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1.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(4): 929-935, Oct.-Dec. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-974283

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the antifungal activity of nanoemulsions encapsulating essential oil of oregano (Origanum vulgare), both in vitro and after application on Minas Padrão cheese. Nanodispersions were obtained by the phase inversion temperature method. Cladosporium sp., Fusarium sp., and Penicillium sp. genera were isolated from cheese samples and used to evaluate antifungal activity. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of non-encapsulated and encapsulated oregano essential oil were determined, and they were influenced by the encapsulation of the essential oil depending on the type of fungus. The antifungal activity of the nanoencapsulated oregano essential oil in cheese slices showed no evidence of an effect of the MICs, when applied in the matrix. On the other hand, an influence of contact time of the nanoemulsion with the cheese was observed, due to the increase in water activity. It was concluded that nanoencapsulated oregano essential oil presented an inhibitory effect against the three genera of fungi evaluated. If environmental parameters, such as storage temperature and water activity, were controlled, the inhibitory effect of nanoemulsions of oregano oil could possibly be greatly improved, and they could be presented as a potential alternative for the preservation of Minas Padrão cheese against fungal contamination.


Subject(s)
Oils, Volatile/pharmacology , Cheese/microbiology , Origanum/chemistry , Food Preservation/methods , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Antifungal Agents/pharmacology , Oils, Volatile/analysis , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Food Contamination/prevention & control , Cheese/analysis , Food Preservatives/analysis , Fungi/isolation & purification , Fungi/classification , Fungi/drug effects , Antifungal Agents/analysis
2.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(1): 112-119, Jan.-Mar. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889190

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT An ascomycetes fungus was isolated from brine storage of green olives of the Arauco cultivar imported from Argentina and identified as Monascus ruber. The combined effects of different concentrations of sodium chloride (3.5-5.5%), sodium benzoate (0-0.1%), potassium sorbate (0-0.05%) and temperature (30-40 °C) were investigated on the growth of M. ruber in the brine of stored table olives using a response surface methodology. A full 24 factorial design with three central points was first used in order to screen for the important factors (significant and marginally significant factors) and then a Face-Centered Central Composite Design was applied. Both preservatives prevented fungal spoilage, but potassium sorbate was the most efficient to control the fungi growth. The combined use of these preservatives did not show a synergistic effect. The results showed that the use of these salts may not be sufficient to prevent fungal spoilage and the greatest fungal growth was recorded at 30 °C.


Subject(s)
Food Preservation/methods , Monascus/growth & development , Olea/microbiology , Food Preservation/instrumentation , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Food Storage , Fruit/chemistry , Fruit/microbiology , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Monascus/drug effects , Olea/chemistry , Sodium Benzoate/analysis , Sodium Benzoate/pharmacology , Sodium Chloride/analysis , Sodium Chloride/pharmacology
3.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(supl.1): 128-139, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-974327

ABSTRACT

Abstract Pyroligneous extract is applied in diverse areas as an antioxidant, an antimicrobial, and an anti-inflammatory agent. The discovery of new cost-effective antimicrobial agents of natural origin remains a challenge for the scientific community. This study aimed to conduct a systematic review and a technological forecasting of the existent evidence regarding the use of pyroligneous extract as a potential antimicrobial agent. Studies were identified through an investigation of various electronic databases: PubMed, SciFinder, Web of Science, Scopus, Scielo, Google scholar, and ProQuest. Patents were searched through INPI, Google patents, Espacenet, Patents online, USPTO, and WIPO. The literature on antimicrobial activity of pyroligneous extract are limited given the short duration of studies and variability in study design, use of pyroligneous preparations, and reports on results. However, evidence suggests the potential of pyroligneous extract as a natural antimicrobial agent. The most studied activity was the role of PE as a food preservative. However, pyroligneous extracts are also effective against pathogenic bacteria in the oral microflora and treatment of candidal infections. Further research is needed using standardized preparations of pyroligneous extracts to determine their long-term effectiveness and ability as antimicrobial agents.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Wood/chemistry , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Bacteria/drug effects , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Food Preservatives/chemistry , Fungi/drug effects , Anti-Infective Agents/chemistry
4.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 48(4): 724-729, Oct.-Dec. 2017. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889162

