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1.
Pesqui. vet. bras ; 40(8): 571-578, Aug. 2020. tab, ilus
Article in English | LILACS, VETINDEX | ID: biblio-1135670

ABSTRACT

This review reports the leading causes of death in feedlot beef cattle. It describes economic losses resulting from these deaths and suggests control alternatives. Diseases associated with the respiratory and digestive systems were the most frequently observed. In different geographical areas, the importance of each one might vary. Outbreaks of diseases such as botulism occur occasionally and can cause important economic losses. Cattle tick fever can cause significant losses in zones of enzootic tick instability. Technical assistance and sanitary and food management are critical for the best productivity in feedlot cattle.(AU)


Esta revisão discute as principais causas de morte em bovinos de corte em confinamento. Descreve as perdas econômicas resultantes dessas mortes e sugere alternativas de controle. As doenças associadas aos sistemas respiratório e digestivo foram as mais frequentemente observadas. Em diferentes áreas geográficas, a importância de cada uma pode variar. Surtos de doenças como o botulismo ocorrem ocasionalmente e podem causar importantes perdas econômicas. A tristeza parasitária bovina pode causar perdas significativas em zonas de instabilidade enzoótica do carrapato. A assistência técnica e um bom gerenciamento sanitário e alimentar são essenciais para a melhor produtividade em bovinos de corte confinados.(AU)


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Pneumonia/mortality , Pneumonia/prevention & control , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Acidosis, Lactic/mortality , Acidosis, Lactic/prevention & control , Acidosis, Lactic/epidemiology , Botulism/prevention & control , Botulism/epidemiology , Cattle Diseases/mortality , Flatulence/mortality , Flatulence/prevention & control , Flatulence/epidemiology , Cause of Death
2.
Rev. Paul. Pediatr. (Ed. Port., Online) ; 38: e2018123, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1057201

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: To perform a systematic review of literature data on gut microbiota and the efficacy of probiotics for the treatment of constipation in children and adolescents. Data source: The research was performed in the PubMed, the Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO) and the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) databases in English, Portuguese and Spanish. All original articles that mentioned the evaluation of the gut microbiota or the use of probiotics in children with constipation in their title and abstract were selected. Data synthesis: 559 articles were found, 47 of which were selected for reading. From these, 12 articles were included; they studied children and adolescents divided into two categories: a gut microbiota evaluation (n=4) and an evaluation of the use of probiotics in constipation therapy (n=8). The four papers that analyzed fecal microbiota used different laboratory methodologies. No typical pattern of gut microbiota was found. Regarding treatment, eight clinical trials with heterogeneous methodologies were found. Fifteen strains of probiotics were evaluated and only one was analyzed in more than one article. Irregular beneficial effects of probiotics have been demonstrated in some manifestations of constipation (bowel frequency or consistency of stool or abdominal pain or pain during a bowel movement or flatulence). In one clinical trial, a complete control of constipation without the use of laxatives was obtained. Conclusions: There is no specific pattern of fecal microbiota abnormalities in constipation. Despite the probiotics' positive effects on certain characteristics of the intestinal habitat, there is still no evidence to recommend it in the treatment of constipation in pediatrics.


RESUMO Objetivo: Realizar revisão sistemática dos dados da literatura sobre a microbiota intestinal e a eficácia dos probióticos para o tratamento da constipação intestinal em crianças e adolescentes. Fonte de dados: Foi realizada busca nas bases de dados PubMed, Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO) e Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS), em inglês, português e espanhol. Foram selecionados, pelo título e pelo resumo, todos os artigos originais que avaliaram a microbiota intestinal ou o emprego de probióticos em crianças com constipação intestinal. Síntese dos dados: Foram encontrados 559 artigos, dos quais 47 foram selecionados para leitura. Destes, foram incluídos 12 artigos que estudaram crianças e adolescentes distribuídos em duas categorias: avaliação da microbiota intestinal (n=4) e avaliação do emprego dos probióticos na terapêutica da constipação intestinal (n=8). Os quatro artigos que analisaram a microbiota fecal utilizaram metodologias laboratoriais diferentes. Não foi observado um padrão típico de microbiota intestinal. Quanto ao tratamento, foram encontrados oito ensaios clínicos com metodologias heterogêneas. Foram avaliadas 15 cepas de probióticos e apenas uma foi avaliada em mais de um artigo. Foram evidenciados efeitos benéficos não uniformes dos probióticos em algumas manifestações da constipação intestinal (frequência evacuatória, consistência das fezes, dor abdominal, dor ao evacuar ou flatulência). Em apenas um ensaio clínico foi obtido completo controle da constipação intestinal sem o emprego concomitante de laxantes. Conclusões: Não existe um padrão específico de anormalidades da microbiota fecal na constipação intestinal. Apesar dos efeitos positivos dos probióticos em determinadas características do hábito intestinal, ainda não existem evidências que permitam sua recomendação no tratamento da constipação intestinal em pediatria.


