic vectors, blood transfusion and oral intake. Among the vectors, Triatoma infestans, Panstrongylus megistus, Rhodnius prolixus, Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma brasiliensis, Triatoma pseudomaculata, Triatoma sordida, Triatoma maculata, Panstrongylus geniculatus, Rhodnius ecuadoriensis and Rhodnius pallescens can be highlighted. Transmission of Chagas infection, which has been brought under control in some countries in South and Central America, remains a great challenge, particularly considering that many endemic countries do not have control over blood donors. Even more concerning is the case of non-endemic countries that receive thousands of migrants from endemic areas that carry Chagas disease, such as the United States of America, in North America, Spain, in Europe, Japan, in Asia, and Australia, in Oceania. In the Brazilian Amazon Region, since Shaw et al. (1969) described the first acute cases of the disease caused by oral transmission, hundreds of acute cases of the disease due to oral transmission have been described in that region, which is today considered to be endemic for oral transmission. Several other outbreaks of acute Chagas disease by oral transmission have been described in different states of Brazil and in other South American countries.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Blood Transfusion/adverse effects , Chagas Disease/transmission , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Food Parasitology , Insect Vectors/classification , Triatominae/classification
14.
Belo Horizonte; s.n; 2015. XX, 106 p.
Thesis in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: lil-760577

ABSTRACT

O conhecimento dos reservatórios de Leishmania spp. é crucial para o estabelecimento de medidas eficientes de controle das leishmanioses. A detecção,identificação da espécie de Leishmania bem como a quantificação da carga parasitária em diferentes amostras de animais podem ser ferramentas úteis na indicação da participação de um determinado hospedeiro como fonte de infecção para os vetores. Neste trabalho foi realizado um estudo sobre a infecção por Leishmania spp. em roedores e marsupiais em áreas endêmicas para as leishmanioses de Minas Gerais. As amostras utilizadas foram provenientes de pequenos mamíferos capturados em cinco localidades: Regional Nordeste de Belo Horizonte, Município de Divinópolis, Terra Indígena Xakriabá no Município de São João das Missões, Barra do Guaicuí em Várzea da Palma e Casa Branca, localidade pertencente ao Município de Brumadinho. A detecção e quantificação do DNA de Leishmania foram realizadas através da Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase (PCR) e PCR em tempo real (qPCR) direcionadas ao alvo kDNA e a identificação da espécie através da PCR-RFLP direcionada ao hsp70. Foram capturados animais pertencentes a 14 diferentes espécies, das ordens Rodentia e Didelphimorfia. Os resultados mostraram que, em geral, a maioria dos animais foi capturada em áreas não urbanizadas e a maioria dos espécimes pertencem a ordem Rodentia. Dos 346 animais examinados, 78 (22%) foram positivos em pelo menos um tecido...


A maior positividade foi observada na Terra Indígena Xakriabá (35%), seguido pela Regional Nordeste de Belo Horizonte (27%), Casa Branca (24%), Divinópolis (9%) e Barra do Guaicuí (8%). Quanto às espécies de animais, Thrichomys apereoides e Didelphis albiventris tiveram um número expressivo de exemplares capturados (76 e 113 respectivamente) e uma positividade considerada alta (28% e 19%). Com relação aos tecidos, o fígado apresentou maior positividade (14%), seguido por medula(9%), baço (6%), pele de orelha (5%) e pele de cauda (4%). Nas amostras dos animais foram identificadas as espécies L. (V.) braziliensis, L. (L). infantum e L. (V.)guyanensis, sendo que a primeira foi encontrada infectando um maior número e uma maior diversidade de espécies de animais. Os animais capturados na Terra Indígena Xakriabá apresentaram a carga parasitária mais elevada, e, com relação às espécies dos hospedeiros, T. apereoides foi o que apresentou a maior carga parasitária. Quanto aos tecidos, houve uma alta positividade em amostras de fígado enquanto as amostras de baço apresentaram uma alta carga parasitária, o que aponta para a importância desses órgãos na infecção dos pequenos mamíferos por Leishmania spp.. A pele de orelha se mostrou eficiente na detecção das três espécies de Leishmania encontradas. Os resultados obtidos, aliados ao conhecimento epidemiológico da área, mostraram a importância da participação deste animais no ciclo de transmissão de Leishmania nas áreas endêmicas estudadas. Esses dados ressaltam a necessidade de mais estudos a respeito destas diferentes espécies de mamíferos, possíveis reservatórios de Leishmania spp.,visando a implementação de novas estratégias de vigilância epidemiológica e aplicação de medidas de controle específicas, tanto para leishmaniose tegumentar como para leishmaniose visceral...