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT The effectiveness of bacteriophage P100, nisin and sodium lactate, individually and in combination, in inhibiting Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat pork ham slices was assessed. The antimicrobials were applied to the surfaces of ready-to-eat pork ham slices, which were inoculated with a mixture of L. monocytogenes. Among the individual antimicrobial treatments, bacteriophage P100 was the most effective, decreasing L. monocytogenes to undetectable levels at zero and 72 h post-infection. Sodium lactate was the least effective treatment. Treatment with nisin at zero h significantly reduced initial cell density (p < 0.05). However, this pattern was not observed at 72 h of storage. A significant difference (p < 0.05) existed between the results of separate bacteriophage and nisin treatments after refrigerated storage, but not immediately upon inoculation of the bacteria. The results showed that the use of bacteriophage P100 is the method of choice for the control of bacteria.


Subject(s)
Animals , Bacteriophages/physiology , Fast Foods/microbiology , Food Preservation/methods , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Listeria monocytogenes/drug effects , Listeria monocytogenes/virology , Meat Products/microbiology , Nisin/pharmacology , Sodium Lactate/pharmacology , Food Preservation/instrumentation , Listeria monocytogenes/growth & development , Swine
5.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 46(2): 591-599, Apr-Jun/2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-749715

ABSTRACT

The effect of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) essential oil (REO) and modified-atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the survival of certain pathogens (Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes) in poultry fillets and on their meat quality during 7 days of refrigerated storage were investigated. Because REO at 0.05% and 0.1% had weak antibacterial activity and REO at 0.3%, 0.5% and 1.0% imparted unacceptable organoleptic properties, only REO at 0.2% was used to treat the poultry meat. The results showed that adding 0.2% REO to poultry fillets did not reduce the size of the population of S. Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes. However, REO treatment significantly decreased the L* (lightness) value and increased the a* (redness) value of stored fillets, and adding REO in combination with MAP reduced the level of lipid oxidation. In conclusion, in a suitable combination, REO can be applied to improve the quality of meat, but further studies should be conducted to determine the appropriate commercial level for different meat products.


Subject(s)
Animals , Food Quality , Food Packaging/methods , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Listeria monocytogenes/isolation & purification , Meat/microbiology , Oils, Volatile/pharmacology , Salmonella typhimurium/isolation & purification , Atmosphere , Food Storage , Microbial Viability , Refrigeration , Time Factors
6.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 110(1): 1-22, 03/02/2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-741625

ABSTRACT

An increasingly asked question is 'can we confidently link bats with emerging viruses?'. No, or not yet, is the qualified answer based on the evidence available. Although more than 200 viruses - some of them deadly zoonotic viruses - have been isolated from or otherwise detected in bats, the supposed connections between bats, bat viruses and human diseases have been raised more on speculation than on evidence supporting their direct or indirect roles in the epidemiology of diseases (except for rabies). However, we are convinced that the evidence points in that direction and that at some point it will be proved that bats are competent hosts for at least a few zoonotic viruses. In this review, we cover aspects of bat biology, ecology and evolution that might be relevant in medical investigations and we provide a historical synthesis of some disease outbreaks causally linked to bats. We provide evolutionary-based hypotheses to tentatively explain the viral transmission route through mammalian intermediate hosts and to explain the geographic concentration of most outbreaks, but both are no more than speculations that still require formal assessment.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/isolation & purification , Antioxidants/isolation & purification , Fatty Acids/analysis , Industrial Waste/analysis , Malus/chemistry , Plant Oils/isolation & purification , Seeds/chemistry , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/economics , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology , Antioxidants/adverse effects , Antioxidants/economics , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Cell Line, Tumor , Chemical Phenomena , CHO Cells , Cricetulus , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Dietary Supplements/adverse effects , Dietary Supplements/economics , Fatty Acids, Nonesterified/adverse effects , Fatty Acids, Nonesterified/analysis , Fatty Acids, Nonesterified/economics , Fatty Acids/adverse effects , Fatty Acids/economics , Food Preservatives/adverse effects , Food Preservatives/economics , Food Preservatives/isolation & purification , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Food-Processing Industry/economics , Fruit/chemistry , Fruit/economics , India , Industrial Waste/economics , Linoleic Acid/adverse effects , Linoleic Acid/analysis , Linoleic Acid/economics , Oleic Acid/adverse effects , Oleic Acid/analysis , Oleic Acid/economics , Plant Oils/chemistry , Plant Oils/economics , Plant Oils/pharmacology
7.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 44(4): 1181-1188, Oct.-Dec. 2013. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-705259