Subject(s)
Humans , Infant , Child, Preschool , Child , Adolescent , Constipation/therapy , Probiotics/adverse effects , Dietary Supplements/adverse effects , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/drug effects , Abdominal Pain/chemically induced , Abdominal Pain/epidemiology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Constipation/microbiology , Probiotics/administration & dosage , Probiotics/therapeutic use , Feces/microbiology , Flatulence/chemically induced , Flatulence/epidemiology
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765803

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG) is known to have both nutritional and functional advantages over distal gastrectomy for the treatment of early gastric cancer. Although laparoscopic surgery is a popular choice, intracorporeal anastomosis is a newly developed technique that is gaining popularity. This study aimed to determine any differences in the oncological, surgical, and functional outcomes of intracorporeal and extracorporeal anastomosis after PPG. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed on 90 patients for cT1N0 gastric cancer who underwent laparoscopic pylorus preserving gastrectomy from January 2015 to June 2017 at the OOO, Korea; 38 patients underwent intracorporeal (TLPPG) and 52 underwent extracorporeal (LAPPG) anastomosis. The postoperative oncological, surgical, and functional outcomes were compared between the two groups. In order to compare the outcomes in obese patients, the postoperative and functional outcomes in patients with a BMI of ≥25, and in those with abdominal wall thickness measuring ≥28 mm, were evaluated. RESULTS: The TLPPG group showed a significantly reduced wound size (4 cm (3~4) vs 5 cm (5~6), p<0.001) and had fewer wound complaints than the LAPPG group (0.0% vs 15.4%, p=0.01). Postoperative complications were not significantly different between the two groups. In the BMI ≥25 subgroup, the first flatus time after operation was shorter in the TLPPG group (2.9±0.5 vs 3.5±0.8 days, p=0.04). CONCLUSION: The study demonstrates that both TLPPG and LAPPG are safe and feasible, and that there is a potential benefit for obese patients.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Wall , Flatulence , Gastrectomy , Humans , Korea , Laparoscopy , Postoperative Complications , Pylorus , Retrospective Studies , Stomach Neoplasms , Wounds and Injuries
4.
Annals of Coloproctology ; : 181-186, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762319

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to compare the short-term outcomes of laparoscopic-assisted colon cancer surgery in the Soloassist II-assisted (SA) group and in the human-assisted (HA) group. METHODS: A total of 76 patients with colon cancer who underwent laparoscopic-assisted right hemicolectomy and anterior resection performed by a single surgeon between January 2017 and May 2018 were recruited from the consecutively enrolled registry and retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS: Of 76 patients, 43 underwent surgery with human assistance and 33 underwent surgery using the Soloassist II system. The clinicopathologic characteristics were not statistically different between the 2 groups. In both HA and SA groups, no statistical difference was observed between operation time (220.23 ± 47.83 minutes vs. 218.03 ± 38.22 minutes, P = 0.829), total number of harvested lymph nodes (20.42 ± 10.86 vs. 20.24 ± 8.21, P = 0.938), and other parameters of short-term outcomes (length of hospital stay, blood loss, open conversion, time to flatus, time to soft diet, and complication events). Subgroup analyses did not show statistical differences. CONCLUSION: Soloassist II can reduce the participation of a human assistant during surgery and is not inferior to human assistance in laparoscopic-assisted colon cancer surgery. Thus, it is a feasible instrument in laparoscopic-assisted colon cancer surgery that can provide positive short-term outcomes.


Subject(s)
Colon , Colonic Neoplasms , Diet , Endoscopes , Flatulence , Humans , Laparoscopy , Length of Stay , Lymph Nodes , Retrospective Studies
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-786104

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The overlap method is one of the most popular procedures for construction of an esophagojejunostomy and its common entry is usually closed with sutures. This study aimed to report long-term complications and surgical outcomes of the overlap method with stapled closure (OMSC), to compare them with those of laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy (LATG), and to analyze a learning curve.METHODS: Between January 2015 and August 2017, 100 consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic total gastrectomy with OMSC for gastric cancer and the patients' medical records were reviewed. Their clinicopathologic characteristics, surgical outcomes, and long-term complications were investigated and compared with those of the LATG group. A learning curve of OMSC was analyzed using the Exponentially Weighted Moving Average chart.RESULTS: The overall duration of surgery was shorter in the LATG group; however, there was no difference in patients with early gastric cancer. Hospital admission was shorter and the pain scale was lower in the OMSC group. There was no difference in the number of harvested lymph nodes, date of flatus, or incidence of postoperative morbidity. Both groups showed no duodenal stump leakage, anastomosis-related complications, recurrence, or mortality during the follow-up period. Petersen hernia was a notable long-term event following OMSC compared with LATG. At least 27 cases of surgery were required to reach a plateau in terms of surgery duration for OMSC.CONCLUSION: OMSC is a safe option for the treatment of gastric cancer and has favorable long-term results and surgical outcomes. Closure of mesenteric defects and Petersen space should be considered.