Subject(s)
Animals , Leishmania/parasitology , Leishmaniasis/transmission , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology
15.
Belo Horizonte; s.n; 2015. XX, 106 p.
Thesis in Portuguese | ColecionaSUS, LILACS, ColecionaSUS | ID: biblio-940891

ABSTRACT

O conhecimento dos reservatórios de Leishmania spp. é crucial para o estabelecimento de medidas eficientes de controle das leishmanioses. A detecção,identificação da espécie de Leishmania bem como a quantificação da carga parasitária em diferentes amostras de animais podem ser ferramentas úteis na indicação da participação de um determinado hospedeiro como fonte de infecção para os vetores. Neste trabalho foi realizado um estudo sobre a infecção por Leishmania spp. em roedores e marsupiais em áreas endêmicas para as leishmanioses de Minas Gerais. As amostras utilizadas foram provenientes de pequenos mamíferos capturados em cinco localidades: Regional Nordeste de Belo Horizonte, Município de Divinópolis, Terra Indígena Xakriabá no Município de São João das Missões, Barra do Guaicuí em Várzea da Palma e Casa Branca, localidade pertencente ao Município de Brumadinho. A detecção e quantificação do DNA de Leishmania foram realizadas através da Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase (PCR) e PCR em tempo real (qPCR) direcionadas ao alvo kDNA e a identificação da espécie através da PCR-RFLP direcionada ao hsp70. Foram capturados animais pertencentes a 14 diferentes espécies, das ordens Rodentia e Didelphimorfia. Os resultados mostraram que, em geral, a maioria dos animais foi capturada em áreas não urbanizadas e a maioria dos espécimes pertencem a ordem Rodentia. Dos 346 animais examinados, 78 (22%) foram positivos em pelo menos um tecido.


A maior positividade foi observada na Terra Indígena Xakriabá (35%), seguido pela Regional Nordeste de Belo Horizonte (27%), Casa Branca (24%), Divinópolis (9%) e Barra do Guaicuí (8%). Quanto às espécies de animais, Thrichomys apereoides e Didelphis albiventris tiveram um número expressivo de exemplares capturados (76 e 113 respectivamente) e uma positividade considerada alta (28% e 19%). Com relação aos tecidos, o fígado apresentou maior positividade (14%), seguido por medula(9%), baço (6%), pele de orelha (5%) e pele de cauda (4%). Nas amostras dos animais foram identificadas as espécies L. (V.) braziliensis, L. (L). infantum e L. (V.)guyanensis, sendo que a primeira foi encontrada infectando um maior número e uma maior diversidade de espécies de animais. Os animais capturados na Terra Indígena Xakriabá apresentaram a carga parasitária mais elevada, e, com relação às espécies dos hospedeiros, T. apereoides foi o que apresentou a maior carga parasitária. Quanto aos tecidos, houve uma alta positividade em amostras de fígado enquanto as amostras de baço apresentaram uma alta carga parasitária, o que aponta para a importância desses órgãos na infecção dos pequenos mamíferos por Leishmania spp.. A pele de orelha se mostrou eficiente na detecção das três espécies de Leishmania encontradas. Os resultados obtidos, aliados ao conhecimento epidemiológico da área, mostraram a importância da participação deste animais no ciclo de transmissão de Leishmania nas áreas endêmicas estudadas. Esses dados ressaltam a necessidade de mais estudos a respeito destas diferentes espécies de mamíferos, possíveis reservatórios de Leishmania spp.,visando a implementação de novas estratégias de vigilância epidemiológica e aplicação de medidas de controle específicas, tanto para leishmaniose tegumentar como para leishmaniose visceral.


Subject(s)
Animals , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Leishmania/parasitology , Leishmaniasis/transmission
16.
Biomédica (Bogotá) ; 34(4): 631-641, oct.-dic. 2014. ilus, mapas, tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-730947

ABSTRACT

Durante la última década se han reportado numerosos casos de infección por Trypanosoma cruzi por vía oral, debidos a la contaminación de alimentos con heces de triatominos silvestres o con secreciones de reservorios en áreas donde los vectores domiciliados han sido controlados o no hay antecedentes de domiciliación. Con base en criterios epidemiológicos, clínicos y socioeconómicos, la Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Agricultura y la Alimentación (FAO) y la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS) establecieron una clasificación de los parásitos transmitidos por contaminación de alimentos en diferentes regiones del mundo, en la cual T. cruzi ocupó el décimo lugar de importancia en un grupo de 24 parásitos. Los cambios ambientales, como la deforestación y el calentamiento global, han afectado los ecotopos y el comportamiento de los vectores y de los reservorios de T. cruzi , de manera que estos se han desplazado a nuevas zonas, generando una nueva forma de transmisión por contaminación de alimentos que requiere su evaluación en el país. La presente revisión aborda la transmisión oral de la enfermedad de Chagas con énfasis en los estudios orientados a identificar los factores de riesgo, las especies de triatominos involucrados, la fisiopatología de la infección oral y los genotipos del parásito que están implicados en esta forma de transmisión en Colombia y en otras regiones de América Latina, así como la necesidad de adoptar políticas para su control y vigilancia epidemiológica.