ABSTRACT

This study was developed in order to evaluate two alternatives for the control of Listeria monocytogenes in raw bovine meat pieces, both based on the use of Thymus vulgaris and Rosmarinus officinalis essential oils (EOs). The antilisterial activity of different concentrations of the EOs was tested in vitro using agar dilution and disk volatilization techniques. In addition, L. monocytogenes was inoculated in meat pieces, which were submerged in edible gelatin coatings containing 2% (v/v) EOs or submitted to the vapor of EOs (0.74 μL.cm-3). L. monocytogenes was quantified after one, 48 and 96 hours of storage (7 °C). In the in vitro tests, the EO of T. vulgaris presented higher activity. The two options used (edible gelatin coating and vapor activity), in spite of exercising effects with differentiated behaviors, presented antibacterial activity against L. monocytogenes inoculated in raw bovine meat (p < 0.05). Greatest antibacterial activity were obtained in the experiment that used edible coatings containing EOs, at 48 hours of storage reductions in bacterial counts between 1.09 and 1.25 Log CFU.g-1 were obtained. In the vapor effect experiment, the EO of T. vulgaris caused the highest reduction in the population of bacteria inoculated in raw bovine meat (p < 0.05), 0.40 Log CFU.g-1 at 96 hours of storage. This study supplied important information regarding new and promising natural alternatives, based on the concept of active packaging, for the control of L. monocytogenes in the meat industry.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Listeria monocytogenes/drug effects , Meat/microbiology , Oils, Volatile/pharmacology , Thymus Plant/chemistry , Anti-Bacterial Agents/isolation & purification , Bacterial Load , Food Preservatives/isolation & purification , Listeria monocytogenes/growth & development , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Oils, Volatile/isolation & purification , Rosmarinus/chemistry , Temperature
8.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 44(4): 1163-1167, Oct.-Dec. 2013. graf, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-705277

ABSTRACT

The antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin-like substance (BLS) P34 against Listeria monocytogenes was investigated in chicken sausage. The BLS was applied to chicken sausages (256 AU g-1) previously inoculated with a suspension of 10² cfu g-1 of L. monocytogenes. BLS P34 inhibited the indicator microorganism in situ in all incubation times for up to 10 days at 5 °C. The effectiveness of BLS P34 was increased when it was added in combination with nisin. The bacteriocin was also tested in natural eatable natural bovine wrapping (salty semi-dried tripe) against the same indicator microorganism, also showing inhibitory capability in vitro. BLS P34 showed potential to control L. monocytogenes in refrigerated meat products.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Food Microbiology , Listeria monocytogenes/drug effects , Peptides/pharmacology , Chickens , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Listeria monocytogenes/growth & development , Nisin/pharmacology , Temperature , Time Factors
9.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 44(4): 1189-1194, Oct.-Dec. 2013. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-705283

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to assess the activity of essential oil extracted from the leaves of C. blanchetianus Baill, popularly known as "marmeleiro", in inhibiting the growth and survival of pathogenic microorganisms in food by determining their survival in vitro and by observing the behaviour of Listeria monocytogenes inoculated into a food model (meat cubes) that was stored at refrigeration temperature (7 ± 1 ºC) for 4 days. The results indicated a bactericidal effect against Aeromonas hydrophila and Listeria monocytogenes and bacteriostatic action against Salmonella Enteritidis. A bacteriostatic effect on meat contaminated with L. monocytogenes was found for all concentrations of essential oils tested. These results showed that essential oil from the leaves of C. blanchetianus Baill represents an alternative source of potentially natural antimicrobial agents that may be used as a food preservative.


Subject(s)
Aeromonas hydrophila/drug effects , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Croton Oil/pharmacology , Croton/chemistry , Listeria monocytogenes/drug effects , Oils, Volatile/pharmacology , Salmonella enteritidis/drug effects , Anti-Bacterial Agents/isolation & purification , Bacterial Load , Croton Oil/isolation & purification , Food Preservatives/isolation & purification , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Microbial Viability/drug effects , Oils, Volatile/isolation & purification , Plant Leaves/chemistry , Temperature
10.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 44(2): 357-365, 2013. graf, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-688567

ABSTRACT

This research evaluated the antimicrobial effect of the clove (Syzygium aromaticum) and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf.) essential oils (EOs) against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 growth added to bovine ground meat stored under refrigeration (5 ± 2 °C) for three days. The EOs, extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), were tested in vitro using an agar well diffusion methodology for determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). The MIC concentrations for both essential oils on culture tested of L. monocytogenes were 1.56%. The EOs concentrations applied in contaminated ground beef were 1.56, 3.125 and 6.25% (w/v) based on MIC levels and possible activity reductions by food constituents. The bacteria populations were significantly reduced (p < 0.05) after one day of storage in ground meat samples treated with clove and lemongrass EOs at concentrations of 1.56%. There were no significant counts of L. monocytogenes in samples at the other concentrations of the two oils applied after the second day of storage. The sensory acceptability evaluation of the bovine ground meat samples treated with EOs showed that the addition at concentrations higher than 1.56% promote undesirable alterations of taste, odor and characteristic color. The application of EOs at low concentrations in food products can be used in combination with other preservation methods, such as refrigeration, to control pathogens and spoilage bacteria during shelf-life; which goes according to current market trends, where consumers are requesting natural products.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Cymbopogon/chemistry , Eugenia/chemistry , Listeria monocytogenes/drug effects , Meat/microbiology , Oils, Volatile/pharmacology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry , Anti-Bacterial Agents/isolation & purification , Food Preservatives/chemistry , Food Preservatives/isolation & purification , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry , Listeria monocytogenes/growth & development , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Oils, Volatile/chemistry , Oils, Volatile/isolation & purification , Refrigeration , Temperature
11.
Acta cir. bras ; 27(6): 361-369, June 2012. ilus
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-626253

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To analyse histopathological alterations characterized by the mitotic index in the mucosa of the large intestine in Wistar rats submitted to jejunoileal bypass operation after continued administration of sodium nitrite and vitamin C to different groups. METHODS: Eighty male Wistar rats were employed and separated into 12 groups. In the control group (20 rats): five animals ingested only water; five animals received vitamin C; five animals received sodium nitrite and five received sodium nitrite + vitamin C. In the sham group (20 rats), the animals were anesthetized and underwent midline laparotomy and only intestinal manipulation was performed: five animals ingested only water; five animals received vitamin C; five animals received sodium nitrite and five received sodium nitrite + vitamin C. In the operated group 40 rats underwent a jejunoileal bypass surgery: ten animals ingested only water; ten animals received vitamin C; ten animals received sodium nitrite and ten received sodium nitrite + vitamin C. The mean weight of the animals was measured weekly. The large intestine was subdivided into cecum (S1), ascending colon (S2), transverse colon (S3), descending colon (S4) and rectum (S5) for histopathological analysis and mitotic counts. The statistical analysis was used to compare the mitotic indices. The level of significance was 5%. RESULTS: The mean of all the segments indicates that the sodium nitrite+vitamin C group obtained the lowest mitotic index compared to the other treatments in the control group. The segments S1 and S2 showed a statistical difference with the vitamin C treatment: a higher mitotic index and better preservation of the mucosa in the operated group. In the sham group the main statistical difference occurred only in the sodium nitrite+vitamin C group between the means of the segments. CONCLUSIONS: The comparison of all the colonic segments of the various groups revealed a lower mitotic index in the animals treated with sodium nitrite+vitamin C. In addition, it was found that vitamin C did not present a statistically significant inhibiting effect on the preservation of the mucosa and the mitotic index.


OBJETIVO: Analisar as alterações histopatológicas caracterizada pelo índice mitótico na mucosa do intestino grosso em ratos Wistar submetidos a operação de bypass jejunoileal após a administração continuada de nitrito de sódio e vitamina C para diferentes grupos. MÉTODOS: Oitenta ratos Wistar foram utilizados e separados em 12 grupos. No grupo controle (20 ratos): cinco animais ingeriram apenas água; cinco animais receberam vitamina C, cinco animais receberam nitrito de sódio e cinco receberam nitrito de sódio + vitamina C. No grupo sham (20 ratos), os animais foram anestesiados e submetidos a laparotomia mediana e só a manipulação intestinal foi realizada: cinco animais ingeriram apenas água; cinco animais receberam vitamina C, cinco animais receberam nitrito de sódio e cinco receberam nitrito de sódio + vitamina C. No grupo operado 40 ratos foram submetidos a uma cirurgia de bypass jejunoileal: dez animais ingeridos apenas água; dez animais receberam vitamina C, dez animais receberam nitrito de sódio e dez nitrito de sódio + vitamina C. O peso médio dos animais foi medido semanalmente. O intestino grosso foi subdividido em ceco (S1), cólon ascendente (S2), cólon transverso (S3), cólon descendente (S4) e reto (S5) para análise histopatológica e contagem das mitoses. A análise estatística foi utilizado para comparar os índices mitóticos. O nível de significância foi de 5%. RESULTADOS: A média de todos os segmentos indica que o grupo que ingeriu nitrito de sódio + vitamina C obteve o menor índice mitótico em relação aos demais tratamentos no grupo controle. Os segmentos S1 e S2 mostraram uma diferença estatística com a vitamina C de tratamento: um maior índice mitótico e melhor preservação da mucosa no grupo operado. No grupo sham a principal diferença estatística ocorreu apenas no grupo que ingeriu nitrito de sódio + vitamina C entre as médias dos segmentos. CONCLUSÕES: A comparação de todos os segmentos do colon dos vários grupos revelaram um menor índice de mitose nos animais tratados com nitrito de sódio + vitamina C. Além disso, a vitamina C não apresentou efeito inibidor, estatísticamente significativo, na preservação da mucosa e do índice de mitoses.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Ascorbic Acid/pharmacology , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Intestine, Large/pathology , Jejunoileal Bypass/adverse effects , Mitosis/drug effects , Sodium Nitrite/pharmacology , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Intestinal Mucosa/drug effects , Intestinal Mucosa/pathology , Intestine, Large/drug effects , Mitotic Index , Mitosis/physiology , Rats, Wistar
12.
Rev. chil. nutr ; 36(3): 228-238, sept. 2009. ilus, tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-554693

ABSTRACT

The objective was to evaluate shelf-life extension of fresh beef meat applying crude extract of bacteriocines produced by a native strain of Lactobacillus plantarum LPBM10. Fillets of rib (longissimus dorsi) were stocked during 12 days at 3° C and analyzed by means of microbiology analysis, pH, texture, weight loss and sensorial. Significant differences were found among treatments for psychrotrophics and fecal coliforms, being better the treatment with crude bacteriocin extract that had germicide effect. Fecal coliforms were inhibited by the crude bacteriocin extract during most of the period. The mesophilic count didn’t present difference among treatments. The pH changes and the weight loss present statistical variations among treatments and between days. Cutting force diminished during storage time in all treatments improving meat tenderness without presenting significant difference. The appearance, color and aroma diminished the acceptance value as the storage time advanced.


El objetivo del presente trabajo fue evaluar la extensión de la vida útil de carne refrigerada mediante la aplicación de extracto crudo de bacteriocinas producido por Lactobacillus plantarum LPBM10. Se utilizaron filetes de solomo redondo (longissimus dorsi) almacenados durante 12 días a 3º C y analizados por medio de análisis microbiológicos, pH, textura, pérdidas de peso y sensoriales. Se encontraron diferencias significativas entre los tratamientos para psicrotrófilos y coliformes totales, resultando mejor el tratamiento con extracto crudo de bacteriocinas que tuvo efecto bactericida. Los coliformes fecales también fueron inhibidos por el extracto crudo de bacteriocinas. Los cambios de pH y pérdida de peso presentan variaciones estadísticas entre tratamientos y entre días. La fuerza de corte disminuyó durante el tiempo de almacenamiento en todos los tratamientos mejorando la terneza de la carne sin presentar diferencia significativa. La apariencia, color y aroma disminuyeron el valor de aceptación a medida que avanzo el tiempo.


Subject(s)
Bacteria , Bacteriocins/pharmacology , Meat/microbiology , Food Preservation/methods , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Lactobacillus plantarum/physiology , Cooled Foods , Coliforms/analysis , Food Contamination/prevention & control , Food Microbiology , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Consumer Behavior , Time Factors
13.
Rev. chil. nutr ; 36(1): 64-71, mar. 2009.
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-551871

ABSTRACT

The use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) for food bio-preservation has taken great importance nowadays due to its capacity for controlling pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms. Application of bi-o preservative strains as well as extracts and metabolites produced by them have demonstrated to control diverse undesirable microorganisms improving the enlargement of foods shelf-life and safety against bacteria that can affect the consumerís health. This review involves aspects of food bio-preservation and specifically of meat and meat products susceptible of alterations and attacks of diverse microorganisms. Bio-preservation methodologies of common use in foods are detailed as well as more outstanding aspects of metabolites produced by LAB, making special emphasis on bacteriocins, antimicrobial substances that have demonstrated its effectiveness to control diverse microorganisms and have had successful application on foods. The use of bio-preservation is revised, considered as a technology barrier that combined with other conservation methods like refrigeration and joint to good manufacturing practices can be an interesting option to diminish the addition of chemical preservatives, providing safe foods naturally preserved.


El uso de bacterias ácido lácticas (BAL) en la biopreservación de alimentos ha tomado gran importancia en los últimos años debido a la capacidad para controlar microorganismos patógenos y alterantes. La aplicación de cepas biopreservantes así como de los extractos y metabolitos producidos por ellas, han demostrado tener control sobre diversos microorganismos no deseados consiguiendo alargar la vida útil de los alimentos y dar seguridad contra bacterias que puedan afectar la salud del consumidor. En esta revisión se abarca aspectos de la biopreservación en alimentos y específicamente en carne y productos cárnicos, susceptibles de alteración y ataques de diversos microorganismos. Se detallan las metodologías de biopreservación más comunes utilizadas en alimentos, así como aspectos mas relevantes de los metabolitos producidos por las bacterias ácido lácticas, haciendo especial énfasis en las bacteriocinas que son sustancias antimicrobianas que han demostrado ser eficaces en el control de diversos microorganismos y han tenido exitosa aplicación a los alimentos. Se revisa el uso de la biopreservación considerado como una tecnología de barrera que combinado con otros métodos de conservación como la refrigeración y ligado a Buenas Prácticas de Manufactura pueden ser una opción interesante para disminuir la adición de preservantes químicos, proporcionando alimentos seguros preservados naturalmente.


Subject(s)
Lactic Acid/metabolism , Bacteria , Bacteriocins/pharmacology , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Food Microbiology , Meat Products/microbiology , Food Preservatives/methods , Food Contamination/prevention & control , Food-Processing Industry
14.
West Indian med. j ; 54(2): 107-109, Mar. 2005.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-410041

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Worldwide, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) rates have increased dramatically during the last decades. Sodium benzoate (SB) is a chemical substance that is used for preparing food and drinks and in the treatment of some metabolic (urea cycle disorders and hepatic coma) diseases. No studies were found which focussed on the effects of SB in MRSA infections. The aim was to determine in vitro activity of sodium benzoate against MRSA clinical isolates. METHODS: In this study, MIC for SB in 36 MRSA and 29 methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) isolates were determined by a broth microdilution method recommended by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. RESULTS: The MIC at which all of the MRSA and MSSA strains were inhibited was at 32 microg/ml and higher concentrations. CONCLUSION: Sodium benzoate showed good in vitro activity against clinically relevant MRSA and MSSA isolates. It is suggested in this study that this cheap substance, which has been used for systemic and local treatment of infection in humans, may be used alternatively for the treatment of MRSA infections. However, it is clear that more comprehensive and in vivo studies are needed to further elucidate the activity of SB against MRSA infections


Subject(s)
Humans , Sodium Benzoate/pharmacology , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , In Vitro Techniques , Methicillin Resistance/drug effects , Staphylococcus aureus/isolation & purification , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Staphylococcus aureus/growth & development
15.
Hindustan Antibiot Bull ; 2005-2006; 47-48(): 20-3
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-2558

ABSTRACT

It has been revealed that the use of synthetic food preservatives has variety of various side effects and hence search of safe and effective natural preservative has become a need. With the afore said objective the present study to screen the possibility of using sesquiterpenoid extract of local folk mushroom Phellinus fastuosus as food preservative was undertaken. Microbial growth inhibition by sesquiterpenoid extract of Phellinus was evaluated in the media with natural ingredient such as milk agar (MA), tomato juice agar (TJA), wheat flour agar (WFA) and pineapple juice agar (PAJA) with the composition with Phellinus extract, sodium benzoate and combinations. Three strains of bacteria and one strain of fungus were used astest organisms. The sesquiterpenoid extract of Phellinus at 0.02% concentration significantly inhibited the growth of all test organisms on natural media and the results were comparable with sodium benzoate. Similarly combination of Phellinus extract and sodium benzoate completely inhibited the growth of all microorganisms in all media, suggesting the possibility of using the Phellinus extract as food preservative.


Subject(s)
Agar , Bacteria/drug effects , Basidiomycota/chemistry , Food Preservation , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Fungi/drug effects , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Sesquiterpenes/pharmacology , Sodium Benzoate/pharmacology
16.
Colet. Inst. Tecnol. Alimentos ; 25(1): 34-45, jan.-jun. 1995. ilus
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: lil-169816

ABSTRACT

Foi estudada a possibilidade do uso de um sistema conservante, constituido de ácido cítrico e metabissulfito de sódio, para a preservaçäo da qualidade do camaräo-sete-barbas, mantido em gelo. Os resultados indicam que é viável, tecnicamente, a utilizaçäo do referido sistema na preservaçäo da qualidade do camaräo sete-barbas inteiro e descabeçado, por um período de estocagem em gelo de 15 dias, sem problemas de enegrecimento acentuado, bem como de elevados teores residuais de SO2


Subject(s)
Food Preservation/methods , Decapoda/chemistry , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Sulfites/pharmacology
18.
Hig. aliment ; 6(21): 25-32, mar. 1992. tab, ilus
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: lil-113426

ABSTRACT

Foram avaliadas as condiçöes higiênico-sanitárias de 100 amostras de caudas de lagostas, durante a etapa de adiçäo de Tripolifosfato de Sódio (TPF), em uma indústria de pesca, do município de Fortaleza-CE. Paralelamente foram analisadas 75 amostras da soluçäo de TPF a 5%, correspondentes às amostras de lagostas retiradas, através da quantificaçäo das bactérias psicrotróficas e de S. aureus; da determinaçäo do Número Mais Provável (NMP) de coliformes fecais e da pesquisa de Salmonela. Os resultados, comparados aos padröes microbiológicos brasileiros vigentes, indicam ausência de Salmonella em todas as amostras. S. aureus, em lagostas, foi detectado numa variaçäo de zero a 1,7 x 10**3 UFC/g na etapa I e zero nas demais etapas. As soluçöes de TPF apresentaram zero na etapa I e numa variaçäo de zero a 8,05 x 10 UFC/ml e zero a 2,8 x 10**3 UFC/ml nas etapas II e III, respectativamente. Em lagostas e soluçöes de RPF, os NMPs de coliformes fecais obtidos variaram de <3a> 1,1 x 10**/g e as contagens de psicrotróficas nestas amostras oscilaram de 10**9 UFC/g e 10**3 a 10**8 UFC/ml respectivamente


Subject(s)
Animals , Enterobacteriaceae/isolation & purification , Food Microbiology , Nephropidae/microbiology , Polyphosphates/pharmacology , Salmonella/isolation & purification , Staphylococcus aureus/isolation & purification , Enterobacteriaceae/drug effects , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Food Technology , Nephropidae/drug effects , Salmonella/drug effects , Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Tail/microbiology
19.
Indian J Exp Biol ; 1991 Jul; 29(7): 676-8
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-60690

ABSTRACT

Several food items, commonly consumed in South India, after nitrite treatment under simulated gastric conditions were found to be mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium tester strain TA 100. Dichloromethane extracts containing the volatile nitroso compounds and ethyl-acetate extracts with the non-volatile nitroso compounds of some of the food items exhibited mutagenicity.


Subject(s)
Animals , Condiments , Desiccation , Fishes , Food Handling , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/epidemiology , Hot Temperature , Humans , India/epidemiology , Mutagenicity Tests , Nitrites/pharmacology , Salmonella typhimurium/drug effects , Vegetables
20.
Colet. Inst. Tecnol. Alimentos ; 20(2): 116-27, jul.-dez. 1990. tab, ilus
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: lil-123406

ABSTRACT

Os principais conservadores, com uso permitido no Brasil ou recomendados nível de Codex Alimentarius, säo revistos em suas características básicas e maneira de atuaçäo. Enfase maior é dada ao espectro de atividade antimicrobiana e mecanismo da açäo inibitória ou letal sobre a célula microbiana. Além disso, säo discutidos os efeitos do pH, natureza da microbiota contaminante, intensidade de contaminaçäo e concentraçäo de uso, como principais fatores que interferem na atividade do conservador


Subject(s)
Bacteria/drug effects , Food Preservatives/pharmacology , Food Contamination/prevention & control , Food Microbiology , Food Preservation , Food Preservatives/chemistry
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