Subject(s)
Flatulence , Follow-Up Studies , Gastrectomy , Hernia , Humans , Incidence , Learning Curve , Lymph Nodes , Medical Records , Methods , Mortality , Recurrence , Stomach Neoplasms , Sutures
6.
Intestinal Research ; : 537-545, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-785862

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Despite the evidence of a modest to high prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in recreational runners and endurance athletes, the frequency and intensity of GI symptoms in exercisers, but nonathletes, individuals from different modalities have been less investigated. Therefore, the present study aimed to assess the prevalence of GI symptoms in individuals that practice moderate or vigorous physical exercise, at rest and during physical exercise training session.METHODS: The sample consisted of 142 exercisers individuals (64 women and 78 men with mean age of 32.9 ± 10.7 years). Out of the 142 participants, 71 reported to perform moderate physical exercise and 71 reported to perform vigorous physical exercise. Participants were assessed by an internet-based questionnaire designed to assess the frequency and intensity (at rest and during physical exercise training session) of 18 GI symptoms.RESULTS: The GI symptoms most frequently reported by the respondents (during rest and physical exercise training session, respectively) were flatulence (90.8% and 69.7%), abdominal noise (77.5% and 41.5%), and eructation (73.9% and 52.1%). Overall, the frequency and intensity of symptoms were higher (P< 0.050) during rest than physical exercise training session for who perform moderate and vigorous physical exercise.CONCLUSIONS: It can be concluded that GI symptoms in exercisers, but nonathletes, individuals are more prevalent during rest than during physical exercise training session, suggesting that moderate and vigorous physical exercise may act as a regulator of the GI tract.


Subject(s)
Athletes , Eructation , Exercise , Female , Flatulence , Gastrointestinal Tract , Humans , Male , Noise , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-715673

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Intestinal dysfunction is one of the most common complications in patients after abdominal surgery. Daikenchuto (DKT), a traditional herbal medicine, is recently employed to improve postoperative intestinal dysfunction. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the efficacy of DKT in improving intestinal dysfunction after abdominal surgery. METHODS: PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane library were systematically searched to identify randomized controlled trails (RCTs) in adult patients undergoing abdominal surgery, who were randomly distributed to administrate DKT and placebo. The primary outcomes included the time to first postoperative flatus or bowel movement. We used random-effects models to calculate summary mean differences (MDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Nine RCTs totaling 1,212 patients (618 in DKT, 594 in control group) were included in our study. Compared with control group, DKT can effectively improve postoperative intestinal dysfunction by shortening the time to first postoperative flatus (MD, −0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], −0.66 to −0.16; P = 0.001) with significant heterogeneity (I2 = 71%, P = 0.004), and bowel movement (MD, −0.65; 95% CI, −0.97 to −0.32; P < 0.001) without significant heterogeneity (I2 = 40%, P = 0.14). Sensitivity analyses by indication of surgery and type of surgery yielded similar results. CONCLUSION: These data provide limited evidence that DKT shows efficacy on improving intestinal dysfunction after abdominal surgery. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously, due to the heterogeneity of the studies included. Thus, the efficacy of DKT on improving postoperative intestinal dysfunction warrants further investigation.


Subject(s)
Adult , Flatulence , Herbal Medicine , Humans , Population Characteristics
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-715548

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Laparoscopic total fundoplication is the standard surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, partial fundoplication may be a viable alternative. Here, we conducted a nationwide survey of partial fundoplication in Korea. METHODS: The Korean Anti-Reflux Surgery study group recorded 32 cases of partial fundoplication at eight hospitals between September 2009 and January 2016. The surgical outcomes and postoperative adverse symptoms in these cases were evaluated and compared with 86 cases of total fundoplication. RESULTS: Anterior partial fundoplication was performed in 20 cases (62.5%) and posterior in 12 (37.5%). In most cases, partial fundoplication was a secondary procedure after operations for other conditions. Half of patients who underwent partial fundoplication had typical symptoms at the time of initial diagnosis, and most of them showed excellent (68.8%), good (25.0%), or fair (6.3%) symptom resolution at discharge. Compared to total fundoplication, partial fundoplication showed no difference in the resolution rate of typical and atypical symptoms. However, adverse symptoms such as dysphagia, difficult belching, gas bloating and flatulence were less common after partial fundoplication. CONCLUSION: Although antireflux surgery is not popular in Korea and total fundoplication is the primary surgical choice for gastroesophageal reflux disease, partial fundoplication may be useful in certain conditions because it has less postoperative adverse symptoms but similar efficacy to total fundoplication.


Subject(s)
Deglutition Disorders , Diagnosis , Eructation , Flatulence , Fundoplication , Gastroesophageal Reflux , Humans , Korea
9.
Journal of Gastric Cancer ; : 172-181, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-715193

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate the surgical outcomes and investigate the feasibility of reduced-port laparoscopic gastrectomy using learning curve analysis in a small-volume center. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed 269 patients who underwent laparoscopic distal gastrectomy (LDG) for gastric carcinoma between 2012 and 2017. Among them, 159 patients underwent reduced-port laparoscopic gastrectomy. The cumulative sum technique was used for quantitative assessment of the learning curve. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences in the baseline characteristics of patients who underwent conventional and reduced-port LDG, and the operative time did not significantly differ between the groups. However, the amount of intraoperative bleeding was significantly lower in the reduced-port laparoscopic gastrectomy group (56.3 vs. 48.2 mL; P < 0.001). There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of the first flatus time or length of hospital stay. Neither the incidence nor the severity of the complications significantly differed between the groups. The slope of the cumulative sum curve indicates the trend of learning performance. After 33 operations, the slope gently stabilized, which was regarded as the breakpoint of the learning curve. CONCLUSIONS: The surgical outcomes of reduced-port laparoscopic gastrectomy were comparable to those of conventional laparoscopic gastrectomy, suggesting that transition from conventional to reduced-port laparoscopic gastrectomy is feasible and safe, with a relatively short learning curve, in a small-volume center.


Subject(s)
Flatulence , Gastrectomy , Hemorrhage , Humans , Incidence , Laparoscopy , Learning , Learning Curve , Length of Stay , Operative Time , Stomach Neoplasms
10.
Annals of Coloproctology ; : 234-240, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-717377

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: A cutting seton is used after a partial distal fistulotomy to treat patients with a high exrasphincteric fistula in ano to avoid fecal incontinence and recurrence. In Saudi Arabia, religious practices necessitate complete cleanness, which makes conditions affecting anal continence a major concern to patients affected by an anal fistula. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the efficiency of the cutting seton in treating a high anal fistula among Saudi Arabians. METHODS: Between January 2005 and December 2014, a prospective study was done for 372 Saudi Arabian patients diagnosed as having a high anal fistula and treated with a cutting seton at Al-Ansar General Hospital, Medina, Saudi Arabia. 0-silk sutures were used. All patients underwent the same preoperative assessment, operative technique, and postoperative follow-up. Weekly, the seton was tightened in outpatient clinics. RESULTS: Two hundred ninety-eight patients (80.1%) were males and 74 (19.9%) females. The duration of symptoms varied from 3–21 months. The fistula healed completely in 363 patients (97.6%); 58 patients (15.6%) reported some degree of incontinence to flatus, but none to feces. In 9 patients (2.4%) the fistula recurred. CONCLUSION: The utilization of the cutting seton method in the treatment of patients with a high anal fistula is highly efficient as it simultaneously drains the abscess, cuts the fistulous tract, and causes fibrosis along the tract. Treatment of a high anal fistula by using a staged fistulotomy with a cutting seton was very rewarding to Saudi Arabian patients who feared anal incontinence for religious reasons and was associated with low postoperative complication and recurrence rates.


Subject(s)
Abscess , Ambulatory Care Facilities , Fecal Incontinence , Feces , Female , Fibrosis , Fistula , Flatulence , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitals, General , Humans , Male , Methods , Postoperative Complications , Prospective Studies , Rectal Fistula , Recurrence , Reward , Saudi Arabia , Sutures
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-759484

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although intravenous (i.v.) lidocaine is used as a perioperative analgesic in abdominal surgery, evidence of efficacy is limited. The infusion dose and duration remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a longer low-dose 48-hour infusion regimen on these outcomes. METHODS: Fifty-eight adults undergoing elective open colorectal surgery were randomized into the lidocaine group (1.5 mg/kg bolus followed by 1 mg/kg/h infusion for 48 hours) and control group. After surgery, patients were given a fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia machine and time to first bowel movement (primary outcome) and flatus were recorded. Postoperative pain scores and fentanyl consumption were assessed for 72 hours. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in time to first bowel movement (80.1 ± 42.2 vs. 82.5 ± 40.4 hours; P = 0.830), time to first flatus (64.7 ± 38.5 vs. 70.0 ± 31.2 hours; P = 0.568), length of hospital stay (9 [8–13] vs. 11 [9–14) days; P = 0.531], nor postoperative pain scores in the lidocaine vs. control groups. Cumulative opioid consumption was significantly lower in the lidocaine vs. the control group from 24 hours onwards. At 72 hours, cumulative opioid consumption (µg fentanyl) in the lidocaine group (1,570 [825–3,587]) was over 40% lower than in the placebo group (2,730 [1,778–5,327]; P = 0.039). CONCLUSIONS: A 48-hour low-dose i.v. lidocaine infusion does not significantly speed the return of bowel function in patients undergoing elective open colorectal surgery. It was associated with reduced postoperative opioid consumption, but not with earlier hospital discharge, or lower pain scores.


Subject(s)
Adult , Analgesia, Patient-Controlled , Analgesics, Opioid , Anesthetics, Local , Colorectal Surgery , Fentanyl , Flatulence , Humans , Ileus , Length of Stay , Lidocaine , Pain, Postoperative , Prospective Studies
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-713997

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Colostomy creation is an essential procedure for colorectal surgeons, but the preferred method of colostomy varies by surgeon. We compared the outcomes of trephine colostomy creation with open those for the (laparotomy) and laparoscopic methods and evaluated appropriate indications for a trephine colostomy and the advantages of the technique. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated 263 patients who had undergone colostomy creation by trephine, open and laparoscopic approaches between April 2006 and March 2016. We compared the clinical features and the operative and postoperative outcomes according to the approach used for stoma creation. RESULTS: One hundred sixty-three patients (62%) underwent colostomy surgery for obstructive causes and 100 (38%) for fistulous problems. The mean operative time was significantly shorter with the trephine approach (trephine, 46.0 ± 1.9 minutes; open, 78.7 ± 3.9 minutes; laparoscopic, 63.5 ± 5.0 minutes; P < 0.001), as was the time to flatus (1.8 ± 0.1 days, 2.1 ± 0.1 days, 2.2 ± 0.3 days, P = 0.025). Postoperative complications (<30 days) were not different among the 3 approaches (trephine, 4.3%; open, 1.2%; laparoscopic, 0%; P = 0.828). In patients who underwent rectal surgery, a trephine colostomy was feasible for a diversion colostomy (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The trephine colostomy is safe and can be implemented quickly in various situations, and compared to other colostomy procedures, the patient's recovery is faster. Previous laparotomy history was not a contraindication for a trephine colostomy, and a trephine transverse colostomy is feasible for patients who have undergone previous rectal surgery.


Subject(s)
Colostomy , Flatulence , Humans , Laparotomy , Methods , Operative Time , Postoperative Complications , Retrospective Studies , Surgeons
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-713269

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The feasibility of reduced-port laparoscopic surgery (RPS) in colon cancer remains uncertain. This study aimed to compare the short-term outcomes of RPS and multiport surgery (MPS) in colon cancer using propensity score matching analysis. METHODS: A total of 302 patients with colon cancer who underwent laparoscopic anterior resection (AR) (n = 184) or right hemicolectomy (RHC) (n = 118) by a single surgeon between January 2011 and January 2017 were included. Short-term outcomes were compared between RPS and MPS. RESULTS: Seventy-three patients in the AR group and 23 in the RHC group underwent RPS. After propensity score matching, the RPS and MPS groups showed similar baseline characteristics. In the AR group, patients who underwent RPS (n = 72) showed a shorter operation time (114.4 ± 28.7 minutes vs. 126.7 ± 34.5 minutes, P = 0.021) and a longer time to gas passage (3.6 ± 1.7 days vs. 2.6 ± 1.5 days, P = 0.005) than MPS (n = 72). Similarly, in the RHC group, the operation time was shorter (112.6 ± 26.0 minutes vs. 146.5 ± 31.2 minutes, P = 0.005), and the time to first flatus was longer (2.7 ±1.1 days vs. 3.8 ± 1.3 days, P = 0.004) in the RPS group (n = 23) than in the MPS group (n = 23). Other short-term outcomes were similar for RPS and MPS in both the AR and RHC groups. CONCLUSION: The short-term outcomes of RPS were found to be acceptable compared to those of MPS in colon cancer surgery.


Subject(s)
Colon , Colonic Neoplasms , Flatulence , Humans , Laparoscopy , Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures , Postoperative Complications , Propensity Score
14.
Rev. chil. cir ; 69(1): 44-48, feb. 2017. ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-844323

ABSTRACT

Introducción: El tratamiento en el cáncer de recto ha progresado en la última década. Hoy es factible ofrecer una cirugía con preservación de esfínteres, realizando anastomosis colorrectales bajas o anastomosis coloanales. Esto ha determinado que muchos pacientes desarrollen disfunción intestinal que puede llegar a ser severa, agrupando una serie de alteraciones que se conocen como síndrome de resección anterior baja. Objetivo: Efectuar una adaptación cultural de la versión 1.0 en español neutro del cuestionario acerca de la función intestinal o Low Anterior Resection Syndrome Score (LARS Score), efectuando traducción, comparación de traducciones, traducción inversa y prueba piloto. Resultados: Los resultados obtenidos de la prueba piloto revelan que la población encuestada logró comprender el instrumento, por lo que no se realizaron modificaciones posteriores. Conclusión: Se cuenta con una versión adaptada del cuestionario LARS para ser usada en Chile, la cual puede someterse a procesos de validación y establecer las características psicométricas para ser usada en pacientes con cáncer de recto operados.


Introduction: The treatment of rectal cancer has progressed in the past decade. Nowadays, it's feasible to provide sphincter sparing surgery with low colorectal anastomosis or coloanal anastomosis. This has determined that many patients develop intestinal dysfunctions that can become severe, grouping a number of disorders known as low anterior resection syndrome. Objective: To perform a cultural adaptation of the version 1.0 questionnaire about bowel function or Low Resection Syndrome Score (LARS Score) in neutral Spanish, making a translation, comparing translations, back translation and pilot test. Results: The results of the pilot test showed that the population surveyed understood the instrument, so that no further modifications were made. Conclusion: We now have an adapted version of the LARS questionnaire for use in Chile, which can undergo validation processes to establish the psychometric characteristics for use in patients with rectal cancer surgery.


Subject(s)
Humans , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Rectal Neoplasms/surgery , Surveys and Questionnaires , Chile , Cross-Cultural Comparison , Defecation , Digestive System Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Flatulence , Postoperative Complications/psychology , Psychometrics , Rectal Neoplasms/psychology , Rectum/physiopathology , Reproducibility of Results , Severity of Illness Index , Syndrome , Translations
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-788014

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Colonic stenting as a bridge to surgery is an alternative to emergency surgery in patients with acute malignant colonic obstruction. This study aimed to compare the outcomes of early and late surgery after colonic stenting for obstructive colorectal cancer.METHODS: From March 2004 to August 2014, the medical records of obstructive colorectal cancer patients who underwent surgery after colonic stent insertion were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into early surgery (≤7 days after stenting) and late surgery (>7 days after stenting) groups.RESULTS: Eighty-four patients underwent colonic stenting for obstructive colorectal cancer. Forty-six patients were ultimately enrolled: 18 in the early and 28 in the late surgery groups. The mean ages were 63.7 and 71.8 years, respectively (P=0.01). Blood loss was lower in the early surgery group (median [interquartile range], 50 [50–50] mL vs. 50 [50–100] mL; P=0.020). The time to first flatus was longer in the early surgery group (3.0 [3.0–5.0] days vs. 2.0 [2.0–3.0] days; P=0.010). The time to first soft food intake was similar. Postoperative complications did not differ (16.7% vs. 14.3%, respectively; P=0.525) and no patients died.CONCLUSION: Surgical outcomes were similar between early and late surgery. However, the former featured less blood loss, indicating less surgical difficulty. These results show that early surgery can be performed safely in obstructive colorectal cancer patients after colonic stenting if the patient's clinical condition is amenable to early surgery.


Subject(s)
Colon , Colorectal Neoplasms , Eating , Emergencies , Flatulence , Humans , Intestinal Obstruction , Medical Records , Postoperative Complications , Retrospective Studies , Stents
16.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-303913

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To evaluate the efficacy and safety of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for gastrointestinal disorders.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Retrospective analysis of the clinical data of 406 patients who underwent FMT from May 2014 to April 2016 in the Intestinal Microenvironment Treatment Centre of Nanjing General Hospital was performed, including patients with constipation(276 cases), recurrent Clostridium Difficile infection (RCDI, 61 cases), ulcerative colitis(44 cases), irritable bowel syndrome (15 cases) and Crohn's disease(10 cases). Donors were completely unrelated, 18- to 50-year-old non-pregnant healthy adult, with healthy lifestyle and habits, without taking antibiotics, probiotics and other probiotics history within 3 months. There were three routes of FMT administration: patients received 6 days of frozen FMT by nasointestinal tube placed in the proximal jejunum under gastroscope (319 cases); patients received capsules FMT per day for 6 consecutive days (46 cases) or once 600 ml of treated fecal liquid infusion into colon and terminal ileum by colonoscopy(41 cases).</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Clinical cure rate and improvement rate of different diseases receiving FMT were respectively as follows: RCDI was 85.2% (52/61) and 95.1%(58/61); constipation was 40.2%(111/276) and 67.4%(186/276); ulcerative colitis was 34.1%(15/44) and 68.2% (30/44); irritable bowel syndrome was 46.7% (7/15) and 73.3% (11/15) and Crohn disease was 30.0%(3/10) and 60.0%(6/10). RCDI had the best efficacy among these diseases(P<0.01). There was no significant difference between the three routes of FMT administration(P=0.829). The clinical cure rate and improvement rate of different routes were 43.3%(138/319) and 58.6% (187/319) respectively in nasogastric transplantation group, 41.5%(17/41) and 61.0%(25/41) in colonoscopy group, 37.0%(17/46) and 63.0% (29/46) in the capsule transplantation group. There was no serious adverse event during the follow-up. The most common side effects were respiratory discomfort (27.3%, 87/319) and increased venting (51.7%, 165/319) in nasogastric transplantation group. Diarrhea was the most common complication in colonoscopy group (36.6%, 15/41). The main symptoms were increased venting (50.0%, 23/46) and nausea(34.8%, 16/46) in oral capsule group. Side effect symptoms disappeared after the withdraw of nasogastric tube, or at the end of treatment, or during hospitalization for 1-3 days.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>FMT is effective for many gastrointestinal disorders. No significant adverse event is found, while the associated mechanism should be further explored.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Clostridium Infections , Drug Therapy , Clostridioides difficile , Colitis, Ulcerative , Drug Therapy , Colonoscopy , Methods , Constipation , Drug Therapy , Crohn Disease , Drug Therapy , Diarrhea , Fecal Microbiota Transplantation , Methods , Female , Flatulence , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Drug Therapy , Gastroscopy , Methods , Humans , Intubation, Gastrointestinal , Methods , Irritable Bowel Syndrome , Drug Therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Nausea , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
17.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-303876

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To compare the postoperative analgesia efficacy, rehabilitation parameters and complication between multimodal analgesia and traditional analgesia after radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer patients.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Patients with gastric cancer who underwent surgery in our hospital from October 2016 to December 2016 were enrolled in this prospective study. According to the non-randomized method, patients were assigned to multimodal analgesia group(n=32) and traditional analgesia group(n=33) in gastric cancer treatment team A and B in Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University. The treatment measures of group A were as follows: (1) The ratio of 1/1 diluted ropivacaine (100 mg, 10 ml) was infiltrated around the incision before abdomen closure, with incision sutured layer by layer. (2) Parecoxib sodium (40 mg) was injected intravenously every 12 hours after operation for 5 days. (3) Oxycodone-acetaminophen tablet was given orally on the first day or the second day after operation, 50 mg twice a day. (4) Patient-controlled analgesia was not used after operation. Patients in group B received direct suture of incision and patient-controlled analgesia. The pain score, postoperative rehabilitation and 30-day postoperative complications were collected and analyzed.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Multimodal analgesia group had lower pain scores at 1 d (4.8±0.9), 2 d (4.3±1.0), 3 d (2.9±0.8), 4 d (2.4±0.7) and 5 d (1.7±0.7) after surgery, as compared to traditional analgesia group (5.9±0.9, P=0.000), (5.1±0.7, P=0.001), (3.9±0.8, P=0.000), (3.0±0.6, P=0.000), (2.6±0.7, P=0.000), with significant difference. Postoperative hospital stay [(8.2±1.6) days vs. (10.6±2.2) days, P=0.000], time to ambulation [(47.5±13.8) days vs. (66.2±16.8) days, P=0.000], time to first flatus [(76.4±25.2) days vs. (120.0±29.9) days, P=0.000], time to first defecate [(117.3±42.2) days vs. (159.7±30.7) days, P=0.000] and time to first fluid diet [(83.8±21.6) days vs. (141.9±33.9) days, P=0.000] in the multimodal analgesia group were significantly shorter than those in the traditional analgesia group. There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to 30-day postoperative complication rate(9.4% vs. 9.1%, P=1.000).</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>Multimodal analgesia can significantly reduce the postoperative pain and is beneficial to rehabilitation, meanwhile it does not increase the risk of postoperative complications. Multimodal analgesia is safe and effective for gastric cancer patients undergoing radical gastrectomy.</p>


Subject(s)
Acetaminophen , Therapeutic Uses , Amides , Therapeutic Uses , Analgesia, Patient-Controlled , China , Comparative Effectiveness Research , Defecation , Drug Combinations , Eating , Flatulence , Gastrectomy , Rehabilitation , Humans , Isoxazoles , Therapeutic Uses , Length of Stay , Oxycodone , Therapeutic Uses , Pain Management , Methods , Pain, Postoperative , Drug Therapy , Postoperative Complications , Prospective Studies , Recovery of Function , Stomach Neoplasms , General Surgery , Surgical Wound , Rehabilitation , Therapeutics , Suture Techniques , Treatment Outcome , Walking
18.
Gut and Liver ; : 196-208, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-194969

ABSTRACT

The pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), once thought to be largely psychogenic in origin, is now understood to be multifactorial. One of the reasons for this paradigm shift is the realization that gut dysbiosis, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), causes IBS symptoms. Between 4% and 78% of patients with IBS and 1% and 40% of controls have SIBO; such wide variations in prevalence might result from population differences, IBS diagnostic criteria, and, most importantly, methods to diagnose SIBO. Although quantitative jejunal aspirate culture is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of SIBO, noninvasive hydrogen breath tests have been popular. Although the glucose hydrogen breath test is highly specific, its sensitivity is low; in contrast, the early-peak criteria in the lactulose hydrogen breath test are highly nonspecific. Female gender, older age, diarrhea-predominant IBS, bloating and flatulence, proton pump inhibitor and narcotic intake, and low hemoglobin are associated with SIBO among IBS patients. Several therapeutic trials targeting gut microbes using antibiotics and probiotics have further demonstrated that not all symptoms in patients with IBS originate in the brain but rather in the gut, providing support for the micro-organic basis of IBS. A recent proof-of-concept study showing the high frequency of symptom improvement in patients with IBS with SIBO further supports this hypothesis.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents , Brain , Breath Tests , Diagnosis , Dysbiosis , Female , Flatulence , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Glucose , Humans , Hydrogen , Irritable Bowel Syndrome , Lactulose , Prevalence , Probiotics , Proton Pumps
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-17912

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Acupuncture has recently been accepted as a treatment option for managing postoperative ileus (POI) and various functional gastrointestinal disorders. Therefore, we conducted a prospective randomized study to evaluate the effect of acupuncture on POI and other surgical outcomes in patients who underwent gastric surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six patients who underwent distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer from March to December 2015 were randomly assigned to acupuncture or non-acupuncture (NA) groups at 1:1 ratio. The acupuncture treatment was administered treatment once daily for 5 consecutive days starting at postoperative day 1. The primary outcome measure was the number of remnant sitz markers in the small intestine on abdominal radiograph. The secondary outcome measure was the surgical outcome, including the times to first flatus, first defecation, start of water intake, and start of soft diet, as well as length of hospital stay and laboratory findings. RESULTS: The acupuncture group had significantly fewer remnant sitz markers in the small intestine on postoperative days 3 and 5 compared to those in the NA group. A significant difference was observed in the numbers of remnant sitz markers in the small intestine with respect to group differences by time (P<0.0001). The acupuncture group showed relatively better surgical outcomes than those in the NA group, but the differences were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: In this clinical trial, acupuncture promoted the passage of sitz markers, which may reflect the possibility of reducing POI after distal gastrectomy.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture , Defecation , Diet , Drinking , Flatulence , Gastrectomy , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Humans , Ileus , Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction , Intestine, Small , Length of Stay , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Prospective Studies , Stomach Neoplasms
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-8203

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To demonstrate the feasibility, safety, and technical strategies of hand-assisted laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (HAL-CME) and to compare oncological outcomes between HAL-CME and the open approach (O-CME) for right colon cancers. METHODS: Patients who were scheduled to undergo a right hemicolectomy were divided into HAL-CME and O-CME groups. Measured outcomes included demographic variables, perioperative parameters, and follow-up data. Demographic variables included age, sex distribution, body mass index (BMI), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification, previous abdominal surgery, tumor localization, and potential comorbidities. Perioperative parameters included incision length, operative time, blood loss, conversion rate, postoperative pain score, postoperative first passage of flatus, duration of hospital stay, total cost, number of lymph nodes retrieved, TNM classification, and postoperative complications. Follow-up data included follow-up time, use of chemotherapy, local recurrence rate, distant metastasis rate, and short-term survival rate. RESULTS: In total, 150 patients (HAL-CME, 78; O-CME, 72) were included. The groups were similar in age, sex distribution, BMI, ASA classification, history of previous abdominal surgeries, tumor localization, and potential comorbidities. Patients in the HAL-CME group had shorter incision lengths, longer operative times, less operative blood loss, lower pain scores, earlier first passage of flatus, shorter hospital stay, higher total costs, similar numbers of lymph nodes retrieved, similar TNM classifications, and a comparable incidence of postoperative complications. The 2 groups were also similar in local recurrence rate, distant metastasis rate, and short-term survival rate. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate that the HAL-CME procedure is a safe, valid, and feasible surgical method for right hemicolon cancers.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , Classification , Colectomy , Colonic Neoplasms , Comorbidity , Drug Therapy , Flatulence , Follow-Up Studies , Hand-Assisted Laparoscopy , Humans , Incidence , Laparoscopy , Length of Stay , Lymph Node Excision , Lymph Nodes , Mesocolon , Methods , Neoplasm Metastasis , Operative Time , Pain, Postoperative , Postoperative Complications , Recurrence , Sex Distribution , Survival Rate
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