Many cases of infection caused by the oral transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi have been reported during the last decade. These have been due to the contamination of food by faeces from sylvatic triatomines or by leakage from reservoirs in areas where domiciliated vectors have been controlled or where there has been no prior background of domiciliation. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have used epidemiological, clinical and socioeconomic criteria for ranking parasites transmitted by the contamination of food in different areas of the world; T. cruzi was placed tenth in importance amongst a group of 24 parasites in such ranking. Environmental changes such as deforestation and global warming have affected ecotopes and the behaviour of T. cruzi vectors and reservoirs so that these have become displaced to new areas, thereby leading to such new transmission scenario caused by the contamination of food, which requires evaluation in Colombia. The current review deals with the oral transmission of Chagas´ disease, emphasising studies aimed at identifying the pertinent risk factors, the triatomine species involved, the physiopathology of oral infection, the parasite´s genotypes implicated in this type of transmission in Colombia and other Latin American regions, as well as the need for ongoing epidemiological surveillance and control policies.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Chagas Disease/transmission , Food Parasitology , Feces/parasitology , Fruit/parasitology , Insect Vectors/parasitology , Meat/parasitology , Rhodnius/parasitology , Trypanosoma cruzi/isolation & purification , Vegetables/parasitology , Animals, Wild/parasitology , Armadillos/parasitology , Blood Donors , Beverages/parasitology , Blood Transfusion/adverse effects , Colombia , Chagas Disease/congenital , Chagas Disease/epidemiology , Chagas Disease/parasitology , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Genotype , Gastric Mucosa/parasitology , Housing , Mouth Mucosa/parasitology , Parasitemia/parasitology , Parasitemia/transmission , Peptide Hydrolases/physiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/parasitology , Protozoan Proteins/chemistry , Protozoan Proteins/physiology , Risk Factors , Trypanosoma cruzi/genetics , Trypanosoma cruzi/pathogenicity , Trypanosoma cruzi/physiology , Variant Surface Glycoproteins, Trypanosoma/chemistry , Variant Surface Glycoproteins, Trypanosoma/physiology
17.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 109(7): 887-898, 11/2014. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-728796

ABSTRACT

The role played by different mammal species in the maintenance of Trypanosoma cruzi is not constant and varies in time and place. This study aimed to characterise the importance of domestic, wild and peridomestic hosts in the transmission of T. cruzi in Tauá, state of Ceará, Caatinga area, Brazil, with an emphasis on those environments colonised by Triatoma brasiliensis. Direct parasitological examinations were performed on insects and mammals, serologic tests were performed on household and outdoor mammals and multiplex polymerase chain reaction was used on wild mammals. Cytochrome b was used as a food source for wild insects. The serum prevalence in dogs was 38% (20/53), while in pigs it was 6% (2/34). The percentages of the most abundantly infected wild animals were as follows: Thrichomys laurentius 74% (83/112) and Kerodon rupestris 10% (11/112). Of the 749 triatomines collected in the household research, 49.3% (369/749) were positive for T. brasiliensis, while 6.8% were infected with T. cruzi (25/369). In captured animals, T. brasiliensis shares a natural environment with T. laurentius, K. rupestris, Didelphis albiventris, Monodelphis domestica, Galea spixii, Wiedomys pyrrhorhinos, Conepatus semistriatus and Mus musculus. In animals identified via their food source, T. brasiliensis shares a natural environment with G. spixii, K. rupestris, Capra hircus, Gallus gallus, Tropidurus oreadicus and Tupinambis merianae. The high prevalence of T. cruzi in household and peridomiciliar animals reinforces the narrow relationship between the enzootic cycle and humans in environments with T. brasiliensis and characterises it as ubiquitous.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cats , Dogs , Mice , Chagas Disease/transmission , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Insect Vectors/physiology , Triatoma/parasitology , Trypanosoma cruzi/physiology , Animal Distribution , Brazil , Chagas Disease/blood , Chickens/parasitology , Didelphis/parasitology , Ecosystem , Family Characteristics , Goats/parasitology , Host-Parasite Interactions , Lizards/parasitology , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction , Mephitidae/parasitology , Monodelphis/parasitology , Rural Population , Rodentia/parasitology , Swine/parasitology , Triatoma/classification
18.
Rev. saúde pública ; 48(5): 851-856, 10/2014.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-727251

ABSTRACT

The control of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis is a challenge, particularly in Brazil, where the disease has been gradually spreading across the country over the past 30 years. Strategies employed for decreasing the transmission risk are based on the control of vector populations and reservoirs; since humans are considered unnecessary for the maintenance of transmission. Among the adopted strategies in Brazil, the sacrifice of infected dogs is commonly performed and has been the most controversial measure. In the present study, we provide the rationale for the implementation of different control strategies targeted at reservoir populations and highlight the limitations and concerns associated with each of these strategies.


O controle da leishmaniose visceral zoonótica representa grande desafio, particularmente no Brasil, onde um paulatino processo de expansão geográfica da doença vem sendo verificado há mais de 30 anos. Nesse contexto, humanos não são considerados relevantes para manutenção da transmissão. Assim, as estratégias usualmente utilizadas com vistas à redução do risco de transmissão se baseiam no controle das populações de vetores e reservatórios. Dentre essas estratégias, a eliminação de cães infectados, correntemente utilizada no Brasil, tem sido das mais questionadas. Neste comentário, apresentam-se os fundamentos que justificam diferentes estratégias de controle orientadas para a população de reservatórios, assim como os limites e preocupações associadas a cada abordagem.


Subject(s)
Animals , Dogs , Humans , Leishmaniasis, Visceral/epidemiology , Brazil/epidemiology , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Incidence , Insect Vectors , Leishmaniasis, Visceral/prevention & control , Urban Population
19.
Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop ; 47(5): 599-606, Sep-Oct/2014. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-728889

ABSTRACT

Introduction Leishmania major is the causative agent of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL), and great gerbils are the main reservoir hosts in Iran. Abarkouh in central Iran is an emerging focal point for which the reservoir hosts of ZCL are unclear. This research project was designed to detect any Leishmania parasites in different wild rodent species. Methods All rodents captured in 2011 and 2012 from Abarkouh district were identified based on morphological characteristics and by amplification of the rodent cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene. To detect Leishmania infection in rodents, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of each ear was extracted. Internal transcribed spacer-ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (ITS-rDNA), microsatellites, kinetoplast deoxyribonucleic acid (kDNA) and cytochrome b genes of Leishmania parasites were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and sequencing were employed to confirm the Leishmania identification. Results Of 68 captured rodents in the region, 55 Rhombomys opimus were identified and nine Leishmania infections (9/55) were found. In addition, eight Meriones libycus and two Tatera indica were sampled, and one of each was confirmed to be infected. Two Meriones persicus and one Mus musculus were sampled with no infection. Conclusions The results showed that all 11 unambiguously positive Leishmania infections were Leishmania major. Only one haplotype of L. major (GenBank access No. EF413075) was found and at least three rodents R. opimus, M. libycus and T. indica—appear to be the main and potential reservoir hosts in this ZCL focus. The reservoir hosts are variable and versatile in small ZCL focal locations. .


Subject(s)
Animals , Haplotypes , Leishmania major/genetics , Leishmaniasis, Cutaneous/veterinary , Rodent Diseases/parasitology , Rodentia/parasitology , Cross-Sectional Studies , DNA, Protozoan/analysis , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Genetic Markers , Iran , Leishmania major/isolation & purification , Leishmaniasis, Cutaneous/parasitology , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length , Rodentia/classification , Zoonoses
20.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 109(3): 299-306, 06/2014. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-711724

ABSTRACT

Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a neglected clinical form of public health importance that is quite prevalent in the northern and eastern parts of Egypt. A comprehensive study over seven years (January 2005-December 2011) was conducted to track CL transmission with respect to both sandfly vectors and animal reservoirs. The study identified six sandfly species collected from different districts in North Sinai: Phlebotomus papatasi, Phlebotomus kazeruni, Phlebotomus sergenti, Phlebotomus alexandri, Sergentomyia antennata and Sergentomyia clydei. Leishmania (-)-like flagellates were identified in 15 P. papatasi individuals (0.5% of 3,008 dissected females). Rodent populations were sampled in the same districts where sandflies were collected and eight species were identified: Rattus norvegicus (n = 39), Rattus rattus frugivorous (n = 13), Rattus rattus alexandrinus (n = 4), Gerbillus pyramidum floweri (n = 38), Gerbillus andersoni (n = 28), Mus musculus (n = 5), Meriones sacramenti (n = 22) and Meriones crassus (n = 10). Thirty-two rodents were found to be positive for Leishmania infection (20.12% of 159 examined rodents). Only Leishmania major was isolated and identified in 100% of the parasite samples. The diversity of both the vector and rodent populations was examined using diversity indices and clustering approaches.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Male , Disease Reservoirs/parasitology , Ecosystem , Insect Vectors/parasitology , Leishmaniasis, Cutaneous/transmission , Psychodidae/parasitology , Rodentia/parasitology , Disease Reservoirs/classification , Egypt , Insect Vectors/classification , Psychodidae/classification , Rodentia/classification
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL